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SPORTING.

TALK OF THE DAY.

FIXTURES. Or-rnTiTTP 20 > 21— PaWatua. on oi „ «m 2t5-Pabnerston §«' £l~£ orth Ofcago 26, 27-Cromwell en' E~S ore „-n S 6 ' 27-Westporfc 27, 28— Poverty Bay 2 p ( 27— Dunedin November. 26. 27— Reefton ,, BcjVo8 cjVo- L A anC^ Palk Si-Auddand 5, 9, 10— Auckland 9K_A shnral.9—Haniototo K.G. 1899. 9— Waverley-Wai- January. q in nf'v^ 011 3>3 > 4-Southland 9'9 ' ll°-°.ta1 I °-°. ta^ r 4, 5-Kumara 23, 11-Wellingten 12 ' 13 " Lake Cou^ 30— Coromandel February. 30— Tahuna Park 2, 3— Tapanui 30-Feilding 23, 25-Can.terbury December. March. 1-CorpxnandeL 2 2, 23, 20-Dunedin 1-Feildina 23, 24-North Otago 3— Tahuna Park , 8. 9-Mas.terton May. 11, 15— Woodville 24, 23— Dunedin 16— -Alexandra NOMINATIONS, ACCEPTANCES. &c. October 26, 27 — Gore. — Acceptances, also entries for the Hack Race, October 24. November '9, 10 — Wihton. — Acceptances, also entries for Trial Stakes, October 21. November 9 — Taiebi. — Handicaps, 25th October; acceptances, 3rd November. November 9 — Maniototo Racing Clttb.— Nominations, post entry. November 8, 11 — Lancaster Park. — Nominations, October 22; handicaps, October 28; acceptances, November 3. November 30, December 3— Tahuna. Park. — Nominations, October 29; handicaps, November 16; acceptances, November 26. December 26, 27 — Dtjnedin. — Nominations for Otago Cup and ether leading events, November 19; nominations for other events, December 3 ; handicaps, December 10 ; general ci.tries 3rd acceptances, December 17. January 12, 13 — Lake County. — Acceptances, November 7; final acceptance, January 11. February 9 — Maniototo. — Nominations for Trial Stakes and Trot, November 1 ; handicaps for Trot, November 24; first acceptance, December 14; acceptances for Trial Stakes, February 4 ; second acceptances for Trot, February 7.

THE FORBTJRY. Twenty-seven years and a-half have elapsed since the Dunedin Jockey Club first raced on the Forbury course. It was on Thursday the 23rd of March, 1871, that the inaugural race meeting opened, in splendid weather, and with an attendance estimated at 3000, including the Governor (Sir George Bowen) and party. The first programme was not very richly endowed, as stakes go nowadays, having the totalisator to feed them. Only £655 was given in, prizes, spread over a dozen events, the leading races being the 3?orbury Handicap, of 120sovs, won by Mr Coombes'a Catapult after a. race with Bobby Burns and Sir Tatton, and the Dunedin Jockey Club Handicap, of loOsovs, in which the Auckland mare Yatterina ridden by French defeated Backbiter and Miss Rowe. Absolutely the first race run on the tiack was the Maiden Plate won by Mr W. @. Webb's Swindle, this mare having an easy task to defeat Tiger and Comet. Swindle also won the Town Plate. Other winners during the two days' racing were Magic in the Trot, Backbiter in the St. Kilda Stakes, Novice in the Selling Race, Lady of the Lake in the Hack Race, Sir Tatton (ridden by Dan O'Brien) in the Hurdles, Little Nell in the Publicans' Handicap, Miss King in the Consolation, and Gazelle in the Hack Race. Bai Yatterina, who was herself a good mare, and subsequently became famous as the dam of Libeller, Matchlock, and others, there was no first-class horse at the meeting, though Backbiter had some claim to class, and Sir Tatton was a representative hurdler. It was in after years that the real gentry of the turf put in an appearance in representative numbers. We saw such horses as Lurline and Calumny and Ariel and Templeton and Guy Fawkes and Mata and Fishhook and Trump Card and Somnus and Oudeis performing there in the comparatively early days; the central period of the Forbury's existence introduced us to Lady Emma, Sir Modred, Nelson, Vanguard, Gipsy King Carbine, Dunkeld, Freedom and Mantonj and in later years we have seen such wonders as Multiform and Gold Medallist and Conqueror running and winning. Some day I may find time to prepare an article on the historic contests the Forbury has witnessed. Meanwhile, this being merely in the nature of a good-bye paragraph, I make passing men,-, tion of some of the crack norses and wou!<A add the names of the office-bearers who managed the 1871 meeting. Mr J. StephenßO.a was judge, Mr Caleb Moore starter, Mr J. R. Mills ("übiquitous Joe") clerk of course, whilst Messrs W. H. Taggart, G. Dowse, and Arthur Smith were the joint handicappers ; and the stewards were Messrs J. Marshall, It. Wilson, J. A. Douglas, G. Dodson, W. H. Taggar* D«. Qoraoft» Hi, Scgtfe* and isk

Wain. Of these stewards I know that Messrs Wain, Tatrcfart, and Wilson survive, whilst Mr John Stephenson and the three handicappers are still with us, also Mr iSydney James, who has been secretary continuously. The last rider weighed out at the Forbury was " Billy " Tree, who had t^e mount on Maremma in the Farewell Handicap.

THE C.J.C. MEETING.

When Mr Stead first intimated that there was a doubt about starting Multiform for the New Zealand Cup, he gave out that he proposed to preserve the horse's engagement until he saw what the strength of the field was likely to be. The last acceptance found nearly all the best horses paying up, and Mr Stead has withdrawn his crack. If he had so chosen, he could, of course, have kept in Multiform ever so much longer. I am not referring to legal rights. According to his legal rights Mr Stead could have kept Multiform engaged until the very morning of the race. What I mean is that it was within his privileges to have retained Multiform as a Cup candidate until a date beyond the final acceptance, without forfeiting his claim to be deemed a considerate owner. No one could have complained if he had done what he said he would do—namely, stick to Multiform until he saw the strength of the field. By surrendering his own interests in the matter, and taking out the horse so early as last Monday, Mr Stead has done more than some owners who profess to be very frank and very gentlemanly would do in the interests of the public, and I honestly think the Yaldhurst owner is entitled to a vote of thanks, not for scratching the horse, for I think it a pity he is scratched, but for removing his name from the list at a comparatively early date after determining to scratch. If Mr Stead should now have the luck to win with Allair. his sole surviving candidate, the win will be a popular one. I do not, however, feel very sure about the chance of the Cissy colt. He may win, but his public performances are not a strong recommendation. To tell the truth, the race seems to be a remarkably open one. St. Paul would be strongly fancied now were it a certainty that he would stand up to his final gallops; but there seems to be some doubt on the point. Swordfish II is pleasing the touts, and I think him the likeliest of the top weights, though according to Auckland judges, who should know him best, he has rather more to carry than was generally expected up North. Nestor hardly seems to be doing a Cup preparation, and Day Star, one of the "chucks in," as a mere matter of weight, is only half fit, according to all reports. Starshot's chance is prejudiced, they say, by a tendency to soreness occasionally. There is no doubt about Epaulet. He is *n shining health, and will be as fit as a fiddle. Rogue or no rogue, he shall be one of my selections. Boreas, too, having now proved himself over a distance, must be counted dangerous, and the same remark applies to Douglas. Tirant d'Eau, on the other hand, is not doing well at the game in public, and for that reason I solemnly turn Mm up. Or Mr O'Brien's pair, I can form no opinion, good, bad, or indifferent, at present. Leaving them out, I select Swordfish 11, Starshot, Epaulet, Boreas, Douglas, Dundas, Altair, and Fulmen as the crowd from which the winner will very likely come, and if driven to an absolute selection in one this week, I should say Fulmen ; but something may yet occur to make me alter my mind, and I reserve my final tip. The weights for three of the minor handicaps are now -before us. VI tne Hurdle Handicap lot, I like Liberator on his Oamaru running. He gave Glenore nearly 2st and a beating, and now concedes only J.DID. Next to the old horse, the better of the top weights is perhaps to be preferred, and this may be Ilex, though I don't think Mr Wise is enamoured of bis chance with I* .7. •" Swordfish takes it into his head to gallop, he will take a lot of beating in the Ricearton Welter, but'l give both Bimetallist and Bnsa a show. Rangefinder, Bloomer, and Sequin seem to be the pick of the candidates for the Ladies' Purse.

NORTH OTAGO.

' While it can be understood that the howlin<> "■ale which prevailed at Oamaru last Thursday and Friday, raising clouds of dust and blowing right through one's clothes and skin to the very marrow, had some effect upon the attendance, this cause is wholly inadequate to account for the severe discouragement to the club arising from the fact that the crowd mustered only about 300 persons. The wind was disagreeable, but the trade of the town went on as usual, and it the publio had had a mind to go to the racecourse the weather would not have hindered them. The poor attendance must be traceable to other causes. Some say that the Oamaru folk have shown a distaste for racing ever since the notorious Fishhook affair, many openly avowing that that business made them " full up" of the sport. I cannot deny the statement, but it is difficult to see the connection between this alleged cause and the result, since the Fishhook episode belongs. to years ago, since when a new generation has sprung up. ,The lack of patronage seems hard to account for. Whatever may have caused it the present management is in no degree responsible. Under the existing regime the club has managed racing in a competent manner; it has also reduced the liabilities to the dimensions of a very light burden ; and now it has thoroughly improved the course, the running track being completely fenced in on both sides all the way round. Racing has, indeed, been put upon a thoroughly sound footing in the white stone district, and all that is lacking is a fair degree of public support. This, surely, the club has a right to expect, at any rate from the people of Oamaru. Mr J. F. Reid (the president), Mr Jasper Nichols (the vicepresident), Mr G. M. Procter (the treasurer), Mr George R. Hislop (the secretary), and others have done an immense amount of work for the public in setting the club upon a firm footing, and now it is up to the public to say "Thank you" m a practical manner by rolling up and taking an interest in the sport. If this response is not made pretty soon some of the grafters will drop out, and then there will be a risk of racing at Oamaru getting into the hands of less worthy men. The course, one of the best in New Zealand, t was in splendid order on both days, and the general arrangements for the meeting were efficiently attended to, the committee's handicapping on the whole being excellent; tho starting of Mr J. Henderson fair, though ■through want of the starting mechanism many vexatious delays took plac^ at the post, and horses generally deemed quiet suddenly grew restive and inclined to bolt out in front. The secretarial business was diligently supervised by Mr Hislop ; and Messrs Mason and Roberts were, as usual, accurate and prompt an receiving and paying out upon the totalieator, though the crowd being so small, and bookmakers being licensed to intercept the business, the firm mentioned handled only £1191 for the two days. Of the racing itself, a lengthy description is not necessary, but I propose to briefly run through the proeremme, making few comment*

THE RACING AT OAMARU.

The opening hurdle race found Liberator and Glenore fighting out what looked like a genuine contest. Old "Lib." had, however, a bit, the best of it all the way, and won by three lengths. Dundee ran off early m the race. Something of that sort seemed to be expected— why, I can't say. Perhaps it was the 51b penalty, though Dundee is a big horse, and one that a bit of weight ought not to trouble. I may say, however, that if Dundee had tried ever so hard he would have had a job to win from Liberator. The old fellow was in great form, ever so much the better for his gallops at Dunedm. Brisa made a one-horse race of the Maiden Plate, o-alloping the six furlongs in lmm 20see, which was a good go, seeing she was out by herself, and enabled to take the finish very leisurely. I thought she was lucky that nothing could get at her nearing the top oi the hill where she seemed to tire ; but it must be remembered that she was by no means as at as she can be made. With her out of the way the race would have been a certainty for My Lord, who was undoubtedly the best of the rou°-h 'uns. None of the others in the field show promise, though Criterion may be capable of improvement, vlzal disappointed his party in the Welter, failing to run up to his track form. Irish wirl, on the other hand, shaped better than nad been expected of her. Her followers thought she would win, and backed her confidently, but I don't think they reckoned on her getting home all alone, for she was only half fit. Black and Red made light of his 51b penalty in the Spring Handicap, catching Vandyke six furlongs from home and thereafter smothering the local representath c. Private information was to the effect that Choroid was a really good thing for the .Novel Race, but he got into trouble at the distance when^ challenged by Stockfish, and whilst the latter' ran on for an easy win Choroid stopped and finished out of a place. Stockfish's was the easiest win of the meeting. The old gelding looked rough, and had done very little work, and the stable' put very littlo on him, though they had a good win all the same, there being a very decent dividend. Loughlin bid up to £23 on behalf of the owner, and took Stockfish back. He is a perfect wonder. Mr Sewell likes to have a mount in the Ladies' Bracelet, and in these races ho has a good record, having previously, since the formation of the present club, won on Highlander, Remorse 11, -and Pioneer. This year he took the ride on Miss Ottley, and plainly had oil the best of it as regards horsemanship and moiint. The riding otherwise was safer than it looked likely to be when the horses went out. Clubs cater for so-called "gentleman riders," I suppose, in the hope that this will be a bit of a draw, and also with the idea of encouraging our lads to learn how to sit a horse properly. In both respects the results are distinctly disappointing, and it might be wiso to abolish tho present conditions in favour of one prescribing that the horses are not to be associated with a training stable. Mr Goodman expected Swordfish to win the Flying Handicap, but he also started Cherrystone a3 "a saver," and put a trifle on her, and the precaution got him home, for Swordfish tarried at the post till his chance had gone, whilst Cherrystone cut down The Orphan and won the best face of the day in plucky fashion. Lobo's running off in the second day's Hurdle Race appeared to be an honest disaster. Had he kept straight the chances are that he would have won : but since Pioneer did the mile and a-half iii 2min sSiseo he must have taken a lot of licking. It was a fast go. Vandyke whipped round when the starter said " Go " in the Welter, and Swordfish darted off with a lead of which he was never deprived. Luncheon adjournment served to freshen Swordfish up again, and he fairly beat Black and Red and Remorse 11. Mr Goodman sent his paii to do the best they could, and win him the stake, and he backed neither, which was a good thing for him, as the event proved, as if lie had put anything on either it would have been on Black and Red. I don't go so far as to say that tl>e result indicates that Swordfish is better than Black and Red, but I do affirm that as the race happened to be run such was the case. Remorse shaped well for seven furlongs, and by the time Black and Red caught him both were dead licked. Daisy Bell won the Ladies' Purse very easily. The Orphan really led all the way in the Waitaki Plate, but Brisa and Warrington both got close on to her in mounting the hill, and 50yds from home it was anybody's race. Then, however, The Orphan made a final spurt, which carried her clear, and she won by over a length. Last Shot led from start to finish of the Hack Race. Godfrey, the rider of Choroid, was fined £5 for siDging out "Go" and thereby causing a false start; and Emerson being adjudged to have got purposely left with Stockfish was fined £10, a motion to that effect being carried as against a motion to disqualify him. The Farewell Handicap brought about an interesting race, Remorse II overhauling Miss Lochiel just in time.

STABLE COMMISSIONS.

Treating of the Caulfield prospeefs, the Australasian said: With the ring constituted as it now is, the backng of a horse like The Grafter is no easy matter. Bookmakers are supposed to assist owners to the opportunity of adding to the prize money offered for a stake. This is one of the excuses for the existence of the ring, as it is called. Unfortunately — or fortunately, as the case may be — the ring makes no attempt to live up to this character. Instead of laying an owner a fair price about his horse, the policy of present day bookmakers rather seems to be to refuse to bet with him in the hope of selling their goods at a shorter price to the public. This policy has, to a certain extent, recoiled against the ring in connection with this year's Caulfield Cup. They would not lay Wayfarer except at a prohibitive price, and now he is scratched. In this case it is not likely that the owners wanted to bet, but the public would have backed Wayfarer after his victory at Flemington if they had been offered any encouragement. Then came Majestic. The ring would not lay the owner. As one of their leaders put it — " I will keep my money and retail it to the public at a better price." Now no one is anxious to back Majestic even at 100 to 2, and the ring's chance of laying him has gone. Of course the owner of Majestic is thankful now that he was not accommodated at shorter prices than he will be able to get this afternoon if he still wants to back his representaive. We merely point out how hard it is to get anything out of the ring about a horse which bookmakers regard as likely to be a publio favourite. From an owner's point of view, a £5000 Caulfield Cup and the totalisator would be much better than a £2000 Caulfield Cup and a ring which either cannot or will not bet when what looks like a stable commission comes into the market.

ENGLISH RACING.

The Duke of Westminster's Calix, son of Orme and Petal, made his first public appearance in the Champion Breeders' Biennial Foal Stakes at DerjbjtJwd jafatttad.. fayjjuxitQ against

| eight opponents, but to his lack of good looks j he added a disposition to cut it promptly, : and he finished nowhere, the race being won by Oreo, who was not at all fancied after his defeat at York. Oreo, bought as a yearling for 500gs, is by Orvieto (son of Bend Or) out of Darkness, by Southampton from Edith, by Distin. The Duke of Devonshire attended to see Dieudonne run for the Champion i Breeders' Biennial, and had the satisfaction of witnessing his colt's success. Odds of sto 2 were betted on the son of Amphion and Mon Droit, who, although disposed to lay his ears back a quarter of a mile from home, kept to his work and, hard held, disposed of Champ fie Mars by a length. At the same meeting Mazeppa won the Devonshire Stakes for Two-year-olds, doing the five furlongs in tl<e fast time of lmin 0 4-ssec. Sandown Park followed, and here one iof the surprises of the season was | effected when Urugayo won the Michaelmas j Stakes. This colt was totally friendless at 50 to 1. Urugayo, a son of Deuce of Clubs and Begonia, was purchased for 60gs by Mr P. Torterolo last October, the colt being knovvn at the time as Ravensworth. The Doncaster rr.eeting came next. On the first day backers thought it good business to get a bare shade of odds about Desmond for the old-estab-lished Champagne Stakes, but this youngster j never looked like winning, and he and three others were outstayed by the Hall Mark colt, who after the race was named Mark For'ard. I He is by Rightaway (son of Wisdom) out of ' Hall Mark, by Sterling from La Cascadense, by Cremorne from Harmony, by Marsyas. Mr i Allison remarks that there is not enough of the i colt to make a horse of class, and the form I must be poor if not all wrong. Acmena ran in the Great Yorkshire Handicap, and finished fifth, the race being won by Locarno, who started at 100 to 6.

THE ST. LEGER.

Wildfowler won by four lengths, having knocked out all his opponents a couple ot hundred yards from home. This colt was bred in Ireland by Captain Greer, and is jointly owned by him and S. Darling, who trains the colt. He started at 10 to 1, second favourite. Tho owners seem to have fancied the colt in a lukewarm sort of way, but Wood, the rider, had but little hope of a victory. The Sportsman's special writes: — "Wildfowler may, of course, be a smashing good horse. He was by no means wound up for the Two Thousand Guineas, and he came back from Newmarket with a touch of fever, which prevented his running for the Derby. Tn the Leger he stripped a vastly different animal, with muscle and power developed to a really remarkable extent, and all that you could say against him is that he is a bit straight in the knee. But as to Jeddah, I write with bedrock knowledge when I say that, although he came round into the straight with the race apparently won, he flinched and cringed immediately he got on that hard ground, just as he did in the Two Thousand, and Watts could make nothing of him from, that point to the finish. This is no mere idle excuse of my own. Ho is not a good horse in his trainer's opinion, as judged by the Persimmon standard ; neither is Wildfowler in the same street with Galtee More. I asked Wooci to-uay why he did not win in the same style on Gal tee More last year. ' I could have won more easily still,' said he, but I only had to win, and I won.' Of course we know now that Ga.itee More was not to be unduly shown up in view of his handicap engagements, but it was a mistaken policy to pursue with a great horso, and knocked at least 10,000gs off his selling value." Wildfowler carried silk for the first time in the Plantation Stakes at the Newmarket First July meeting last year, when he ran third to Lucknow and Stream of Gold. This performance was followed up at Doncaster with a win in the Kous Plate. Success also attended his efforts in the Autumn Breeders' Foal Plate at Manchester, when Nun Nicer was second, and the colt scored his third consecutive victory in the Rutland Stakes at the Newmarket First October. Making a last show for the season in the Middle Park Plate, he could only finish third to Dieudonne and Disraeli. He reappeared this year in the Drakelow Stakes at Derby. For this he was only opposed by Bonnebosq, and his task looked so easy that those wishing to back him had to lay odds of 10 to 1. To the general surprise he was bowled over by a neck. Wildfowler next ran for the Two Thousand Guineas, for which Ire was unplaced, and Disraeli won'by a length and a-half from Wantage. Backed afterwards for the Derby, he saw as little as 10 to 1 in the quotations, but training troubles supervening he was struck out about a week before the race, and did not make another public appearance until the Leger. DONCASTER BLOOD STOCK SALES. The annual sales during Leger week at Doncaster opened badly on the 6th September. A considerable portion of the lots submitted failed to ' find purchasers, and moderate amounts were forthcoming for those that changed hands. The highest price (900gs) was given by Lord Penrhyn for a yearling colt by Saraband from Cream Laid, sent up from the Croft stud. On the second day a stronger tone characterised the proceedings in the sale paddock, for there was a considerably increased attendance, and better prices were realised. The best obtained was 1550g5, given by Mr Purefoy for a filly by Morion or St. Angelo out of Whirlpool, while at 1200gs a colt by Ravensbury from Little Emily was knocked down to Captain Bewicke. There was no lack of animation in the sale ring on the third day, when a number of choice lots came under the hammer. The half dozen sent up by Sir Tatton Sykes were all disposed of, and realised 7160g5. The highest price was obtained for a colt by Morion from La Fleche, taken by Mr Larnach (Jeddah's owner) for 2700g5, while at 1750gs a colt by St. Simon out of Mimi became the property of Mr L. Brassey, and Mr J. A. Miller gave 1150gs for a filly 'by Orme out of Wedlock. Mr Larnach was also the purchaser of a filly by St. Simon out of Pamela, in Mr Simons Harrison's consignment, the prioe paid being 1350g5.

BOOKMAKERS BESET.

On Friday last, whilst Dunedin backers were trying to pick the Waitaki Plate at Oamaru, the police made a descent upon the offices of Barnett and Grant in the Arcade, Abe Moss in Exchange Court, and Tommy Barnett in High street, and quietly arrested all the persons found therein. The business was done without any fuss 'or excitement. Our Dunedin police have a way of their own of doing these things — or rather, I should say, they understand the true police method. So much must be said as a matter of fair play to the officers. Even those of us who disagree with the policy of our gaming laws and dislike their administration may make this confession. The constables simply entered, closed the doors, and explained the position, without any unnecessary heroics or out-of-place apology. I hear that one of the three principals happened to be out at the time, but hearing of what was going on, he presented himself and walked into the trap. In another case, so report says, a visitor failed to understand the position, $aH .vyent on, with the buainaas of the visit.

" Dear me, only fancy Swordfish winning a second time ! You know, I thought he'd win ; but they told me to back Black and -Red. Never mind, put mo 5s on So-and-So for the Waitaki Plate." And so on, whilst all the time the other parties present, who had at once " dropped " to the po&ition, were motioning the voluble one to silence. Well, what happened was that the three sets of persons arrested were marched off to the lockup and duly bailed out, having entered into recognisances to appear before the Bench next morning. So it came about that on Saturday at the Police Court, before Messrs A. Solatnon and T. Scott, Peter Grant, Abraham Moss, and Thomas Barnett were charged with beinft the occupiers of certain offices unlawfully used for the purpose of betting with persons resorting thereto upon certain events and contingencies related to horse races ; Jack Dalziell, Richard Hoops, and William Banks were charged with assisting in the management of certain gaming houses; and David Bhort, James M'Mullan, and Alice Fitzpatrick were charged with being found in a gaming house without lawful excuse. Mr Hanion, instructed by Mr Sim, appeared for the bookmakers and their employees, while Messrs Short and M'Mullan and Mrs Fitzpatrick were undefended. Chief-detective O'Brien said he would ask for an adiournment till Thursday, so that the case might be heard be fore the stipendiary magistrate. Mr Hanlon acquiesed in the arrangement proposed, and the persons charged were remanded accordingly, bail being allowed — each of the bookmakers in the sum of £100; each of their assistants £25 ; and each of the other persons £5 each. So the matter stands, and it is, of course, not a subject for comment.

A PROSECUTION AT HOME.

The last mail brings news of a batch of arrests at Folkestone (England) in regard to which much feeling was caused by the action of the police. Four men were taken up for carrying on the business of a bookmaker in the enclosed racecourse outside the rings', with the aid of such ordinary paraphernalia as boards, books, pencils, and betting tickets. They were marched off to a horse-box, in which they were detained for two hours ; they wore then handcuffed and conducted under the public gaze to the nearest police station, and there they were locked up all night, although they offered substantial bail, which was peremptorily refused by the inspector. Next morning they were made to march three miles and a-half in custody to tho Hythe Sessions House, where they were 3-emanded. When the case was called on, the defending counsel made a strong attack on the conduct of the police, denouncing it as arbitrary, oppressive, fraught with illegality from beginning to end, and a disgrace to the force. It came out clearly, he said, that the police had received instructions from their superior officers to arrest all persons carrying on a bookmaking business outside the rings, with a view, presumably, of enlarging the receipts of this new lacocourse, and there could be no doubt that the defendants were arrested for a supposed breach of the Betting House Act, regardless of the Kempton Park case. The authorities having by this time looked up their law, the charge-sheet was altered, and the defendants were confronted with a charge under the Vagrant Act of using instruments of gaming on a game of chance — namely, a horse race, in a public place. The bench dismissed the charge, and it was said that an action for false imprisonment would probably be brought against the police.

THE PONY CLING.

