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TALK OF THE DAY By MAZEPPA.

TRAINING AS IT WAS AND AS IT IS. There can be little doubt that the existing tendency to shorten races for the sake of producing big fields is telling a bit on the old trainers. I was chatting the other day with tone of their number, and he put it this way : ■"Any boy with enough common sense to eat land sleep can feed a horse and gallop him for a six-furlong race, but when it comes to preparing a horse for a two-mile race the man to <io it is the old trainer with experience." ■This sounds feasible, and upon reflection _ I fern bound to admit that there is something in St. The veterans of our turf must possess more knowledge^ their business than beginners can have, and when any of the many Btrange things that happen in stable experience have to be puzzled out and attended to, 'the man who has had 500 horses through his I establishment is more likely to hit upon the flight procedure than the lad who is training f-his first. Yet I would hesitate about going ,*'o extremes' in the application of this doctrine. I'lt would be unjust and unwise, for example, [to trust it so far as to argue that beginners [ought not to start training. These old men jwhom wffbow down to were presumably boys, also beginners, at some time or other. fAnd if we choke off the novices, who is to co the training; when the old 'uns die? Again, the daddies have of late years reformed their 'methods. Twenty-five years ago many of then believed in galloping their horses every Hay, and galloping them over the full distance faf the race they were being prepared for. ,That practice ie now entirely out of date. i'How many trials at two miles do we get before a New Zealand Cup? The whole system 'bf training is altered, and in spite of contra--Vliction, I maintain it is improved. There is iaio rule on the subject at all. Every horse is {trained differently. A Nelson or a St. Clair — [gross-bodied horses — are trained one way ; a ' 'Slazer or a Nihilist — horses that to some extent train themselves, in a sense — are subjected to quite another kind of work ; and seldom indeed are any horses sent all the way. ■This change in method proves that the old 'trainers were not infallible. All the same, Experience isr worth a great deal. The very fact that the elderly trainers have changed f/their ways shows that they are open to conjviction, and, displaying wisdom in this, their '{knowledge should be worth paying for. lam Fmot arguing against the young trainer. He fanust get his show. But he will not be a good [man unless he has properly learnt. Those owners who are for ever changing their and picking up new lads for the work onay pretend as much as they like, but the fact fin many cases is that they take the youngsters for the sake of cheapness. The cutting-down irf distances plays into their hands to some extent. I notice, however, that most, if not all, «f our best horges are in the hands of competent trainers. The low-priced horse is the •ne that the low-paid beginner generally gets to work on. Unluckily, there aTe many of these, «.nd the competition to train them leads to such a cutting down of wages that it beats me how some of the so-called trainers live. THE VALUE OF A PEDIGREE. If Newhaven's pedigree could be traced into tha English Stud Book, says "Milroy," his Talue as a sire would be fully ten times greater than it is to-day in England. Little doubt exists in the minds of many Australian sportsmen who have known Newhaven's family for 30 years or more that the source from which lie came is a pure one, and no doubt many of them would gladly avail themselves of his Bervices at a higher fee than the 9gs asked for them in England ; but in spite of the good opinion held of Newhaven and his family in Australia, where it is best known. English breeders will have none of a horse of doubtful H cent. The only article that will sell in the bla country is the pure hall marked. One of the best handicap horses of modern years, Clorane, whose lines can be traced three generations farther back than Newhaven's, cannot command a mare of class in England because there is a blot, or a doubt, eight generations off. Instead of such a great performer under big weights going to the stud as a 20,000-guinea asset, he is not worth a twentieth of that sum in the open market, because, however loyal bis owner and best friends may be to him, and provide him with good mares to make a, name on, he is excluded