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TALK OF THE DAY.

By MAZEPPA.

*#* There are 32 horses left in the Second Eclipse Stakes, to be run at the Dunedin Cup meeting this season, and all of these are liable for the full stake. On known form at least halt of these could be ruled out as possessing no calculable chance of beating Mr Stead's best ; bub the beauty of horse-racing is that form changes very suddenly, and another consideration tending to encourage owners to give battle against edds is that mishaps and accidents and colds occur to the best as well as to the worst ; wherefore, though to back the Yaldhurat stable against the field would at present look like good 'business, there is some sort of a chanca for the others. Even on their merits, some of the candidates have valid claims to respect — I refer to such horses as Diunt and Nihilist and St. Paul — and while, as I have said, the Eclipse looks like a good thing for Mr Stead, he has not yet won it. His representatives are Gold Medallist, who so far has eicaoed a penalty, and is therefore ireichtod at

8.7 ;. Multiform, who haa the full 101b penalty makißg his weight 9.3; and .the two-yenr*oldß Conqueror and Altair. - Some say that ' ths latter, who is a ion of Castor and Cissy, will bo the beat of the fleet in the autumn. Perhaps this may be so, but at .present my idea is that Gold Medallist will be kept for the Eclipse.

*** English papers to hand this week confirm the denial that Qaltea More has been sold to the Hungarian Government — a denial which appeared in these columns last week— and, in addition, we now have news that the Hungarian Jockey Club officially contradicts the story of the sale, which originated in the Vienna neirtf* papers. An offer from someone whose name is not revealed has been made for Galtee More, and Mr Gubbins has put a price on the champion colfc, but no business resulted. The price, it is said, was a very high one. All this took place when Galtee More had the Sandown Foal Stakes immediately in front of him, with wbat looked like a good show in the Cambridgeshire to follow ; but he . did not altogether maintain ' his reputation in the Foal Stakes, though he won, and ho failed to make any show in the Cambridgeshire, and as a consequence of these things the offers for Galtee More cooled off considerably. In regard to the Cambridgeshire, my copy of the Sportsman of the 28th October hat gone astray, so I cannot give tho detailed account this week ; bub I have a report of the race for the Foal Stakes, from whioh it appears that tha crack started at-. 100 to 8 on, and woo easily enough,' though the performance was so littla like his old dashing stylo as. to cause him to Tece.de in the Cambridgeshire betting to ■33 to 1. " * " : ■ r - s- >

*** Since the trotting lilt was last published, on the 21st October, a number of horses have made even time, and the majority of these ara new to the list. At North Otago we had Stirling Lad doing the two miles iv exactly 6min and Berlin Doll making 4-min 56sec for a mile and a-half. The Gore meeting brought in Lexington with records of 2min 56iec at a mile and smin 54sec at two mile*, while Batchei Boy II enters the list with. 4min 27« ec for a mile and a-half. That fast horse Spider showed a gait of 4-min 4-sec for the mile and a< half at the Timaru meeting, and Garfield did a mile in 2min 54sec. The Ashburton Trotting Club's meeting resulted ia Ringwood II getting a record of smin 46sec, Medium And smin 57£oain and Flirt smiu 47sec for two miles, while Belfast Girl reduced her time to smin 4-2 sec ; at* mile and a-half Cass registered 4min 18sec and' Toby brought his time down to 4min 7«ec ; and at a mile Ringvrood II did 2min 4-lsec. Tho T-aieri mooting found Harry Sneaker making Smtn 23scc at two miles and Miss M'Phee 4m in 28; ec at a mile and a-half. The Winton meeting resulted in White Wave reducing her time for three miles to Bmin 36scc. "Palmerston North saw three, new 'records — Jersey 2tnia 57sec for a mile/ Gazelle 6uoin 40iec for two mile 3 and a-half, and Deceiver Bmin 47*eo for three miles'. Half, a dozen joined the even" timers at. the Wellington trotting; .meetinf, where Winnie did 3min, Toroa 2min 57sec, and Little Hero 2min 53sec for a mile, while at two miles Duck II made, Smin 48sec, Thyrna smin 54sec, and Cleveland < smin 40*eo. Tho Plumptou P.ark meeting found ,fou£'fa»b,hor*eß lowering' their ' records 'at a mile — namely, Jcisie to 2min 37sec,-Huzeldean to 2min 47« ec, !~Hotdern to 2min 37sec, and Littls" Willie,- to I 2min 26£ sec, the latter being .only, 2sec behind I the colony'.s record; for. the distanfce./ The Myo- | mile performance* at tmV meeting included , lola. omin 43spc, Fleigher smin Mise I H*nlon smitL si£sec', Broolihqlttr smiri'2osec, I Kingston suiin 27$ ec, * Thomas (pony) soiin ! 52see, and Colonial smic 28%iec. while Lady Jane reduced her record to smin 21sec, Beware got to the sa>in 16iecmark, and the pony Topsy IrviDgton did better tban even time, though her best performance came later on at Lancaster Park. Tbis Lancaster Park meeting brought about the following results : — At a mile, Candidate equalled his own record of 2min 39seo, while Gazelle improved hers to 2min 31sac and Miss" Poole (o Smin 32£ sec, and the recruits were The Baron 2min 46sec and Isabel 2min 43 4 ssec ; at two milea Maggie lowered her teCoi'd to smin 12sec, and Prince Albert oßnia down to srnin 18f»ec, wbile the name* added to the lisb were those of Eglantine smin 44 cc, the pony Topsy IrvingtonSißfn 303 ec, Experience smin 25£»ec, Jessie Palm smin'2O 4-s»ec, Hocest, Jack smin 54£seo, .The Baron smin 26£*. Ec, Rosewood smin 14& sec, and Heather Dew smin 25«ec. The champion records for the colony— namely, 2min 30seo ox better, stand thus :—: —

