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OMNIUM GATHERUM.

The Tirata Company's sawmill at Dannevirke was burned down on Sunday. It was insured for £SOO in the Phoenix. According to last week's Gazette new industrial schools have been established at Burwood (Canterbury), Chriptchurch, and Wellington. - Mr Thomas Skeyhill, the oldest resident of 'Willunga (South Australia), died a few days ago at the advanced age of 108 years. He enjoyed good health until a few days before liis death. It is anticipated that when the track through Whitcombe Pass is completed it will be possible to ride to Ashburton, catch the train, and reach Christchurch in one day from. Hokitika. 'X'he Westport Times says that since Mr Hobbl opened up the Mokihiivui district several additional splendid patches of bush have been discovered, and a number of timber areas have been applied for. The' five pupils presented by S. Hilda's Collegiate School for University matriculation last December have passed successfully. So far in the short history of the fc^ool there have been no failures in this examination. During a severe thunderstorm at Newbtead (Vie), Leslie Ware, aged 10, was struck by lightning and killed inetaa*}y. The pony he was riding was absolutely unhuit. The lad's body was frightfully burnt. His straw hat was cut to shreds and his clothing torn to pieces. E Battery, Christchurch, wke unable to fire a salute on the occasion of the proclamation of the King through having no ammunition. The Battery jiow possesses six quick-firing Nordenf eldt guns and cix 9-pounder ' Armstrongs. A clerk in the Government service, who was examined in the Magistrate's Court a while back, deposed that he was^only a temporary clerk. It was subsequent!^ ' established that his temporary employment had lasted 12 years continuously ! A young lad named Tolley, belonging to Adelaide, swam a distance of three miles and a-quarter a few days ago in the exceedingly quick time of lhr 37min. He was accompanied by a boat and two attendants, but never stopped at all on the way. One of the Maoris present at the public proceedings at Gisborne on the day of the receipt of the new 3of the Queen's death was heard to feelingly remark: — "The Queen — she was a splendid Queen, and we feel her loss. Oh, ye 3, our hearts are cad at her death." Detective M'lllveney on Tuesday arrested a young man named John R. Corkhill at Dipton (says the Mataura Ensign) on six charges of forgery, some dating back as far as July last. It is alleged that the accused victimised three Gore traders during show week by means of forged cheques. A youn<r married woman residing at Redfern (N.S.W.) killed her infant by poisoning it on January 15, and then attempted to commit suicide by t°Hng a solution of match heads and jumping 14-ft from a balcony. The unfortunate woman, who is only 20 years of age, was greatly worried over domestic matters. Two men named Foley and Bingham were committed for* trial at Brisbane on January 15 on a charge of hating assaulted a girl in a cab. In connection with the alleged assault, a letter was recently received at the criminal investigation branch, to the effect that if accused were committed for trial Sergeant Shannahan and Constables Carcw and Henderson would be murdered. It is ako understood that a high official engaged in the case received a similar letter. An interesting rouvenir of an event long past has been brought to light through the death of the Queen. This is a scarf of black crape worn by an officer in her Majesty's service at the funeral of the great Dulie of Wellington in 1852. This has been carefully treasured by a family at Hastings and appropriately brought out and used for the black drapery outside a prhate residence in memory of the late Queen. The West Australian inspector of fisheries, who recently visited the north-west pearl I fisheries, reports that the export of pearl shell | has been increasing yearly, 'the total value of pearl shell raised during the past 10 years being | just under £1,000,000. A turtling industry | lias also been started at the Lacepede Islands. j where a factory has been evec'.ed, and the work of catching turtles and conveying them to the factory was in full swing. It is expected that in a short time a first-class commodity will be produced. | During the late cruise of the Hinemoa with the Governor's party on board a visit was paid to the island at the entrance to Paterson Inlet, Stewart Island, and the Eskimo dogs left there by the Southern Cross Antarctic expedition were seen. They are (says the Christchurch Press\ well looked after by the men in charge of them, and seemed in splendid condition, but as savage as Eskimo dogs usually are. Captain Hutton thinks they are left there for the purpose of being sold to the next Antarctic expedition that comes along, probably the British. Speaking to a representative of the Timaru Morning Post on Saturday on the subject of New Zealand's federation with Australia, Mr Prichard, editor of the Launceston Examiner, said that while Tasmania had feelings of the warmest friendship for New Zealand, she looked on this colony as her most powerful opponent in agricultural and pastoral pursuits. Consequently the little island would not favour the granting of reciprocity to New Zealand if we decided to remain outside the Commonwealth. "We have joined," said Mr Prichard. " and we'll have to pay the piper. If New Zealand wants the benefits of federation she ought to assume the responsibilities and expenses as well. We don't want her to get freetrade or reciprocity with the Commonwealth. We want a Federal protective tariff of 10 or 12 per cent. That ought to give our farmers sufficient protection, and if it won't, well, they had best be allowed to go to the wall." v There was unusual activity among the geysers at Whaikarewarewa on Wednesday (says the Hot Lakes Chronicle). Waikorohihi commenced to play in the morning and continued throughout the day, playing to a height of some 20ft or 30ft. About midday the cauldron commenced to boil furiously, the water rising about 3ft above the ledge and flowing into the stream below. The sight of this boiling mass.of tvater rising from the cauldron and flowing over into the cold stream is a magnificent one. Kereru was also playing throughout the day. Pohutu and the Prince j of Wales's Feather commenced to play about 3 o'clock, the former shooting up to a splendid height. The sight of these four geysers all • playing at the same time is one of the finest j sights to be obtained in the district. There | i was a vast quantity of steam about while the 1 geysers were in action. From every crack it j beemed to burst forth, and the place had quite ] an awesome appearance. The geysers continued to play for nearly the whole of the afternoon. It is some time since such as- , tivity has been experienced in Whakare-