from the Stud Book, and whenever occasion may arise to use his name as a sire, t!ie debasing h.b. (halfbred) will be added and the sale of his stock will thereby be considerably affected. This may jeem strange to the average Australian, who will breed from a stallion because he comes from a family that has produced winners of jiote. The average Australian does not trouble to inquire, nor does he care, whether the horse traced into ths English Stud Book or not ; but such a system would never do in England, the fountain from which all thoroughbred horses are drawn, because it is the absolute purity of their stock which enables them to command the world's markets, and without the rigid scrutiny and jealous guarding of the national horse interests on the part of the keeper of the Stud Book, foreign confidence would wane, as would the prestige of the English-born thoroughbred ; and so such smashing racehorses as Clorane and Newhaven must go by the board in the interests of the community. The Americans breed a good number of horses that have doubtful crosses in them, but are in the 'American Stud Book. Many of these horses were famous racers, but the Yankees would have a deal of trouble in persuading the Contiental Governments or Continental breeders to buy them for stallion*. Tl'e«e buvrs rightly regard the English Stud Book as the surest certificate of purity, therefore it is to England they go with their thousands for Buch horses as Carnage, Galtee More, and the like. When Stromboli was in America he could have been sold as a racehorse for nearly ' £2000, but when he broke down the Yankees frould not look at him at hack prices as a stallion to beget racehorses, because his female line was untraceable. They admitted the big brown's superiority as a racehorse— fine bone and shape— and the wonderful strength and vitality of his sire line, but as a sire, or a •peculation, he wasn't worth a cent to them, because there was no trace of his fifth dam, *rho was bred at a time when stuo. books were Unknown in Australia. The fact of this mare being a very handsome animal, that I 0 0**? fell orer a thoroughbred, and was bred by Mr Lawson, who had a number of purebreds in bis possession at the time, and that she" founded a splendid line of racehorseß that fcrer* good from the first, did not weigh with.

the practical Yankee, and Stromboli came back to Australia, leaving a couple of foals behind him which, when tried, were found topclass racehorses ; but their success did not influence the Yankee, who would not buy Stromboli or any other short-pedigreed horse. This desire for absolute purity in stallions is also becoming recognised here in Australia, where we have hitherto been satisfied to accept Betty, by Hector, Sappho, and others as pure, and have, with good reason, regarded their descendants as more reliable than many families that we can trace, because these descendants had been tested for generations on the racecourse and found to be fully 18-carat ; but this, notwithstanding, a big Australian bank bought several stallions some months ago foT their stations, and in each case a properly-authenticated pedigree with Bruce Lowe's family number attached to each was demanded. If Sappho, Dinah, Betty, and the Toss mare had been impure, it is improbable that any of their descendants would have been alive to-day. The known impure sources have all died out, but the descendants of these pedigreeless old dames are increasing and improving. Argument like that, or any other argument, will not sell stallions coming from them out of the country, or save them from the stigma of h.b. when they reach England. RACING IN WEST AUSTRALIA. Six horses started for the Derby at the West Australian Turf Club's meeting. Warrior 11, despite rumours of having gone amiss, was sent out favourite, at 2 to 1 on. Treasure, for whom Mr Temby had given 500gs a week or two before the race, waa next in demand. When the barrier rose, says the Australasian's correspondent, Warrior II took charge, and increasing his lead at every stride, he was 10 lengths in front as they swept down the hill to the river side. Going as strong as a lion, the son of Enfilade increased his advantage to nearly 20 lengths at the home turn, and eventually passed the judge 100 yards in front of Froth, with Treasure, some distance off, third. The time, 2min 41seo, was the fastest on record for the race. It was Newhaven's achievement reproduced in Westralia, and it is not to be wondered at