These nine performances are all' that we c*u raise as showing- the p»cfc which American* 'regard- as standard time — that*. iet- to say, Zmin--30sec or better^; bnt of course it is a'big handt- _ cap sgaiost ourselves in the ' compamon 'to reckon in distances of over • a mile, since two miles in stnin is ever so much more meritorious . tban a mile in 2min 30«ec. I regard Specification's three miles in'7min 35^sec as a really wonderful performance wheu analysed and compared. It may also be observed that although only six horses have actually done, 2mm 30seo or better at a mile in New Zealand, there are many that could get inside that mark if wanted to, and they will come forward as soon at they are genuinely wanted. The bempta>ion required is a big money consideration. A valuable purse for a championship meeting in, say, March, after the stallions are ready to race, would cut all the records on a track like Tahnna and be the greatest draw ever seen in ttvtting. -

*** The P*rthenops9U3 case in Melbourne is accepted by the leading turf writers as a jasb decision. " Asmodeus " says : The denouement of the inquiry has formed the sensation of the week, and as a result of further investigation at the hands of the V.R.G. the horse and his joint owners, Messrs Samuel Allen and Thomas Arnfield, have been disqualified for life. No further action was taken in respect to the trainer (A. Ferguson) and rider (P. Guinane), both of whom were disqualified during the pleasure of the stewards. This is the most drastic punishment meted out to those convicted of evil doings at Flemington since the celebrated Mata case in 1880. As all tutf inquiries are held in camera the evidence adduced in this now cause celebre is not. avail able. • The public are only seized of the outiide facts of the case — namely, that Par* thenopaeus put up an indifferent performance in the Spring Handioap when unbacked, and two days later, when handicapped relatively on 71b or 81b woree terms in the Final Handicap, he was backed for a good stake and won. Th« case was one which obviously necessitated in« quiry, with the immediate result that the trainer and jocktey were dealt with in the way mentioned, and the affair adjourned with, a tw*

