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DEATH OF MR JOHN CARGILL

Information has been received of the death at Landsdowne, in the Okanagan district, British Columbia, of Mr John CargUl, brother of his Worship the Mayor, who was a prominent figure in thß early history of this portion of the colony. While a young mai Mr Cargill served for a short tioae in the Royal Navy, and epeut two or three years on the West India station in the brig Ringdove aud the frigate Seriugapalam, and having left the service and returned to Great Britain he made a voyage about 1841 to Tasmania and Port Phillip, and, after a. cruise among the Pacific Islands, settled in Ceylon, where he waa engaged as r. coffee planter up to the year 1846 Returning once more to England he was in time to assist hi g father, Captain Cargill, iv the formation of th Obago settlement, and he came out; with him in the John Wickliff. He was one of the earliest runholdera ia Ofcago. His first run was on the cossb line at T<--kotnairiro. He afterwards took up the Mount Sbuart ruu H having his head station at Meadow bank, in the middle of the Taien Pisin. On the outbreak of the diggings he removed to what was then looked upon as back country, taking up wh«,t .afterwards became the well-known Teviofc ruo. Here he joined in partnership with his ssn-in-law, Mr JS. R. Anderson, and Cargill and Anderson's rim was long known as one of the fiiipst in the South Island, having a flock of 55,000 well-bred merino sheep. They atterw%;d6 took up a large property in ths south, known as Gladfield. Uufortunateiy, owing to the irruption of rabbits and the breakdown in the wool values, their ventures resulted in heavy loss, their experience being shared by many of the pioneer settlers, and both Mr Cargill and Mr Audeison turned their eyea to other countries. Mr CaigiU lolt New Zealand for Bnglaud'ia 1884-. He found his way to British Columbia about 1837, aud continued to reside there, with his youngest daughter, up to the time of his death, which occurred at the ripe age of 77 years. WhiJe in Otago he took au active and leading part in the political movements of the time. He was one of the fiL'sb representatives of the pvovince elected to the General Assembly which met in Auckland immediately after the constitution of the provinces, being returned unopposed iv October, 1853, in conjunction with Mr W. H. Cutten, to represent the country district of Otago. Mr Cargill went up to Auckland in company with hi-) father ami the late Mr J. I Maoandrcw to attend the parliamentary session. In 1855 he was elected mfcmbar of the Provincial Couucii for the Tokomairis-o district, and in the same year was re-eieebsd M.H R. for the Dunedin country district in company with his father. Mr Cargili also took a lively interest in the volunteer movement. During one of his visits to the Home country he joined the Edinburgh corps and became ensign therein ; he also attended the Sobo 1 of Musketry at Hybhe, and obtained a certificate as a firsfc-cUss marksman. On returning to the colony he used his knowledge to help in the establishment of volunteering, and he became and continued for some years colonel in I command of the militia and volunteers ;in the Dunedin district. Mr Cargill was married, shortly after his arrival in the colony, to the eldest daughter of the late Mr John Jones, bub she died in January, 1868, and he subsequently married a daughter of the late Dr Feathers! on Of the fir.it marriage there was a famiiy of four daughters and two sons. Charlotte, the eldest daughter, married Mr Charles Ireland (son of Mr Ireland, Q.C.), barrister, and i ow reoides wibh him and their family in Britkh Columbia; Madeline married JohD, son of the late Mr J. Hyde Harris, and now lives iv Eu<ope with one daughter ; the third daughter married Mr B. R. Anderson, aud she also resideß in Europe ; tfce youngest daughter is in British Columbia, and w-s with her father at the ftime of his death ; and the sons are Johu and Edward, who have settled in British Columbia. The family of the second marriage consisted of three children, of whom two survive, — tha elder son being a doctor of medicine al present in South Africa, and the younger being with his mother in England. The deceased genbleman was a man ot high personal character, who won the warm esteem of his fellow colonibts, and the news of his death will be received with regreb by all who knew him.

Previous to tha reading of the minutes at the City Couucii meeting on the 9th, Cr Denniston said he was sura he spoke not only for all the councillors but for the citizens geneially when he expressed to his Worship their heartfelt sympathy in the loss by death of his brother and former partner, Mr Johu Cargill. Many of the councillors and a number of the citizens had known the late Mr Caigill more or less intimately, and those who did not kuow him had been made acquainted by the newspapers' obituaiy notices with the f^cts of liis life, and had learned what a useful citizen and colonist he had been. He (Cr Denniston) repeated that his Worship and his family had tlie hearty sympathy of tbe couucii and of the citizens.

Cr Hardy spoke in a like strain,

The Mayor, in reply, said he fully appreciated the kindly feeling expressed by the speakers. He might say that his brother John was one of the earliest settlers. He came out in the John Wickliff, and, to the best of his ability, had done liis duty to the colony while he resided in it. He was a member of the first Assembly that sat in Auckland ; be served in the Provincial Council and the General Assembly ; he was among the earliest runboMeis; and lie waa at all times a promoter of whatever made for the good of the colony.

News fiotn liarofconga by the Upolu states that the Government; printing plant hss bees locked up by Mr Moss, the British Resident. A party of men aud police demanded possession under instructions ibuued by Judge Tepoc, at/d burst the door o^cu and quietly removed the plaut.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18980217.2.89

Bibliographic details

DEATH OF MR JOHN CARGILL, Otago Witness, Issue 2294, 17 February 1898

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DEATH OF MR JOHN CARGILL Otago Witness, Issue 2294, 17 February 1898

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