that the colt at once became favourite for the Cup, which appeared to be at his mercy. That night, however, Warrior II got cast in his box, and in consequence receded in the betting, Australian being made favourite of the 19 starters up to the last moment, when Limber's support rushed her to the head of affairs in the machine. After Froth had made the pace, Warrior II dashed to the front, and was galloping great guns in front as they approached the home turn ; but Australian was within striking distance, and Flintlock was gradually moving up. The pace had told its tale on the Derby winner before the distance was reached, and th« big, long-striding Australian headed him, and for a moment or two appeared to have settled everything. Flintlock, on the outside at this stage, put in a brilliant run, and almost before the spectators had realised it, Carbine's son strode past Australian and placed the rich prize to the credit of Mr Kidman. Loch Dee surprised many by running third, and another outsider in Honiton, who had a particularly rough passage for half the journey, finished close up fourth. The winner was a good horse for the ring. The trainer, J. Tully, was, when the race was being run, lying in a rather seriotis condition in a private hospital. Honiton, with an uninterrupted run, would have been much nearer the winner. The owners of this horse had the nice wager of £4000 to £40, and had he won Honiton would have paid in the totalisator £750 for each of the two sovprei°;n« invested. Mural went amiss, and was scratched, while Le Var is «aid to have broken down, and he has run his last race. Though a moderate in "Victoria, Flintlock cut the Westralian two-mile record down to 3mm 33 4-ssec. Warrior 11, in the circumstances, ran a great colt, and he will probably yet prove one of the best three-year-olds in Australia. TAPANUI. Wet weather interfered with the sport on the first day of this meeting, end, though the rain had cleared off on the second day, giving place to a strong breeze, the course was necessarily slow. Under the circumstances Decoy's performances in winning the double were decidedly meritorious. This free-moving daughter of Medallion and Siren has come back to her very best form, and may perhaps win a good race before long if she keeps her condition. In the Tapanui Handicap, now reduced to six furlongs, she was made a strong favourite in what without her would have been a good betting race, and, Jack M'Comb handling her judiciously, she won without distress after an interesting if not exciting contest. She had to be kept going, and a momentary falter would have cost her the race, but all the way along the straight it could be seen that, bar mistake or mishap, she would just about get there. The following table shows the previous winners of

I may point out that in this race last year Paladin with 9.12 got beaten by Zillah 7.10 by a length, whereas this time Zillah with the same weight was nowhere, and Decoy won with 10.5. Not much, perhaps, is to be safely deduced from this, excepting for what it is worth, that Decoy this year is better than Paladin was last year. On the second day Decoy wcyi the Racing Club Handicap, seven furlongs, with 10.12. Mr Gourley raised her half a stone — a very fair rise, considering the extra furlong, and the high scale of weights — and she won easier than on the first day, and as she was meeting two horses that had stood out of the Tapanui Handicap, we may say that she in one race or the other took on all the candidates present that had any claims to form. Bracken ran both days without picking up anything — the weights were a bit high for him ; but the Tasmanian horse, The Slumberer, scored in the Grand Stand Handicap, staying a little better than his opponents. I Picket got home in the Stewards' Handicap rathei easily, and Donna Rosa (daughter of Don Pedro and Red Ensign) won her two races in a style which seems to indicate that she may emulate the deeds of her relatives — Red Lancer and Red Banner. J. M'Comb was th* most successful jockey at the meeting, he having six wins and a couple of good seconds. Mr H. Gourley's handicapping appears to have stood the test all right, and hevalso started successfully, and, though I once more remark that the combination of offices is not advisable as a general thing, the fact remains that in Mr Gourley's case there was no fault to be found. Messrs Mason and Roberts passed £3492 through the totalisator, this being £34 less than leib y«u.