of dealing with anybody else who might h9 found implicated. As is now well known* snfficient evidence w*s forthcoming . to bring about the sweeping- convictiors which have caught the racing public of all Australia by the ear. It is presumed the V7R.C. was sufficiently justified by the evidence in ordering the levere form of punishment which it has thought fit to apply to all the parties associated with the pulling of .Parthencpsaus in the Spring Handicap, and this wholesale wiping out of owners, trainer, rider, and horse cannot but exercise a beneficial influence generally on the whole army of turf traders — and it is a pretty formidable one — who run their horses dishonestly. Hitherto, the prevailing custom has been to vieit the sins of the prime instigators of "jobs" on the nnfortunate jockey, and occasionally on the trainer, the primary wirepullers invariably escaping ecathless. It is some consolation to know that the V.R.C. has at laat changed this order of things, and that a whoTI gang whom it has found guilty of naaljpracticee has been dealt with in a manner which it doubtless deserves. * # * Some interesting side-lights are thrown on the affair by "Ajax," the correspondent of Sydney Referee, who remarks : Tha ending of the much-talked-of Pnrthenopseus case came as a great surprise to most people. Nobody probably were more surprised than Messrs T. Arnfield and S, Allen, who have to suffer tho supreme penalty -of the racing tribunal— disqualification for life.- Both were anxious, about Guinane and ' Ferguson, who had been disqualified during the p'easure of the stewards, and were doing their best to' aw/st them, little thinking what . waß in ■ntore for themselves. They each felt the ■ sentence of - the .V.R.C. Committee very. ' keenly. Tfa« mercurial Sammy Allen, the humourous little man who tent the cable to the Prince of Wales congratulating him on Persimmon's Derby win, and who takes a personal interest in every variety artist that arrive* in Australia, has been as if in a dream ever since. No one ever took Sammy very seiiously at any time. He was regarded as a man who was fond of beibg talked -abont, but as for guile, no one suspected him of it. It was s a conceit he had to have his name on the card ai the owner of Pnrthenopseus— the first horse he ever ran in his life. He and Arufie'd bought the horse jointly with the object of sending him to Mr C. Hibbert, the well-known English bookmaker, bub when the trouble came Al'en took the responsibility of being the sole owner. TheV.R C Committte, however, associated Am Beld in the ownership. As everybody now knows, P. Guinane, the jockey, turned Queen's evidence in the case, and this was how the V.R.C. Committee were able to get evidence to convict Arnfield and Allen. There haß been a lot of talk about the alleged asking by Guinane of a price to keep bis mouth shut, bub failing to get it he had made a clean breasb of it. Ido not think there is any truth in this, bnt I believe the climax was brcught about by an injudicious letter to the papers signed by Allen, saying that he had every confidence in FergusoD, and »as he said i.o'hing about Guinane the inference was that .he had not eirnilw confidence in him. This seems to have got Guinane's back up. He evidently thought they were *U trying to get out and leave him in the lurch, and .this.vimpelled him to make his disclosures to the pommittee There it, ' I be- " lieve, a good deal.lof,. bitterness manifested by Arnfield and Alleii against-Ferguson, who, as well as Guinane, is regarded as having^made bimself safe withthe.ccmmiltee. I do noticnow yrhat tte two men will_<io now that their vocation is gone. Arnfield is' a man of braiua and resources, and will no doubt start in some busiceis;" but Allen it, I take it, more of the butterfly, and with his comfortable income will probably simply saunter through lif<\ Arnfield is reputed «o be worth about £40,000 and Allen about £20,000. *+* Mr T. Grose, the sharebroker, who died in the Dunedin Hospital la«t week at the age of 51 years, was not a horsey man in any sense of the word, yet he might fairly claim to be a sportsman — that is to say, he went to races and /did a bit of backing, and on several occasions became interested in ownership reppousibHitieo. He was part owner of Captive at one time, acd sole o.wner of CampbelJ, and his readiof-ss for a spec at various times gave him a say in other horses with which his name was never publicly associai^d. So far as I ever beard, be always conducted himself in these and other transaction* in a straightforward and npright manner. Nottbat " poor old Tern," as he was often called, posed as an angel by any manner of means, but in his own brusque way ho tried to do a fair thing, and more than once to my own knowledge he refused to play the shark when the opportunity came in his way. Ah a case in point I may mention that once upon a time, being commissioned 6y a friend at a distance to buy a jracir if he found one to. suit ,th« inquirer's conditions, he in his ignorance of horseflesh ' tnado a bargain for a horse that be thought was just the thing, and was about to ship his purcbaße..wben.he discovered ihat the brute wan lame. A sharper might htive cccked % blind ej eto the lameness ; many men, stopping short . of 'that, would have tried in some way to shift - the burden to the pockets ofNhe pr ire' pals ; but Tom Grose shouldered the less himself and cajd nothing about it, merely informing his friend that he could not get a horte to suit him. This was the action of a genUeruau, and otherwise, in a general way. I had reason to form a good opinion of " Old Tom." Perhaps if he had been smarter, in tbe common acceptation of the term, he might have had a bib of money as a stand-by wten sickness overtook him. **.* A final settlement of the American «a«eof Riley Grannan, "the plunger,-"' against the Westchester Racing Association has been arriTed at, and the decision endorses the right nf the American Jockey Club to warn people off ' who are detected making presents to jockeys. At the Coney Island Jockey Club's Summer meeting in 1896 Forget, a western mare, after a couple of in-and-out performances, defeated good company in remarkably fast time. Riley Grannan backed the mare handsomely in this race. The further entry of the mare was refused under a decision rendered July 11, 189S, pending an investigation of the race by the jockey club. The outcome of the investigation of tbit and other questionable races was the revocation of the licenses of one trainer and two jockejs and tbe rnling-oif of Grannan. Dnring the season of 1895 Grannan had won largely on one of Jockey Taral's mountß, and bad presented the jockey with '500dol. At Morrisp&rk Grannan was refused admission, but he obtained a temporary injunction restraining the .stewards from debarring him from, their - grounds, pending the final decision of his case. In referring to the verdict against Grannan, the Spirit of tbe Times says: — Since the passage of the racing bills the decition of the Court of Appeals in the case of Riley Grannan against the Westchester Racing Association is the greatest victory for turf government, as represented by the jockey club, in its history, The fundamental principle of turf government •was at stake in this case, and while a final decision in favour of the iockey club was antici-

pitted, it i« none the I«ss welcome. The. right of the various *s*cciations to exclude from their courses such persons as the jockey club may see fit to punish gives the* jockey club an autocraticpower — which, however, will only be used to further the best interests of the American turf.

