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IN A NUTSHELL.

— We desire to express our regret that a statement should have appeared in our columns reflecting on the bona fides of Mr Robertson's trotting horse, Motuifci. The report or paragraph was furnished by a correspondent at a distance, and was believed to be genuine at the time, and we therefore hasten to state that we are now convinced that the same was ■unfounded. — A trotting club has been formed at Gore. The Possible, by Nordenf eldt — Realisation, is coming back from England. — The Trenton gelding Severity has been edld to an English buyer for loOOgs. "— A new trotting club, and apparently a good one, has beeiv formed at Auckland. — It seems to be virtually settled that MiHarry James will be appointed to the D.J.C. eecretaryship. — Richard Marsh has now trained three Derby winners — Persimmon, Jeddah, and Diamond Jubilee.

— Mr Musker, of England, has sold his colt by Melton— Minere, now named Toddington, ,to Mr H-. Sievier for £11,000. > - — Mountebankhas been sold by Mr H. Goodman to Mr Woodrofie, of Christchurch, and I , hear- is to qualify as a hunter. —Mr Frank Lawry'srbill to legalise consultations was slaughtered; last week, the second reading being refused by 32 ' to 23., — I hear that Mr Harry Goodman is likely to- move to Christchurch early next month, and " take Mr Kbe Mos3*s yearlings with him. . — American, jockeys carried off pretty well everything at the opening of- the Newmarket May- meeting. The heavy wind suited their Style. -^- There are as many as 4000, thoroughbreds in training in the United Kingdom, and there are 40 training establishments at Newmarket alone. "" —It has transpired that the late Mr W. R. Wilson retained a half-share in Patron, whose recent sale was consequent on Mr Wilson's death. — A Sydney cable states that at the Belmore coursing meeting Martin Taylor's (Christchurch) Blacklock divided the St. George's Stakes. — The doctors cut an abscess out of Tom Buddicomb's aim last week. He is still very ill, though not in any danger. Weakness is his principal trouble. * — Diamond Jubilee probably carried a 121b penalty in the Princess of Wales's Stakes, in which he was beaten by Merry GaL This filly jaii second in the Oaks. — Mr L. C. Haalett will piobably be asked to act as starter at the D.J.C. October meeting in the absence of Mr Piper, and I expect that ■pill be the arrangement. l " — Hengi'jt, engaged in the New Zealand Cup, is said to be going to Australia. This report is contradicted in the south, ar.d j. do not know which' is right. — Seven races were run at Newmarket on May 15, five of which were won by horses ridden by American jockeys. In the other two races the American jockeys came in second. , — A reduction of stakes by about £500 will probably bo recommended by the D.J.C. Programme Committee, the cutting to be made chiefly in the Spring meeting's events. — Mr Stevens, member for Manawatu, has secured from the Minister for Agriculture apromise to do something in the diiecfion of inspecting 'and registering breeding stallions. r__ [t is stated that The Grafter was offered to Sir Blundell Maple for 2000£S a week before he distinguishedMiimself by winning the City and Suburban, but that gentleman declined to buy. — Through political manipulation San Francisco has cow in force a- bill prohibiting bookmaking and pool-selling cji racing or coursing, but allowing, nevertheless, wagers on prize "fights. v — There is Jittle hope of the irnrsoi'ted horse Orzil doing any tracing in Australia.* He has broken down badly, and e>s soon as his leg is fit to travel on, he will be sent to his owner's station.

— On the 2nd June two fast Arnericin horses,Ethelbert and Jean Berand, ran a match on the Gravesend course at a mile and a-quarter, 0.0 up, Ethelberb winning with but little to spare in 2min 8 l-ssec.

— I hear that Mr J. B. Reid has bought The Fly with a view to having his popular and unsoiled colours carried at the Grand Naiional meeting.

— The Duke of Devonshire has had the misfortune to lose his valuable brood mare Greeba, in foal to Enthusiast. She was at the Eaton Stud on a visit .to Orme, and died of inflammation of the bowels.

- - The stewards of the English Jockey Club on May 15 investigated the charges of foul liding inside against " Skoets " Martin, the American jockey, May 11, and ha-ve decided to suspend him ixntil June 9. — A report has got about that Mr J. Grindley is leaving Dunedin for the Cape. That gentleman assures me that he has no such intention. Mrs Grindley is going for a trip, and that may have- set the report in motion.