POOR THREE- YEAR-OLDS AND GOOD

Referring to prospects for the racing season 1901 in England, the S. and D. News remarks : That Diamond Jubilee is of the same brilliant order as his illustrious brother, Persimmon, is not to be entertained for a moment ; for iindoubtedly the three-year-olds of the past season were below the average from a classic standard, and descending in graduations to second-rate handicap performers. That Diamond Jubilee will turn out relatively a better four-year-old next season than he was a three-year-old there need not be the least doubt, as he was the personification of soundness all round when he retired into winter quarters ; and increasing age should modify rather than increase that nervous excitability which marred his two-year-old career; but which, excepting in one notable instance, was conspicuous by its absence all last season. He gained all of his classic triumphs both decisively and handsomely, and when pressed he responded immediately an extra effort was required of him, with bulldog courage. And with regard to the two-year-olds, the same paper has it : The past season, so far as its contingent of the best class two-year-olds are concerned, is unquestionably one of the most remarkable that can be instanced during the last half of the century, in furnishing so many promising equine youngsters who finished up their juvenile racing days so close together that fully a dozen displayed form at different times justifying them to be placed at the top of the tree. Two of them retire into winter quarters with unbeaten certificates ; and yet they are not likely to become such public fancies for the Derby as some five or six others. These are Toddington, by Melton out of Minera, and Floriform, by Florizel II out of Maid of Athol, the lastmentionecl only running once in public ; but as he secured the Middle Park Plate, the victory at once placed him in the front rank. DEATH OF IDALIA. This famous mare died recently at Hawbs's Bay. She was bred in England, year 1870, by Lord Stamford, got by Cambuscan ont of Dulcibella, by Voltigeur — Priestess, by The Doctor. Dulcibslla was 13 years of age when this Idalia was born. I say "this Idalia," becrt.se Dulciballa had an Idalia five years earlier. Her first Idalia was by Thunderbolt. Rather a strange fact, that, isn't it, for a mare to have two foals of the same name? In the latter end of 1874 our Idalia was bought for Canterbury and came out with Hammock, Maria Theresa, and Aurifera, the vessel that brought them landing them safely at Port Chalmers early in 1875, consigned to my old friend Mr "Ned" Griffith, better known to the sporting public ac "Senex." For five seasons in succession Idaba was mated with Traducer. To him she first produoed that handsome little stayer Betrayer, who got beaten by Hornby in the Derby, but had his revenge in the Canterbury Cup, and afterwards won the Wanganui Cup when it was made the first £1000 handicap ever raced fo.- in New Zealand. He died in 1889. Idalia's second foal was the superb Sir Modred, who had a splendid career as a young horse, winning amongst other races the Derby and the Dunedin Cup, for the Hon R. Campbell, and lasted to his five-year-old season, when he captured the Canterbury Cup for Mr David Proudfoot. His ultimate mission was to be sent to America, where he founded a race of fast and useful horses. Idalium, the next of Idalia's progeny, fetched as a yearling the then record price of 1025g5, and proved no good as a racer. He died in America in 1899. Cheviot, fourth in order, was bought as a yearling by Mr Delamain at 525g5, and placed the Derby to the credit of the Hon. W. Robinson. Last of Idalia's foals to Traducer was the fast but unlucky July, who, cut out of classio races by reason of his "too previous" birth (being foaled on the 29th July), never won a race of any kind, being chiefly notorious for his second to Lady Emma in the Dunedin Cup when Sou-wester got into the ditch. Billy White rode July in that race, and had a go that surprised every- j body and caused July to be backed for years j afterwards, to the ultimate disgust and dis- j comfiture of the takers of odds. Traducer ! having died, Idalia was next put to King of Clubs, and the product was Liverpool, ft etylish chestnut who won the Welcome but got dished by Black Rose in the Derby. The mare missed in 1882, and her next produce was Fair Nell, daughter of Apremont. Fair Nell proved a disappointment on the turf, but ! being put to the stud she produced to St. George that fast horse Saracen, following up with Loyalty and Bonnie Scotland, so that she achieved fame through her sons and justified the cross that