*** Dunkeld has been sold to go to America from Australia. This horse was bred by Mr Stead, got by Apremont from Athole, who a year later gave birth to Heather Bell, the consistent and speedy mare that did such excellent service on the turf for Mr Hungerford. Athole was sired in England, by Blair Athol, and foaled in the colony, her dam being Florence Macartby, dam of Tirailleur. Thereate three things that I remember Dnnkeld by :" First, that when he ran for the Middle Park Plate in the colours of Dan O'Brien he put up a etone overweight in order to"get the services of Derrett. Entitled as a two-year-old maiden from a mare that had not produced a winner to carry only 6.11, he put up 7.11. and won comfortably, beating Wolverine, Chudlcigb, and Adulation. The next thing that I remember about Dunkeld was his coming to Dunedin for the Cup meeting, and playing up on the road out to the stables after being landed from the Christchurch express. He was within an ace of seriously damaging himself that night. Then, again, there was his series of performances at that meeting. In the Champagne Stakes he was fairly held by Cynisca after half a mile had been gone ; he next :day "scored in a very decisive manner in the City Stakes, giving Scots Grey 111b and a beating ; and then, on the third day, he stopped very badly in the Marshall Memorial S-akes, for which he was a strong favourite, somewhere ' about the distance post.

* # * To be candid, I did expect a few more nominations than those which have been madefor the Tahuna Park Christmastf de meeting ; still, considering that clubs all round, the country are ottering for patronage at this particular time of the year, there is really every reason for the Tahuna folk to be satisfied, seeing that they have a fair representation of the pick of the Otago horses. Victors are included, truly, but Otago is Otago's mainstay in racing as in all other things. The entries include such known performer* as Bedale, Colonel, Honest Wilkes, and Joe Barnett, and of second-raters there are many that possess a fair turn of speed. We novr want only good handicaps and fine weather to make the meeting a thorough success, and as to the first of these dtsiderat* we may trust George Dowse. One 'thing about these entries which seems to me rather peculiar is that the saddle races have filled better than the harness r»C' s. Also it is to be noted that owners evidently prefer the shorter distances. The mile races have the most numerous entries, and the mile and a-h&lf come midway between, drawing in turn more thau the two-mile even's. Three-mile races would nob take at all nowadays, yet it is only a few years since that was the recognised distanoo for trotting races, and anyone who had advocated substituting mile or mile and a-half events would have been denounced as a traitor to the sport. The fashions ohange. Yet this is not altogether a fashion. Experience teaches that it is at a mile that trottets show their beat speed. The Americans found that out a generation back.

*** Young Cbaafe, who rode St. Paul in ; the. New Zealand Cup, i« " annoyed at soma { of the remarks of newspaper critics to the' effect that, he had not done justice to the.; dashing little Bon of St. Ltger, and in a chat ■with a representative of the Sporting Review over tbe race, he remarked that, he was afraid that some of the press writers drew more on (heir imagination than on facts, and tcsrv frequently they disregarded the fact that a jockey was riding according to instructions. Referring more particularly to tbe Cup race, he said: "The pace was very solid from the start, and I wan one of the first to move, and, steadying St. Paul, I got him in a good position on the rails. He ran coolly in that position for five furlongs round to the back stretch, when he commenced to pull, and I had to hang on to him a bit. At that time I could see that those in front of me were Haria, Venus, Primula, >,Sir Launcelot, and two others. At the back stretch, as I 6aid, St. Paul began to pull, [ and I had to take a hold of him. It became so dusty that I bad to half shut "my eyes, but the little horse carried me along in great style Coming out of the back stretch, about five furlongs from home, St. Paul was moving splendidly, and pulling harder than he had done during the journey. When I got a clear look in front I noticed that | Epaulet had left my side and gone to the front, atid was going great guns. As St Paul was i pulling hard and having a clear run, I let him ! go along so as to get on b rl "" terms with Epaulet. Epaulet was leadn me about a lenstb and a-half round the b?nd to the straight, but on entering tbe ftraight he ran out a little, and I shot up with St Paul on tbe inside and made a straight line for home. At that time I felt confident tuat I would win, and I never moved on my horse u%til I got inside the distance, snd there I saw Waiulru coming very fast in the middle. I knew 1 had Epaulet -beaten, and had to meet this new danger. I -sat down and rode St. P«ul in earnest, but, as you know, Waiuku just beat me. It is sheer nonsense to say I commenced my run too soon, and I believe I got all I possibly could out of St. Paul, wbo was beaten by a, horse that was much more favourably handicapped, as St. Paul wan giving away weight and a couple of years. We got a little bit of satisfaction next day." ,