— Meunier, an old French jockey, who had gone down very low in the world, was recently run over and killed by an electric trpmcar. He rode Pent JStre a good third in the Chantilly Derby for Mr Jennings in 1874.

—In days of old they used to sweat racehorses and then bleed 'em, says a London paper. And now, with increased education and free evolution, the racehorses work a similar system on their owners.

—It may not be generally known that the St. Simon horse Bill of Portland became seriously affected in his wind before he was sold in England to come to Australia, where he has been a conspicuous success as a sire.

— Ten of the 14 horses that ran in the Derby — Diamond Jubilee, Simon Dale, Disguise 11, Bonarosa, Sailor Lad, Dewi Sant, Sidus, Democrat, Frontignan, and Most Excellent — are engaged in the St. Leger at Doncaster.

—No winner of the Derby had started with odds of 6 to 4 laid against his chance since West Australian won for Mr Bowes, of Streatlam, in 1853, until Diamond Jubilee, standing at that quotation, won the great Epsom lace this year. — A coincidence, to add to the many existing between the victories of the Prince's two Derby winners, is that on, each occasion the first two past the judge were half-brothers on the sire's side, all four colts being sons of St. Simon.

— The Brooklyn Handicap, of 10,000dol, run at New York on the 26th May, was won by Kinley Mack, a four-year-old son of the Englishbred horse, Islington, who started at 6 to 1 and got to the end of the mile and a-quarter in 2min lOsec. _ — Diamond Jubilee's Jockey, H. Jones, is 19 years of age, and can go to scale at 7.6, so that after his successes on the Pjince's colt he ■will probably have no difficulty in getting a fair amount of riding outside of Marsh's stable if he so desires.

— There was a rare battle between Sam Pickering and Sam Darling for the possession of Simonside after his success in the Trial Stakes at Newmarket. Finally the colt fell to Pickering's bid of 1210gs, and it was reported that the purchase had been, made on behalf of a foreigner. — The race for the Great Jubilee Handicap at Kempton Park (Eng.), won by Sirenia, was an egce^tionall^ fast gae^ |ha ajßjaftgjfojjpji

mile and a-quarler, being covered in 2min 5 2-ssec. This is only 1 l-ssec slower than the time record put up by Clarehaven at Brighton in August last year.

— Mermaa's victory in the Ascot Gold Cup should put a lot of money on the value of Eidothea, a three-yeai-old sister to the old horse. Mr Archie Yuille bought this mare at the Hobartville sale for 130gs, and she now belongs to Mr P. C. Patton, a great believer in Australian horses.

—Mr S. Hordern has had the bad luck to lose the yearling half-brother to La Carabine through an attack of strangles. Another good one that also died from the same cornpiaint was a filly by Haut Brion from Round Dance. To lose a brace of such well-bred ones is a serious loss to a stud.

— The time occupied by Diamond Jubilee in winning the Derby (the exact length of the course being one mile four furlongs and 29 yards) was 2min 42sec, this being equal to the fastest time on record, in which the comse was covered by Persimmon, own brother to yesterday's winner, in 1896.

— The Prince of Wales has purchased the American-bred David 11, bay horse, G, by Tenny, dam Quesal, and he will be used to lead Diamond Jubilee in his work. David II has been a winner in England, and he, Maximo Gomez, Trumpet, and Tommy Atkins give Quesal, his dam, a great record as a producer of winners.

— Persimmon and Diamond Jiibilee are the third pair of own brothers to win the Derby. Lapdog in 1826 and Spaniel in 1831, by Whalebone out of a Canopus mare, were the most recent previous to the successes of the sons of St. Simon and Perdita 11, the other pair being Whalebone in 1810 'and Whisker in ISIS, by Waxy out of Penelope.

— Mr James R. Keene, the famous Ameiican breeder and owner, was at Newmarket in May — curiously enough, for the first time in his life, notwithstanding that his good horse Foxhall won the Cesarewith and Cambridgeshire in the year 1881. It is 30 years sinca he was previously in England, and his trip has been made in search of health.