Mr Reeves (father of our Agent-general) prophesied would prove a sue- I cess. Enid, Idalia's second daughter, also j ' by Apremont, won the first Oaks and after- I wards mothered Geraint and Bellicent,_ so she was worthy of her family. Ravenswing, ! though a small mare, showed a lot of speed, | and won the Great Autumn Handicap. She in after life produced Chaos and leh Dien, i and then, being sold to go to Victoria, she was mated with Carbine, and gave birth to Raven's Plume, now in the old country. For three years Tn succession Idalia was then put to St. George, with the result that she bore Cypriote one. year, slipped twins the next, and then foaled Erpjs. It was at thi3 stage that eha was bought by the Hon J. D. Ormond, who put her to Apremont, with the result that she first produced the twin Middle Park, then Mount Ida (now famous as the dam of Ideal), and last of all Idalia had to Dreadnought the foal known as Sir Lancelot. We may well say that Idalia died full of years and honours, and I am glad to be able to add that she lived the last years of her life in luxury and ease. As for the mares that were her shipmates: \ Hammock gave birth to Somnus and others and died in 1898; Maria Theresa, who became famous as dam of Marie Antoinette, The Dauphin, Quibble, Lorraine, and Alsace, died in 1890; and the other one of the party, Aurifera, died in 1886, her four products being Argentine, Mount dOr, Golden Crest, and j Pursestring. j

KEEPING THEM STURDY. As is only to be expected, English papers of recent date contain a lot concerning the late T. Jennings, who made his mark as a trainer. The Pink 'Un, in its notice of his oareer, says the horses he trained and did such great things with were mostly of the rough-and-ready sort, and there were not many of the two- and three hundred guinea sire lot in his stable. "Here's yours," said Mr Tattersall, who then sold in the street at Newmarket as he knocked down for llgs a ragged yearling. "I made no bid" said the astonished Jennings. "Never mind," said Tattersall, " I have knocked him down to you." "All right, I will have him," was the reply. That yearling was Plutus, a big winner that sired a still bigger one in Flageolet. Tom Jennings seemed to implant upon his horses his own robustness and stamina. He t would no more "coddle" a Derby winner than he would a selling plater. The last tima

we saw him at Ascot he spoke in terms of disgust at the way the modern racehorse that is a bit above the common is treated. Said he : "They think it a wonderful thing to allow anyone to look at some of these horses more than once a week, or to run them twice without a long rest. What would they think of i Verneuil, who won the Vase on Tuesday, the Gold Cup on Thursday, and then came out as fit as a fiddle and won the three miles Alexandra Plate on Friday?" JOCKEYS CANNOT COMBINE. Speaking about the reference to jockeys in the Gimcrack speech, "Ranger" remarks: There are plenty of jockeys of one sort and 1 another, chiefly ranging from common to medium, from rather honest to perchance a bit the other way, with one here and there of ; superior quality, and of an integrity untarj 'nished by any sweet blandishments put forth jby professional backers. These are the words iof Lord Crewe : "It is quite evident that the ' more jockeys there were the more competent ' jockeys there would be ; and the less tempI tation there was to form anything in the naj ture of a combination of jockeys, the less possibility of evil-disposed persons to get control of it." We need not fear that jockeys are likely to combine systematically ; they are too jealous of each Other. Their competency, moreover, does not proceed from i numbers, but from natural ability, fostered by skilful training in their youth, and from , the possession of a head that is, in colloquial I phrase, "screwed on in the right way." Many trainers do all they can fo teach promising ! apprentices how to ride well, with a view to handling their fees ; for a little jockey not out of his times may become, if he is at all brilliant, a little gold mine for his trainer. The latter is, therefore, anxious to exploit juvenile talent in that direction. Now, lads in English racing stables are taught to ride as far as possible in the American style, shifting their weight forward and lying down. Curiously, many horses that pull hard pull less when thus steered. MANIOTOTO. The Naseby Cup has now been won for the third time under the heavy burden of 10.0 or over. Miss Mack, a sturdy daughter of Hotspur, had 10.10 in the saddle, or a rise of 121b on her first day's weight, when in 1892 she beat De Trop, Fable, and Knickerbocker Sam ; Edelweiss carried 10. 