*** The Feilding Club hed a showery and windy day to open iti meeting with laßt week, but on the following day the weather cleared, and the meeting, being well attended by men «nd hor߀s,may be classed as a succes", one proof of which in lhat £8205 went through the totalizator, or £364- ahead of last year's total. A straggliDg Btart in the FlyiDg -gave Chacseur and Langdale an advantage which they kept to the end, the latter winning with something to spare. Troubadour failed to stay»in tha Hurdle Race, and when he retired Muscatel was left in the lead, retaining it to a comfortable win. Plain Bill easily cut down St. Hiko in the Hack Hurdle Race. The Sfc Andrew's Handicap also proved to be a rather soft ihiDg for one of the competitors. Mis^fire could not keep the advantage he stole -in the ficj-t 50 yards, and Primula, who hung it out better, had to give way when Leda made her well-judged run in the straight. Pompom showed up at the fighting end of the race, but was beaten for pace by Leda, who just now is pretty well. This race has been won in past years as follows :—: —

This is a race that Leda evidently likes, for she won it in 1895, was second to Mahaki last year,and now wins it again. L. Matthews has ridden her each time. The times given above are to the nearest quarter of a second. There was a great struggle in the Hack Race, Indian Shot beating The Miller by only enough to swear by. The

Kiwitea Stakes was won all the way by. Little Billee, buthehad'to keep going to dispose of The Guardsman. On 6he second day Leda repeated her victory of la«b tear in the Manchester Handicap, running 'he mile and aquarter in a little less than 2min 12sec. She was ridden much the same way as in the St. Andrew's Handicap, reljing on a big run at the finish. The surpri&e of the meeting was provided by that erratic horse New Forest, who disposed of Australina in the early stages of the race and then beat off the challenges of Little Billee and Quiltiri and just won. Backers are thoroughly sick of New Forest, and they were probably mere dabblers in odds and not the regular calculators who shared the £20 dividend.

*** At the Manchester Trotting Club's meeting in October an important match against time was the chief attraction. This was the attempt by Mr T. Smallwood, who, it will be remembered, drove Lady Combermere when that celebrated mare trotted 20 miles in one hour, to cover 4-0 miles 600jds in two hoars with three horses. Mr Geo. Brown offered £200 to Smallwood if successful, with a sum of £50 in case of failure. The three animals chosen by by Mr Smallwood were the famous Benny C. (the property of Mr W. Harrison), holder of the three miles record ; Phyllis Wilkes, a wellknown stayer ; and Kitty Collins, the latter being a green five-year-old American mare. 'A stiff breeze blew down the track when Smallwood made his appearance with Kitty Collins. Odds of 3 and 4 to 1 against time vrere offered. At the crack of the pistol Kitty Collins went off at a steady pßce, the odd 600 yds being covered in 58 4-ssec, The first mile after was covered in 2min 50) ec, and this pace was kept up in capital style. Four miles 600 yds were covered in 12min 23 l-sseo, and here Smallwood changed to Phyllis Wilkes. The lastnamed went a little better than her predecessor, and the fifth mile, including the change, only occupied 2onin 48 4-ssec. Benny C. took up the running at eight and a-haif miles, and ten miles were covered in' 29<nin 29sec, Benny C. doing the tenth mile in 2min 45sec, Smallwood thus being well on the rkhb side, being about half a minute to the good. Benny C. continued to go faster than his predecessor*, the time for, 13 miles* 600 yds being 37min 57 4-ssec, and here another change was made to Kitty Collins. She went much slower, and the seventeeath mile occupied just a shade under 3ruin. At 17£ miles (time, 51tnin 51£ sec) Phyllis Wilkes was called upon, and the eighteenth mile, including the change, was returned at 2min 52see. At the half distance — or, to be more correct, 20 miles 300 yds — the time was 58min l§seb, and Smallwood, who had thus plenty in hand, took for the first time sotna refreshment. When 30 miles 600 yd« had been covered in lhr 15min 52|sec Smallwood was well assured of victory, having 34-aiin left to do 10 miles. Phyllis Wilkes c*me on after Kitty C tiling's departure, and with Dn Brino doiDg a little pacing the uext five miles were covered in 13cnin 52jj:sec before Becmy C. was again, called upon. Tae three-miles record-holder was as fresh as paint, notwithstanding his previous exertions, and the full distance was covered in lhr 53tnin~19.§<ec. the thirty-eighth mile being covered in 2min 30fsfc. Smallwood thus won with nearly 7min to spare, and going on with Benny -C. the full distance covered in the two hours was 42 miles 1503 yds Ift. " -