— Mr Allison writes: The Breeders' Stakes at Newmarket brought out the truly remarkable little Dunover colt, who would, I feel sure, not have made lOgs had he been offered as a yearling last season. A small, punchy, mealycoloured, soft-limbed colt, . looking like an3 rthing but a racehorse, and yet he can gallop to some tune. Truly, they go in all shapes, and he won in a canter.

— At the speechifying at Moonee Valley (Victoria) Mr J. L. Purves said that at one time he was a bitter oppoaent of the totalisator, but he had seen the error of his # ways, and was now fiimly convinced thai it was a good thing. Mr F. Madden was present, and W. H. Croker, who is a totalisator champion, tried to get him to seize the occasion for recanting his views, but Mr Madden said nothing. — The Prince of Wales is the only owner who, since the institution of the Derby in 1780, has won the race with two colts bred from the same sire and dam. Both Whalebone and Whisker ran aa the property of the Duke of Grafton, but Whalebone belonged to the third Duke, and Whisker to the fourth. Lapdog was the property of Lord Egremont, while Spaniel belonged to Loid Lowther.

— Diamond Jubilee has now won for the Prince of Wales £14,775 10s in stakes, the Derby adding £5450 to the amount the colt had previously secured.. This year the Two Thousand Guineas (£4700) and the Newmarket Stakes (£3125 105) have gone down to his account, and a two-year-old he won the Boscawen (Post) Stakes at the Kewmarket First October meeting last season, worth £1200 i

— Altair has won his second race in England. He made an example of his seven opponents in the May Handicap, of lOOOsovs, the opening race of the day, for which he was very substantially backed by his connections, and would have seen a shorter price than 9 to 2, at which hel started, had it not been for the support forthcoming for Boucan, trained in Archer's stable, from the parties connected with the son of Buccaneer.

— The winner of the Two Thousand Guineas has -won the Derby on 18 occasions, those that have landed the double event being: — Srnolensko, 1S13; Cadland, 1828; Bay Middleton, 1536; Cotherstone, 1843; West Australian, 1853; Macaroni, 1S(« ; Gladiatsur, 1863; Lord Lyon, 1866; Pretender, 1889; Shotover, 1832; Oimonde, 18SC; Ayrshire, 18SS; Common, 1891 ; Isinglass, 1893 ; Ladas, 1894 ; Galtee More, 1597. Flying Fox, 1899; and Diamond Jubilee, 1900.

— The feature ot the day at Oakland track, San Francisco, on Saturday, 21st April, was the breaking of the Coast record at a mile and aquarter by My Gipsy. She ran the distance in 2miii SJsec. A day or two before she was beaten a head in 2min 6sec, which showed that, with a light weight on, she could accomplish better things. Hova, with 2niin 6sec, holds the Australasian record for the distance. The world's record is 2min 3|sec, by the American horse Banquet.

— - Thanks, " Phaolon," for this nice little par : li/ is pleasing to- learn that ..the Dunedin Jockey Club's move to Wingatui has not proved the disastrous affair that some of the pessimists were found ready to predict. So far from this proving to be the case, it is mentioned that the club made the nice little profit of £300 over their recent meeting. Everyone would be pleased to see the veteran club again back to its old place amongst the leading racing institutions of the colony. — No one owner has ever succeeded in winning the Derby five times, but the late Duke of Westminster, Sir Joseph Hawley, and Mr John Eowe3, of Streatlarn, each won the great three-year-old prize on four occasions. The present Duke of Portland has three times carried off the great Epsom event, thus following the exomple set in earlier times .by Sir Charles Bunbury, the founder of the race; Lord Grosvenor, Sir F. Standish, Lord Egremont, the third Duke of Grafton. and Lord Jersey. — A curious incident occurred at Newmarket in May. After Kaffir Queen, winner of a selling plate, had been knocked down to Mr Sievier for HOOgs, Mr Weatherby refused to allow an order on Messrs Pratt to pass as payment, and Mr Sievier tendered three £500 notes in payment, demanding change. A difficulty then arose, for change was not forthcoming. llowever, Mr Sievier left his £1500 down, and expressed his willingness to receive the change at Mr Weatherby' s convenience, and the incident terminated. — That good performer Bendigo, who recently returned to Engjand from Silesia, where he had . been located for some years, is now doing stud duty at Newmarket at lOgs a mare. — It is estimated that in a year or two's time the Sandringham stud will bring in to the Prince of Wales a profit of £39,000. The original outlay' was as small as the Duke of Portland's. Mowerina was the foundation? of the success of the Welbeck stud, and Perdita II of tho other. Both, when carrying silk, figured in a selling race. » — Thus the Australasian: — When in Australia Merman was a much-misunderstood horse. Who would have thought, even after ho had won the Williamstown Cup with 9.4, that Merman would live to win the Ascot Gold Cvp — the most important weight-for-age race m the world? .... Merman is a horse for Australians to be proud of. He has kept up the reputation of our horses for soundness and stamina,, and he has "beaten all comers for the most important long-distance weight-for-age race in the world, <«jk,^ E^ Madden^ gj Amstiqtk li|tsj£ur.i