0 when she defeated Muscovite 8.2 a head last year ; and now Decoy wins with the steadier of 10.5 from the same Muscovite, who was handicapped at 7.11 and had the services of Tom Budicomb, this being his first public ride since '- his accident. The facts show that Decoy's | performance was much better than EdelI weiss's last year. Edelweiss gave Muscovite 261b and beat him a head in the time of 2min 27sec for the mile and a-quarter ; Decoy gave Muscovite 361b and beat him a length in 2min 22sec, and the course this year could hardly be considered fast after the recent rains. The following table shows the previous winners of The Nasebt Cup. JBflft— Diesppointiu'nt, a 8.12 Laverty £2 0 0 Jggi-Ki.ick'rb'ck'rS, a 8.2 MonkUy 118 0 1892— Miss Mack, a > 10.10 Robertson 116 0 189.1— The La^t, a ... 7.5 Smith ... 3 1 0 ]«H— The l-»nr, a .. 7.10 Whi'e ... 10 4 0 1895- Jack the Flat, a 7.0 Smith ... 6 7 0 1896-llpx, 6yis ... _8. 1 Byrne ... 210 0 I 1897— Rebec, a ... 7. 9 Ha din* )#B-Qoick=hot,syrs 8.5 < lare ... 113 0 1899— Mis* O'Ksna, a... 8. 5 King ... 2 1 0 )SO9-EdeWiss,syrs 10.0 M'Uomb 312 0 1901— Decoy, 6yrs ... 10 5 M'Uomb 213 0 The race for this year's Cup is thus described in the Chronicle : — About an hour was lost at the poht owing to some of the horses proving refractory, Decoy and Wild West in particular. When the nag fell, all the horses, with the exception of Puzzle (who was left" at the post owing to the martingale and rings of the bit getting entangled), got away together. Wild West and Moslem Maid cut the pace, but after three-quarters of a mile was covered Decoy drew away from the rest, with Muscovite at his heels, and took the lead. These two were never challenged, Decoy winning by a length. ADVANCE'S SHOW IN MELBOURNE. Advance is off to . Melbourne, so he will not be at Wingatui^or the Dunedin Cup. The departure is not to be wondered at. The true cause for wonder is how he has not gone to Australia earlier. In "that country there are more large stakes, more long races, and, judiciously managed, there are richer prizes to be made out of the betting. If Advance had gone across when his real galloping^ability was first revealed, by this time he would have won a big Cup, and with it a fair stake out of the Ring at odds far longer than the starting-price rates which the owner must accept in New Zealand. An ordinary horse can earn as much in New Zealand as in Australia ; the real toff, however, can do better over there. The terms of the lease under which Advance has been held by Mr Gordon constituted, it is said, the bar to, his shipment in the past; but that difficulty could have 'been overcome as well a year ago as now for aught I can see to the contrary. The fact is that Advance, one of the greatest horses ever raised in New Zealand, worthy on his deeds to be ranked with Carbine, Maxim, and Trenton, has somehow or other missed his chances. Now, rather late in life, when he is at the top of the handicaps, his owner seeks to repair one of the errors that have been made. I feel fairly confident that if the son of Laurel is landed fit and well in Australia he will 'win something. Whether ne has a good show for the Newmarket Handicap is a serious question. He can carry his 9.11 all right, but others in the race can gallop fast under their weights, and the doubt is as to whether Advance, if he starts, will have the luck to escape blocking in the large field that starts for the Newmarket. The cable advises that Advance has been backed to win about £10,000 in the six-furlongs race. Personally, I would not back him for sixpence in that event because there is no assurance of a clear ' course, and six furlongs is an inadequate test. Thus early I prophesy, in* spite of the cablegrams about the wagering, that if Advance wins one of the' big handicaps at the V.R.C. meeting, it will be the Australian Cup. He likes the distance, and 9.7 is a I light weight for him. The idea of making La Carabine give him 61b is to my mind absurd. Nine-thirteen for a mare is equal in this race to 10.2 for a horse, and I make bold to say that La Carabine's father, "Old Jack" himself, would have had all his work cut out to concede 91b to Advance a.t two miles and a-quarter. If the New Zealander is beaten , on his merits it will be not by this mare, nor Paul Pry, nor anything about the top of the handicap, but by some overlooked and underrated and bottled-up candidate well down | in the list. My strong advice about Advance to backers is to let the owners, or whoever is now acting in the betting market, have the Newmarket chance all to himself, and to wait for a long-distance race even at shorter odd*.