*#* Fourteen' started for • the \ Middle Park Plate this year,j the,' largest field nince leiuglass' won five years ago. -Orzil, the favourite, did not maj^e much eho.w in the race, however, the finish of which was left to Disraeli and Dieudonae, and the last-named carried the livery of Che Dtfka of Devonshire first past the post without the l-.ast difficulty. The result of the race was indeed a surprise, for the stable had not a shilliog on Dieudonne, who started ab XOO lo 7, whjle several fancied ones never showed prominently at all. The Sportsman's special adds : — William I'Anson and Mr Buchanan were away wide on the far side of the course anxiously watching the Jenny Howlet coH, but ho never from flag-fall to finish gava them a moment's hope. 0.-Z'l was in hopeless difficulties coming down the hill, and I think he will always go bettor up hill than down. Nothing really ever h^ad a chance bub the winner, who scored easily by three lengths, Disraeli and Wildfowler making a good fight for second pKce, with Grodno very close up, as I thought. Watts had actually begged off riding the winner in order to have tbe mount on the third. It is a funny thing that just when breeders are beginning to desert a horse he not uncommonly comes to the front. Ayrshire has already done it most effectually this season, and now we have Amphion, sire of tbe Middle Park winner. Dieudonne is handicapped, I think, with his two crosses of Hermit, and if ever he breaks a bloodvessel we shall know why ; but he is full of some very stout, robust blood, combining Rataplan, Stockwell, and Sterling, with Vedette on the top of it, and though I cannot yet bring myself to look on him as the brilliant colt the Middle Park running suggests, it cannot be denied that he is a stylisb, clean- made, one, and tbe confidence reposed in him at Kempton had clearly a very solid foundation. It is satisfactory to ficd Igonomy mares doing well. Cyllene and Dieudoune are both out of daughters of that horse. The following is a list of WiNXEIIS OF THE MIDDLE PARK PLATE SINCE ISB2.

* # * Eleven days later the Dewhurst Plate was regarded as a good thing for Dieudonne, but the weight told in getting up the hill, and the colt could only get third place. Ninus finished immediately in front of him. aud the pair knocked under to Hawfinch, a Kinggcleru colt with 20 to 1 obtainable against him. His trainer — to whom he has bean leased by his breeder, Mr J. Terry, for hi? racing career— had no idea of the colt's success, since he had suffered from bad knees and illness, and went to the post coneequently in very backward condition. The Sportsman's special writes.- The Dewhurst Plate sfforted a fine bone of contention, there being agreement on one point only — that the calfish, sleepy-looking Hawfinch could have no chance. John Porter gave i;o one auy encouragement to back him, for really the *on of Goldfinch had hardly ever had a flerious gallop, having gone dead amiss with the rest of the stable in the * summer. Prior to that period, however, I had many times heard favourable accounts of him, and only gave him up now, as I did Vcuvian lasb year, because tbe stable had no sort of fancy for him. Dieudonne, bright and clean of limb, was looking quite at his best ; and Orzil

appeared to have once more taken heart of grace ; ab all events, he was more demonstrative in the paddock than he has recently been. Koyal Footstep showed signs of nob having got over the effects of her severe struggle on Tuesday, and it w\p a pity to ask this great fine fitly to come again so soon. She and Nun Nicer are quite good enough to put by for next ye.ir. Many would have it that St. la would win, but how they made it out passes my comprehension. The best looking of the p&rty was Ninus ; indeed, I have seen no better-looking colt this season. H*wfloeh is a great lengthy, lanky chestnut, with ample bone, a malformed though perfectly sound near hock, and curious knees. It was said that he is so lazy he ougjii. to have two men to ride him, and this certainty appeared so when S. Loates got up, for it needed considerable persuasion on the part of the jockey to make the colt loaf clumsily out of the paddock. " Come up, old man," cried - Loates, vigorously kicking him. The boys outside all laughed, some offering to pull in front and others to push behind. At last Hawfinch was sufficiently roused up to amble and blunder his tray down the course, and no one ever saw anything less like a winner than he then appeared. Orzil, as usual, gave a fine show in the canter. The race was indeed r surprise, for after St. la had shown good speed Dieudonne appeared to have taken the measure of his field, almost as he did in the Middle Park Plate; but Ninus was staying on, and there was this astonishing Hawfinch realising at last from- the vigorous calls of S. Loates that' something unusual was going on." Yes, he was indeed waking up and sticking stoutly to the others. At six furlongs Dieudonne, with all his brilliant speed, snuffed right out, a palpable non-stayer, and the issue rested between Ninus and the despised outsider. Despised or not, ' the animal in question got more and more awake the farther he went, and pntting in still better work he fairly wore down Prince tjoltykoff's colt and won cleverly.