The Tahuna Park Committee had a lengthy sitting on Tuesday of last week, the business before them being to inquire whether or not the trotting pony Cling had been fairly entered for the club s races last autumn. The point was as to the sufficiency of the list of performances sent in with the nomination paper. Acccrding to the evidence it would appear that the owner, Mr Rutherford, has since the races taken his horses away from Clark, the trainer, and the latter, to get even with Rutherford, gave information to the secretary to the effect that the list of performances sent in was defective in that some of the mare's best doings were omitted. Mr Harry James thereupon made inquiries, and the special meeting of the committee was held to take the evidence and consider what should be done. It seems pretty clear — in fact it is ad-mitted--that Clings best performances were not supplied to the handicapper, but Mr Rutherford denies that he had any knowledge of the fact. This will be the main issue that the committee have to try. Evidence has been taken, and the meeting stands adjourned for further inquiries. Under these circumstances the matter is not one for comment, but I may remark that the committee seem to be thoroughly in earnest about sifting the business to the bottom, and I have no doubt they will come to an honest finding.

NAPIER PARK

At this meeting last week the totalisator investments reached £9784, an increase of £205 over the investments of last season's mesting. Most of the races were Avon pretty easily, not always, however, by the first favourites — indeed, backers seem to have been rather astray in their judgment over most of the races. This, however, is not to be wondered at when one considers the chequered form displayed. Take Missfire, for example. He tailed away in the rear in the first day's Hurdle Race, and won the second day's event just as he liked. I notice that he sur vived a protest alleging inconsistency, so we must suppose the charge was not proved ; but to us outsiders, who don't know what the evidence was, the running of Missfire looks like a complete reversal of form. Then there is the case of Castashore — an easy winner on the first day; one of the last on the second. It is pretty well understood that he is a rogue, and no one suggests that his owner was to blame; all the same, these I'-ings are dreadful worries to backers. On the other hand, a couple at least of the performers ran most consistently. I refer to the hurdler Ruby, and more particularly to Whitirea, who must be a really good cut of a horse to get homo in three stakes. Tirant d'Eau was one of the disappointments of the meeting.

OWNERS' REMINDERS.

October 29 — Tahuna Park nominations. November I—Maniototo1 — Maniototo nominations for Trial Stakes and Trot. November 3 — Taieri acceptances. November 3 — Lancaster Park acceptances. November 7 — Lake County acceptances for Trot.

CHE BETTING MARKET.

Messr-.s Barnett and Grant report tho following business: — New Zealand Cup. — 1000 to 25 Double Event, 500 to 37 Douglas, 300 to 38 St. Paul, 300 to 20 Epaulet, 200 to 23 Goldleaf, 200 to 12 Altajr, 200 to 6 Co3ur do Lion, 200 to 12 Dundas, 150 to 22 Boreas, 100 to 5 Target. Cup and Stewards'.— lloo to 2J Rubin and

Nihilist, 1000 to & .Rubin and Windermcre, 100$' • 131 3 i Double Event and Refugee, 800 to 14 Dougy las and Chasseur, 760 to 5 Boreas and Jabbery COO to 16 Boreas and Target, 500 to 2£ Epaalet' and Belleclair, 500 to 2 Epaulet and Vanilla, 500 to 2£ Epaulet and Hermosa, 500 to 22 Boreas and Chasseur, 500 to 7 Boreas end Female Fianchise, 500 to 3 Fukoen and Nihilist, 500 tor 3 Fulmen and Fem&ie Franchise, '500 to 2fe Douglas and Jlermopa, suO to 2 Cxoldleaf and; Iho Spinner, 500 to 2 GoJdieaf and Cannonshot, 500 to 2 Nestor and Skirmisher, 500 to 2 ■Nestor and Vaniila, (.00 to 1 Rubin and Vanilla^ 500 to 1 Double Event and Cannonshot, 500 to 1 Doubie Event and Female Franchise, 500 tp I Event and Skirmisher, 500 to 7j£ Starshot and Dundas, 450 1o 4h Boreas and Hern.oaa, 400 to 6 Boreas and Blazer, 300 to 3- Boreas and Cuiverin. 250 to 3 Douglas and Belleciair, 250 to 1 Nestor ami Belleclair, 250 to 2Jlirant cVEau and Female Franchise, 250 to 2li Tirant d'Eau and Hermosa, 200 to 2 Swordfish and Cannonshot, 200 to 2 Swordfish and Female franchise, 200 to 1 Epaulet and The Spinner 200 to 3 Boreas and Dundas, 200 to 3 St. Paul and Target, 200 to 3 Daystar and Amphion, 200 to 2 Daystar and Blazer, 200 to 2 Starshot and Vanilla, 200 to 3 Boreas and Benson. Melbourne and New Zealand Cups.— 1000 to 10 Clarion and Starshot, 750 to 4 Dreamlard and Epaulet, 700 to 6 The Grafter and Daystar 600 to 6 The Grafter and Boreas, 600 to 14 Tho - Grafter and Swordfish, 500 to 4 The Grafter and Tirant d'Eau, 500 to 1 Clarion and Rubin, 500 to 2 Mischief and Tirant d'Eau, 500 to 4 "Wait-a-Bit and St. Paul, 500 to 6 Massinigsa and Boreas; 500 to 5 Massinissg- and bt. Paul, 500 to 3 Cocos and Tirant d'Eau, 400 to 3 Ihe Grafter and St. Paul, 350 to 3 Merloolas and Boreas, 300 to 3 Massinissa and Douglas, 300 to 4 Ma3sinissa and Boreas, 300 to 6 Meiloolas and Swordfish, 300 to 1 Eosebery anil Epaulet, 250 to 1 Manfred and Epaulet, 250 t» 2A Massinissa and Altair, 250 to 2J Ma3sinißsai • and Starshot, 200 to 1£ Wait-a-Bit and Tirant d'Eau, 200 to 2 Massimssa and Daystar, 200 to 1 Amberite and Epaulet, 200 to 2 Merloolas and St. Paul, 200 to 2 The Chief and Altair. Mr A. Moss reports the following business: New Zealand Cup.— 2oo to 14 Nestor, 250 to 15 Dundas. New Zealand and Melbourne Cups.— 2so to 5 ThojS-rafter and St. Paul, 250 to 5 Massanissa and St. Paul, 500 to 2 Clarion and Douglas. New Zealand Cup and Stewards.— 6oo to 5 Tirant d'Eau and Female Franchise, 300 to 4 Swordfish and Arline, 250 to 5 Boreas and[ Dundas, 200 to 3 Boreas and Arline, 100 to 3 Boreas and Chasseur, 200 to 3 Altair ancj Blazer, 200 to 2£ Starshot and Female Franchise, 100 to 2 Starshot and Chasseur, 200 td 2 Epaulet and Target, 200 to 3 St. Paul ancl Benzoin.

RAID ON ALLEGED TOTE BJBTTOSS.

A NUMBER OF ARRESTS MADE.

On Friday afternoon not a little excitement was created in sporting circles when it became known that the police had made a simultaneous raid upon premises where " tote betting" 1 is supposed to be carried on, and where cer* tain gentlemen, who describe their occupation under the euphemistic title of " turf commission agents," together with several individuals who .jvere found on the premises, were placed under custody and marched to the lock-up. From inquiries, it is learned that shortly be* fore 4 o'clock a detachment of officers of th* law, garbed in the ordinary attire of civilians^, left the police station. Presently they separated and divided themselves into three detachments under the leadership of Constable Cooney, Detective O'Brien, and Con-* stable Hanson respectively. Proceeding tot different parts of the town, precisely as the hour struck they, in their several collective rapacities, made a descent upon the offices ofS Messrs Barnett ana Grant in the Arcade, Met Abraham Moss in Princes street, and Thomas Barnett in High street. The Oamaru races: were being_ held yesterday, and a good deafof betting, it is believed, was going on amongst^ that class of gentlemen known in the sporting community as "punters." Doubtless it was* this which prompted the police officials to pay' their unexpected visits to the offices of the, " turf commission agents." Each of the lattecwere arrested, and also two assistants and| three civilians. Of the latter one belonged tq the gentle sex, and at the police station sha did not fail to give expression to the inward, disgust she entertained at the indignity thrust* upon her by the arbitrary action of the police. The guardians of the law, however, are an» unsympathetic class, and the protestations o£the indignant female appeared to awaken no^ responsive throb in their breasts, and she* was compelled to await with her brethren iU distress until such time as some good Samaritans made their appearance and went; through the form, as by law provided, of " bailing them out." The names of those ar-* rested were Messrs P. Grant, T. Barnett, A. Moss (bookmakers), Messrs Hoops, DalzieU (Assistants), Mrs Fitzpatrick, and Messrs James M'Mullen and William Banks (civilians). The bookmakers were admitted to bail in the sun* of £100, the .assistants in the sum of £25, and tho civilians in the sum of £5 eaoh.

At the City Police Court on Saturday, Petec Grant, Abraham Moss, and Thomas Barnetfcwere charged with being the occupiers of cer-* tain offices unlawfully used for betting witrt persons resorting thereto upon certain events> and contingencies relating to horse-racing. Jack Dalziell, Richard Hoops, and WillianE Banks were charged with assisting in the management of certain gaming houses. David, Short, James M'Mullan, and Alice Fitzpatrick were charged with being found in a gaming* house without lawful excuse. — Mr A. C. Hanlon, instructed by Mr Sim, appeared for all* except the three last-named, who were undefended. — Chief Detective O'Brien asked foil a remand till Thursday, in order that the cases., might be heard by the stipendiary magistrate. The Bench thought this was the proper course, and, Mr Hanlon offering no objection, the cases were adjourned accordingly. — The same baiß was allowed in the case of Grant, Moss, anc? Barnett— namely, £100, and the bail for the . assistants was fixed at £25. Short, M'Mullan, ' and Mrs Fitzpatrick were admitted to bail ia the sum of £5 each.

VICTORIAN SPORTING ITEMS.

MELBOURNE, October 2G. Mr George Gray, the West Australian, sportsman, ha* reconsidered his decision anenfc retiring from the turf. Acton has been scratched for the Melbourne Cup. Majestic and Ptenown are unlikely starters. October 21. Plutus has arrived, and -presents a thor-oughly-trained appearance. ■ Merloolas is on the improve. One thousand to 80 was taken about Amberite for the Cup, 1500 to 110 -Clarion, 500 to 35 Dreamland, 1000 to 50 Wait-a-Bit, 1000 Ho 40 each Trapper and Heretic, 500 to 20 Cocos, 2000 to 60 Roseberjr. The closing quotations offered were : Bto 1 each the Grafter and Massinissa, 100 to 9 \m berite, 100 to 8 Clarion and Dreamland, 10ij to 5 Wait-a-Bit, The Chief, Merloolas, ar.d Cocos, 100 to 4- Eleusinian, Trapper, Heretic., 100 to 3 Rosebery, Cordite, Plutus, and Battalion, 100 to 2 Catspf.w*

Mr S. G. Cook despairs of getting Reka feound enough to race again under six months. October 22. A cold and overcast morning. Excellent work was accomplished. The Grafter, with the outside running, finished alongside xhe Chief in a mile and a-half gallop on the tan in 2min 47£ sec. This is a first-class performance on the part of both horses. Thunder Queen was sent two miles on the tan, and traversed it in 3min 48sec. Fleetwood had the best of Promontory in a five-furlong flutter, done in lmin 6isec. Courage led Gauleon and Woodlark throughout a mile and a-quar-4er, and wound up in 2min 19sec. Corinthia Spurted five furlongs in. lmin 6£sec. Catherine {Wheel, Kalinga, and Janette finished in the order named at the end of half a mile, traversed in 53£ sec. Wayfarer, who is evidently recovering from his recent indisposition, covered a similar distance a second faster. Eleusinian again moved in slovenly fashion, being held by the Princess of Wales at the end of a mile and a-half, run in 2min 528ec. Hainault and Lellamaine galloped eleven furlongs in 2min 37sec. Trapper did a mile and a-quarter nicely in 2min 19sec. Rosebery ran over Amberite and Pelissiev at the finish of eleven furlongs—in 2min 31isec. Plutus, with the assistance of Corrie Roy for the last mile, beat that time by half a second, sweeping along like a piece of machinery. Cocos, War God, Sweet Marie, and Mischief had a miniature race for a mile and a-half, Cocos finishing in front in 2min 48isec. Picture, who has lately been suffering from dental troubles, put in a strong mile and a-half gallop with Longford. Toxteth, Catspaw, The Tola, and Mertoolas did useful pacing work. Podacres, Tagus. and Soult were sent three miles over hurdles, the two first-named fencing beautifully, but Soult cut himself terribly. Dalmahoy, the New South Wales fencer, jumped splendidly alongside Clive. The following scratchings are posted : — Birksgate and Eddystone for all engagements ; Town Clock for the Melbourne Cup. October 24. This was a summer morning, but the work, *s usual on Monday, was of a perfunctory description. Plutus skipped over a mile on the tan in lmin 57sec. War God and Miss •West registered half a mile in 522 sec. Merloolas took half a second longer. Hickenbotham. states that the recent heavy wagers about Heretic and Thunder Queen are outside the stable connections altogether. A slight disposition is evinced to field against Bobadil for the Derby. Two hundred and fifty to 100 was accepted by a bookmaker, whilßt there are numerous offers to take 3 to i on the colt. Four hundred and fifty to 50 was accepted about Massinissa for the Cup, 500 to 40 Dreamland, 1000 to 30 The Chief, 1500 to 50 Lee : Metford. At a meeting of the Moonee Valley stewards, T. G. Muir (owner of The Tola, Caledonia, and North British), together with H. Cook (the rider), and the racehorse The Tola (were disqualified for 12 months for suspicious practices in connection with the Phoenix Handicap. .Betting is dull. The Grafter is firm favouiit6| for the Cup at 7to 1. There are symp.tottis of The Chief being Forrester's elect after all. Thousands to 30 are accepted whenever offered, whilst a nice Bfcalte has been secured at 100 to 3. 2000 to 140 was taken about Dreamland ; 100 lo 10 was offered about Massinissa; 100 -to 9 each Amberite and Clarion ; 100 to 6 Merloolas; 100 to 4 each Battalion and Rosobery. The following scratchings are posted : — Maribyrncng Plate: Beaulieu. All engagements : North British, The Tola, Caledonia. 'Melbourne Cup : Majestic, Renown, Virtue, Bunyan, Lee-Metford. Availon, Spangle, Tho Musketeer, Repeater, Strathjoy, Patriot, Misrule, Lord Richmond, Honiton, Wayfarer, Ashton. October 25. This was a beautiful morning. The Chief and The Grafter were first out, and traversed a mile and a-half on the tan, the latter with the outside running. They covered the distance in 2min 58isec, and there was nothing to choose between them. They were accompanied by Heretio far a mile and a-half. Thunder Queen negotiated the Cup distance on the tan in a taking manner in 3min 48|sec. Eleusinian was sent over two rnileß on the sand in 3min 47sec. Trapper finished well in advance of Gauleon and Woodlark at the end of a mile and a-half, run in 2min 49sec. Amberite, Pellisier, and Rosebery, the latter with the outside running, swept over a mile and aquarter in 2min 15sec, Amberite beating Pellleier by half a length, Rosebery another half ■ft length away — a sterling performance on each horse's part, making Pellisier 1 s chance in the Hotham Handicap, with only 6.7, a particularly rosy one. Plutus galloped a mile and ahalf in 2min 49sec. Toxteth executed a simitar performance. Loohuanita and Picture galloped eleven furlongs in 2min 31isec. Lo"ngford badly beat Syerla over a similar journey in a second faster. Longford is evidently a good horse. War God ran over Miss West and Courage in a mile flutter in lmin 50isec. Moonlyon beat this time by 3sec. Sweet Marie finished upsides with Cocos. Though no attempt was made at record breaking, the mile and a-half was left behind in 2min 48isec. Badge and Corintbia finished up five furlongs in lmin s'^sec. Dreamland, looking the picture of health, was restricted to |low cantering. Merloolas did not work before breakfast. At Caulfield yesterday afternoon Massinissa spurted five furlongs in lmin ssec. Last night 2000 to 70 was taken Trapper, 3000 to 90 The Chief, and 2500 to 100 Rosebery. In the Maribyrnong Plate trials on < lie Plemington course to-day Lowland Chief beat pabet and Oceanica over five furlongs in lmin Hsec. The two bad their shoes off. Fleetfoot, Bhod all round, cut out the distance in lmin ssec, and Gipsy Bill, under similar conditions, in lmin 6sec. Merloolas did not work, and it is rumoured was away swimming. He is evidently a mysterious customer. At Caulfield Viscount II finished in front of Alice Mostyn at the end of five furlongs, finished in lmin 6ii?ec. Clarion wound up ?.n excellent gallop of one mile and three-quarters in 3min 14sec. Condiment beat Heiress over five furlongs in lmin 6£sec. Holster ran the Derby distance in 2min 45£ see, the last mile and a quarter being ticked off in 2min 162 see. W. Redfearn rides Heretic -in the Cup.

MELBOURNE CUP. (Received Oct. 25, at 9.10 p.m.)

MELBOURNE, October 25. The final acceptances for the Melbourne Cup number 32, as follow : — st. lls. «t. lb Amberite .. 9 11 Mischief .. ..7 7 Battalion .. 910 Rosebery .. 7 6 Merloolas .. 910 War God .. 7 6 The Grafter .. 9 2 Longford .. 7 5 The ' Chief ..9 0 Dieamland ..7 2 Clarion .. ..8 5 Toxteth .. ..7 2 Elusive .. ..8 4 Plutu3 '.. ..7 0 Catspaw .. ..8 3 Woodlark .. 613 Syerla .. ..8 2 Carbinier .. 612 Wait-a-Bit . ..8 0 April Fool .. 612 Elusinian .. 8 0 Massinissa .. 6 12 Trapper .. .. 712 Heretic .. .. 611 Manfred .. 712 Pelissier .. 6 8 Cordite .. .. 7 10 Holster ..r ..6 8 Thunder Queen 710 Relic .. .. C 7 foma ... „. 710 Contrast m 5 7

EST A NUTSHELL.

— Mr W. Rathbone is progressing favourably towards recovery. — Tigress was scratched on Tuesday for all her C.J.C. engagements. — Merganser, who slipped her foal to Apremont, has again visited that sire. — It. Kingan, who was disqualified last season, has been granted a license. —Mr John Wrightson is appointed liandicapper for the Cromwell meeting. — Multiform was scratched for the New Zealand Cup at 11 a.m. on Saturday. — The Shrew, who went to the stud last year, has produced her first foal, a colt to Robinson Crusoe. —It is stated that genial Tom Pollard stands to win a fair stake about Douglas on the New Zealand Cup. — Purser won his St. Leger trial with Ninus a week before the great Doncaster race, but broke down in the gallop. — Fulrnen," Nihilist, and Brisa were taken to Christchurch on Saturday, their trainer, J. A. M'Ginness, being in charge. — Daunt and Stockville won exactly the same races on Tuesday at the Napier Park as they did on a similar occasion last season. — Mr J. T. Reid informs me that the mares are looking well at Elderslie, and that there is a promise of a good foaling season. — Hyrnettus lost a lot of ground at the first turn in the Coongy Handicap at Caulfield, and this made his performance a meritorious on*. —Mr Moore, a chemist at Waipawa, did not know till recently, when " Tattersall " sent an inquiry, that he had won £900 in a consults^ tion last year. — Mr H. M. Lyon sends a copy of the Wellington Club's book of programmes, showing stakes amounting to .£9220. It is a neat and well-printed book. — At the Doncaster meeting last month Mr W. C. "Wilson, the owner of Trenton, won the Tattersall Sale Stakes of £785 with a two-year-old colt by Kendal. — I regret to hear that Mr H. Goodman has ha# a death in his family. He lost a fine little boy last Monday, the cause being inflammation of the brain. — During eight years' career as an owner in Victoria Mr W. R. Wilson has won the Caulfield Guineas .with Strathmore, Wallace, Aurum, and Bobadil. — Admirers of Dreamland need not have any appiehension because of his withdrawal from the Caulfield Cup. The horse is to be reserved for the big Flemington event. — The many friends of Mr Joe Thompson will be sorry to hear that his father has been laid up -with a serious illness in Sydney. The old gentleman is 84 years of age. — Writes Mr Allison : The Leger at one point seemed an absolute certainty for Jeddah, and then an even greater certainty for Wildfowler. Never have I seen a Leger won quite so easily. — The North Otago Club deserves thanks for statirg in its race books the breeding of all the horses entered. I learn from this list, by the v. >y, that Ilex and Izal are both out of a mare naoisd Susie. — Greenstone, the horse that made such a poor show in the Final Steeplechase at the Egmont meeting, fell while cantering on the Hastings training track, breaking his leg, and consequently had to be destroyed. — Major Egerton, the official handicapper to the English Jockey Club, died on September 2 at the age of 60 years. He had held his office since 1886, and was considered a good handicapper. His father was a clergyman. — On September 2 Madden headed the list of successful riders in England, with 116 wins out of 513 mounts to his credit. T. Loates came second with 89 victories, M. Cannon third with 83, and Allsopp fourth with 80. — On the death of Major Egerton the stewards of the English Jockey Club appointed Mr R. R. Mamwarmg, Mr A. Keyser, and Mr F. F. Dawkins a committee to make the Newmarket handicaps for the remainder of the season. — The Gippsland horse Mutiny is an acquisition to the ranks of Victorian steeplechasers. He was going great guns and held a most commanding lead of his field at Flernington prior to his torcpling over the last fence but one. * — Ta-panui races will be held on the 2nd and 3rd of February, when £400 will be given in stakes. Mr Hugh Gourley is appointed handicapper and starter, Mr Alex. M'lntyre judge, Mr John Sector clerk of the course, Mr D. Ferguson clerk of the scales. — Mr J. Hendeison, of North Waitaki, tells me that his newly-purchased mare Paradise proves not to be in foal, and she has been mated with Euroclydon. Broadside is not in foal either, and she will be put to the big horse when her time comes. — When Esau was put up for sale at Oamaru last week an ill-advised friend remarked that he could pull a water-cart. The auctioneer renrarked that he was selling a racer, not a carthorse. The only bid was of £15 by Mr A. Rodgers, and he got the horse. — St. Gris, the winner of the Imperial Produce Stakes, is out of Isabel, the dam of St. Frusquin, and by Galopin, the father of St. Simon, who sired St. Frusquin; Flying Fox, who ran second was believed to be the best two-year-old in England up to the time the last inai! left. — The first yearling by Trenton offered in England was a. colt from Golden Agnes, and he brought 1150gs. Mr Allison considered this youngster the best yearling of the week, and but for being a late foal he would have brought more money. Several Carnages brought fail prices. — The A.J.C. committee have hit upon a device for putting an end to shop betting. It has I been decided " not to allow, after July 31 next, 1 any person interested in any shop or office kept for the purpose of betting, or at which betting is carried on, to be registered as a bookmaker." 1 — The training establishment known as Grovs House, Malton, so long in the hands of the Pecks, father and son, and subsequently of Mr Charles Lund and Mr Miles I'Anson, was offered for sale by auction in August, but there was only poor competition, and the property was withdrawn at £1000. — Disraeli was sweating freely in the paddock bafore the race for the Loger. He woie heavy woollen bandages in front, and was also bandaged behind, and it was therfore not altogether surprising that he broke down, being dismounted outside the paddock after the race, in which he finished last but one. — In reviewing the Dunedin meeting in last week's issue I made a remark to the effect that backers who bet with the bookmakers did not have the advantage of having horses bracketed. In reply there! o Messrs Barnett and Grant draw my attention to their rules, showing that they recognise the bracketing except in trots. — If G-leiieJg ever had any claim to be considered a New Zealand Cup horse he may have a show in the Winton Cup, but perhaps Decoy or Seabreeze ma-y have a chance with him. I like First Ventuie in the Flying, and Decoy in the Tradesmen's Handicap. Mr Dowse made the hai cheaps appearing in this issue. — The Lochiel stock were in evidence at the Rosehill races on the Bth, claiming two victories. The principal race, the Rosehill Handicap, fell to a Lochiel colt, in Toxteth, a brother to The Chevalier, in Ike Foulßham's stables. This is apparently a pretty fair handicap hcrse, and should be kept in mind for the suzriner handicaps. — Mr Kaiwhata, the native sport who purchased Jadoo from Mr Percy Martin recently, also owns a four-year-old mare by Wonderland.