TAHUNA PARK PROSPECTS.

I Everything points to a capital day's sport ' on Saturday, the 23rd inst., at Tahuna Park, i and I venture to predict at least one recordcutting performance, if not more. Owners have accepted freely, though not recklessly, and we may take it as a fact that eveiy race is difficult to pick. There are several comparative strangers to me in the Trial Handicap lot, and I may be overlooking the winner in naming Tonic to beat Inchkeitb. and Pickwillow. Is there any reasonable assurance that the four long-start candidates in the Stewards' Pony Race are absolutely no good? Because if one of them can trot at all it ought to win. Of the others I like Hulda best, but hesitate about tipping her when giving 21see. What about the Progressive Handicap? Those that I know in this race I don't like, and am inclined to go for Susie Wild. Then comes the Tahuna Cup, which some say is a good thing for Burlton, not so much on what he actually did at Gore, his time there being 5.25, but on what he could have done if wanted. I believe that Grant has this horse pretty well, but my own opinion is that he is not good enough to take a very short price about, and I would just as soon back Plan, who, if fit, will stand shoving in a close finish. For the ' Bracelet I mention The Gossoon, Kai Iwi, and Kremlin, and Kai Iwi may win. In the Anniversary Handicap we may see All Day trotting pretty fast, and I give The Gossoon a show if reserved, whilst Silvermane is also 1 worth watching. In the Dunedin Pony Han- , 'dicap I like Nita; whilst Gertie in the Elec- | trie Handicap and Valor or All Day in the ; Dash Handicap are the best selections I can make at present. THE ZEEHAN CASE. This remit from Southland was settled last j Friday night, in the meantime, at any rate. j Mr Swale carried his appeal to the Metropolitan Committee against a decision of the South- ! land Racing Club disqualifying him and W. Pine (rider) and the horse Zeehan because of inconsistent running at the New Year meeting, and after hearing all the evidence that I Mr Swale produced in support of the appeal ; and all that the club could supply as justifying the disqualification, the committee came to the conclusion to sustain the appeal, thus reversing the club's decision. I have not perused the evidence — it is very voluminous, and for another thing there is some talk of aa appeal by the club to the conference, and I consider it fair to let that be settled before probing into the details. I know, however, that Mr Swale made out a very strong case, being assisted by the written statement of the breeder and others, to the effect that Zeehan is a brute in regard to temper, and wholly unreliable, and it was therefore no surprise to find Mr Swale exonerated, particvilarly as he possesses a clean record. Many thought, indeed, that the club would abandon its defence, and let the reversing of the sentence go unchallenged. I suppose that the newer evidence gathered by the club was also strong, seeing that the defence was after all ' persevered in, with, I understand, a firm ex1 pectation on the club's part that the appeal would be dismissed. In this the club wasmistaken. The committeg practically say by their finding that Zeehaa's inconsistency was innocent of fraud. So far as I can learn, the inquiry at Dunedin was conducted in a thorough and impartial manner, and if this is known when the appeal to the supreme tri1 bunal comes on (if it does come on), the club 1 will need to make out a very strong case in order to set up the original decision on its leg=. I fully believe, however, that the club is in its action prompted by a sense of duty. From all that I know, there is no personal feeling in the matter. THE QUEEN'S DEATH. " Terlinga " remarks that the