*#* In America during the first week of October several of the world's harness records (trotting and pacing) were lowered, flrsb in importance being Chelhalia's redaction of the twomile record from 4min 22feeo to 4min 19^sec. Janie T. lowered the world's mark for trotting fi'lieF, two years old, from 2min 15Jieo, at which it was held jointly by Silicon and Impetuous, to 2min 15^sec, and diipliced Nowaday as the fastest two-year-old of the year. The Monk cut the mark for four-year-old trotting geldings to 2min B£Bec in the Transylvania Stake, reducing his own previous best time by I^-s^c. The grey gelding PrestOD, three years old, cub that age record from 2min 14i.ee, where it was previously held by Fred S. Moody, to 2min 13^ec in the second heat of the Kentucky Futurity. At Glen Fulls. October 8, John R. Gentry and Robert J. were scheduled to try to lower the world's team record, and the famous pacers clipped a full second from their own previous world's > best, going the mile in 2oaiu Bsec — last quarter in 30Jsec.

*#* The Melbourne Leader calculates that for the first three months of the racing season 18y7-98, and including the V.R C. Spring Meeting, the progeny of the undermentioned tires have won tbe following amounts :—: — ■ Carbine, £6220 ;• largest' winner, Atnberite, £4126. G<zo, £tf4\ ; largest winner, G-aulua, £3500. Tuenltoti, £4198 ; largest winner, Auvrun, £1783. Lochiel, £1015^- Jarge3t winrjer, ' Srrrvivor, £2409. - - . ■ " ' Abercorn, £2149 ; largest winner, Coco?, .£31,0. Neckersgat, £1567 j-'largest Winner, Lady Mos- : tyD, £1057. W Splendour, £1541 ; largest winner, Partheno--pseifs, £707. Grand Flaneur, £1428 ; largest winner, Robin Hood, £1418. Olorious, £1110; largest winner, Whernside, £506. Manuka, £1000 ; largest winner, Britomarte, £1000. I Newminster, who headed the list of winning sires for the season 1896-97, h*s «o far only had three placed performers, who have won two races and secured one third for £145.

*j(* Something about tbe watch is included in Mr Clibborn's recollections of Ireland, as related in Sydney Referee. It does not now' matter abjut naming the locality, bub it was about six miles from Dublin — on the miniature Sandown, where the raeiog is done, and Captain Quinn is manager. There wa3 a complimentary meeting to the Duke and Duchess of York, and one ot the races was at five furlong; . A mare named Medine and Knock!ong 11, owned by Mr Gubbins, were among the startets, but beaten by Waterhen, who won. It is a rule of the Irish Turf Club that races shall not be less than five furlongs, but when Mr H. C. White and one or two others from Australia put their, watches on they made the time 59iec, indicating that the course was something less than five furlongi. Then there were letters in the Irish Field and other papers, and a protest that the course wai 90 yards short of the advertised distance. The protest was overruled as t;oo late, and the matter ended ; but a match between Medine and Fiddler'^? Green for £300 w«ss the outcome of a statement that one would have beaten the other had tbe course been the full distance, which, 'duly came off. It was a new illustration to the Irish people of the use of the . watch. They did nob take any official time, but 'have remeasured their course.

*** London Sportsman says' that "the carbhorse," as some of the ladies in the paddock at Kempton styled Diakka before the race for the Duke of York Stakes, proved himself sadly too good for his more lightly-framed opponents The following description of Plenipotentiary might well be-a#plied to Diakka :-— " He was a horse of such ponderous muscle and carried so njuch flesh that he alwaya looked like a fat bullock

when in training. . . . Robinson, whose orders were to try and cufc down Plenipo. (with Glencoti) by the severity of the pace, remarked after the race : * I came the first balf-mile as hard as I could lick, bub on looking round I saw the great fat bullock cantering by my side, Conolly at the same time exclaiming: "I'm here, Master Jemmy ; only waiting till I'm wanted."' Glencoe, believed till then to be tbe fastest; horse of his day, was beaten four lengths." Very similar wan the experience of thos- runners at K4mpton who made play to the bend — "the carthorse" was right there when wanted, and never gave his backers a moment* uneasiness.