• — Mystery that he bought from Mr R. Gooseman, and Mr W. C. Edwards has sold him a four-year-old mare by Henchman from Aronoel. Fred Collins is in charge of the trio, wnich are quartered at Greenmeadows. — A filly by Carnage from Bluette recently realised 350gs in England, and a colt by the same sire from Galathea fetched 670gs. These prices were topped by a yearling colt by Trenton from Golden Agnes, who changed hands for 1150gs. The initiatory produce of Australian sires is thus being fully appreciated by buyers of thoroughbred stock in England. j — '"Peeping Tom" writes: The appointment of Mr G. Dowse as handicapper to the Lake County Club appears to have given general satisfaction throughout the goldfields. I understand that Mr Dowse has met the club most fairly in the matter of remuneration, and I think the management have acted wisely in | again securing the services of the veteran. — A correspondent of the Australasian writes: — "Happening to be within five yards j of Bobadil when he pulled up after his exercise j outing in the Guineas, I took particular notice how his breathing apparatus worked, and, to my astonishment and wonderment, beheld that it was difScult to discern his pipes had been opened, all the others blowing like a grampus." — Glancing down the Melbourne Stakes entry, says " Terhnga," I noticed at once that Renown was missing, and as the Trenton colt has not been engaged in anything else, I am afraid we shall not see him under colours this spring. Cocos is the only Derby candidate in the Stakes. Possibly he will go for this race, though I should think Mr Bailey will decide to run him in the Derby. — A Wairarapa paper says : Mr J. Macara is somewhat unfortunate with hiß horses this year. Both his horses for the Taratahi-Carter-ton Guineas have gone amiss, and are unlikely starters on the 9th of next month. The filly Kynock has developed shoulder lameness, and is now being treated to swimming exercise at Mr W. B. Buick's, while Durn Dum having become shin sore has had to be thrown out of work. — " Galopin ' writes : I stood by and heard two very prominent pencillers distinctly and very emphatically decline to accept a bet of £3000 to £1000 offered in one hand on Mr Wilson's colt for the Caulfield Guineas, but other systematic speculators on good things of a Bobadil nature contrived by splitting up their investments in smaller parcels among some 30 or 40 fielders to get on fully £5000 at an average of about 3 to 1 on. — Prince Paul Esterhazy, an influential member of the Austrian Jockey Club, died in August. He was especially fond of steeplechasing and hurdle racing. In 1883 the Prince was second in the lis,t of winning owners, mainly owing to the numerous successes in mile races of Parsifal, this son of Cambuscan and Mrs Day being perhaps the best he ever owned; and in the same year his horse Theodolite won the Great Vienna Steeplechase. — It is related of Admiral Rous that on one occasion a noble owner said to him, apropos of one of the old Turf Dictator's handicaps, " jnow, Admiral, do you think that my horse lias got . any chance for this race?" " None whatever," unhesitatingly replied the admiral. " Then, pray, do you call that handicapping? I thought that every horse was at any rate supposed to be given an equal chance." An unanswerable question, to which the admiral made no reply. — Judgment in the Launceston totalisator cases has met with the result that the issues are to be sent back 1o tlie l^cal magistrate to inquire. (1) AVhether the horse-racing engaged in by the appellant clubs or either of them is a branch of horse-racing distinct from that over which the Tasmanian Turf Club exercises control? (2) Whether there is any, and if so what, objection to register the appellant clubs or either of them with the Tasmanian Turf Club? — Weights for the C'esarewitch, run on the 12th October, appear in th.3 English papers now to hand. Chalereux, the winner, trained by Blackwell, was handicapped at 7.5; Asterie, who ran second, had 7.3 ; Merman, the third horse, was weighted at 8.5. Love Wisely was top weight with 9.5. Chalereux was handicapped for the Cambridgeshire, run yesterday, at 7.5, but would have a stone penalty. Merman at his original weight of 7.10 read like one having a show in the Cambridgeshire. — One of the best races witnessed on the Bth at Rosehill (N.S.W.) was that between the two-year-olds for the Juvenile Plate. There were 10 starters. A strong contingent backed Mr Cameron's filly Jeanette down to 2 to 1. The latter had Huxley in the saddle, and he landed the filly a clever neck winner in front of Mr Mates's Gossoon — Angora filly Capella. Jeanette is a chestnut filly by Lochiel from Helene, by Marvellous' from Scandal, by Barbarian, and is trained by Mr Alfred Thompson. — Says " Terlinga" : The condition of Canary might well have engaged the attention of the stewards at Caulfield. This unfortunate beast was so " sore " (he seemed a perfect cripple) that he could hardly be got out of the paddock, and it was pitiable to see the poor brute walking down the straight. Stewards do not like to interfere in these matters, and they did not stop Canary. When an owner starts a horse for a steeplechase in such a state he ought to bo made to ride him himself. Canary gave Underwood a tremendous fall. — Mr Joseph Garlic, a Lancashire coursing man, died on September 1. He will be remembered as the breeder of the famous Greentick, by Bedfellow — Heaitbnrn, one of the most famous sires of the day. Greentick made his debut in Mr Garlick's nomination in the Haydock Park Derby in September, 1883, where he won two courses. Shortly afterwards he was sold to Mr R. F. Gladstone, for whom he won the Great Newton Cup, and also ran up to Mineral Water in the Waterloo Cup of 1844. Greentick was the sire of the great Fullerton. — "A Poor Man " writes to the Southland News " I will be very thankful if Mr Gibbs and Mr Dowse, the handicappers for the Gore and Winton laces, will inform me how in common justice they place 7.0 on my horse Professor seeing he only won two or three hack races and was sold at the last Tnvercargill race meeting for £10. Also how do they place hor=>es like Battlefield, Decoy, and Seabreeze, ! which have proved themselves in first-class company in the north on equal weights with my horse? I have been jockey and horse trainer for nearly 30 years, and never saw such strange judgment." — General Byrne, who died in England on September 2, will be chiefly remembered as the owner of Amphion. This doubtfully bred son of Speculum or Rosebery out of Suicide, who was bred in ISBG, was purchased as a yearling at Doncaster by Chandler for the modest sum of 350gs, and he made a victorious debut for Gen. Byrne in a two-year-old race at Croydon, winning in hollow style. Amongst his opponents was L'Abbesse de Jouarre, who subsequently proved successful in the Oaks. The Champagne at Stockhridge and the Great Kingston T.Y.O. Race at Sandown Park were added to Amphion's score before he first experiencd defeat, and altogether during his career he won 14 races out of 24, the value of the stakes he placed to the credit of his owner amounting to close upon £21,000. — One of " Jav elm's " stories: Two young i ladies were studying the card in the grand stand while their male attendant was down in the paddock trying to pick a winner for them. One noticing the abbreviation " imp." in one of the pedigrees asked an explanation of her companion, who replied, " Imported, my dear. I know it is, because I remember Charley telling me that Mr O'Shanassy bought it in England." "And what doe 3 'b h ' mean?" was thfl next aueation, " Oh, that stands for ' born,

here,' you know. The colonial horses are not considered so good as the English ones, and they put that in so that the haudicapper shall know not to give it so much weight. ' " And what's the meaning of ' b g ' ?" asked the persistent inquirer, but before there was time to reply to the embarrassing third query, Charley returned with the I)icket. — The editor of the Stud Book is quoted by the Australasian as saying : "It is useless trying to trace Rosebud's pedigree. Several times during the last 20 years I have made stienuous attempts to do so, and have always failed. Rosebud founded a capital running family in New Zealand ; that was my reason for trying. She wa3 bred in New Zealand. Her sire II Barbiere was bred in New Zealand, and covered in Nelson and Blenheim. Her dara was bred in New South Waies, and impoited to New Zealand in the way stated by Mr Redwood. When Macleay's stud was dispersed in the former colony sometime in the forties, I forget when now, a mare called Rosebud went adrift with two daughters, and all trace of them lost. I have thought it possible — I suppose the similarity of name engendered the idea — that one of the three found her way to New Zealand, and there begat Rosebud." — Late English papers report the death of the stallion Isobar, by Isonomy out of Remorse, by Hermit out of Vex, by Vedette out of The Flying Duchess, by The Flying Dutchman. On the turf his career was not particularly brilliant, but he made a sensational debut when a three-year-old at Ascot in the Rous Memorial Stakes, on which occasion, starting at 20 to 1, he upset the odds betted on Duke of Richmond, whose victory ha-d been looked upon by his supporters as certain. He confirmed the form by winning the St. George Stakes at Liverpool, and afterwards followed Melton home for the St. Leger, though the verdict was six lengths for Lord Hastings' s horse. — It is said that Captain Greer and S. Darling, the joint breeders and owners of Wildfowler, did not land a very big stake by their colt's success in the St. Leger, the stable commission of £500 to win and £300 for a place having being nothing like executed. — On the St. Leger day the Doncaster Committee made a determined effort to keep the enclosures free of known bad. characters, and as a result of their energetic action the Doncaster Bench had next rnonrning to deal with several cases brought before them. Among the captures was the notorious " Fitz " Murray, who, convicted of " frequenting with intent, ' received a sentence of two months' hard labour. — Only three horses in this country have, within my own knowledge, had 20,000gs offered for them. For Orme and for Ladas that offer was made by the late Colonel W. P. Thompson, of'the Brookdale Stud, New Jersey, and refused respectively by the Duke of Westminster and tho Earl of Rosebery. For Galtee More, as we all know, the money was accepted, simply because he represented too much capital value to stand in Ireland, and Mr Gubbins would not have let him stand anywhere else." — Mr Allison, in the London Sportsman.

CANTERBURY BOEtfaS.

Bt M. Qvko.

Multiform was withdrawn from the New Zealand Cup at 11 o'clock on Saturday morning, and his scratching naturally afforded an interesting subject for discussion by sporting men. I am sorry that Mr Stead decided to scratch the horse, as, notwithstanding the heavy weight ha was asked to carry, I believe he would have won. It is understood that Multiform's elimination was not caused by his breakdown, but his owner did not care to risk his horse's defeat. No doubt many have lost heavily through backing Mr Stead's horse, but Mr Stead has been quite as candid with the sporting public as any owner could be expected to be, and if backers disregarded the repeated warning given them by Multiform' s owner they have only themselves to blame. This applies with greater force to those who have supported the horse during the last week or so, and it was little short of suicidal for punters to accept the short prices offered after being distinctly told that there was every likelihood o£ the horse being scratched. There are many who assumed that as Multiform's name appeared in the list of acceptors a few days ago it was Mr Stead's intention to start his brilliant horse, especially as St. Cyr was withdrawn and Altair had not shown in public any great brilliancy. Whilst I regret that we shall not have the pleasure of seeing Multiform start in the New Zealand Cup, I must say that few, if any, owners have, in my experience, taken the public so much into their confidence regarding their horses as has Mr Stead. Mr Beckett, the well-known Sydney trotting hoise owner, arrived last week with a team of eight trotters. He wired from Wellington nonsinating his horses for the forthcoming Plumpton Perk meeting, but the entries were unfortunately too late. When nominating for the Lancaster Park Amateur Trotting Club's meeting on Saturday, it was found that Mr Beckett could not i;roduce satisfactory documentary proof, as required by the rules, of the history of his horses, and the club was therefore compelled t.> inform Mr Beckett that his nominations could only be taken subject to his being able to satisfy the committee as to the bona fides of the animals brought here by him. At first^sight it seems somewhat surprising that Mr Beckett should have neglected to provide himself with the requisite information to enable him to comply with the rules, especially as he had been here before, and therefore should have known that he would not be allowed to start any animal whose credentials were not forthcoming, but the Sydney sportsman explains that it is sometimes exceedingly difficult to obtain reliable information as lo the breeding or time registered by many of hi-= horses. There are few, if any, purely trotting meetings held in or uear Sydney now, and Mr Beckett is of opinion that he has but little hope of obtaining a coirect list of his horses' werforrnances. Be that as it may, it is satisfactory to note that the Lancaster Park Club is determined to stick to the rules. A well-attended meeting of the committee of the newly-formed Ashl-vrton County Racing Club was held in Mr Davison's office on Tuesday last. Mr Hugo Friedlander was elected chairman. Mr G-. A. M. Buckley wrote expressing regret that he could not see his way at present to accept the position of president of the club. The chairman said that under the provisional rules of the Ashburton County Racing Club the president or other permanent officer could only be elected at a general meeting of the members. The acting secretary (Mr John Davison) read letters from most of the other officers elected, accepting office, and stated that the remainder were either in the room or had accepted verbally. After considerable discussion the meeting decided that : the emolument of the secretary should be at j the rato of £20 for a one day's race meeting, j and £25 for a. meeting of two clays' racing, j for the racing year ISSS-S-ythe secretary to j provide his own clerical assistance. The act- ' ing secretary reported that he had written for . the totahsator peimits to be allocated, but had left the number open. He was instructed to write again, stating that the club desired three permits. Messrs Gates and the chairman were appointed a committee to arrange for taking over all tho assets of the amalgamating clubs. To this committee was also delegated the duty of sending circulars to members of the amalgamating clubs, intimating that they would be admitted members of the Ashburton County Racine Club witaeut ballot, provided they. paid.

their subscriptions before December 1 of this year. Tho chairman and Messrs Hart and G atos were apointed a committee to draft rule 3 for the club, and to report at next meeting. Messrs Gates, Upton, Doherty, and Davison wece appointed a Ground Committee, and Messrs Davison and Gates a Programme Committee, the latter to prepare a programme for a two days' meeting about January 2 and 3; the stake 3 not to exceed £600 for the two days. The committee met on Saturday evening, six members being present. Mr W. B. Denshira was elected a member of the committee, in place of Mr P. H. Cox, resigned. A letter was received from Sir George Clifford, congratulating the club on its formation. -It should command support throughout the district. He had. written to the Colonial Secretary, recommending the issue of two permits for the use of the totalisator for this season, and had also reminded him that three permits were allotted to Ashburton by the conference, and the full number would be necessary next season, when the club would be able to hold a spring meeting. Messrs Gates, Doherty, and Hampton, the Tinwald members of the committee, sent in their resignations, but these were held over to give the senders time to re-consider tho matter. Three applications for tho secretaryship were received, and Mr C. H. Dowding was appointed. Tirant d'Eau and Jadoo were landed from the Elingamite yesterday at Lyttelton. At the annual show of the Ellesmere Agricultural and Pastoral Association, Hybrid, by Le Loup — Lady Emma, took first and special in the thoroughbred entire class, Doctor, by Ingoma-r — Mirella-, second. Hazeldean, by Childe Harold, was first in the entire trotting class, Boston Boy second. Would it not be as well if racing clubs were to exclude all persons disqualified by trotting clubs from their grounds ? Trotting bodies de- ' cline to admit to their grounds anyone placed under the ban of racing clubs, and if the latter were reciprocal, the combination could scarcely fail to do good, and establish a genuine epoTting feeling between those governing both classes of aporfc. Mr Henry's handicaps for the Spring Hurdle Handicap, Riccarton Welter Handicap, and Ladies' Purse, to be decided at the C.J.C. metropolitan meeting, appeared on Friday. In tha first-mentioned event Social Pest and Ilex meet on equal terms — 12.7 each — and if the former has retained the form lie displayed when he won the Grand National Hurdle Race he should be hard to beat. So, too, should Ilex, judging by his Dunedin victory. Troubadour at 10.13, Dundee 10.12, Sylvanus 10.11, and Liberator 10.5 have each recently won, and of this four I prefer Sylvanus. Old Liberator will gallop well with 10.5, but perhaps the fag end of two miles may not suit him now. Nicholas at 10.5 is nicely treated, but not quite so liberally as Clarence has been. It is rather far, perhaps, for this horse, but with such a light impost he ought to finish well up. Kuku 10.3 appears to be highly assessed, whilst Powder | Monkey has been given a chance. Social Pest and Sylvanus will take a lot of beating. Black and Red is not severely treated with 9.9 to carry in the Riccarton Welter. His recent victories fully entitle him to the post of honour. Remorse II should run well with 9.7, and so, too, should Swordfish 9.2. Alcestis will trouble the best of them with 8.10, and Remorse 8.9 has run so well at Riccarton, though unfortu- | nately, that she ought to have a chance with 8.9. Of the others I should say that Crusader 8.8, Aquatic 8.8, Bimetallist 8.8, and Falka 8.7 form a dangerous quartette. Of the Ladies' Purse entrants Double Event 12.5, as a known, weight carrier is entitled to respect, although, carrying it over a mile and a-half may trouble him. Haria 11.13 is no favourite of mine, bufc I fancy he will go near winning this race. Rangefinder 11.13 is probably not a weightcarrier, and although Sequin has not recently shown up prominently, she ought to race well in this company with 11.12. So, too, ought Blocmer, if she cared to try. Zola 11.0 ran well at the recent Okoko meeting, and may repeat his performances here. If so, he will probably beat all those below him in the handicap. It is generally recognised that Skirmisher has been given a rare chance of distinguishing himself in the Stewards' Handicap. The horse is going well, and there is no donbt that if he cared to try he might win. He was apparently beaten one morning last week by Epaulet — an unreliable pair. Cutts has again had to ease Djin Djin in his work, the colt showing signs of soreness in the fetlock. Some time ago Djin Djin went lame, the seat of the trouble being in the near hind leg, and now, when the horse seemed to be getting on nicely, the other hind leg shows signs of weakness. This is hard luck for Cutts, the more so as the colt's complaint shows but little outward sign of its presence, and cannot easily; be named. Glenogle, trained by Cutts, all going well, will take a lot of drubbing in his engagements at the Cup meeting, and the pick of the Yaldhurst division wili have to be good indeed to defeat Sir G. Clifford's representative. Glenogle is a fine free galloper, and ought to do wonderfully well. On Saturday evening nominations were due I for the Lancaster Park Amateur Trotting Club's ! meeting. Taking into consideration the fact ! that the limits were cramped, thus shutting out i anything but fair performers, the entry is quite : as numerous as could be expected. The stakes offered at the meeting are exceptionally good, and as the meeting is held right in the middle of the Carnival week, a most successful gathering is sure to eventuate. Mr F. Buckland, of Wonbobbie station, N.S.W., has written to Mr A. I. Rattray to the effect that he may be expected to pay a visit to Canterbury in December, bringing with him a team of trotters to compete at the Canterbury Trotting Club's Boxing Day meeting. If Fritz accompanies the team its advent will receive an additional attraction. Dundas is galloping as well as anything at Siccarton. He will be a dangerous horse in any race in which he may be started. His companion, Hermosa, does not seem to be galloping quite so freely as she did a month or six weeks ago. Bizarre is open to improvement, as also is Bristol albeit the latter is moving fairly well. These are all inmates of Hobbs's stable. Kissmiss and Corselet are shaping better with every gallop. I do not fancy either is forward enoiigh to win at the forthcoming meeting. Golden Legend shows fair form in his daily exercises, and it would not surprise me to see him win a minor race at the forthcoming S^ -r ng meeting. Typhoon, whilst being schooled in company with Clarence on Saturday, over-jumped, coming down heavily, and giving his pilot, MurrayAynsley, a nasty-looking fall, but fortunately he got 'off with a severe shaking. Clarence jumped well. Silex is showing the possession of pace, and amongst the two-year-old division Scottish Minstrel, Tanglewood, Francesca are travelling nicely. None of these, I should say, are nearly, so good as Glenolge. Fatigue, Weary, Ben Farley, The Spinner, Flying Kitty, Eredanus, Telemeter, Culverin, Jib, Miss Charm, Powder Monkey, Crusader, Shooting Star, Medallius, Lepanto, Golden Lake, Heliograph, Rougemont, Alcestis, Raindrop, Vulcan, Dodger, Monogram, Deadbeat, ATOina, Tamapu, Hawthorn, and several other minor lights have got through their allotted tasks fairly well, but none have done anything noteworthy. It is reported that Motto proved herself better; than Altair over a mile and a-half at Yaldhurst, and that Multiform successively defeated St. Lucia aad. Scyew Gun $iid. Skobeloff and Telr

stoi over half a, mile at the same place on Saturday morning. Douglas and Oingo, in charge of Munn, from Napier, arrived here on Saturday, whilst Fullnen, Brisa, and Nihilist, arrived on the same evening. At a meeting of the Committee of the Tinwald Racing Club on Wednesday evening, after the routine work had been gone through, the position of racing matters in the county was discussed. Votes of thanks were passed to the president of the club, Mr G-. A. M. Buckley, and to Mr E. Gates, chairman of the committee, for their action in endeavouring to form a club representative of the district. Kegret was expressed that a meeting of the members of the several amalgamating clubs had not been called, so that officers representative of them all could have been elected. The following resolution was passed:— " That a vote of thanks be tendered to the delegates for their active interest in endeavouring to form a strong representative club for the county, and that the committee Tegrets the action of the conference in appointing the officers of the new club, thus debarring the members of the clubs from exercising their manifest rights to elect their officials from the said members, whom it had been decided to accept without ballot." The New Zealand Cup, presented to the Canterbury Jockey Club by Mr G. G. Stead, has been on exhibition in the windows of Jae makers. The cup is a heavily embossed piece of silver plate, with gilt interior, standing about 19in high, and surmdunted by a Pegasus-like equestrian figure, holding aloft a wreath of victory. On one side of the cup is a spirited and artistic bas-relief of a horse race, containing four figures. On the other side is the mscription. Boreas is the ruling favourite for the New Zealand Cup, and 5 to 1 is the best price en offer about him, and very little is obtainable j at that price. Swordfish II is at 7's, and slightly longer odds are quoted about Day Star and St. Paul. Starshot is at Bto 1, whilst the remainder range from 14 to 50 to 1. When Chaafe was here last year with St. Paul, one had to almost sleep at Riccarton to see the horse work, the little fellow often being worked in the dark. French, in charge of Swordfish, is another early bird, and he is usually one of the first to work. Peculiarly enough, both French and Chaafe are putting up at Cutts's, and it is well known tbat Ted is up before the early worm. Seabrook is quietly recovering from his attack of influenza. Mr Horler, of Riccarton, has had two valuable trotting horses killed by some miscreant, one being shot, and the other's artery was severed. Some time ago Mr Horler lost another valuable horse at the hands of the horse fiend, whom the police seem powerless to deal with. Sandhurst is being hacked about the roads. The horse has altered in appearance a great deal during the last few months. A very great improvement has been decided upon at Riccarton. The five-furlong races have been started -just round the bend at the top of the course. For the future such, races will be started a furlong beyond the Cup starting place, thus making an almost straight run. I have only just had time to glance at Mr Briukman's handicaps for the Plumpton meeting. I should say Director, Simon R., and Kai-Iwi have a chance in the Maiden Handicap; Vickery and Narragansett in the Pony Handicap; Vesta Nash and Millionaire in the Sockburn Handicap; Bellman and Sing-Sing in the Progressive Handicap; Kingston, Polly Huon, and Vasco in the Plurnpton Handicap ; Monte Carlo and Regent in the Electric Handicap ; and Design in the Dash Handicap. I hear there is some likelihood of nominators of trotters for the approaching meetings here being asked to provide the powers with more information as to the antecedents of their horses than has so far been submitted.

WELLINGTON NOTES.

BY OSLOOKEB.

October 24-. Sea Serpent has broken down and is withdrawn from his Carterton engagements. The "Wellington Racing Olub wants a new clerk of the course. Mr George Macdonald declines reappointment owing to business engagements. During the last week the Napier horses Oingo, Douglas, Cceur de Lion and Tirant d'Eau passed through on their way to Riccarton. I expect Swordfish to win the New Zealand Cup ; Douglas next best. Mr H. M. Lyon will spend the Prince of "Wales' s Birthday at Carter ton. If the Otaki Maori Racing Club had only had one day's racing instead of two they would have probably received better entries. The entries for Carterton are very satisfactory- Nearly all the district-trained horses and a few outsiders are engaged. I For many seasons the Porirua stable lias done good service for the Otaki Maori Racing Club. At present it is probably stronger than ever it was, but has not entered anything at Otaki next month. A. contingent of trotting horses passed through here last week on their way from Syd- j ney to Christchurch. Their names do not appear among the Plumpton entries. The class of horses entered at the meeting of the Masterton Trotting Club on Thursday is good. I shall be present and have something to say about it next week. I Later. — My information concerning St .Paul j was too previous. | Josh Prosser took Boreas and Ostiak (Welcome Stakes candidate) south yesterday. Lindsay and White go down to-morrow. The latter still shows the effects of influenza. Mr Kenneth M'Lennan has been appointed secretary of the Woodville Jockey Club. George Morse (hack handicapper to the Wanganui Jockey Club) has been appointed handicai.per to the Levin Racing Club. Certain district owners took objection to the King of All (J. E. Henry), and he was not considered in the matter. At a meeting of the committee of the Tara-tahi-Carterton Racing Club last night, it was decided not to allow wagering or betting except through the totalisator at the meeting on the 9th and 10th November. The Masterion Racing Club should follow the move of the other Wairarapa clubs in barring the books, and thus protect their permits.

AUCKLAND TOPICS.

By Taihoa.