chased of the Prince of Wales the brown colt Sandringhani, foaled 1596, by St. Simon, dam Perdita 11, by Hampton, out of Hermione, by Young Melbourne. Sandringham is the full biother of the Derby winners Persimmon and Diamond Jubilee, and was a very highly tried yearling, but would not stand the training. The terms of sale are private, but the supposition is a. good round sum was paid for the horse. He will go into the stud at Mr Maddens Hamburg Farm, near Lexington, Ky.

— I was under the impression, writes " Terlinga," that the Melbourne Cup entry (171) was probably the largest evei received for a longdistance handicap, but I find I was wrong. For Joe Miller's Chester Cup there were 219 entries, 129 acceptances, and 43 starters. The course was too narrow to start such a lot in a line, and " there was a front rank and a rear rank, the same as with a troop of dragoons." Four three-year-olds filled the places. Joe Miller carried 4.10, and won, with Stilton, 5.8, second, and Poodle, 5.3, third. George Fordham rode Benita, who ran fourth, and his weight was 4.0.

— A recent Louisville telegram is to the following effect: — "Charles Head Smith, of Chicago, owner of Lieutenant Gibson, deposited with the sporting editor of the Courier-Journal a certified check for 5000dol as a forfeit for 50,000d0l that Lieutenant Gibson can beat any horse in the world, weight-for-age, at a mile and a-half, the race to take place after Gibsor's stake engagements at Saratoga, at the track offering the largest purse." Mr^ Smith, if, the foregoing is tiue, has great confidence in his colt Lieutenant Gibson, and shows the spirit of the tiue sportsman. The challenge is open to the world, and is for horses of any age.

— An American exchange says an interesting case was disposed of at the Memphis Chancery Court recently. During the Memphis meeting of 1893 a man named A. Frost sued the Jockey Club for 10,000dol damages because he had been ejected from fche grounds for disorderly conduct. He had backed a horse in a certain race, and when Col. Clark changed jockeys on a contending horse, Frost made a vigorous protest to the presiding judge that all bets should be declared off. No attention was paid to the noisy claim, whp.n Frost became abusive, and was landed outside the gates, and hence the suit. After two minutes' deliberation the jury returned a verdict for the defendant club.

— An amusing incident occurred at Newmarket in May, says the Sportsman. The Prince of Wales, being desirous to witness the working of the starting gate, drove from the Jockey Club enclosure to a gate leading on to that part of the Heath where the races are run. The custodian at this gate, failing recognise his Royal Highness, promptly stopped the laudau, and, to the amusement of a" few spectators of -the scene, temporarily delayed the Prince's progress to the starting-post. Matters were, of course, quickly put straight by an official of the Jockey Club, but the gatekeeper, instead of being complimented on the strict discharge of his duties, was severely admonished.

— Bonnie Gal, the darn of Disguise 11, came into possession of Mr J. R. Keene in rather a curious way. She belonged to Colonel North, who gave 1300gs for her as a yearling, and for some reason or other, at the end of her three-year-old season he sent her up to the Newmarket Decr-mber sales. He, however, had no real intention of parting with her, and Captain Carvick and j\ir Moncrieff were both present to see that the gallant colonel did not lose the mare. Somehow or other they got separated in ths crowd at the ringside, and when she was knocked down for@t'l6oogs each thought it was the other's bid. Consternation reigned supreme when they found that the successful bidder was a third party, who had a commission to buy promising mares'" for Mr Keene.

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Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2417, 12 July 1900

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3,131

IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2417, 12 July 1900

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