*.** The 17 acceptors for the Auckland Cup constitute what may without disrespict be termed an odd lob. At least half the number are either on or jugt off the sick list. Take Nestor for an example. This horse wen last season's Auckland Cup, and in the light of that performance he must be held to be worth his present impost, which is 'equivalent to weight for age ; yet, having been in retirement so long, he cannot be regarded as a decent investment. Blarney and Tire represent the contingent that have actually been amUs, and D*y iStar also, I should think, since no one can accept this horse's recsnt performances as indicative of his real form.* My present idea is that the Cup is a fairly good thing for Waiuku

or St. Paul, and I prefer the former.- If danger comes from the light wsights I should expect to see" Miss Anna or Anita do the trick. ■ Th« last-mentioned .is very, leniently treated for * horse that has won the race. .

*#* Sydney sports who w«nt to Moorefield on - the 20th ult. saw a promising performance on the part of Blazon, a four-year-old by the Australian Peer— Wildfire, therefore brother to Wild Peer, who unfortunately became unsound when doing very good work for the StephensonHazlett stable. Ridden by E. Cleal at 6.7, Blazon helped Valour 8.12 to make the pace throughout the mile and a-quarter of Lhe Mcorafield Handicap, and at the end the light weight prevailed by half a length, having done the distance in 2min ltaec. Blazon's starting price was 10 to 1. On the same day Typhoon, son of the Musket hors« Enfilade, from Monsoon, by Gang Forward— Typhoon, by Wild Dayrell, pulled off the two-year-old race, beating the Carbine youngsters Battle Abbey and-Senia-tion and others.

*#* In connection with the recent imprisonment of bookmakers for tote betting, and the petitiou sent to the Minister for Justice prajing that the sentences be reduced so far as the imprisonment was concerned, a reply was received on Saturday from the Minister -stating that, having carefully inquired into the surrounding circumstances, be regretted that he could not .recommend his Excellency'to grant the requeit. Tb.l3 is no more than I expected.- The Minister -rhiMfc not be bl&nred for carrying out the law. It ir the law 'itself that is wrong. 'What make's tlie penalty so biting is that these oxen wera first offenders in the eyes of the" law, yet they are treated with 'more" severity ~than many a person who actually s eilh. ' ■

*#* It w ill be time enough ' to discuss the Wellington Cup seriously after the acceptances appear ; but if asked to name two that are well in at the weights I should say Uniform and Black and Bed.

[892-aiusket ... 4yrs 6.10 2min msec £18 6; 1893— Musket syrs 8 4 2inin 4JJsec £6 8: L894-G. Plover ; 4yrs 8.10 2min 42|sec £4 5: 1895— Leaa .. 4yrs 6.13 2min 43 sec £15 10; LB9S— Malaaki ... 6yrs 8.8 2min 3SJsec £5 13i LB97— Leda ... 6yrs 7.11 2»na 43 sec £2 16;

[883— Lord Falmoiuh s Buaybody ... 1 23 [BSt— Lord Hastings's AJclion 120 3-5 1885— Mr Vyner'a Minting 119 4-5 ISSii -Lord Callhorp<3'ti Florentine ... 117 4-5 ISS7— Sir K. Johnstone's Kriar's Balsam 115 2-5 ISSS -Duke of Portland's Donovan ... 1 15 1-5 1889— Chevalier Giuistrelli's Signorina... 1 20 S9O —M. E. Blaac's Gouverneur 1 2] LB93 — Duke of Westminster* Onne 1 20 1-5 1892 -Mr H. M'Galmont's Lsingldss ... 121 2-5 W.I -Lord llosebery's Ladas 1 1(! 1-5 !S94— Mr Pairie's Speedwell IIS 3-5 :B!)tj— Mr L. de Hothschild's St. Frufcquia 116 2-5 .896— Mr J. Gubbin.s's malice Moro ... 1213 5 897 — Duke of Devonihire's Dieudonne... 1 17 2-5

One mile, ni. 8. Pji-dwood ... 2 24i Yujr Yum ,I'itle Willie ... 2 26j Rasp ... lnooKi.Y.\ 226 J- Vita ... One Mile and A-half.' Irookltn... • ..." " ... ' ..'. Two Miles. .ROOKLYN 4 57J ['UITA ... 11). 8. : ... 2 27i ... 230 ... 2 30 ... t 3 40J -:.;'-4 581:

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Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2284, 9 December 1897

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6,943

TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2284, 9 December 1897

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