October 24. News of the withdrawal of Multiform from the New Zealand Cup caused great jubilation in pencilling circles. Mr Stead's horse had been supported for a considerable amount. With confirmation of the information St. Paul's price shortened to 5 to 1, at which figure he is bracketed with Boreas and Swordfish. Day Star and Starshot stand at 100 to 10, while Dundas has shortened to 100 to 8. Before the scratching of Multiform had been generally confirmed, a emnvni^ion .bout St. Paul at 7 to 1 wa", whipped in on some of the "ansuspecting books, \.ho aio now wild. Waiorongomai, whom I mentioned Inst week as one of the dangerous division m the City Handicap to be run at the A.R.C. Spring meeting next mouth, ie eotting through solid

work at Ellerslie, while other regular attendants on the track doing a sound preparation are Acone, Picklock, Miss Rose, St. Elmo, Eton, Coronet, and Bonnie Blue. The lastnamed, who is named among the jumpers, is shaping so well over the small sticks that he may be expected to pick up a maiden hurdle race before long. The two-year-old colts Hastings and St. Peter are both doing well, and the meeting of the pair and Miss Delaval should make the juvenile races to be fought out at Ellerslie -next month interesting. The Auckland Trotting Club's Spring meeting was brought to a close last Wednesday afternoon in the rnresence of a moderate attendance. £1293, in 10s tickets, was passed through the tote, bringing the total for the two days to £2873, which is considerably below, the expectations of the club. Tho public were well on the winners right through the day. Starting with the Trial Trot Handicap, one mile and a-half, they sorted out Wild Rose II (12sec), and the only other one that appeared to hold any chance (Waitekauri) was in trouble half a mile from home, Wild Rose eventually scoring by the best part of 40 lengths in 3min 28sec, paying £1 Bs. Pioke 36sec found a warm following in the October Trot, two miles, and the old gelding justified public opinion by going to the front almost from the jump, and, trotting faultlessly throughout, he never left the issue in doubt, winning by 60yds in smin 36sec. Dividend, 19s. The Harness Trot, one mile and a-half, was looked upon as resting between Tiptop 30seo' and the aged Alice (12sec), the former being slightly the favourite. Tiptop flattered his backers for the best part of a mile, but from this stage it was to be seen that Alice, who was moving along like a piece of machinery, must pick him up before the post was reached. This she did a couple of furlongs from home, and won eased up by five or six yards in 4min 21sec. Dividend, £1 Bs. A protest was entered against the winner by Mr M'Gregor, owner of Tiptop, on the ground of inconsistent running, but it was dismissed. The feature of the programme, as i far as trotting is concerned, was the Class Handicap, a mile, in which Albert Victor (3sec), who trotted magnificently right through without the semblance of a break, won by four lengths from Lusitania (7sec), doing the first half mile in lmin 15sec, and completing the journey in 2min 36sec, from which three or four seconds might easily have been chipped off, as he was eased up over two furlongs from home, where he had the field beaten. Nannie, who accounted for the two pony flat races on the opening day, was again too much class for the fields opposed to her, and romped home in the Junction Handicap, and in the Shorts Handicap, of five furlongs, she won in lmin lOseo with no less than 11.12 ' up. 15s vas the dividend in each case. The Handicap Hurdles, one mile* and a-quarter, fell to K.araka 10.5, who made the most of the running, and comfortably beat off Erne 9.10, scoring by three lengths in 2min 12sec. Dividend, £1. The acceptances and nominations received on Friday for the A.R.C. Spring meeting are in every way satisfactory, and there is every reason to anticipate a most successful inauguiation of the racing season at Ellerslie next month. Up to the present Mr T. Morrin's mares have pvoduced 25 foals, representing 13 fillies and 12 colts, and the Messrs Nathan's mares 12 fcals — eight fillies and four colts. The foalings at these establishments during the last week are as follows: — Mr Morrin's Forrao (by Sterlingworth — Pulchra), colt to HotchkisE — fall brother to Uniform and Multiform; Agnes (by St. Leger — Lubra), filly to Hotchkiss: Lyrelinus (by Leolinus — Lyre), filly to Castor ; Gannet (by Anteios — Albatross), filly to Hotchkiss; Mr Nathan's Campania (by Robinson Crusoe — Campanilla), filly to St JJeger; Maratea (by Eiridspord — Acrere), filly to St. Hippo. At Mr W. Rathbone's stud, Inisthona, dam of Fabulist, has produced a filly to Apremont. Mr R. Henry, the Christchurch trotting enthusiast, who attended the Auckland Trotting Club's meeting last week, left for Lyttelton to-day with five horses. Mr J. C. Booth has taken the jumpers Mogul and Forella in hand again. j Mr J. J. Russell, of New Plymouth, has purchased Uhlan, by Cuirassier— -Aida. Chaafe moved south with St. Paul this afternoon, and unles3 something goes wrong with St. Leger's son between this and Cup Day, he will strip one of the fittest in the race. Despite all the rumours that have been in circulation during the past month as to the little fellow's soundness, he has registered several very taking gallops during the week and finished up quito sound. But I shall not be much surprised to hear that Riccarton has succeeded in finding a weak spot in the horse. On Saturday morning, at Ellerslie, St. Paul galloped the Cup distance, being assisted by St. Ursula and St. Peter. He got over the last seven furlongs of the journey in lmin 31£ sec. The probable result of the Auckland Guineas seems pretty well as open a question as ever, though a dash of improved form on the part of Hylas hag caused his chance to be somewhat more extolled than any of tho others. The son of St. Hippo has come on well since he was transferred to J. E. Sharpe's establishment.

SOUTHLAND NOTES

By Goidspub. INVERCARGILL, October 24. Prime Warden has gone to the stud. The hurdler Narrate is in foal to Remembrance. Mr Hugh Gourley has been reappointed handicapper and starter to the Tapanui Racing Club. ; The Drummond folk hold their annual race meeting «on November 2. St. Patrick's name does not appear in the list of Winton nominations. Mr George Dowse has accepted the position of handicapper to the Lake County Jockey Club". The annual race meeting of the Tapanui Club has been fixed for the 2nd and 3rd February. Dinna Forget is laid down with rheumatic fever, and consequently will not start for the Winton Guineas. At Riverton Paru, King of the Hills, and old Musket are being put through their facings preparatory for Winton. Reflection has foaled to Lorraine. Both Tapanui and Winton have supported Mr W. F. Ward's nomination as representative at the Racing Conference. The Winton handicaps have been well received by owners, the trots coming in for special commendation. Lorraine, Remembrance, Silvermark, and Palliser are at tho service of Southland breeders. Tlie Handicap Trot, of two and a-half miles, inaugurated by the Queenstown Club, has been satisfactorily filled this season. Mr Dowses adjustment should appear shortly. Tot White is busy with a large team, having no less than iivo horses in daily work. They include Battlefield, Camperdowii, First Venture, Tassy, and a two-year-old named PerMnette, and all claim engagements at Gore and Vincoii. It vas IV hifeulton -if (llenelg's owner to give mm a g-illo^ ot I'm Dimedin meeting.as an indf\ to lu=s clt.'.t^ v, -he New Zealand Cup e?rnivr' JFa\ins; nii^qprt the acceptances, the ide.i of ; "ing «bioad lia been abandoned. He In, i, nif j'^um voighb in the Winton

Cup, which should assist him in distinguishing himself in the big event. Good nominations and satisfactory acceptances have been received by the Gore Club for the races to be held next Wednesday and Thursday. Both Mr Gibb and Mr Dowse have been set the difficult task of indexing the relative nowers and capabilities of a miscellaneous assortment of trotters, many oi them unknown to me. Some have achieved greatness, and others no doubt expect to. Let us hope that their efforts will produce good contests. Seabreeze, a recent arrival from the north, is by Sou'-wester — Barbelle. Without the acceptances, I fancy the following to run forward at the Gore meeting: — Charlton Handicap, Hippomenes and Proposal ; Novel, Blizzard and P. P.0. ; Spring Handicap, Swordfish and Linkshot; Hurdles, Saunterer and Supnlejack; Flying Handicap, Proposal ; Two-mile Trot, Count, Manuka Whroo ; One-mile Tiot, Comus, Manuka, Commodore. A well-known sport in the Western district, Mr P. M'Anelley, is dangerously ill. My fancies for the V.R.C. Derby are Bobadil, Cocos, Lee Metford; and for the Melbourne Cup, Massanissa, Amberite, Wait-a-Bit, Cocos.

THE MAGGIE M. CASE.

By M. Quad. j CHRISTCHURCH, October 24. Mr BisTiop, S.M., on Thursday gavo judg- ! ment in what is familiarly known as the Maggie M. case. The magistrate's decision is probably , a fair one on the evidence; but somehow 1 cannot help feeling that if the case had been settled by arbitration the result would have been different. Only men who thoroughly understand the sport of trotting would be expected to arrive at an equitable decision. In j such a case as this, bristling, as it did, with I amazing admissions and dubious veracity, it would be worse than useless to attempt to criticise the evidence given by some of; the witnesses. Such criticism would not tend to elevate the sport of trotting, or redound to the credit of some of those who tendered sworn statements. Judging by what I know of the matter, I should say that there are plenty of people who have little regard to the value of an oath, and if the reputation of some oi those who were mixed up m the case received a heavy coat of paint, they cannot complain if some of it sticks. In connection with this case, it will be remembered that C. Kerr asked the South Island Trotting association to inquire into allegations made against him during the lies-ring of the case in court. The evidence taken by the controlling body will show that ilerr had no difficulty in clearing himself of the charges made against him. There was no evidence forthcoming to show that he had ruu Maggie M. "stiff," and the association had an easy task to decide. I would submit that it is extremely inadvisable for any trainer to undeitake the training of animals wholly or partially owned by bookmakers. The judgment leferred to above is as follows: — "This is a claim to recover a certain trotting mare named Maggie M., or her value, with certain racing incidentals, the subject of dispute between the parties. I have deferred giving judgment until the present time, because an application was made to me by one of the parties aftei the close of the final argument to take furthei evidence. Tho whole question was then left io. abeyance pending an arrangement between the parties with regard to his further evidence. As, however, I have heard nothing further of the matter, there seems to me no sound reason why the delivery of my judgment should be fuither delayed. A great deal of evidence has been given in the case, some of it of a contradictory ns-ture, and although the statements and actions of both, parties have been admittedly sucb as do not commend themselves to ordinarily decent, honest, and straightforward people, yet die main facts of the case are simple and plain enough, and do not, to my mind, present any great difficulty. In October, 1896, the mare Maggie M. was handsd over for racing purposes by the plaintiff to the defendant, and the following document, was signed : — ' I, John Higgins, agree to return bay mare Maggie M., by Kentucky — Belle Mahone, to Daniel Mahoney, on the payment to the said John Higgins of the sum of £50, less half expenses, on January 1, 1897.' The plaintiff now attempted to go behind this document, and, while wishing to take advantage of it as evidence of the bailment, disputes the amount. He says that £20 out of the £50 was money alleged to have been uut on the tolalisator by the defendant, at the request of the plaintiff, but which he (the plaintiff) now believes was not so put. His reason for so believing is that he has since discovered the defendant to be such an awful rogue that he cannot trust him in anything. However this may be, I must hold that in October, 1596, the plaintiff believed that the money had been so paid, and having stated and settled the amount then due at £50, he cannot now repudiate it. I cannot also follow the argument that the recovery of the amount is barred by the Gaming Act. It was simply money paid by an agent at the request of his principal. The plaintiff states that the mare was to be trained by Kerr, who was to get half winnings as his shaie, | the other half to go to the plaintiff, while the | defendant was to pay all nominations and acceptances, and, as his reward, "take what he could get or make" — I presume as a bookmaker. This is absolutely denied by the defendant, who states that there was a clear agreement that the trainer should get half winnings, while tho other half should be divided equally between the plaintiff and defendant. This I think the more probable agreement, and sucE I hold it to be. The mare, accordingly, was given, over to Kerr to be trained, and in due time was entered for and ran in a number of races, and won altogether in stakes up to January, 1898, the sum of £185 7s. The mare was not redeemed by the plain- . tiff in January, 1897, in terms of the original i arrangement, but by mutual agreement the re- | lations^ between the parties were continued on | indefinitely until November, 1897, when the I defendant alleges that he gave notice to the I plaintiff to determine the agreement within a I week, failing which he would dispose of the ; mare. He demanded a sum of .£SO, and as this was not forthcoming, he stated that he [ sold the mare to Kerr on November 22, 1897, for a sum of £50 in cash. I have very grave doubts as to the bona fides of this transaction, but apart from this, I hold on the facts that the agreement between the plaintiff and the defendant was never properly determined; that there was no proper demand for the debt due ; that there was no statement of accounts between the parties, and, therefore, no opportunity to tender the amount, and that the notice was insufficient. I therefore hold that the defendant could not exercise any right of sale. I now come to the accounts between the parties, which 'I settle as follows- — The value of tha mare owned by the plaintiff, and for which the defendant is liable, is £50. To this must be added a quarter share of the winnings, amounting, as I already stated, to £185 7s — namely, £4G 6s 9d. This makes a total sum due to plaintiff of £96 6s 9d. In his claim plaintiff allows a sum of £15 15s as the half share of expenses paid by defendant. In addition to this the defendant has entered a counter claim amounting to £68 14a lid. The only item in this that I need specially refer to is that of £10, which is allegod to be cash lent. The transaction is corroborated by the witness Tames Forward, and I see no reason to doubt its correctness, Tli<a amount of the counter

claim which I allow is £64 Ss Bd. Thia, together with the £15 15s given credit for, amounts to £80 3s Bd, thus leaving a balance in favour of the plaintiff of £16 3s Id. As the plaintiff in this particular prays for the return of the mare or its value, my judgment will be in the alternative in this way : Judgment for plaintiff on the main claim for £96 6s 9d, to be reduced by £50 upon return to the plaintiff by the defendant of the mare Maggie M. Judgment in favour of the defendant on his counter claim for £80 3s Sd. This would mean that the plaintiff could only become entitled to the possession of the mare upon payment by him to the defendant of a sum of £33 16s lid. I shall make no order for costs on either side. I have not referred to the legal argument as to tho application of the Gaming Act to the transactions between these; parties as regards the stakes won, for I hold that it does not apply. It is quite clear to my mind that the defendant, Higgins, simply held the winnings of the mare as agent for the plaintiff. As the accounts are somewhat complicated, and may not be readily followed, I subjoin a detailed summary of the figures." The summary was as follows: — Plaintiff entitled to recover value of mare (£SO), fourth share of winnings (£lB5 7s) £46 6s 9d, total £96 6s 9d. Defendant entitled to recover cash lent to purchase mare £30, cash lent to back mare £20, further cash lent £10, admitted share of expenses £15 15s, share of further expenses £4 3s Bd, total £80 3s 8d; leaving a balance in favour of plaintiff of £16 3s Id. A special meeting of the South Island Trotting Association was held on the 23rd Sept. in their rooms, Morten's Buildings, to consider a request made by Mr C. Kerr that the Association should inquire into the allegations made against him by Mahoney, the plaintiff, during j the hearing of the Maggio M. case in the Magij strate's Court. Mr Selig, president, occupied | the chair, and there were also present Messrs • Clarkson, Chadwick, M'Lean, Walker, Myers, i Alulholland, Derrett, and Harris. Apologies were received from Messrs Howell, King, and Grierson. ! Some discussion took place as to whether it would be advisable to publish the evidence until the Magistrate had given his decision in the case before the court. Eventually ;t was decided not to do so. | Messrs Harris and Walker urged that Kerr i and Mahoney should hear each other's evidence, and that given by any witnesses either desired to call, whilst Mr Myers submitted that there was no need for Mahoney'a presence. It was pointed out by the chairman that the latter had every right to be present, and this view was adopted. Messrs C. Kerr and Mahoney were then called, the former stating, in answer to the chairman, that he desired to call evidence to disprove the statements made against him. He bac been accused of running Maggie M. " stiff,' and his position as a public trainer was likely to Se seriously jeopardised by sucb a statement. Mahoney said he had received no notification of the meeting, consequently he was not prepared with his witnesses. lie objected te Messrs Harris and Chadwick sitting in judgment on the case, on the ground that they had been hostile witnesses to him in the S.M. Court. The rjresident said it was an oversight that Mahoney had not received the same notice a» Kerr; as to Mahoney's other contention, Mr Harris denied that he was a hostile witness, and there was no reason why he should not retain his position as a delegate. Actually the point was one for tho delegates named to decide. Mr Walker wished to know whether the gentlemen named by Mahoney intended to adjudicate on the case. Mr Clarkson thought they should do so. Mr Chadwick could not see what evidence Mahoney had to call. He had not produced it in the S.M. Court. Mahoney, sworn, said he was not prepared to admit that the evidence given by him in tho S.M. Court was correctly reported by the papers. He had made no statement against Kerr, tut merely repeated what Higgins had told him, to the effect that Kerr could not be trusted. Could not say that anyone but himself had heard the remarks attributed to Higgins. Did not know of his own knowledge that Kerr had ever wilfully stopped Maggie M. from winning. He'd said he thought the Snare was stopped at Timaru, but could not bring any witnesses to prove that such had occurred. Never arranged with Kerr to run the mare " stiff." His suspicion that this was so was caused by the fact that on Boxing Day the mare could not do better than 5.30 or 5.40, whilst immediately afterwards she won in just over 5.5 J. Had taken tho mare from Munro, another trainer, because he could not trust him. Munro was asked by the stewards to explain the mare's running, but nothing was done. Higgins was not then interested in the mare, but thought that he had suggested that Kerr should get her to train her. ; Could not recollect that Higgins had arranged with Kerr to stop the mare. Did not run her " stiff " at New Brighton and put £9 on her. Had probably made statements in the S.M. Court which should not havo been made. Felt sure the papers had misrepresented his cvii dence. ! Mr Harris said it might be advisable to obtain the magistrate's notes. i Mr Walker thought there was no necessity | far Kerr to call his witnesses, as there was no I evidence before the association against Kerr. Messrs Chadwick and Harris contended that in the interests of trotting the witnesses should be heard. J Higgins, sworn, stated that he had never told Mahoney that Kerr was a rogue and not to be trusted. Put £14 on the mare at Timaru for himself, but nothing for Kerr, and on the first day at Lancaster Park invested £10 for Kerr on Maggie M., and £3 on tho second day. The first amount was put on for him by the man in charge of the totalisator. Never ertered into any arrangement with Kerr to stop the mare. Nominated and accepted with Maggie M., and was supposed to get a quarter of the stake. It was not true that he manipulated the mare to suit his book. The reason he entered the mare in Mr Holmes'a name was because he wanted to get his money back. Asked a tote clerk to put £10 on the niaie for Kerr. Asked another gentleman to put £5 on the second day, £2 of which was for himself. The totalisator clerk, sworn, said that Higgins asked him to put £10 on Maggie M. for Kerr. This, ho thought, was on the first day. It was not usual to give credit on the machines. Charles Kinross, sworn, said he put £14 on Maggie M. for Higgins at Timaru. Could not say whether Higgins was betting at the meeting. They were not licensed to bet. A. G. Holrnea, sworn, said he received £5 from Kerr to back Maggie M. Had never received money from Higgins. Backed for himself. Did not back her on the second day. Another witness, sworn, said he received money from Higgins to put on Maggie M. on the second day at Lancaster Park. Put 10s on for himself on the second day. J. Redmond, sworn, said he backed Maggie Mon both days at Lancaster Park. Gave Higgins £1 to put on the mare. Mahoney gave him the ticket the same evening, tho latter having purchased the ticket. C. Kci-r, in answer to Mr Chadwick, said he could not say where he obtained the £50 stated in the court to have been paid by him to Higgins for Maggie M. He did not keep a banking account, and it was not an uncomSrnou thing for him to have five £10 notes in his possession, especially as he was in the habit of buying and selling horses. The President mentioned that the evidence

given by Mahoney before the court was greatftt at variance with that given before the assow ciation. Mahoney said that the evidence he had heaicj was new to him. He had never been informed of any of the betting transactions mentioned by the various witnesses. Neither Kerr nor Higgins had said a word to him about it. Kern had told him to back the mare on the second day at Lancaster Park. He felt, after hearing tho evidence, that it was possible he had been, mistaken. Had never personally blamed Kerr. Mr Harris moved — " That the association, having gone fully into the evidence in the Maggie M. case and the reflections passed upon C. Kerr, is of opinion that there is no case to answer, and that the reflections were without the slightest truth or foundation." This was car* ried unanimously.

THE NEW ZEALAND CUP.

By M. Quad.

CHRISTCHUECH, October 24. The eye of every sportsman in the colony 13 always arrested when he sees the line at the head of these notes. No matter how important other races may be, or where they may, be run, I know of no New Zealand race, except it bo the Grand National Steeplechase, which, excites so much interest as the event carrying the above name, which will be decided at Riccarton a fortnight hence. Ever since che name of the race was changed to the New Zealand Cup, the popularity of the race has increased, until now it deservedly holds pride of place. It is hard to understand why this should be so. There must be more in a name, notwithstanding the suggestion of the old sawto the contrary than many imagine. The race is one of the hardest to win in the colony. Not perhaps on the day; but owners ancl trainers have months of anxiety watching their charges. I wonder how many owners ano\ trainers bitterly regret that they ever tried to, win a New Zealand Cup, and so lost tha services of a horse that would have stood a. less searching trial, and retained its usefulness for many years? The ambition to win a New Zealand Cup is naturally strong in every sportsman, but it is strange that whilst the ambition is strong but few owners make an effort to breed horses likely to win such a trying race. This year the field is probably no weaker in quality than many of those which have preceded it, and it is a thousand pities that Multiform has been withdrawn. My first selection was Multiform, and I had great faith in Ins ability to win, notwithstanding his crushing impost. Patron, when he won the Melbourne Cup was the same age as Multiform is now, and unless the former was a niueh. better horse than we have been led to believe, I fancy there are but few who would deny that the Hotchkiss horse was more than his equal. St. Paul will probably be at Riccarton during the incoming week, and judging by tho accounts of the work he" is doing, he must be reckoned with. Last year he ran a fine race behind "Wamku, and his recent success in the Avondale Cup shows that he is well. He is not, perhaps, a stayer; but there are few in tho race who can claim this distinction. Swordfish II is galloping freely and well, and his condition cannot be questioned. i\.ll goin^ well with him, he should run a great race French has evidently taken great care with Lis preparation, and although the horso pulls up and subsequently walks in a gingerly; manner, there appears to be nothing wrong with him. Nestoi- is showing vciy fair form on the tracks. This horse is a great big animal, carrying little superfluous lumber, and on credentials ought to run well ; but 1 would prefer St. Paul on form to him. Day Star is apparently a better horse than he was last year. He is galloping much more freely; his stride seems to have lengthened out a great deal, and the horse shows no inclination_to shirk his tasks. Whilst this is so, there appears to be none of that brilliancy which we were told at one time characterised the horse. He should start fairly fit. Starshot has certainly not been galloping quite so well as she did previously. She appears to be as healthy as evor, but she docs iiot stretch herself out as of yore. She has several times ben apparently badly beaten on the tracks, and although this may mean nothing, it would be better to leave her alone until at the post. I should say there is a probability she may not start ; and, even if she does, I do not fancy her chance. Epaulet is galloping splendidly since his return from, the south. Perhaps there is not a horse at Riccarton that he could not drub on the training track; anyway, I have not seen, anything that could. He is evidently unreliable, and his owner has regretfully come to this conclusion. If it were not that the Cup day is so near, Mr Harris would probably ob glad to get rid of him. Boreas is tho favourite for the race, and bookmakers would not be sorry to see his name eliminated- from the list. He won very easily, I am told, in Hawke's Bay, and that being so, he must have a chance here. Cceur de Lion's performances in the north' wex-o not particularly impressive, but his racing tbere may not have exposed his true form. He has not yet arrived at Riccarton. Douglas has arrived, and is looking well. I have not seen him out of a walk, but he is supx-osed to be in wonderfully good heart. Goldleaf will have to improve a great deal to have a possiible chance. I should imagine she will be an absentee when the numbers go up. Of Rubin I know nothing worth chronicling, and I have only just had time to look at Tirant d'Eau. So far as I could judge, he is as leanlooking as ever he was, but I am not going to discard him because he was defeated in short races in the north. Hentas is going better than his mate Peerage, but neither appear forward enough to win. Peerage, I feel sure, will develop into something inoro than useful. Dundas is travelling as nicely as any horse here, but whether tho Cup will be his mission I am unable to say. He has several other engagements, and he must go near winning the Derby. Ho should run well in any event. Altair is an almost certain starter, I understand, but his prospects of success are probably based on the assumption that his form in ihe north did not display his true ability, and two miles may suit him better than a shorter journey. He is the only representative of the Yaldhurst stable. I havo a great deal of respect for Target. She ran well at the recent Hawko's Bay gathering, and she has shaped remarkably well here. On form Double Event can have no possible hope of winning such a race as this, and it is a mystery to many that the payment was made for him. Fulmen I have seen for a few moments only, but there cannot be a doubt that he must have an undeniable opportunity of distinguishing himself. Bred as he is, he ought to stay, and I should not be surprised if his light impost enabled him to land the coveted stake. Next week I shall be able, I trust, to point out more clearly my impressions concerning the various horses engaged. In the meantime it would be as well, perhaps, to refrain from any suggestion as to what may win. | The Mariposa, with the colonial mails of Ist October, arrived at San Francisco on th* 19tli inst., due dat%

fSPOB/riNG- NOTES FROM AUSTRALIA.