Dengue fever is again prevalent in many parts of Queensland, no fewer than 46 hands at Bundaberg Foundry being laid up with it. The Mayor of .Sydney (Alderman Dr Graham) proposes to abolish the Town Hall refreshment room, and to turn it into a municipal library. A report on the Mokau coal measures has been furnished by Dr Robertson, the salient features of which are published in the Taranaki Herald. Dr Robertson states that the estates purchased and under offer comprise 12,01-7 acres, with a frontage of about 40 miles to the Mokau River, held under lease for 60 years from 1892. On the 4240-acre block several coal seame have been exposed. One seam 7ft to Bft in thickness has been opened by adits at a height above the river sufficient to permit of the coal in the mine trucks being emptied di-rec-tly into steamer. Only a few acres of this coal seam have been worked. It should underlie the whole 4240 acres and a large portion of the 8167 acres adjoining. The upper seam, at present being worked, is of excellent quality, and finds a ready sale in the markets of the West Coast, where it commands a high price. The river is navigable by steamers of 200 tons as far as the mines, and vessels of a larger capacity could be loaded a few miles away by barges. In concluding his report, Dr Robertson says the quantity of coal is inexhaustible, and the conditions are probably more favourable for easy and profitable working than in any colliery he has &ecn in any of the Austra-

From Greymouth last week the Brunner I Coal Company exported 14-47 tons 7cwt coal, 61 tons 12cwt coko, and 1 tan 12cwt bricks. The Blackball coal mine is again at work. The Westport Times says that Trooper Brown, of Denniston, has written to Mr 1 James Colvin, M.H.R., from De Aar, South. Africa, asking to be allowed to erect a headstone "over the grave of the late Trooper Charles Colvin. Trooper Brown says: —"I have got the money, so that you need not j bother about sending any o\er." I With reference to the chrome mine at the Croixelles (Nelson), two of the owners, Messrs Tatton and Jackson, have just returned ta '' Nel&on from a visit to Onatea, Bay (says the , Evening Mail), and they report satisfactory progress. It has been found that the chroma has made lower down the hill, thus showing that the run of the lode has been proved , much more extensive than it was on'o-inally ' thought to be. At the completion of the trara I line to the point of carrying the buckets there will be .500 tons of ore for shipment by tbe first vessel. In regard to the shipment of ora by the Margaret Galbraith, the stuff arrive J |in London at the end of November. A cable- ' gram from Morrison and Co. says that last , mail advices stated that the quality of the ora was good, bffc that owing to the strike of lightermen it had not been possible to discharge the cargo. Altogether, the outloo'c ; for the Coixellcs chrome mine is very bright*,

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19010206.2.3

Bibliographic details

Otago Witness, Otago Witness, 6 February 1901

Word Count
1,695

OMNIUM GATHERUM. Otago Witness, 6 February 1901

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