death of the Queen will probably prevent King Edward VII running any horses in England this year, Ofc at all events until towards the close of the season, which expires on November 30. Sometimes horses ha\e been run in another name when the owner has been in mourning-, but it seems unlikely that such a course will be adopted with the King's horses. The fir3t animal to be put out of a valuable engagement will be Ambush 11, w ho won the Grand National Steeplechase for the Prince of Wales last year. The Royal two-year-olds did not show much form in 1900, and their owner may lo^e nothing through Lauzan, Lord Quex, Fruequina, and Lady Lade being retired from the Derby and Oaks. In the case of Diamond Jubilee it is a different matter. He is engaged in the Rous Memorial and Hardwicke Stakes at Ascot, the Princess of Wales Stakes of 10,000sovs at Newmarket, and the Jockey Club Stakes of 10,000sovs at Newmarket. On paper Diamond Jubilee looked very like winning the two ten thousand pound stakes— the Princess of Wales Stakes, in fact, looked a j certainty for him, but Disguise II and Lord j Melton, are in the Jockey Club Stakes. The lot^ieft in the first big race are very so-so on public form, and Diamond Jubilee's withdrawal is very likely to advantage the gentleman who gave 1250gs for Downham at Mr Musker's sale in December. With everybody in mourning the racing season in England must of necessity be even duller than that of last year, when the war took so many sportsmen out of England. THE MACHINE WANTED. The totalisator finds a champion, in the Melbourne Leader, which states : The totalisator fractions, i.e., the odd pence not paid to winning backers, at the S.A.J.C. Summer meeting benefited the charities to the extent of £27 Is sd. Victorian morality insists that not only the fractions but the total sum lost by backers shall go into the satchels of the ringmen, as it would not seem to be respectable for the State to recognise gambling ! By the way, there is surely reason to hope that one 'of the several blessings which may be expected as an outcome of Australian federation, will be the adoption of the totalisator as the legalised mediuto for turf betting transactions throughout the length and breadth of the Commonwealth. It has long been so recognised in four of the six federated States — viz., South Australia, Queensland, Tasmania, and Western Australia. The trend of public opinion in its favour in New South Wales is unmistakable, and if a T>lebiscite were taken in Victoria those who still oppose the legalised use of the machine would assuredly find themselves in a hopeless minority. It has been a weary and an annoying wait, but common sense will prevail in the long run.

THE BETTINQ MARKET. Messrs Barnett and Grant report the follc-v-ing business ■ — Easter and Autumn. — 300 to 7 Mcl wood and Paladin, 200 to 6 Blazer and Renown, 100 to 2 Renown and Ideal, 100 to 2 Pampero and Renown. .Newmarket Handicap.— loo to 12 Advaaca.

The Tapanui Handicap. 1891— L-o, 4yr» 9.2 Jack'on ...£2 1 0 18*2— Wild Wave, 4yrs 8.2 B*'ne t ... 2 18 0 I«93— Mariner, syr« ... 9.3 R. Allan... 3 3 0 1894— Wolseley, 4yrs... 8 5 Godfrey... 2 12 0 1895— Wolseley, syrs... 9. 7 T Cotton 19 0 189«-Toxa, 6yre ... Rl2 Evans ... 110 0 7897- Campbell, 3yw 8. 3 L Kid* ... 211 0 1898— Maydawn, a ... 6.13 R. M'Kay 14 4 0 1599-St Denis, 4yrs... 8.5 J. M'Comb 8 9 0 19fl0-Zil!ah, a ... 710 T B'dVmb 11 1 » 1801— Decoy, 6yra ... 10 5 J. H'Conab 2 8 0

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TALK OF THE DAY By MAZEPPA., Otago Witness, Issue 2448, 13 February 1901

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TALK OF THE DAY By MAZEPPA. Otago Witness, Issue 2448, 13 February 1901

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