By HORT I'OENE. MELBOURNE, October 15. V.A.T.C. SPRING MEETING, First (Caulfield Guineas) Day. From time immemorial — or, to speak by the • card, from the year of the inception of the race, 1881— it has invariably rained on Guineas Day. 'Annesley's year (1890) was certainly an exception; but then that was tho exception which simply proved the rule. Yes; Jupiter Pluvius -lias ever and always had the tap turned on; l»ut, sooth to say, more in kindness than in •anger. On Saturday this was especially the 'case ; for, after 72 hours of blinding dust storms .•whirled about by cyclonic winds, the ungentle Vain from Heaven proved almost a welcome •respite. All day long — from long before daylight round again to the "wee, sina' hours .'ayont the twelve" — the dust fiend reigned su■preme, rendering the task of touting the training a work of art, I can assure you. And as jfcho acknowledged weather "experts" — " Wet iWragge," Signor Baracchi, and Sir C. Todd iept on predicting "wet, squally weather" day after day, and similarly kept on never getting within coo-ec of it, by tho time the horsewatchers at Flemington had hied their way homeward for the matutinal on Saturday morning they wero thoroughly convinced, despite Ahe threatening clouds, that we wero in for a of the preceding three days. About "9 o'clock J.P. aforesaid began to get in his good work again, and although rude Boreas kept on blustering, it certainly looked at noon ■as if things had fixed themselves up for a .thorough soaker. However, as the afternoon «wore on the clouds lifted, and although a keen, *hill wind made locomotion a positive necessity, we were not troubled with any rainfall iworth noticing from the time the second race ,was run. Notwithstanding the inauspiciousnoss of the •outlook up to 2 o'clock, there was a marvellously good attendance, the Acting Governor jand suite likewise being en evidence. Caulfield looked its very best, whilst as legarded tho running track, nothing better could have Jbeen desired. Tho strong wind blowing directly ■«down the straight no doubt tried the stamina •cf the contestants at the fag end of their jjourneys; but then they had the full benefit •jof a whole-sail gale after turning out of the straight and going round the back of the -course, so that the times registered wero not affected prejudicially one iota — lather t'othei ■way about, in point of fact. As fai as I'ir pressmen were concerned, they certainly sul fered under a slight disability through the heavy downpour flooding their legular sanctum eanctorum ; but as there is a spare room at Caulfield at the use of members of the Foui th Estate, they managed to keep things up to ■date fairly well. Tho first item — the Caulfield Stakes — camo on for decision at half-past 1 o'clock, and punctually to time 15 competitors deployed mtc the arena. After his sensational mne-furloug gallop at Flemington on Thursday morning, when he traversed the distance in a tick uudei lmin 59sec (albeit the Sydney men woulr! Lave it that he took a shade over 2min), The Grafter was set down as next door to a "moral" for this particular event. However, Mr W. Forrester (the erstwhile "Black Bill," who is now a White Bill) decided to allot the Gozo — Maori Quepn five-year-old gelding The Chief the task in preference to the Romannosed brother to Gaulus, and although there were 14 other starters, he kept on hardening in the quotations until 2 to 1, and in some places 7 to 4, was accepted about him. So persistent were the punters to get on to the supposed good thing that the books had to open out against the others, with the result that the next pair in demand — Picture and George Frederick — wore quoted at 8 to 1 each, •whilst 12's were to be obtained about either Reka (on whom his party had staked £100), Battalion, or Waitabit. The last-named took up the running from Olaf, Picture, Reka, and Catspaw, behind whom came the favourite, ■whilst Mr W. R. Wilson's pair, Elusive and 'Kajestic brought up the rear. Waitabit carried on the running right round and into the straight, nearing which the favourite experienced an extremely rough time of it whilst attempting to get on better terms with the leader. At this time Hymettus (who shut up immediately afterwards) was running second, with Rosebery third, then coming in order Olaf, Battalion, Reka, and The Chief.' On entering the home stretch Battalion ran up second, followed by Reka and The Chief. Coming to the distance, Waitabit resigned the leadership in favour of Battalion and The Chief, a short, sharp, and decisive struggle betwixt the twain resulting in the favourite downing the aged Queenslandcr, and running home an easy winner by a length and a-half, Waitabit finishing three lengths astern of Bat--t&lion, with Roka, who ran really well, fourth, Clarion fifth, and George Frederick sixth, the last to pass the post being Hymettus and Majestic; the time being something moie than creditable — to wit, lmin 57Jsec. ** There could be no two opinions about it boiug a smisVng good performance on the part of The Chief, no more than there could about several of the opposers being entitled to wear a second saddle cloth, on which could have been truthfully placed, instead of a number, the notification, "Not wanted on the voyage." Elated with their initial success, the noble army of pimters advanced gaily to the betting bourse when business opened on the second item on the programme— a Hurdle Race, of two miles and a-quarter, for which a dozen 2addled up. J. E. Brewer's mount, an aged gelding named Manazona (a grandson of "Musket), with 11.5 in the saddle, was considered to be so much superior to the- others that at the conclusion of the wagering no better price than 5 to 2 was on offer, Insult 9.9 and Realgar 11.4 dividing second favouriteship at 6's, whilst Willy Glasscock's friends supported Crysalite 10.8 down to 7's. If there was one animal in the race that tho rank-and-file of backers felt thoroughly convinced could not get at the right end of a two miles and a-quar-ler hurdle race, that animal was the aged Mercury— Ruby gelding Monte, who had 10.3, in the person of T. Curtin, on his back. When lie was lying last after the first hurdle had been negotiated, they never gave him a second thought, all the interest being centred in the dash displayed by Insult 9.9, who was bringing the field along at a swinging gait. After a mile had been traversed the favourite was lying sixth — a long way out of it, nor did he ♦ppear to make up his leaway to any appreciable extent until rounding the turn for home, when _ Brewer took advantage of the others swinging wide out towards the centre of the course to slip up next the rails — an adroit move that gained him several lengths, and enabled iini to assume command when nearing the last obstacle. Over this Crysalite, who had been reefing Powell all over the straight, came down c purler, and just as it looked as if the punters were again going to land their "brass," Monte came with a wet sail, and, to the immense relief of the bookmakers (the majority tof whom had never written his name), romped tome in the easiest possible manner by three lengths, whilst Silver Pines 9.0, who likewise acted as rearguard during a portion of the jfcryst, was two lengths farther back still, Realgar, Insult, Soult, and Bell Metal coming next in order, with Legs last, the time occupied being 4min 24|sec. The Provost ran disappointingly in this event, and it looks as if the severe clout he received whilst crossing a fence durine the last Caulfield Grand

National Steeplechase had rendered him gallid about negotiating any jumps, big or little. He certainly displayed over - cautiousness on Saturday, Alf. Williams riding him instead of W. Powell, who was up on Crysulite. The seven coloured on the card started for the ensuing event, the CAULFIELD GUINEAS, of 500sovs; second 75sovs, third 25sovs. For three-year-olds. Special weights with penalties. One mile. Mr W. R. Wilson's br c Bobadil, by Bill of Portland— She, 8.8, including 31b penalty (H. J. Morrison) 1 Mr W. Bailey's eh c Cocos, 8.12, including 71b penalty (L. Bushel) 2 Mr R. Chirnside's b % Cordite, 8.0 (T. Finlay) 3 Mr J. Turnbull's br c Heretic, 8,5 (R. Lewis) 0 Mr J. Mitchell's b c Holster, 8.12, including 7lb penalty (H. J. Gardiner) .. -■.0 Mr F. Austin's b c Lee-Metford, 8.5 (P. Dowling) 0 Mr R. Ciavcn's br c Gauleon, 8.5 (J. A. Delaney) 0 Betting: 4 to 1 on Bobadil, 10 to 1 agst Cordito, 20 to 1 bar two. Those are the odds returned by the bookmakers' " official " organ, the Argus (" official," that is, so far as starting price is concerned), and I need hardly add that they appear much more " roseate " in print than they did on any ticket I saw written on the betting bourse. With regard to Bobadil 1 s starting price no exception can be taken, and as for the " 20 to 1 others," as none of them won it didn't matter ; but the punter who asked for 20 to 1 about Cocos would have been advised to get his bumps folt immediately, I can assure you. Not that thoso more intimately associated with tho stable were supporting him to any extent, but the general would never have allowed such liberal odds as those to pass unnoticed about such an approved good colt. The result of the mile dash is a matter of history now — Bobadil won, and won comfortably enough at the finish. Just below the distance it certainly looked as if Cocos would occasion more trouble to the two-year-old champion than the long odds on offer against the son of Abercovn and Copra forshadowed, and when the latter was backed for the Caulfield Cup immediately after the event colour was lent to the contentions of some of his supporters that Bushell (who certainly rode a very peculiar race on him) only threw out " a feeler " in order to try ancl obtain some sort of a line as to the New South Wales representative's prospects of footing it with the Brown Demon when they met at level weights over a mile and a-half. To be beaten at a mile by three lengths in lmin ITJsec, with only 2lb inoie than his Derby '-•eight up, was certainly a very moderate performance on the part of Cocos, and iiinetymne out of every hundred on the course refused to look upon it as anything approaching a reflex of his true form. Cordite, who fimsnod a couple of lengths farther back still, failed to justify tho high opinions formed of his prowess thiough the excellence he disnlavod last, season ; whilst neither Heretic, Lee-JJc'-o'l Holster, nor Gauleon ever appeared 'o ,I) o uteiy tJircateii danger. For all that, llo'=-.toi and Heretic acquitted themselves creditably, the last-named deserving a word or two of commendation for the bold front ho displayed until a bump from Cocos caused him to collide with the fender-rail, as a result of which his trainer (Walter Hickenbotham) had an anxious time of it with him all next day, when hot fomentations had to be applied to his thigh. Holster's gallop piesented itself to mo more in tho light of a " working " one, with a view to futuio contingencies — say, a Cup, or something of that sort. This son of Carbine and Cambric promises to turn out a fairish sort of a horse. So docs Gauleon, albeit ho finished "absolutely." The latter is somewhat in the lough as yet, and when he gets the polish on you can lely upon it that ho will fully maintain (and perchance advance) tho racing roputation of the Gozo' — Industry cross. Tho First Handicap Steeplechase, of "about" two miles, was akin to a revelation in the matter of pace, Mr Septimus Miller's bay gelding Nilus (by Gloiious — Coolyrie), 12.0, winning easily by oight lengths in 3rnin 58sec, only 6sec longer than it took Archer (in 1861) and Lantern (in 1861) to annex their respective Melbourne Cups I Mr Tom Dempuey's aged gelding Miller (Glorious — Gridiron), 11.4, started favourite at s's, Mr C. F. Glasscock'a gelding Sirius (The Assyrian— Stella), 9.10, dividing second favouriteship with Nilus at 7's. Mailboat (Postmaster— Maid of the Mist) 9.5 brought the field along till rounding the turn for home, lm nearest attendants the greater portion of the nourney before Sirius and Miller, Nilus lying about fifth some distance astern; but after crossing the sod wall half a mile from homo Nilus came with a tremendous and longsustained run, and simply smotherd the opposition, the only other aaiiinal who exhibited anything like the same amount of pace being Irish Stew, who after lying a long way out of his ground for a mile and a-half, eventually carried his 12.7 into fourth place, followed by Tremolo, Sirius, Happy Jack, and Camboyne, with N.Z. last. The next item set down for discussion was that rich plum the Debutant Stakes, worth :£IOOO to the winner, 150sovs for second and 50 soys third ; over half a mile of ground. For this 17 lined up at the barrier, the full betting being as follows: — 5 to 2 Carinthia (Gossoon — Trieste), 7's each Scorn (Bill of Portland — Tea Rose) and Alice Mostyn (Neckersgat — Miss Mostyn), 10's each Lady Lillian (Malua — Naga) 10lb j>enalty anc l Habet (Splendour — Lady Gresford), 12's Isola (Malua — Cypriote), 16's each Lissaduru (Bill of Portland — Cooya), Rock of Ages (Gibraltar — Atropos), Chatelaine (Janissary— Farthingale), The Ocean Queen (The Sailor Prince — Mario Louise), Tremarden (Trenton — Lady Marden), Fleetfoot (Richmond — Footstep), and Golden Queen (Zalinski — Queen Bee), 25's each Duke of Portland (Bill of Portland — Siloia.), Architect (Malua, — Plan), Mioer (Goldreef — Coolyrie) and Oceanica (Eiriclspord — Oceana. With the exception of The Ocean Queen and Oceanica, who were left at tho post, the field got off on fairly level terms, the firbt to draw out being Golden Queen, who was closely xmrsued by Lissaduru, Carinthia, and Tremarden. Along the railway side Lissaduru fell back behind the favourite and Tremarden, Golden Queen still showing the way. This she continued to do round the turn and into the straight, the positions of the leaders being identically the same till below the distance, where Carinthia joined Golden Queen for a few strides, but failed to keep her position. At this stage Fleetfoot was first noticeable coming with a wet sail, but «wstaining repealed checks whilst endeavouring to get a clear run. At the half distance, however, the sister to The Admiral managed to extricate herself, but by this time the Messrs W. and C. Wilson's colt Tremarden had headed his stable companion Golden Queen, and although Fleetfoot finished extremely fast sue failed to do more than make s dead heat of it with Golden Queen for second place, half a length behind Tremaiden, the dead-heaters being followed in the order named by Carinthia, Alice Mostyn, Lady Lillian, Lissaduru, and Isola, whilst the trio who brought up tho rear consisted of Scorn, Duke of Portland, and The Ocean Queen; time, 51j3ec. There was any amount of bumping and jostling indulged in during the scramble, both Lissaduru and Scorn receiving ma,rked " attentions." Tremarden is a very nice colt, showing plenty of quality, and was bred by Mr Clarence Wilson, of Ercildoune (near Ballarat), son of the late Sir Samuel Wilson. Tremarden's dam, Lady Marden, was one of the prizes of the St. Albana lottery, and on being offered for. sale with.

a Robinson Crusoe colt (in October, 1895) she was purchased by Mr R. G. Stevenson for 200gs, but only a fortnight afterwards, on being sold under the hammer again, fell into the hands of Mr C. Wilson for 140gs. Lady Marden (who is also the dam of The Skipper, Princess of Wales and The Prize)- is by Maiden (son of Hermit) from a King Tom — Sunshine mare. Alec. Taylor had tried his own filly, Golden Queen, at home to be better than Tromarden, biit with the colours up the colt reversed matters in decisive style. Strangely enough, Walter S. Hickenbotham experienced the same disappointment (only it proved but half a disappointment in the " Wizaid of Burrambeet's " case) with regard to Mr C. M. Lloyd's Lissaduru and Mr J. Rowen's Fleetfoot. On Flemington training track Lissaduru (who possesses the failing of the vast majority of the Bill of Portland stock up to the present — to wit, nervous irritability) could always manage to finish in front of Fleetfoot, and yet in the Debutant Stakes the latter ran much the better race, and under extreme difficulties too. Fleetfoot will just about win the Maribyrnong Plate. Mr W. R. Wilson has a very fine-looking colt in Scorn — ono that is certain to bo heard of to advantage in tho immediate future, and possibly farther on than that again. Twiggeyvous? With the principal handicaps of the spring coming on for decision I will give you in full the details of the concluding event on the first day's programme — an event which was destined to have an important bearing on the quotar tions for the Caulfield Cup and Melbourne Cup : — TOORAK HANDICAP, Of 600sovs ; second, 75sovs ; third, 25sovs. One mile. I. Foulsham's eh g Massinissa, by Splendour — Algerine, 4yrs, 7.13, including 31b ponalty (A E. Foulsham) 1 F. Bailey's eh h Staffa, 6yrs, 8.9 (H. J. Gardiner) . . . . . . . . . . 2 R. G. Row's br h The Musketeer, syrs, 7.13 (W. Woodgate) 3 W. T. Jones's eh g Acton, 6yrs, 7.11 (W. Powell) 4 H. Oxenham's b g Sailor Boy, syrs, 9.3 (A. Delanoy) . . . . 0 D. S. Wallace's br m Moonlyong, syrs, 8.11 (D. Callanam) 0 J. G. Clarke's b g Australian, 6yrs, 8.6 (R. Lewis) . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 A. M'Cracken's br c Patriot, 4yis, 8.4 (A. Hcam) c C. Gidney's eh g- Devoted, syrs, 8 3, including 31b penalty (F. Fielder) 0 J. Bai on's b or br g Superb, 6yrs, 7.13 (W. Delaney) . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 H. Oxenham's b f Alemene, 4yrs, 7.10 (3. A. M'Failane) 0 W. R Wilson's b f Symmetry, 3yis, 7.9 (J M'Donald) 0 J M'Sweeney's b g Aroha, syrs, 7.7 (S Thomas) . . . . 0 J. B. Pearson's br m Contrast, syrs, 7.7 (P. Fielder) 0 Neil Campbell's b h Tainino, 6yrs, 7.7, including 31b penalty (A. Smith) . . . . 0 John Leek's eh m Veloce, syts, 7.7, includ ing 3lb penalty (N. Leek) . . . . . 0 W. H. Mate's br f Lelamine, 3yrs, 7.6 (C. Paiker) 0 J. Baron's eh g Rowdy, 4yrs, 7.5 (D. Morgan) 0 Percy Chirnside's b g Malto, 6yis, 7.5 (R. Trainer) . . . . . . . . . . 0 T. Payten's eh f Miss West, 3yrs, 7.4, carried 7.5 (L. Bushel!) 0 J. Wilson, jun.'e, eh g Avalon, 3yrs, 7.3 (P. Dowlmg) . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 W. R. Wilson's br c Auriferous, 3yrs, 6.12 (A. Manning) . . . . . . . . . . 0 Betting: 6 to 1 agst Contrast, 8 to 1 Supeib, 10 to 1 each Massinissa and Devoted, 12 to 1 each Symmetry, Staffa, Auriferous, and Australian, 14 to 1 each Moonlyong and Hie Mtisketeer, 20 to 1 Avalon, Veloce, Malto, Lelamine, or any other. Tho Musketeer, Aroha, Alernene, and Superb were qtiickest into their stiides, Humphrey Oxenham's mare Alemene (to whom her owner had entrusted 100 of " the best") quickly dashing to the front and leading past the half mile post from Aroha, after whom came The Musketeer, Veloce, Malto, Staffa, Acton, and Massinissa. Veloce led into the stiaight, with Alemene, The Musketeer, Massinisfea, Superb, Staffa, and Acton as her more immediate attendants, but once with their heads fairly turned for home Massinissa sailed to the front, and, finishing well within himself, won by four lengths fiom Staffa, who in turn held two lengths' advantage over The Musketeer, Acton being fourth, Tamino fifth, and Lelamine sixth, with Aroha and Symmetry the last two ; time, lmin 44Jscc. Altogether the stable connections throw-in for about over Massinissa's win, the ring being in a condition to " launch out" over the mile dash with 22 starteis after experiencing two comparative " skinners " with Monte and Tremarden. As soon as he had passed tho post, Mas&inissa went up with a ' swish " to the position of first favourite for the Caulfield Cup, anything over 100 to 14 being closed on instanter. Second (Eclipse Stakes) Day. After the dust ancl heat of town on Wednesday it was pleasant in the extreme to indulge in the dolce far niente business in the sylvan retreat provided by the Victoria Amateur Turf Club folk for the delectation of their patrons ; and as the programme on the "off" day promised some good sport, it was somewhat surprising that the attendance was not larger. As on the opening day, the proceedings were timed to commence at half-past 1 o'clock, and as Wednesday is now a recognised half holiday all over the city and suburbs, the fact that a greater number of persons did not put in an appearance on the classic heath argued trumpet-tongued that the "depression" has not yet lifted to any appreciable extent, so far as the hoi polloi are concerned, the published statements in the press to the contrary notwithstanding. The grand stand and members' stand were each comfortably filled certainly; but the "pit"— that is to say, the flat, to which 2s admission is charged — was but sparsely patronised for a Caulfield Cup meeting, even if an off day. Those who did attend, though, enjoyed themselves as well as people can be expected to enjoy thenyiolves when outsidei after outsider keeps flopping up with (as Jack FalstafE was wont to put it) "damnable iteration," and when returning on the back track had plenty of food for thought as to the possible "dividends" that might have been declared during the day had the totalisator only been in evidence under Government control. Twenty-four out of the 44 coloured on the card mustered at the post for the first race of the afternoon — a five-furlong sprint, yclept the Moonga Handicap, for which Mr J. G. Clarke's ("Battalion" Clarke) three-year-old gelding Roscommon (by Sunrise — Rosemeath) was installed a red-hot favourite at 4 to 1 on the strength of a brilliant victory the preceding afternoon at Sandown Park. Originally handicapped at 6.8, it certainly looked on paper one of the very choicest of good things, with only 3lb penalty to be put up, and the renowned Bobby Lewis to act as "guide, philosopher, and friend." Outside Ro&common 10 to 1 was to be obtained about anything, and in the case of outside goods, such as Sxoincliift (Lochiel — Spice) 7.13 was considered to be, offers of 100 to 3 were as plentiful as could possibly be desired. Some of Spindrift's friends, however, considered the five-year-old gelding possessed a "possible," and consequently a wager of £500 to 15, and subsequently another of JESOO to 20, was accepted about him. Dowry 8.3 carved out the running, and with such effect that the favourite, who ran second the greater portion of the tryst, was at "bellows to mend" below tha diatan.ee., the daughter of

Lochiel and Dona looking all over a winner until Carrara (Metal — Maid of Kent) 8.12 and Spindrift had a cut at her, the latter staying tno longest, and defeating Carrara comfortably by a length and a-half, with Dowry two lengths farther astern of Mr C. F. Glasscock's recent purchase ; the favourite finishing fourth, Warwc fifth, Interlude sixth ; the field being whipped in by Auriferous 7.2, Carlyle, and Bashful. Time, lmin 4fsec. Th Second Hurdle Race (two miles) found odds of 5 to 2 being laid against Manazona (Ivrana — Zona) 12.0 with only eight opposers. Certainly, after his showing on the first day, one of the very best things I have come across for many a long day. It was quietly — but still efficaciously — spread about that J. E. Brewer, his pilot, had lost £150 over him in the First Hurdle Race, and albeit it was a\ithoritatively stated that he intended going for a recovery the public have received such terrible "facers" from hurdle-racing confederacies that they fight shy of anything connected with the erstwhile "push." However, it proved to be a case of "thumbs up" on this occasion, and Manazona won in a common canter in two lengths from Realgar 11.7, whilst Soult 11.4 was three lengths behind the Millers' representative, Clive 10.4 finishing fourth, and a very speedy neddy named Insult (from the Wagga district) 9.12 fifth; the time being 3min 50;Jsec. When Bobadil was observed casting a mile and a-quarter behind him on the training tra-ck at Flemington on Wednesday morning at an even-time gait, it was open and palpable that the public were doomed to disappointment in tlio matter of witnessing him and The Chief measuring strides for a mile during the Eclipse Stakes contest in the afternoon. There was nothing apparently wrong with the Derby favourite; but yet his party declined the tryst. However, a field of half a score assembled at the starting post, the weight of money entrusted to him sending The Chief out at 10 to 9 against, the only others to meet with any suppoit at all — and that to a limited extent — being Wait-a-Bit and Cocos, at 7 to 1 each. It had been quite apparent to a critical observer during the earlier portion of the week, whilst The Chief was being exercised at headquarters, that the Caulfield Stakes gallop had worked the unsexed five-year-old son of Gozo and Maori Queen into a high state of nervous irritability, and for my own part I felt perfectly convinced either Wait-a-Bit or Cocos would upset his applecart at a mile.- I don't think The Chief would have won tne Caulfield Stakes at a mile; it was only the extra furlong that enabled liim to get in his best work. Still, he was not ridden as judiciously as he might have been in the Eclipse Stakes, whilst, on the othet hand, waiting tactics on the part of F. Fielder on Wait-a-Bit allowed that presumable non-stayer to battle out the finish very determinedly. Rosebery. who still presents a somewhat rotund appearance — albeit an animal whose splendid conformation at once catches the eye of the most casual observer — led from the rise of the barrier until half way up the straight, when Wait-a-Bit and The Chief closed on him, whilst Cocos, toa, clapped on all sail. Whilst the supieme effort was being made Wait-a-Bit got slightly hampered between The Chief and Cocos, Lut instead of turning it up, he struggled on with thr- greatest determination, a most exciting finish resulting in Cocos squeezing home by a neck from The Chief and Wait-a-Bit, who made a dead heat of it foi second place, Cordite—who came with a fast lun from below the distance — being fourth, with the others following m the order named: Rosebery, Lelamine, Holster, "Woodlark, Clarion, and Hainault. Time, lmin 44sec. This exploit at once raised Cocos' s Caulfield Cup stock up with a bound, the wagers accepted about him therefore placing him on the 10 to 1 mark. It was a slashing good performance on his pait, proving, as it did, that he has something of the bulldog tenacity in his composition — so long as he can be kept well together. Once allow him to "roll," however, and he is all to pieces immediately. By the way Cocos and Cordite each carried a 71b penalty in the event under review. The Australian Hunters' Cup, of 150sovs (20 for second, 10 for third), over two miles and 740 yds of ground, attracted 13 " amatoor " riders, and on the strength of his South Australian reputation Mr R. Barr-Smith's six-year-old gelding Silverthorn 11.12 was heavily backed down to 3 to 1, Wyalla (in Mr Septimus Miller's stable) 11.12 receiving support at the start at 9 to 2, with Bally Mohr 10.10 at B's, and 10 to 1 offered against any of the others. Amongst these others was Mr George Russell's aged grey gelding Domino (by Landsborough — Belgravia), who had not only the steadier of 13.7 on his back, but was supposed by the clever people to be still further handicapped through, his owner persisting in riding him himself. But amongst the more astute horse-watchers at Flemington a select few had been paying strict attention to the excsllent work Domino had been putting in there, and albeit it was acknowledged that Mr George Eussell did not possess the horsemanship ability of Adam Lindsay Gordon's Dick Neville, the fact that Domino's owner was out pretty often of a morning to ride his horse exercise, and invariably tooled his "bike" out to the training ground, placed it beyond the .shadow of a doubt that he would get into the pigskin in pretty fair nick for a struggle. And so the sequel proved ; as Domino, kept well in hand till four furlongs from home, was let out at that particular portion of the journey, and, settling everything for pace, won amidst the most tremendous cheering by two lengths from Silverthorn, with Queen B. a similar distance away third, Ajax, Bonjuela, Wyalla, Bally Mohr, and Patrician being the only others to finish. Time, 4min 56£ sec. During the race Idr A. J. Caton made a truly marvellous recovery on the Messrs Miller's second stiing, Hostile. He was thrown out of the saddle ciean on *<_ 'rlcstile's neck at the first of the treble opposite the stand, but managed to regain his seat, and was just steadying himself when his mount blundered at the next obstacle, and came down with him — steed and rider fortunately escaping injury. It was <jruel hard luck; but the demonstrations of approval on Mr Caton's exhibition of pluck and judgment must have been extremely gratifying to <hat gentleman, who had to repeatedly bow his acknowledgments whilst returning to the paddock. The First Nursery Handicap served to emphasise the excellence of Tremarden, who ran a remarkably good colt under his burden of 9.0. He certainly stood no chance against the speedy Alice Mostyn (Neckersgat— Miss Mostyn), who had been favourably handicapped at 7.11, and whom Tom Salmond's supporters backed spiritedly down to 5 to 1, but for all that Tremarden was very "adjacent" to the leader (Alice Mostyn jumped away at the rise of the barrier and was never headed) at the entrance to the straight. Scorn 7.9 (carried 3lb over — 7.12) started favourite at 4's; but he appeared to encounter heavy weather again, and failed to get closer than third — just behind Promontory 7.9 — at the termination of the half-mile dash, which was negotiated in 51fsec. Promontory (a colt by Bill of Portland from Montalto) is the property of Mr C. M. Lloyd, and of course the followers of Walter Hickenbotham's stable had their pieces on to a man, his starting price being 7 to 1. He swung out a bit too far at the home turn, but ran , as true as a die, and only suffered defeat by j a length and a-quarter whilst finishing in front of the favourite by a length and a-half. Lady Lillian 8.4 was fourth, Chatelaine 7.6 fifth, and Carinthia 8.0 sixth; the whole of the half dozen being engaged in the Maribyrnong Plate. Then came the Coongy Handicap, of a mile and three furlongs; and with the Coongy Han- ; dicap a revelation. During the two years of

liis racing career (he is now four years old)j ' Mr J. Pateraon'B chestnut colt Hymettus (bjj ' Eiriaspord— Busy Bee) has at times — when . presumably unbacked — sprung some big sur? j prises, whilst at other times, when ostensibly'; well supported by his stable connections, ha has suddenly collapsed like the orthodox ' "pricked balloon." On Saturday, in the Caulfield Stakes, after showing up prominently till nearing the entrance to the straight, he was credited with "disappointing" his partisans;' but still, in the Coongy Handicap, with no, less than 8.12 on his back, that clever ught-^ weight, N. Leek, considered the mount worth' accepting. According to the morning paper scribes the race was looked upon as a kind of '"dress rehearsal" for the Caulfield Cup, and if bo this afternoon's event must be a complete gift to Hymettus, who will have 20lb off his back. By the time you receive thier, however, the Caulfield Cup of 1898 will be numbered amongst the things that have been; 1 but whether Hymettus pulls it off or not, tha fact remains that at certain times he undoubtedly possesses the ability to do so. In witness whereof I append the race yclept the | COONGY HANDICAP, of loOsovs; second 35sovs, third 15sovs. One mile and three furlongs. .. | Mr J. Paterson's eh c Hymettus, by Eiridspord—Busy Bee, 4yrs, 8.12 (N. Leek) ... 1 Mr F. Foy's b c April Fool, 4yrs, 7.3, car- ; ried 7.5 (S. Callinan) * 2 Mr S. Miller's b c Carbinier, 4yrs, 6.7 (S. D. Fisher)" 8 J Also started: Catspaw, aged, 8.10 (P. Guin- [ ane); The Chevalier, Gyrs, 8.7 (J. Carson); 1 | Elusive, 4yrs, 8.4 (H. J. Morrison); Devoted, I syrs, 8.3 (F. Fielder); Town Clock, syrs, 8.0 (W. 'Griffiths); Prince Carbine, syrs, 7.13 (O. Parker) ; The Musketeer, syrs, 7.11 (T. Brown) r Robin HooS, 6yrs, 7.8 (J. Flanagan) ; Goodman, aged, 7.8 (E. Bryan) ; La Carabine, 4yrs, 7.7 (P. Dowling); Mischief, aged, 7.7 (W. Powell); | Marusa, aged, 7.7 (W. Redfearn); Watercolcmr, syrs, 7.5 (James Thomas) ; Trent, aged, 7.3, carried 7.4 (H. Webb); War God, 4yrs, 7.2 (P. Fieldei) ; Miraclum, 6yrs, 7.1 (W. S. Hickenbotham); Manfred, 4yrs, 7.0, carried 7.1 (A. Manning) ; Surge, 6yrs, 6.12, carried 6.13 (R. Lewis); Rosella, 6yrs, 6.10, carried 6.11 (C. Cooper) ; Tapioca, 4yrs, 6.8 (W. Meredith). Betting: 7 to 1 agst Trent, 8 to ] Marusa, | 10 to 1 Misphief, 12 to 1 Carbinier, 14 to 1 Manfred, 16 to 1 each Catspaw, April Fool, La Carbine, Hymettus, and Robin Hood, 20 to 1 any other. These are the Argus quotations supplied by a leading bookmaker, and accepted by the rest of the fraternity as the "official" odds to be paid out. As a matter of fact offers of "20 to 1 Hymettus" -were to be heard all over the paddock; hardly anyone bestowing a second thought to him after his inglorious display on Saturday. To revert to the race, Devoted, Catspaw, April Fool, and Prince C arbine were the first to single out, followed by ; War God, The Musketeer, Marusa, La Carabine, Eosella, and Mischief, with Hymettus p bad last. He kept last till five furlongs hac been traversed, when he began to move up, and passing the five-furlong post he made a terriffic run, albeit up a clear track, on the extreme outside. Rounding the turn for home, , he had forged into fifth position, the quartette |in front consisting of Mischief, War_ God, April Fool, and Carbinier. At the distance Hymettus showed in front, but April Fool struggled on so gamely that at the finish Hymettus only held a head advantage over him, Carbinier third three-quarters of a length away, I then Catspaw, War God, Robin Hood (who [ dropped from the clouds), and La Carabine j (who had been badly interfered with). Time, 2min 26sec.

RACING IN NEW ZEALAND.

NAPIER PARK RACES. First Day— Tuesday, October 18. S TRIAL HURDLE RACE, of 50sovs; second | lOsovs. Ono mile and a-half. 11-I— Mr Cowper's Ruby, by TurquoiseDenbigh, 9.7 (Lawry) .. .. «. 1 157— Mr M'Culloch's Blackberry, 11.7 (Fuszard) 2 64— Mr Connop's Barbarossa, 9.13 (Arnott) 3 Also ran: 37 Te Ngaehe 10.0 (Sweeney) and 75 Flying Shot 9.7 (Green). At the hill bend Ruby drew clear of Barbarossa, and Blackberry under the whip took third position, but although the latter ran into second place he could make no impression on Ruby, who won cleverly by three lengths. Time, 2min 56 2-ssec. Dividend, £3 10s. CRITERION STAKES, of 50sovs; second lOsovs. One mile. 92— Mrs Quinlivan's Donovan, by The Dauphin—Witiora, 8.2 (P. White) „ 1 22— Mr Blake's Daphne, 7.4 (Buchanan)., 2 53— Hon. J. D. Ormond's Pansy, 7.2 (M'Donald) 3 Also ran: 102 Tirant d'Eau 8.12 (Lindsay), 132 Pistol Grip 7.12 (Jones), 18 Nightingale 7.4 (Harden), and 19 Amour eux 7.4 (Lowe). At the home bend Donovan and Daphne both made a forward movement, and after the semblance of a struggle Donovan won by half a length. Time, lmin 46 4-ssec. Dividend, £i ss. COUNTY HANDICAP, of 30sovs; second 5 soys. Seven furlongs. 131 — Mr Grant's Alionora, by Mousquetaire — Leonora, 7.9 (Lord) 1 68— Mrs Quinlivan's The Frenchman, 7.0 (Carmichael) 2 144 — Mr Rathbone's Esperanza, 7.0 (Hercock) 3 Also ran: 36 Jadoo 7.10 (Buchanan), 60 Orizaba 7.4 (Lord), 30 Windfall 7.3 (M'Donald), 29 Gold Dust 6.12 (Coghlan), 54 Hikaatahua 6.7 (O'Neill), 41 Borax 6.7 (Price). In the straight Alionora came away from the field and won easily by a, length. Time, lmin 31 l-ssec. Dividend, £i Is. PARK STAKES, of 200sovs; second 20sovs. One mile and a-quarter. 96— Mr Platt's Castashore, by Castor — Zip, 7.4 (Buchanan) , 1 148— Captain Russell's Coeur de Lion, 8.1 (Lindsay) 2 184 — Mr Robinson's Te Hapuku, 7.2 (Robinson) 3 Alsc ran: 86 Nansen 7.9 (Carmichael), 188 Bush Rose 7.9 (Hercock), and 46 Scotia 6.7 (O'Neill). Castashore led the field past the stand the first uime, Nansen being his nearest attendant, with Scotia, Te Hapuku, Coexir de Lion, and Bush Rose in that oicler. Castashore was still in front as they swept roiind the town bend, and had a clear length's lead round the back stretch. Nansen had not been supplanted, though Cosur de Lipn had improved his position, having gone into third place, with Te Hapuku next. Entering the straight Castashore came away from the field and romped home a winner by fully five lengths, Ccaur de Lion coming very fast, and beating To Hapuku for second place. Time, 2niin 10 3-ssec. Dividend, £7. SPRING WELTER, of 50sovs ; second lOsovs. One mile. 145 — Mr Rupuha te Hianga's Whitirea, by Armourer — Kitty Totara, 9.11 (Jones) 1 85 — Mr Joliustone's Waters tone, 9.9 (Collelo) 2 75— Mr Blake's Daphne, 9.13 (Conn on; .. 3 Also ran: 36 Blarney 11.0 (Parker), 119 Brennan 10.0 (Whittaker), 62 Fearnought 8.7 (Davis), 31 Notoriety 8.0 (Newbeiry). Fearnought, Daphne, and Brennan were together as the horses entered the straight, with! Whitirea and Waterstone coming fast. A splendid finish up the straight resulted in Whitirea winning by about a quarter of a leaeth. Time, lmiu 49seo. Dividend, j63 Bs*

HANDICAP HURDLES, of 70sovs ; second 10 soys. One mile and three-quarters. 147 — Hon. H. Mossman's Antares, by Castor —Hilda, 11.0 (Moragan) .. .. 1 164 — Mra Qumlivan'B Rangirnmeliu, 10.10 (Sweeney) 2 73— Mr Rathbone's Sylvanus, 11.7 (Parker) 3 147— Mr Hope's Missfire, 12.0 (H. Moore) . . 0 When the bend for home was reached Antares went to the front and waa never caught, winning comfortably by three lengths. Time, 3rrun 25 2-sseo. Dividend, £3 ss. RAILWAY HANDICAP, of lOOsovs; second lOsovs. Six furlongs. 213— Hon. J. D. Ormond's Daunt, by Dreadnought — Orientale, 9.4 (Davis) .. 1 72— Mrs Quinlivan's Donovan, 8.5 (White) 2 64 — Mr Connop's Victoria Cioss, 7.1 (Caiinichael) 3 Also ran: 46 Amphion 8.8 (Lord), 15 Straybird 8.5 (Hercock), 156 Aquatic 7.2 (Price), 52 Dottrell 7.0 (M'Donald), 35 Nevermore 6.7 (O'Neill). Nevermore led to the home bsnd, closely followed by Donovan and Victoria Cross, but these gave way in the straight to Daunt, who won. without an effort by _ fully two lengths. Time, Imin 14 4-ssec. Dividend, £2 15s. AHURIRI HANDICAP, of 50sovs; second 10 soys. Once round. 27£> — Mr Rathbone's Stockvillo, by Stockdaie —Dowager, 8.3 (Hercock) .. ... 1 Bo— Mr Kaiwhata's Jadoo, 7.4 (Price) .. 2 157— Mr Te Ua's First Blood, 8.11 (Woolley) 3 ' Won with the greatest ease. Time, Imin 68sec. Dividend, £1 13 a. Second Day— Wednesday, October 19. TRIAL HANDICAP HURDLES, of 50sovs; second lOsovs. One mile and a-half. 217— Mr Cowper's Ruby, 10.9 (Lawry) .. 1 74 — Mr Reeves's Te Ngaehe, 9.7 (Delaney) 2 108 — Mr Connop's Barbarossa, 9.10 (Amott) 0 At the hill bend Barbarossa came down by taking her fence awkwardly, but luckily the jockey escaped without injury. From this hurdle Ruby came away and won by six clear lengths. Time, 2min 52 3-ssec. Dividend, £1 13*. WHARERANGI HANDICAP, of SOsovs; second lOsovs. Six furlongs. 103— Mr Te Hianga's Whitirea, 8.10 (W. Jones) 1 110 — Mr Blake's Daphne, 7.13 (Buchanan) 2 55 — Mr Gollan's Scotia, 7.2 (Lord) .. ..3 Also started: 198 Victoria Cross 8.0 (Price), 145 Pansy 7.4 (M'Donald), 28 Nightingalo 6.7 (Pimgle). In the straight Pansy waa dono with and Whitirea and Daphno came through. Whitirea, full of running, got home about half a length in front. Time, lniiu 17 2-ssec. Dividend, £5 11s. PUKETAPU HANDICAP, of 30sovs; second ssovs. One mile. 55 — Mr Rathbone's Espcranza, by Wapiti — Last Chance, 7.5 (.Heicock) .. ..1 125— Mr Cheer's Nukurau, 7.12 (Whittaker) 2 12— Hon. J. D. Ormond's Wiudfall, 6.7 (Jd' Donald) 3 Also started: 50 Lady Lome S.lO (Robinson), 117 Alionora 8.9 (Buchanan), 60 The Frenchman 7.8 (Noble, Sib over), 26 Ransirnokai 7.1 (O'Neill), 27 Hikaatahua 6.13 (Price). Nukurau was leading into the straight, where Esperanza was brought through and won comfortably by a length. Time, Iraiu 45 4-ssec. Dividend, &1 143. RACING CLUB HANDICAP, of 150sovs; second Ijbovs. One mile and a distance. 10t ! — Mr Robinson's Te Hapuku, by Dreadnought — Watercolour, 7.7 (Robinson) 1 73 — Mr Lemon's Bush Rose, 7.13 (Hercock) 2 86 — Mr Richardson's Pistol Grip, 6.0 (Ellern) 3 Also started: 375 Castashore 8.4 (Buchanan), 63 Amphion 7.11 (Lord), 33 First Blood 7.0 (Carmichael), 67 Dottrell 6.12 (M'Donald), 116 Waterstone 6.11 (Price). Won easily by a length. Dottrell fourth, First Blood and Castashore finishing together last. Time, Imin 57 2-ssec. Dividend, £7 16s. CALEDONIAN HANDICAP, of 50sovs; second lOsovs . Six furlongs. 141— Mr Te Hianga's Whitirea, 10.7 (Jones) 1 78 — Mr Connop's Amour eux, 8.5 (Connop) 2 218— Hon. J. D. Ormond's Fearnought, 8.4 (Davis) 3 Also started: 69 Blarney 10.10 (Parker), 83 Nevermore 8.4 (Whittaker), 86 Notoriety 8.0 (Ncwberry). Ones the straight was reached Whitirea never left the race in doubt in the running, being an easy winner. Time, Imin 17 2-ssec. Dividend, £4 6a. HANDICAP HURDLES, of 75sovs; second lOsovs. One mile and a-half. 312 — Mr Hope's Missfire, by Maxim — Take Miss, 11.12 (H. Moore) 1 189— Mr M'Cullough's Blackberry, 10.6 (Fuszard) 2 105 — Mrs Quinlivan's Raugipimehu, 11.6 (Sweeney) 3 82— Mr Jones's Rhino, 11.8 (Redmond) . . 0 Rhino made the running for about threequarters of a mile, when he gave way to Blackberry, with Missfire next. The two latter werp racing together at the hill bend, Rhino having fallen back beaten, Missfire took the last hurdle with Blackberry, and won by fully a length. Time, 2min 52 l-ssec. A protest against Missfire for inconsistent running was dismissed. Dividend, £1 19s. TELEPHONE HANDICAP, of 50sovs; second lOsovs. One mile. 208— Mr Cheer's Nukurau, by TricksterNightshade, 7.12 (Wright) .. ..1 74—Mr Kaiwata's Jadoo, 7.4 (Price).. .. 2 142^ — Mr Gooseman's Brennan, 8.6 (Whittaker) 3 Also started: 68 First Blood 8.7 (Woolley), 64 Alionora 8.9 (Buchanan), 18 Rangimokai 6.12 (O'Neill). Jadoo was prominent until the straight was reached, when she was tackled by Nukurau, and a splendid finish resulted in Nukurau getting home by a short head. Time, Imin 45sec. Dividend, £2 9s. GIUND STAND HANDICAP, of 60sovs; second lOsovs. Seven furlong 3. 81 — Mr Platt's Castashore, 8.7 (Buchanan) 1 61— Mr Johnstone'3 Waterstone, 6.12 (Price) 2 153— Hon. J. D. Ormond's Nansen, 7.7 (Carinichoel) 3 Also started: 131 Donovan 9.4 (P. White), 261 Straybird 8.5 (Hercock), 117 Aquatic 7.5 (Lord). By the time they entered the straight Castashore was in the leading division, and won with something to spare. Time, Imin 29 2-saec. Dividend, £8 18s. NORTH OTAGO RACES. First Day— Tetursday, October, 20. HANDICAP HURDLE RACE, of 40sovs; spcond ssov3. One mile and three-quarters. 36 — Mr Parkinson's Liberator, by Betrayer —Diana, aged, 11.12 (Hands) .. ..1 47 — Mr Evans's Glenore, 10.0 (Cochrane) .. 2 23 — Mr Livingstone's Dundee, 11.12 (inc. 51b penalty) (Telford) 0 Dundee ran off. Won by three lengths. Time, 3min 29sec. Dividend, £2 13s. MAIDEN PLATE, of 25sovs. Weight for ago. Six furlonga. 82— Hon. G. M'Lean's Brisa, 3yrs by St. Clair— MistraU 7.10 (King) .. ..1 B— Mr Teller's My Lord, 8.13 (Telford) .. 2 7— Mr Liviag^toue's Pioiicer, B.l'J (Cochrane) 3 Also ran: 30 LttUo Tho 8 Ul (Pine), 22 Criterion 8.13 (Hunt), ]i Mms, O'Kane 8.11 (Tripp) 0 Bess Islay S.ll (Smith), !', Venacr 7.12 (RainWon by half a dcscr> Icusths. Pioneer «. '

bad thitd. Time, Imin 20seo. Dividend, JEI Us. WELTER HANDICAP, of 30sovs; second ssovs. Six furlongs. 68— Mr Ross's Irish Girl, by St. Clair— Lady Gertrude, 8.5 (Emerson) .. .. 1 13— Mr Digby's Magg, 5.5 (Wilson) .. ..2 23— Mr Fitzgerald's Gladys 11, 8.6 (Lindsay) 3 33— Mr Nicholls's Izal, 8.10 (Teiford) .. 0 Won easily by two lengths. Tune, Imin 21 se-;. Dividend, £1 16 a. SPRING HANDICAP, of SOsovs; second 5 soys. One mile and a distance. 2 — Mr H. Goodman's Black and Red, by Maxim— Aqualate, 7.11 (inc. slb penalty) (Murray) 1 o— Mr Fitzgerald's Vandyke, 7.10 (.Telford) 2 Won easily. Time, 2min 3sec. Dividend, £1. NOVEL HANDICAP, of 2550v3. Five furlongs. 31 — Mr Rom's Stoqkfish, by Piscatorius — Lacteal, 9.0 (Emerson) . . . . . . 1 26— Mr Browns- Miss Lochiel, 8.7 (Wilson) 2 30— Mr Graham' 3 Miss Otley, 7.12 (Telford) 3 Also ran-.- 69 Ohoroid 8.0 - (Godfrey), 2 Esau 7.8, and 9lb over (W. Buddicomb), 1 St. Elme 7.2 (M'Eldowney), and 4 Little Tim 6.12 (Cotton). Won very easily. Time, lrnm Bsec. Dividend, M 14s. LADIES' BRACELET, of tha value of 15sovs for the first horse, and of the value of ssovs for the second. Gentlemen rfders. ' Seven furlongs. 11 — Mrs Sewell's Miss Otley, by St. George —Aura,, 11.8 (Mr Sewell) .. ... 1 3 — Miss Johnston's Pelerine, 11.0 (Mr Parkinson) 2 I—Miss1 — Miss Schluter's Strongbow, 11.6 (Mr Schluter) 3 Also ran: 2 Gunfiuke 11.4 (Mr Kennedy) 1 Remuera 11.2 (Mr Calder). Won easily by about three lengths. Time, Imin 40sec. Dividend, £1 9s. FLYING HANDICAP, of 40eovs; second 6 soys. Six furlongs. 23 — Mr Goodman's Cherrystone, by Ruby — Cherry, 7.9 (Hewitt) i 10 — Mr Fitzgerald's Vandyke, 8.6 (Lindsay) 2 19— Mr Alexander's The Orphan, 7.6 (King) 3 Also ran: 35 Swordfish 8.3 (Murray), and 14 ViMiilln. 8.0 (Rainbow). Won, all out, l>y nearly a length, The Orphan throo lengths away. Timo, Imin 19 2-5 sec. Dividend, £3 19a. Second Day — Fuiday, October 21. HANDICAP HURDLES, of 35sovs; second Csovs. One mile and a-balf 3 — Mr Livingston's Pioneer, by Vanguard, 9.7 (Cochraue) . . 1 9— Mr Nicholls's Izal, 9.12 (Telford) .. 2 I—Mr1 — Mr Schluter's Strongbow, 9.0 (Lindsay) 3 16— Mr Hastio's Lobo, 10.12 (Robertson) .. 0 Lobo ran off. Won by six lengths. Time, 2min SSJsec. Dividend. XS 14s. HEDCASTLE WELTER, of 30sovs; second Ssovs. Seven furlongs. 17 — Mr H. Goodman's Swoidfish, by Piscatorius — Giriri, 9.V2 (Murray) .. .. 1 11— Mr Dailey's Matlock, 8.3 (Hunt) .. ..2 11 — Mr Alexander's Mount Clair, 9.8 (Ernei3on) 3 17— Mr Fitzgerald's Vandyke, 10.0 (Coohrane) 0 Vandyke stopped at the post. Won easily by two lengths, Mount Clair a poor third. Time, Imin. 33 2-_ssec. .Dividend. £2 ISs. PRESIDENTS HANDICAP, of 45sovs; second ssovs. On© mile. 9 — Mr Goodman's Swordfish, '7.13, includ- . ing 3lb penalty (Hewitt) . . . . . . 1 22— Mr Goodman's Black and Red, 8.4 (Murray) 2 9— Mr Gardiner's Remorse 11, 7.11 (Telford) 3 Won easily by a couple of lengths, Remorse II half a dozen lengths away. 'Time, Imin 47sec. Dividend, £i. LADIES' PURSE, of 20sovs; second ssovs. Gentlemen riders. One mile. 11— Miss Clark's Daisy Bell, by St. Clair, 11.0 Parkinson) 1 9— Mrs Sewell's Remuera, 11.5 (Mr Sewell) 2 9 — Miss Smart's Vandola, 11.7 (Mr Smart) 3 o—Miss0 — Miss Kennedy's Gunfiuke, 11.0 (Mr Kennedy) 0 Daisy Bell was quickest away from a good start,, and won by half a doaen lengths. Time, Imin 58sec. Dividend, £2 7s. WAITAKI PLATE HANDICAP, of 40sovs; second ssovs. Five furlongs. 31— Mr Alexander's The Orphan, by Amulet — Spinaway, 7.12 (M'Conib) .. .. 1 21 — Hon George M'Lean's Brisa, 7.3 (King) ?, 24— Mr Brown's Warrington, 8.12 (Wilson) 3 Also started: 24 Vandyke 9.0 (inc. 2lb over) (Cochrane), 26 Irish 'Girl 7.7 (M'Eldowney), 5 Galileo 7.7 (Telford), 7 Gladys II 7.2 (Cotton). Won, all out, by a full length, Brisa beating Warrington by a neck for second place. Time, Imin 6 3-ssec. Dividend, £3 14s. SACK SJ3LLING . RACS,. of 15 B oys. No weight under Bst. Four furlongs. 70— Mr M'Dowell's Last Shot, by Chain&hot —Miss Sykcs (Telford) „ .. 1 13 — Mr Godfrey's Choioid (Godfrey) .. ..2 21— Mr Digby's Magg (Wilson) -- .. .. 3 Also started: 33 Stockfish (Emerson), 11 Stella Garnet (Murray), 2 Criterion (Rainbow), 2 Little Tim (Cotton). Last Shot jumped off with the lead, and Stockfish was left. Won by two lengths. Time, 54sec. Dividend, £1 19s. The winner was bought in at £15. FAREWELL HANDICAP, of 20&ovs. Six furlongs. 35 — Mr Gardiner's Remorse 11, by Jacinth, 8.4 (Telford) l 7:-- Mr Brown's Miss Lochiel, 7.7 (Cotton) 2 34— Mr Alexander's Mount Clair, 8.0 (M'Comb) 3 o—Mr0 — Mr Duncan's Miss O'Kane, 6.9 (M'Eldowney) 0 A good finish. Time, 3min 19sec. Dividend, £1 19s.

BACIKG IN AUSTRALIA.

MOONEE VALLEY RACES. MELBOURNE, October 22. Tho following are results of the principal events at the Moonee Valley meeting: — St. Albans Handicap. Four and a-half furlongs.—Badger, 8.5, 1; Heiress, 7.12, 2; Habet, 7.12/ 3. Six others started. Betting: 7 to 4 agst Habet, 4to 1 Heiress and Badge. Won by a head. Time, 57Jsec. Moonee Valley Cup. Seven furlongs. — Locksmith, 7.0, 1; Olaf, 7.13, 2; Homespun, 7.3, 3. Also started : Tapioca, Sioux, Lochaber, Olaf, Wayfarer, and Alernene. Betting: 2 to 1 agst Alemene, 12 to 1 Locksmith. After getting well away at the start Lochaber (sic) won by six lengths. Moonee. Valley Pui~o — Beau B»uimnel 1, Safety 2, Titheridge 3. Betting: 2 to 1 agst Safety, 6to 1 Beau Bruioniel. Won easily by two lengths. Time, limn 3L£sec. In tho'TPhosh'ix IlandKip, eight and a-half fufibngs, 'Seasong 6.8, a 7 to 1 chance, easily put down, as a 6 to 4 on favourite Sycrla 9.5, and Sir" James 7.9." The" Tola, Miraculum, Sunbrown, and Nerius al&o started. Time, Imin 52Jsec. Last night nt the rooms 6000 to 180 was laid against Battalion for the Melbourne Cup, and 5000 to 125 Thunder Queen. Eight to 1 was laid aerainet Massinissa and The Grafter, 10 to

1 each Amborito and Clarion, 12 to 1 Dreamland, 16 to 1 each Merloolas and Wait-a-Bit.

WEIGHTS, ACCEPTANCES, &c.

CANTERBURY HANDICAPS. Spring Hurdles, of 200sovs. Two miles. — Social Pest 12.7, Ilex 12.7, Troubadour 10.13, Dundee 10.12, Sylvanus 10.11, Liberator 10.5, Nicholas 10.5, Clarence 10.4, Windermoro 10.3, Kuku 10.3, Glenoro 9.3, Powder Monkey 9.0, Typhoon 9.0. Flying Shot is not weighted, not having complied with the conditions. Riccarton Welter, of 150sovs. Six furlongs. — Black and Red 9.9, Jewel 9.9, Vandyke 9.9, ! Remorse II 9.7, Belleclair 9.7, The Spinner 9.4, Seabrook 9.3, Onigo 9.2, Svvordfish 9.2, Alcestis 8.10, Mountclair 8.10, Remorse 8.9, Bizarre 8.9, Lepanto 8.0, Aquatic 8.8, Crusader 8.8, Bimetati list 8.8, Bold 8.7, Hussar 8.7, Falka 8.7, Ben- ! son 8.4, Kismiss 8.3, Weary 8.2, Brisa 8.0, j Nevermore 8.0, Glynn 8.0. Ladies' Purse, of lOOsovs. One mile and ahalf.—Double Event 12.5, Haria 11.13, RangeI finder 11.13, Sequin 11.12, Liberator 11.8, Bloomer 11.7, Kuku 11.2, Zola 11.0, Rex II 10.11, Beggarman 10.7, Jib 10.2, Tamapu 10.0, Glynn 10.0. WINTON HANDICAPS. Handicap Hurdles. Two miles. — Seaward 11.0, Outrain 10.7, Victim 10.2, Invader 10.0, Seabreak 9.7, Lady Lorraine 9.0. Winton Cup Handicap. One mile and ahalf. — Barrnby 9.4, Picket 7.12, Seabreeze 7.9, Battlefield 7.8, Decoy 7.7, Paru 7.6, Glenelg 7.5, Lady Lorraine 7.0, Waikaia 6.12. Flying Handicap. Six furlongs. — Picket 8.12, Seabreeze 8.9, Musket 8.6, Senior Wrangler 8.4, Edelweiss 8.0, Sparrow 7.11, First Venture 7.10, Last Trick 7.9. Handicap Time Trot (Saddle). Two miles. — While Wave scratch, Lunacy 11 seconds, Miss Collins 13, Pansy (pony) 15, Sandy 21, Artist 24, Student 24, Hawkabury 24, Mayfly 28, Dolly 28, Ivy 30, Fair Nell 30, Gordon 30, Danger 33, Taieri Lad 33, Taipo 33, Demon 35, Onan 33, Grayface 35, Archie 37, Waikaka 37, Tramcar 37. Handicap Time Trot (Harness). Two miles. Foremast scratch, White Wave scratch, Butcher Boy II 7 seconds, Lunacy 11, Sandy 21, Fancy 111 24, Young Abdallah 24, Hawksbury 24, Ivy 30, Fleetwood Abdallah 30, Gordon 30, Taieri Lad 33, Danger 33, Taipo 3% Darby 35, Andy : Gray 35. I Tradesmen's Handicap. One mile. — Barmby 9.7, Seabreeze 7.12, Decoy 7.10, Paru 7.9, Chaos 7.8, Senior Wrangler 7.7, Camperdown 7.6, Professor 7.2, Waikaia 7.0. PLUMPTON PARK HANDICAPS. Maiden Handicap (in saddle), of 30sovs. Two j miles. — Simon R. scratch, The Fly scratch, Protest 6 seconds, Gay Lad 7, Peri 7, Etta Moore , 7, Au Revoir 7, Kai-iwi 8, Dictator 8, Lady I Tracy 8, Mahakipawa 8, Redwood 8, Effie 8, Laurel II 9, Ben Bolt 9, Hindoo 9, Princess ; Victoria 9, Bess 10, Edward R. 10, Advice 10, Estimate 10, Pinafore 10, Glenmuick 10, Mungo Park 10, Queen B. 11, Kent 11, Wandering Willie 12, Bellmore 12. Pony Handicap (in harness), of 25sovs. Two lailos.— Worthington scratch, Sailor Boy II 2 seconds, Vickery 4, Narragansett 10, Lassie 22, Hamlet 28, Kenny 30, Uncle Sam 32, Spalpeen 32, Little Magpie 32. Sockburn Handicap (in saddle), of 65sovs. Two miles.— Bellman scratch, Millionaire 2 seconds, Booby 4, Miss Annie 5, Ipswich 5, Spec 11, General Luck 11, Manuka 11, Vesta Nasii 11, Cosmo 13, The Member 15, Master Jrvington 15, Burwood Bess 15. Progressive Handicap (in harness), of 40sovs. Two miles. — Bellman scratch, The Baron 8 seconds, Sapphire 14, Arahura 17, Eglantine 17, Peril 18, Vickery 22, Imogene 23, lola 23, Zephyr 28, Sue Dudley 29, Garryowen 30. Perl 30, Sing Song 30, Medjidie 30. Selling Handicap (in saddle), of SOsovs. Two miles.— Murmur scratch, Glengarry 7 seconds, Rats 14, Old Jack 19, Ishnlet 21, Come Again 25, Fairfield 27, Paddyfeldt 27, Au Revoir 29, Pearl Marie 30, Yvairarapa, 32, Radical 32, Tor 32, Bess 32, Glenmuick 32, Puss 33, Roanwood 33, Miss Victor 33, Wenlock 33, Carrie 33, Peerless II 33, Ragman 33, Shannon 34, Stormbird 34, Bellmore 34, Scrub 35. Plumpton Handicap (in harness), of 65sovs. Two miles. — Violetta Jun. scratch, Young Burlington 3 seconds, Brookholm 5, Polly Huon »3, Bellman 6, Rosewood 8, Awahuri 9, Booby 9, asco 11, Tracy Belle 13, Heather Dew 16, Kingston 17, Elflock 17, Motuiti 18, Topsy Irvington 19, Tarawera 19, The Member 21. Electric Handicap (in saddle), of 40sovs. One mile. — Monte Carlo scratch, Gazelle 4 seconds Miss Poole 8, Sam Slick 9, Vanxhall 11, Bellman 12, Murmur 16, Manuka 18, Spec 18, Vesta Nash 18, General Luck 18, Tarawera 19, Glengarry 19, Regent 19, Pearl Marie 20, Wokaho 20, Burwood Bess 20, Sans Souci 20, Bob M. 20. Dash Handicap (in harness), of 40sovs. One mile.— Monte Carlo scratch, Cling 5 seconds, Young Burlington 9, Polly Huon 10, Bellman j 11, Utah 12, Micro 13, Isabel 13, Design 13, Scrutineer 14, Topsy Irvington 17, Oakwood i Abdallah 20, Amelia 20, Nigger 20. | AUCKLAND ACCEPTANCES. City Handicap, of 300sovs. One mile and aquarter.—Fabulist 9.7, Waiorongoinai 8.10, Impulse 8.9, St. Clements 8.9, Acone 8.5, Lillie 3.1, Crusoe 8.2, Coronet 7.11, Panoply 7.8, Supplejack 7.6, St. Elmo 7.6, Porangipotae 7.6, Korowai 7.G, Miss Anna 7.5, St. Gordon 7.0, Record Reign 7.0, Hylas 6.12, Donneraile 6.10, St. Ursula 6.7. Hurdle Race, of lOOsovs. Two miles.— St Simon 12.7, Tim 11.0, South Pacific 10.7, Anita 10.7, Kapai 10.7, Nor' -west 10.6, Dingo 9.0, Bonnie Blue 9.0. Guineas.— St. Ursula, Swiftfoot, St. Lawrence, Explosion, Hylas, Auld Reekie, Bluelacket, Blairgowrie, Hippodima, Drum-major, Roscana, Lady Harriet, Dayntree, Tommy Atkins, Rogulus, Milo. WINTON HANDICAPS. Hurdle Handicap. Two miles.— Seaward 11.0, Outrarn 10.7, Victim 10.2, Invader 10.0. I Seabreak n.7. Lady Lorraine 9.0,

Winton Cup Handicap. One mile and a-half. —Barmby 9.4, Picket 7.12, Seabreeze 7.9, Battlefield 7.8, Decoy 7.7, Paru 7.6, Glenelg 7.5, Lady Lorraine 7.0, Waikaia 6.12. Flying Handicap. Six furlongs. — Picket 8.12, Seabreeze 8.9, Musket 8.6, Senior Wrangler 8.4, Edelweiss 8.0, Sparrow 7.11, First Venture 7.10, Last Trick 7.9. Handicap Time Trot. Two miles. — White Wave scr, Lunacy 11 seconds, Miss Collins 13, Pansy (Pony) 15, Sandy 21, The Artist 24, Student 24, Hawkesbury 24, Mayfly 28, Dolly 28, Ivy 30, Pair Nell 30, Gordon 30, Danger 33, Taieri Lad 33, Taipo 33, Demon 35, Onan 35, Grayface 35, Archie 37, Waikaka 37, Tramcar 37. Handicap Trot (harness). Two miles. — Foremast scr, White Wave scr, Butcher Boy II 7 seconds, Lunacy 11, Sandy 21, Fancy 111 24, Young Abdalltih 24, Hawkeabury 24, Ivy 30, Fleetwood Abdallah 30, Gordon 30, Taieri Lad 33, Danger 03, Taipo 33, Darby 37, Andy Gray 37. Tradesmen's Handicap. One mile.— Barrnby 9.7, Seabreeze 7.12, Decoy 7.10, Paru 7.9, Chaos 7.8, Senior Wrangler 7.7, Camperdown 7.6, Professor 7.2, Waikaia 7.0. LAX S COUNTY TROT NOMINATIONS. Governor, Frank, Tory Boy, Bill, Pansy, Dick 11, Modesty, The Boy, Little Jano, Halifax, Design, The Clmer, Waikaka, Miss Mac, Topsy, The Artist, Taipo, Nilnb, Joe, Gordon. LANCASTER PARK NOMINATIONS. Trial Handicap (in saddle), of 40sovs. Two miles. — Roxollo, Advice, Gay Lad, Simon R, Come Again, Rockwood, Wild Rose 11, Pen, Shylook, Jewel, Ben Bolt, Dart, Johnnie 111, Tho"Fly, Lady Tracy, Dora, Edward R, JTionnuala, Booby, Satan, Rats. Pony Handicap (in harness), of 30sovs. Two miles — Little Magpie, Kenny, Lassie, Day Star, Hamlet, Emily, Narrangansett, Ken I Go, Vickery, Uncle Sam, Cipsy_, Spalpeen, Skipper, Satan. Spring Handicap (in saddle), of lOOsovs. Two miles. — Bradlaugh, Gazelle, Bellman, Monta Carlo, Lady May, Kola, Harold B. Advarce Handicap (in harness), of 50sovs. Two miles. — Motuiti, Eglentine, The Baron, Imogene, Awahuri, Bellman, Vickery, The Member, Uncle Tom, Johnnie 111, Manton, Medium And, Worthington. Lancaster Park Handicap (in harness), of XOOsovs. T\to miles. — Violetta, Polly Huon, Collector, Rosewood, Cling. Progressive Handicap (in harness), of 75sovg. Two miles.. — Motuiti, Ipswich, The Baron, Design, Alrnont, Bellman, Tracy Belle, Polly Huon, Young Burlington, Topsy Irvington, Manton, Rosewood. Electric Handicap (in saddle), of 55sovs. One mile. — Tarawera, Hassan, Eulalie, Bradlaugh, Te Aro, Gazelle, Bellman, F. 8., Ebony, Monte Carlo, Scrutineer, 0 essie, Vauxhall, Miss Poole, Cola, Harold B. Dash Handicap (in harness), of 55sovs. One mile. — Violetta, Sam Slick, Ipswich, Micro, Awahuri, Candidate, Isabel, Winnie, Ebony, Polly Huon, Utah, Miss Poole, Cling, Rosewood. Initiatory Handicap (in harness), of 45sovs. Two miles. — Zephyr, Wandering Willie, Rats, Peri, Laurel 11, Narrangansett, Johnnie 111, Ruby IT, Sing Sing, Fionnuala, Booby, Kent, Poril. Nursery Handicap (in 'harness), of 50sovs; for three-year-olds. One mile. — Guy Irvington, Irene, Almont, Moonbeam. Prince of Wales's Handicap (in saddle), of 120sovs. Two miles. — Awahuri, Bradlaugh, Gazelle, Jessie Palm, Bellman, Monte Carlo, Lady May, Cola, Harold B. Sydenharn Handicap (in harness), of 75sovs. Two miles. — Elflock, Kingston, Heather Dew, The Baron, Imogene, Almont, Bellman, Sailor Boy 11, Ebony, Peril, The Member, Ruby 11, Honest Jack, Worthington, Satan, Motuiti. Limit Handicap (in harness), of 120sovs. Two miles. — Monte Carlo, Polly Huon, Collector, Rosewood, Cling, Harold B, Violetta jun. Linwood Handicap (in saddle), of 75sovg. Two miles. — Zealandia, Ipswich, Bradlaugh, Spec, Millionaire, Linwood, Tracy Belle, Bell Lorimer, Cola, Harold B, Bellman. Telegraph Handicap (in harness), of 55sovs. One mile. — Violetta, Awahuri, Micro, Candidate, Isabel, Winnie, Ebony, Polly Huon, Young Burlington, Utah, Rosewood, Cling. Final Jaandicap (in saddle), of 55sovs. One mile. — Tarawera, Hassan, Zealandia, Sam Slick, Pilot, Eulaliej Bradlaugh, Te Aro, Millionaire, F. 8., Ebony, Scrutineer, Jessie, Vauxhall, Topsy Irvington, Miss Poole, Cola, Satan, Harold B. Bellman, Ipswich.

THE TROTTING PONY CLING.

AN INQUIRY AS TO PERFORMANCES. A special meeting of the Tahuna Paik Trotting Club was held on the 18th in Mr Myers's rooms to consider the question of the bona fides of the performances of the trotting pony Cling as handed in to the club with the original entry made. Mr S. S. Myers (president) occupied the chair, and there wero present Messrs Tovrasend, M'Donald, Brown, Wilson, and M'Ghie. Tho Chairman notified that Mr Solomon was present on behalf of Mr Rutherford, the owner of Cling. There was J no rule bearing on the subject, but the Trotting Association in Christchurch did not allow counsel. Mr Brown did not see any objection to Mr Solomon acting for Mr Rutherford. The Chairman said ho had no objection so long as it did not put the other party in the case— Clark, the trainer— at a disadvantage. Mr Townsend said he would agree if tho other mail were allowed an opportunity to piocure counsel if he so desired. Clark stated that he had no objection to Mr Solomon acting for Mr Rutherford, and Mr Solomon was permitted to remain accordingly. Tho Chairman then explained the business of the ovening. Ho stated that they were to consider whether all tho performances of tho pony Cling woro correctly stated at the timo *he raced. It might sewn rathei lato in tho

day to consider, but, if his information wer« correct, it was only through the owner and tha trainer falling out that the fraud, if there -were a fraud, had been discovered. Mr James, tho secretary, had told him that he had received information that Clings best performances had not besn given in a sworn declaration furnished to the club in accordance with the rules'. The mare was nominated to run on the first day of the Autumn meeting here, and on the I second day objection was taken that the sworn ! dsclaration which had been promised should ! be sent in was not forthcoming. Seeing that, the stewards stopped Ihe mare from running. Eventually tha declaration was handed in, and | sworn to by a man so well and favourably | known m the trotting world as Mr Buckland. J-j 16 committee naturally thought that after I Mr Buckland's statement the matter was satisfactorily ended. When, therefore, the secretary told him what had come to his ears ha instructed him to write to Mr Buckland A copy of that letter and of other letters 'relating to the matter would be read. On receipt of the letters he (the chairman) directed that all interested should be requested to attend the meeting. In the meantime he had carefully avoided speaking of the matter even to the members of the committee, so that all could weigh with a free mind the evidence 1 which was to be laid before them. As an mll dividual he was sorry he had anything to do with the matter, but as a member of the committee ho and the others had a duty tc perform to the public and to the other owners He was sure all of them w&re ready to thrash the matter out and get to the bottom. Before thsy proceeded further he would call i.pon Mr oames to state what he knew of it. Mr James, the secretary stated that some few weeks ago Mr Clark, the trainer of Cliug, calio<J | at the office and stated that the best perform- ' ance s were not entered in the declaration fcrwarded to the club. The performances omitted were that the mare had won a race of a mile and a-half in 4min 10 3-ssec, and also that cue i m vo race 3iv wnic h she ran was a 2-4 class. The best performance stated in the declaration w»s 2min Msec in a mile. Clark stated that this was known to Mr Rutherford, and the correct information was wilfully omitted from the entry. Pie (Mr James) told Clark that inquiries would be made into his jJlegations, and he was informed that whatever was done would not exonerate him. Clark said he was ! quite satisfied ; that he had fallen out with Mr Rutherford, and he wanted to get even with i him. He further a3ked if the owner of tha second horse would have any claim on tha > stakes, and he was told their claim held good for 12 months. Mr Buckland was then written to. Previous to that Mr Buckland had been 1 w . ritten to about the mare. He was in Chris fcI church at the time, and he wrote in reply as follows :— •* " Christchurch, April 27, IS9B. Secretary Tahuna Park Trotting Club Dear Sir,— Your 22nd April to hand. Tha mare Cling, about which you make inquiry, is the one I sold to E. G-. Watson. The performances which you attach to your letter are correct. The time of the race in which she trotted second was 2min 35sec, one mile. The other race in which she wag second was two miles; time smin 38sec. The winner had 15sec start from Cling. I am confident of the identity of the mare, because of the brand and numbar. Besides, which, a man in my employ cam© through Dunedin, and saw her trot at Tahuna Park on the day aho won, and he knew her at once. — Yours truly, " J. A. Buckland." Mr Buckland was, however, again written, to, and requested to furnish a sworn declaration,, which he did. (In this declaration appeared the following clause:—" That the performances as supplied by the owner at the time of entry at Tahuna Park are correct, and I am firmly of opinion that the matter is perfectly bona. fide.") Mr James went on to say that a meeting of the committee was held, and after receiving Mr Buckland's statement it was decided to pay out the stakes. After receiving the information from Clark a short time ago the following letter was sent to Mr Buckland: — "J. A. Buckland, Wonbobbie, New South Wales. " The parties connected frith the pony Cling have fallen out, and it has come to the knowledge of the club that the mare's best performanca was never handed in with the entry. This puts you in a very awkward position, as the sworn declaration made by you and handed to the club states that ' the performances as supplied by the owner at the time of entry at Tahuna Park are correct. I enclose copy of your declaration.' My committee are under the impression that you satisfied yourself perfectly that the mare produced for your inspection at Christchurch was Cling, but that you neglected to vorify the performances. I have now to ask- you to be good enough to send as soon as possible a full and correct list of Cling'a performances, and also to state if the present owner was fully aware of them at the time tho mare was dehveied by you, as it has been stated that the performance not sent in with entry was on the list as supplied by you to them. The performance I refer to was a. one mile and a-half trot at either Bathurst or Dubbo in 1894 or 1895, the time being 4min 10 3-ssec. This is very different to the best, as handed, with, entry and forwarded to you while in Christchurch, which please correct as requested. The committee liavo not yet had any of tho parties before them, the chairman being of opinion that I should write and inform you of the matter, feeling sure that you would not lend yourself to anything fraudulent, and theiefore give you an opportunity of forwarding your explanation and full particulars, which I trust you will do by first mail." — Mr James went on to say that tho reply ro ceived from Mr Buckland was as follows. — " Woubobbie, Warren, Ist October, IS9S. " H. L. James, Esq., secretary Tahuna Park Trotting Club. " Dear Sir,— Yours 14th ult. to hand to-daj re Cling and her performances. The facts o{ tha case are that a man named E. G. Watson purchased her from me in December, 1597, foi parties in Now Zealand, whose names were not stated to me. " Whan speaking to Watson I told him that if the people tried any ringing in I \voul<i give the club information, and when the xniuna

wa.3 delivered I posted to Watson a list of her performances and took a copy of it in my let-ter-book. I now enclose you the leaf from let-,ter-book, and by it you will see that the one anile ajid a-half in 4min 10 3-ssec is stated therein." " When in Christchurch I identified the '■ taare, the man with her told me that ' the pro- ' te3t was that the mare was not Cling ' but ■Hark, which, of 'course, I was satisfied was )not the fact, as I knew the mare. I asked him iibout the performances, and he assured me that they had. been put in correctly and nothing kept back. As I' did not happen to have letter with me "at the time to verify the performances, and thinking that the real thing was the identification, I_ Bigned the declara- i ifcion. If I had thought for a minute that the 'performances had not been correctly stated I .would not have signed such a document. In .all my sales I distinctly inform buyers that I give full information to secretaries of clubs of 'all performances,- and warn them not to buy ainless they intend to run straight. I do not I iknow any of the parties" concerned, but E. S. Watson was stated to be a reputable man in in Sydney. — Yours, truly, " J. A. Buckland.'* »— The leaf from the letter book was attached as stated in the letter. 1 The Chairman stated that he had seen Mr .Dowse, the handicapper, who said that he would be unable to attend the meeting. He asked him, however, if he would have handicapped the pony differently if he had known lithe correct performances, and he replied that certainly he would. On the motion of Mr M'Donald it was decided to take tho evidence of witnesses on oath. .JL'he first witness called was the trainer. « David Clark, butcher, said he trained and Hrove the mare Cling. She ran -at the Autumn aneeting here. He nominated her in his own Jname. He did not hand in all the performances she had done. He knew she had better {performances by seeing the list of the performances Mr Rutherford got from Mr Buckland. £Mr Rutherford thought that the performances ;were too good to put in. He was aware when 2.45 was put in as the best performance that that was not correct. Mr Rxitherford knew 'quite as much of the mare's performances as Witr-ess did. Witness never had an interest In the mare. He received all correspondence .hi connection with the mare as it ran in his name. He burnt Mr Buckland's letter. He thought that Mr Buckland had been misled through not having his books with him, when the wrote down from Christchurch. The nomiaiations produced were in Mr Rutherford's ihand- writing. There were others at Gore and Sat Plumpton he thought. l ] To Mi- Brown: Witness saw a list of the He could not say if she were in the 2.45 class. To Mr Solomon: Witness agreed with Mr 'Hutherford that it would not do to put all the performances in the entry. He had told the fclub because of the way m which Mr Rutherford took the horses from him. He never told anyone that Rutherford knew nothing of this. 'He had never told Mr Grindley that lie had a point to work of which Mr Rutherford knew aiothing. He had never said, " I have got a .point up my sleeve about which Mr Rutherford knows nothing." He was on good terms so far as he knew with Mr Wootton and Mr jG-rindley. He quite believed they would side jwith Mr Rutherford rather than with him. JMr Rutherford was ricn, and he was not. That made a difference. They might say what was p.ot true. It was not true that the omission joccurred through witness leaving out the bes~ performances when he was dictating them to Mr {Rutherford. . Robert Rutherford was then called, and said he instructed a man named Wallace, who lived %n Sydney, to buy the mare from Buckland. flhe mare was bought in the name of Watson, ifout a man of that name might have been employed by Wallace. The mare was consigned /to him in a fictitious name. He did not want ihis name to appear, and Clark agreed to run §ier in his name. The letter, produced, setting Sorth the pony's alleged performances was m [his handwriting. He swore that he did not Iknow that the two best performances were #eft out of the list supplied to the club. Clark jread out the list and witness wrote out the performances from it. He had no communication £rom Wallace except to state that the mare had jbeen sent over. He also got a list of the mare's performances at the time. Witness handed jover all the papers to Clark, and he never saw fchem since. He did not remember seeing that tEe horse did a mile and a-half in 4min 10 3-ssec, and that she trotted in a 2.45 class. He handed jail the communications about the maie to WUlark. He only received three or four letters paltogether. On his oath he would swear that '•all the performances, as far as he Knew them, sent in to the chib. He was not aware, nor could he explain how, the two best performJances were left out of the list. Clark read out jfche list and witness wrote it down. , To Mr Brown: He paid £150 for the mare. •He did not pay that amount for a horse whose ifoest performance was 2min 54sec for a mile. {He did not buy the mare on any of her performances. He received private information, !)and it was on the strength of this he bought Ahe mare. He received private information •from Mr Buckland that the mare did a good /performance on his private track. Mr Townsend : Have you ever raced in your name before? — Yes . And why did you not race Cling in your own jname then? — He suggested it, L suppose. There twas nothing crooked in that. *> In reply to further questions, witness said Jhe could not account for the rumour that had spread about that the mare was not Cling. TWnen he was in Christchurch he never got introduced to Mr Buckland. He only spoke to jhirn once, when he asked him if his horse had any show. Mr Clark: Why was the mare shipped to ILyttelton in the first place? Witness: It was at your suggestion. (Conjtinumg): It was not true that the reason was jthnt. it was originally intended to ring her in ! Jup there, but that the idea was afterwards abandoned. He woiild not be a party to such fc, thing. , To Mr Solomon: It was not true that witJnesß and Clark agreed not to send in the projper performances. Have you ever had any offer to have the Jfching settled for money? — I have, but would kiot give a penny, because I had nothing to square. Witness did not give the times when the pony ran second at Bathurst because no official times were taken. They were private ;times. The Chairman put the question at this stage $o Clark: "Have you ever made any offer to ifceeept money to hush this matter up ? " Clark: No. Suggestions have been made to me from outside parties, but I would not agree to it. People have remarked to me : " Why don't you go to him and try and get some money cut of him," but I would not. I said aio, I would rather have revenge. To Mr Solomon: Witness did not say that ';£SO would not square it up, that he would want £100. Mr Solomon ihen spoke on behalf of his client. He said the whole question was whether Rutherford knew that the entry was false. He thought it was only right that he should point out that in receiving the evidence of a man who admittedly went into a swindle with his eyes open, it must be taken with a great amount of caiition. He admitted that he was not only dishonourable, but dishonest, and it was a serious thing to accept his word when he freely and smilingly admitted that he bad come there to blacken Mr Rutherford's character, and to gratify feelings of revenge. He put it to them, would they be justified m olanincr ouch a fiticrna nn the name of a fellow

citizen on the evidence of a man on whose word no judge in the world would place the slightest reliance. The Chairman said that the fact that Mr Rutherford was represented by counsel placed Mr Clark at a disadvantage, and had he known that Mr Solomon was to be there he would have got Clark a solicitor through the club. Alfred Grindley, storeman, being sworn, said, in reply to Mr Solomon, that he had a corversation with Mr Clark on one occasion, whe-a he told him that he knew something about Cling which Rutherford did not know, anl which would put both Cling and Rutherford up. That was about six weeks ago. He never spoke to Clark or Rutherford since. Thomas Henry Wootton, tobacconist, said that Clark told him that he had a trump card up his sleeve which Rutherford knew absolutely nothing about, and which would put Mr Rutherford up as " high as a kite." He told witness to go and tell this to Mr Rutherford. Witness did so, and Rutherford said it was impossible. Clark said it would take something to square the thing. To the Chairman : He knew nothing of the pony's performances. He was a new chum at the races. To Mr M'Donald : Witness went down to Mr Rutherford at Clark's request. Clark said all he wanted was revenge. Witness thought it was pure spite all through. William Heads, storeman, Caversham, said that Clark told him in the Shades Hotel that he had papers in his possession which Rutherford knew nothing about, and which would get Rutherford into tiouble. He also told ■witness that on another occasion. To Mr Brown: : Had not been speaking to Rutherford about the case. William Christie said that he, Mr Clark, and Mr Ewart were out driving one day. Ewart asked C'laik if he would take £50 to square it. He said he wanted £100. To the Chairman: Witness then thought that Clark would take £100 to square it. Tho question was only put in the way of a lark, but the reply was given seriously. In reply to the Chairman, Clark denied that ho had said what Christie said he had. Joseph Carter, expressman, Caversham, said Clark told him that he would take £20 or £30 and square this matter. He told him that after the Grand National meeting. Witness went to Rutherford at Clark's request to tell him about the peiformances of Cling not having been furnished to the club, and Mr Rutherford said he knew nothing about it. To Mr M'Donald: He knew Mr Rutherford better than Clark. Clark never spoke to him about the performances before. To Mr Solomon : Clark knew that witness was going to Rutherford, and he understood that Clark wished him to tell Mr Rutherford that he was willing to take ~30 to square it. This concluded the evidence for Mr Rutherford. Clark said he had no evidence to call. Ho was quite satisfied to let tho matter rest where it was. He had told the truth. Rutherford first showed him the papers when he first got them from Buckland. He said it was no use trying to " ring " the mare in at Christchurch ; it was better to bring her down and run her stiaight. To Mr Brown : Mr Rutherford did not wish his name to be associated with the pony because he said that if there was trouble through the performances not being correctly stated the club would drop upon him (Claj-k), and they would not be able to get anything out of him. To the Chairman : When they found that the mare was branded they gave up the original intention of running her ciooked. This concluded the evidence. Tho phairman intimated that the secretary would communicate with the parties when the decision was arrived at. The committee wo aid defer consideration of their decision till Mr Buckland was again communicated with and a reply received from him.

BOBABIL, OS THE LAMENT OP THE LATER.

(By " Javelin," in the Leader.) Oh! son of She, you'll ruin me; when aie you going to stop? Each time you start I have to part, and backers always "cop." Of coiirse they know you'll "have a go" while others may be 'dead," And when I bluff to get their "stuff" on something else instead, They only wink and plank their "chink" on you against the field ; They'll clear the bag of ev'ry "mag," unless you some day yield. At home for lunch we used to munch cold chicken when we fed (My only boy a saveloy now takes to school instead). My eldest girl, a perfect pearl, a most accomplished wench, To earn her grub Will have to scrub, instead of learning French; From solo whist I must desist; the rosy wine to sup I can't afford; but, thank the Lord, they scratched you for the Cup!

01? TiTl'W'W r P J&XUJaJa JL »

NOTES BY SLIP.

The position in which the previous day's play had left the match between the Grange and Carisbrook B team did not promise a full afternoon's cricket last Saturday. A victory for the Grange was certain, and the only question was the number of wickets by which the victory would be obtained. That was a question into the consideration of which the run-getting abilities of the Carisbrook tail entered; but, in the event, the tail 'wagged very feebly, A. Downes, who obtained a lot of break on a good wicket, puzzling the batsmen very considerably. The way in which Baker and Johnston polished off the task of getting the runs wanted by the Grange was very gratifying to those who were able to look at their display from a wider than mere club standpoint. Baker was particularly active, but his colleague as well as he showed that he was getting into good form. Smith whose bowling had greatly troubled the Grange players in the first innings, was on this occasion treated with scant respect after the first over or two. He was sending them down so slow that the batsmen were easily able to go out and meet his bowling. There was a certain amount of risk in doing that, and Johnston had some luck in one instance in skying a ball over the bowler's head beyond the reach of any of the fieldsmen, and Spraggon, at mid-off, dropped a very hot chance from Baker, who drove a ball, of which he had made a half-volley, hard and straight to him. Harraway at the other end. pegged away very steadily, and though he could not get either of the batsmen out, they were unable to take any liberties with him. Spraggon, who relieved Smith shortly before the winning hit was made, actually had Johnston leg before once, but he did not appeal for it. The match between the Carisbrook A and the Dunedin clubs was the only one of the Senior Cup contests that promised anything like a full afternoon's play on Saturday, and that promise was contingent upon the Carisbrook making a fair score. They never, however, do make many runs on the Caledonian ground, and their previous record in this respect was maintained on this occasion, nine wickets falling for an avtrago of 7 runs apiece.

Siedeberg, who had played a good innings < n the previous Saturday, again batted nicely, and Fisher did well, while Butler played in tho steady manner that characterised his batting last year. The others, however, did very little against the bowling of Latham, whose form with the ball redeemed the excellent promise he gave two years ago. It is clear that the batting strength of the Carisbrook A team is much below that of recent years. On the other hand, the absence of Kinvig is a, severe handicap to the Dunedin Club, especially as Croxford has so far not struck form. Clarke, however, it was gratifying to see, was in excellent form, and his exhibition was the best he has given for a long time, while he received efficient support from Geddes, a new player from the Hawthorn Club, Melbourne, in whom Dunedin ranks seem to have secured a good left-hand batsman. The other members of the team collapsed very badly, as the fact that nine of them only scored 16 runs between them sufficiently shows. It was a foregone conclusion that the Opoho Club would defeat the Albion with an innings to spare. The last two wickets of the hill team added 36 more to the previous day s total, giving their side the substantial lead of 148 runs on the first innings. The Albion were more successful in their second innings than in the first, but they were in a hopeless position all through, and until they get six or seven batsmen of heavier calibre than they now have, and a couple of fresh bowlers, theie does not seem to be much prospect of their upholding with any degree of success the past traditions of their club. Thp two Senior Cup matches at Christchurch were advanced another stage at Lancaster Park on Saturday last, when the weather was splendid — though rather cold as the afternoon wore on — and both wickets were in good order for run getting. The United concluded their first innings against Lancaster Park for 260 (T. D. Harman 14, Harper 12, Williams 10) and the latter made 192 (Bennett 59, Boxsball 47, North 20, Wilding 16, A. E. Ridley 11), after which the United started their second innings with no wicket down for 30 (Harman and Vincent being the batsmen). In reply to the Midland's first innings' score of 246, Sydenham made 184 (T. W. Reese 42, Halley 37, Fowke 28, Walls 24, Wright 11, Gasson 10), and the Midland have started their second innings with no wicket down for 56, Smith and D. Reese batting. The first match of the season between the Pukeuri arid Hilderthorpe Clubs, played last Saturday week, resulted in a tie, the former scoring 26 and 40 (W. Goodall lf| and the latter 41 (J. Hartley 16, G. Thomson 13) and 25. The first match of the season between the Ale?.andra Club and the dredgemen employed at Alexandra, 13 a-side playing, was won by J the former by 29 runs on the first innings, | the club scoring 90 (Burnside 32, Burnes 14, Joss 12) and the dredgemen 61 (Daniels 26). On Labour Day the Dunback Club easily j defeated Shag Point by an innings and 59 runs, scoring 106 (Parker 23, J. Philip 22, Rice 17) to their opponents' 15 and 32 (Weston 13). On the following Saturday, however, the Dunback players were defeated at Palmerston, the latter club scoring 39 (Ferguson 18) and JOO for seven wickets (Miller 34, Robertson 23, Findlay not out 14, M'Leod 11) to Dunback's 23 "(Venn 11). Major Wardill, secretary of the Melbourne Cricket Club, has completed his 56th year. The Major played in an intercolonial match in Sydney 32 years ago, scoring a blob and 4 not out r for "Victoria. Being a kind, thoughtful man (the Referee remarks), with a perennial smile, he is highly popular, and, moreo-\ er, enjoys the respect of perhaps every Australian cricketer who has come in contact with him, and of most Englishmen who have visited Australia. Banjitsinhii gives _a characteristic sketch of "The Major" in his latest book : Major Wardill is a, man of large physical proportions, and looks an old cricketer of bronzed apearance. A thick crop of silvery hair gives one the idea of age that is at once denied by the energy and activity he displays. "Ben " Wardill has, indeed, an amusing way of speaking, with a certain amount of broad Yorkshire about it, and the way in which he breaks up his sentences by stopping at each word with a curious lisping jerk makes it extremely interesting;, though it is a somewhat difficult task at times to follow him. An amusing story is told of his opinion of the batting of the members of Stoddart' s other team, after seeing them practice at Adelaide on their arrival. He at once ga\e out his opinion to the skipper on his asking him what he thought of the players. "Well," he said, "it's Francis Ford first, and the rest nowhere ; as for Jack Brown, he won't get 10 runs in five months, and had better go home." The result of the tour showed him how eironeous his judgment was, and to this day his remark is still a standing joke. The Sydney Referee reports in the last number to hand: M. A. Noble captured nine wickets for 27 runs in a senior club match on Saturday, his victims including L. W. Pye, B. W. Farquhar, W. Howell, and J. C. Wilson, the four leading players of the side. Noble, who captured three wickets in four balls, made the ball cut all sorts of capers in the air. Every batsman on the side was puzzled by the flight of the ball, which curved and dropped perplexingly. A strong wind blew, but it is merely fair to state that Noble has thus early shown greater ability in the practice of curving the ball than ever before. Pie promises to perform greater feats than ever during this season. _ _ A. Kinvig seems to be keeping up his old form, as playing in a match at Macraes on Saturday week he made 37 (not out) out of a total of 61, and captured most of the wickets. SENIOR CUP MATCHES. "Caeisbeook A v. Dunedin. This match was continued on the Caledonian ground on Saturday, and proved to be very interesting and exciting, chiefly owing to the poor display of batting shown by the Carisbrook team and to the excellent partnership of Clarke and Geddes on the Dunedin side. Carisbrook (with one wicket, down for 5) resumed batting, but, with the exception of Fisher (18), Siedeberg (13), and Butler (10), failed to make any stand against the bowling of Latham, whose average reads eight wickets for 26 runs, and the innings closed for 68. With 118 to win, Croxford and Geddes faced the bowlers. Croxford was well taken behind the wickets by Austin off Fisher's first ball. Fish only saw the score taken to 7 when he was bowled by G. Austin. On Clarke joining Geddes the bowlers had a vary warm time of it, both batsmen scoring freely. Hope relieved Austin at the north end, while Austin went on at the south in Fisher's place, but in spite of the several changes in bowling it was not until the score had reached 61 that Geddes was caiight by Siedeberg at cover. The outgoing batsman had made 23 in a fine free style, and is undoubtedly a decided acquisition to the Dunedin Club. With three wickets down for 61 and Clarke still in the Dunedin's chances were favourably looked tipon by the enthusiastic spectators. M'Beth only contributed 3, and M'Kenzie had not started when Clarke returned a bumpy one to Harkness, with the score at 85. His innings

of 53 was extremely brilliant, and his free j hitting all round the wicket was greatly admired by the onlookers. His score included one 5, three 4's, and seven 3's. The remaining batsmen did not make any further stand against the bowling of Harkness, and the innings closed for 97—20 short of the required number. Harkness secured the bowling honours, while at times G. Austin was very puzzling to the batsmen. Scores: — Carisbrook. First Innings fc . 83 Second Innings. J. Harraway, b Latham », o Butler, b Latham .. .. Tv », 10 E. J. Austin, c Geddes, b Latham ... ». 6 Siedeberg, c M'Crorie, b Latham ,X .. 13 ! Fishe-, o Fish, b Latham .. j.« ». 18 Broad, c and b Latham „, „., -„ 5 ; G. G. Austin, b Latham .-.^ ... „, l Hope, b Skitch .. .. „.; ». .. 0 Liggins, c Clarke, b Skitch ..■ »« ... 4 Thomson, c Geddes, b Latham ... .. 4 ' Harkness, not out .."".., *• ».j 0 Extras „, ... .., .^ „. 7 Total „ .. „ r «i bj, 68

DuNEriK. First Innings ,c ..34 Second Innings. Croxford, qE. J. Austin, b Fisher .. ; .. 0 Geddes, c Siedeberg, b G. Austin .. .. 23 Clarke, c and b Harkness .. .. *.. 53 Fish, b G. Austin 5 M-Beth, Ibw, b G. Austin .3 M'Kenzie, c Harkness, b Fisher .., .. 2 M'Crorie, b Harkness .. .., .. *. 6 Skitch, b Haikness .. .. „. .. 0 Beck, run out .. .. R ., .. „ 0 M'Kersey, not out .. .. .. ,• 0 Latham, b Harkness .. .. ».i .. 0 Extras .. ... .. .. »« 5 Total .- »v *. 97

Albion v. Opoho. This match was continued at Opoho on Saturday. The weather and wicket were of tlio best. The Opoho (with 8 wickets for 156) continued their innings, which totalled 192. I M'Gavin only added 5 to his last Saturday's score, and Nichol made 19 in his usual care- i ful style, while Lear knocked up 10. The . bowling was divided between Joel and Dawes. The Albion started their second innings with j Black and Manley. The first wicket put en 22, but the second, third, and fourth ga^e no [ trouble. On Macdonald and Robertson getting together, however, a stand was made. The innings closed for S6, Black claiming 21, Robertson 14, and Macdonald and Joel 11 each. Webb again bowled well, his average for the match being 11 wickets for 36 runs. Doig in the second innings claimed three for 14. The following are the scores : —

Opoho. — First Innings. Collar, run out .. .. . . .. „43 Doig, c and b Dawes ,«j „ .. 4 ColleU, b Joel : .. ,_,. 10 M'Lean, c and b Dawes .. .. «. 9 Webb, b Joel .. .„ .. .. -„ 9 Gooch, run out ... .. ..; .... <*. 2 Gaugh, b Joel .. .. ».. .. n 2 ; M'Gavin, b Dawes .. .. .. .. 52 White, Ibw, b Murdoch .. „., .. 11 j Nichol, c and b Dawes .. ».. ; «. 19 I Lear, not out .. .. .., .. „10 Extras „., la . _.., .. „,21 Total >.j .. 192

Fir&t Innings .... ..54 Second Innings. Black, b Webb Manley, b Webb .. •„ 12 Gibson, run out .. a .] ... .. «. 0 Williams, b Webb „., 0 Macdor.ald, b Doig a. ..j .. ..11 Roberlion, c Webb „.. >„ ... .. 14 Dawes, b Doig .. .. .. .. i«3 Murdoch, b Doig .. .. ... *. 5 Thomson, not oiit •• *.j ... »• 6 Joel, run out .. .. .. j« >•. 11 King, absent ... . . »•-. sm •• — Extras ... .. «. »i »• 3 Total 86

Grange v. Carisbrook B. The Grange v. Carisbrook B match was finished on Saturday in fine weather. The Carisbrook, who had lost five wickets for 46 runs, resumed batting, but the other five wickets only put on 23 runs, thus leaving the Grange 45 runs to get to win. The required number were knocked up without the loss of a wicket, leaving the Grange winners by* 10 wickets. The scores are as follow: — Cabisbeook B. First Innings . . . . . . «™i ■*• 32 Second Innings. M'Lennan, bT. Downes .. .-.; *» 1 Smith, b Henderson .. .. •.. «'i 26 Burt, c Johnston, bT. Downes .. »». 1 Gould, b Henderson *. .. -•.-.: at 4 Leary, bA. Downes . .. ».. as .£«. 8 White, bA. Downes •„,; ... is 0 Spraggon, bT. Downes ••> •• &•_. 6 Haynes, bA. Downes ... a.« ». w« 0 Baker, bA. Downes ..; «... ... m. 3 Lywson, bT. Downes «•. ••: •• ww 4 Harraway, not out .. M « *« ,*•• ' Extras .. •« «: «« n, H Total „ *« m, -«: eu. 69

Ghange. First Inrfings me r. 56 Second Innings. Baker, not out .. .. ■„, jed *• 23 Johnston, not out « as 20 Extras •* >i> d icb as ** 2 Total .. m — «>i „ 45

JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP.

The match Mornington v. Opoho was won by Mornington by 27 runs. Scores : Mornington 78, Opoho 51. For Mornington Gregory (28) and R. Howiaon (21) k and for Opoho

Adams (11), Kilgour (10), and Thomson (16£ batted well. In bowling, for Mornington Gar* side secured four for 14- and Macfarlane foufl for 17. Eckhoff took most wickets for Opoho. The match between the Dunedin No. 2 and Privateers was played on the Asylum ground and resulted in some good scoring. Stalkery winning the toss for the Dunedin, Bent in Eyre and Fleming, and these two players played fine cricket till the score reached 62, when Fleming was caught, after compiling a very nice 33. Eyre soon followed, being bowled for a very patient 30. The other batsmen who troubled the scorers were Murohie (47), M'Kenzie (28), and Wilson (10), the total being 166. The Privateers started badly, as Hessian was caught with the score at s', but Casey came in, and had 500n. 22 to his credit, made with some good hard hitting, before being badly run out. O'Connor" (16), Claffey (19, not out) and M'Cormack (12, not out) also' batted well, and the score stood at 85 for five wickets when time was called. Miller, who captured five wickets, was the best of the Privateer bowlers, and Grimaldi performed best for the Dunedin capturing three wickets. Roslyn scored a decisive win over the Waverley by 208 runs on the first innings. Waverley, batting first, could only put together 20 runs. Roslyn, on going to the wickets, were not disposed of until the score reached 228. A. Dobson (58), H. "Wilkinson (53), H. Fisher (50), F. Jackson (27), and S. Brown (10 not out) were the principal scorers. Jfisher (six for 10) and Armit (four for 10) did great execution for the Roslyn. Fearon, Cramond, and Pickard bowled best for the Waverley. Before the match, the Roslyn Club assembled in the pavilion, where Mr J. C. Thomson, their president, presented the bats offered by him to be competed for last season. These- were awarded to F. Jackson for batting and Hurtle Fisher for bowling. Mi Thomson also intimated his intention of presenting bats to be competed for in the coming season. After three hearty cheers had been given for their president, the club took the field. The Oceana met the Hendley at the Oval. Oceana, batting first, made 56, Richardson (13) and D. Mason (12,n0t out) reaching double figures. The Hendley could do nothing against the bowling of Butlin, and were all disposed of for 19 runs. For the losers B. Thompson (five for 8) and .uestieaux bowled well, and for tho winners Butlin (seven for 1) and King (two for 4). The^Albion Second met and defeated Dunedin No Iby 3 runs. Scores : Dunedin 36 and 82 for seven wickets (M'Lean 23 and Blues 25), Albion 39 (Ritchie 17 Gibson 10). The Dunedin could do nothing against the bowling of Aimes who secured the splendid average of seven wickets for 10 runs. For the Dunedin Aitken and M'Kay bowled well. The Port Chalmers mot and defeated the Trinity at Port by 30 runs on the first innings. Scores: Port 61 and 49 (Hunter 23, Ward 28, Wishart 14, and Jack 14), Trinity 31 and 18 for two wickets (Scott 10). For the Port DJack bowled well taking four wickets for 9 runs ; whilst Kenard bowled very effectively for the Trinity. The match Taieri -v. Carisbrook D was played at Mosgiel on Saturday, but was not finished when the stumps were drawn for the day. Taieri, winning the toss, went first to the wickets, and put together the very respectable total of 117, of which J. Allan claimed 45, Dr Allan 24, R. Inglis 13, and J. Inglis 10. Carisbrook, in their venture, have lost so far five wickets for 45 runs (Smith 13 and Munro 10 not out). For Carisbrook Monk secured seven wickets for 0 31, Maitland two for 9, and Harraway one for 10 ; while for Taieri four of the five wickets that are down fell to H. Allan, the other being captured by H. Inglis. THIRD CLASS CHAMPIONSHIP. The match Mornington No. 2 v. Opoho resulted in a win for the latter by the narrow margin of five runs. . Opoho scored 56 and Mornington 51. The batting honours were divided between M'Nair, Johnson, and Doyle for Opoho, and Norman and Garside for Mornington, and the bowling between APKersey, Johnston, Norman, and Cornish for their respective sides. Dunedin No. 2 met and defeated the Roslyn No.' 2 by an innings and 2 runs. Scores: Roslyn 42 and 43 (Clarke 13 and Gilmour 11). ■ The Dunedin made 88, chiefly through the splendid batting of J. Stewart, who played a fine innings of 40, not out, and was ably assisted by Thomson (15) and Hamann (1?|. Clarke and TJssher bowled well for Roslyn, as did Ferguson, Stalker, Thomson, and Hamann for Dunedin. The Dunedin No. 1 journeyed to Roslyn and defeated the Roslyn No. 1 by 5 runs. The Dunedin started very badly, losing seven wickets for 21, bvit Helcy and Hume came to their team's assistance by scoring 27 and 10, not out, respectively, and the innings closed for 62. The Roslyn were only able to obtain 57, of which J. Eeid made 15. Briggs (five for 21) and Hamann (four for 18) bowled splendidly for Dunedin, while M'Millan, Brown, and Dobson bowled well for Roslyn. Mornington No. 1 beat Trinity by 20 runs. Scores : Mornington No. 1, 86 ; Trinity, 20. For Mornington D. Cameron (36), Williamson (16), Lamb (15), and Williams (13) played well. Ross (five for 7), White (two for 7), and Fleming (three for 2) were the successful bowlers for Rosyln. Nagle secured most wickets for | Trinity. The match between Grange 111 and Albion 111 resulted in a win for the latter by 24 runs on the first innings. Scores : Grange, 31 and 46 (J. Wyllie 10 not out, R. Wyllie 12) ; Albion, 55 (Harris 16, Corbett 12, and M'Cracken 11). For the Grange Price and Wyllie bowled best, while for the Albion Corbett (six for 19), Thomson (six for 20), and Duthie (three for 10) obtained good averages. Carlton defeated Privateers B by 19 runs. | Privateers winning the toss, elected to bat, and I scored +8. Carlton replied with 67, Pollock (15) and Stewart (15) being the chief contributors. For Privateers Smith (six for 22), and for Carlton Pollock (three for 3), bowled well. The High School No. 1 defeated the Waverley No. 2 on the Asylum Ground by 52 runs. High School made 97, Bavron (35, not out), Campbell (23), and Andrew (13) reaching double figures. Johnston bowled best for Waverley. Waverley made 44. Wyatt, How> den, and Hislop bowled best for the School. Port Chalmers met and defeated the High School at Port Chalmers by 17 runs. Scores : Port Chalmers, 82; High School, 65. For the winners Colthorpe (35, not out), Tennent (14), and W. Waters (12) were highest scorers. Bunard (17) and Reid (16) played best for the School. For the Port Mooney (three for 10), Waters (two for 8), and for the School Lewis and Reid bowled best. The Oceana and Taieri met at Montecillo. The Oceana going in first made 72. P. Logan, played a fine innings for 30, not out. Mitchell (19) also reached double figures. Tha Taieri, batting a man short, made 28. For the Oceana Mitchell (six for 8) and M'Farlane (three for 12) ,and for the Taieri Eyre and Stoddart bowled well. No person in Norway may spend more tnafit thieeoenoo at ona visit to a publiohouea.

latham ■eddes ' ['Kersey E Bowlii :ng Analysis. Balls. Mdns. Euns. Wkts. 104 5 26 S 36 2 18 — 36 — 13 —

Fisher 3-. Austin Eope Earlmess E Bowling Analysis. Balls. Mdns. Runs. Wkts. BIM 72 5 38 2 „78 4 28 3' „ 12 — 10 — .. 74 5 16 4

3-ibson Dav-es foel Stanley Murdoch « • Overs. Mdns. Runs. "Wkts. „ 6 0 24 0 „ 17 1 49 4 „16 0 58 '3 m 9 1 17 0 ..8 2 23 1

77ebb _ kl'G-avin xongh 3oig Si' Lean B if. 3ovtlisg Analysis. Overs. Mdus. Kuns. Wkts, w 17 3 22 4 0 28 0 tm, 3 0 9 0 ™ 9 0 14 3 „ 3 2 6 0

nir ±i.Na.Li}Laxa. '. Dovvnes .. Dowries [enclerfaoa mm Balls. Mdns. Runs. Wkts. 54 2 16 3 72 1 33 6 48 0 8 2

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Bibliographic details

Otago Witness, Otago Witness, Issue 2330, 27 October 1898

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37,063

Otago Witness Otago Witness, Issue 2330, 27 October 1898

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