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TALK OF THE DAY.

By MAZEPPA.

*** The judgment of the English Court of Appeal completely and finally, and convincingly overthrows the doctrine of Hawke v. Dunn — the doctrine that a racecourse enclosure is " a place " which it is unlawful to bet in. The court came to that conclusion by a majority of five to one. The position may be very concisely stated. In 1853 an act was passed called the Betting Houses Act. This aimed at the suppression not of betting, but of betting of a I certain kind — viz., the betting that went on in common gaming-houßes and such like places. In order to make the act cover all kinds of offices and rooms, and so forth, it was provided that "no house, office, room, or other place" shall be used for batting in. It is this word "place" that has caused all the hubbub. Persons hostile to betting have before now got the courts to say that if a bookmaker gefc-t up on a box to do his business on a racecourse, or ' fixes his umbrella in the ground as a sign, he is creating " a place," and the Cold Tea Party succeeded in the case of Hawke v. Dunn in carrying the doctrine a step further, the Lord Chief Justice asserting that the presence of bookmakers on business in an enclosure made that enclosure " a place." It is that dictum which the present judgment .upsets. And the decision seems to be sound common sense. All the legal skill in the world could not convince the ordinary mind that a ringed enclosure on a racecourse has anything about it of the nature of a bouse or a room or an office, and, as the Sports--man happily puts it, " once do away with the Bonnd view that no one can be a ' person using ' a place within the meaning of the act unless he has some special title to use as distinguished From mere visitors, and the consequence follows that Mr Jastice Hawkins or the Prince of Wales j wight be attested and searched on tbe lawn at

Goodwood because Mr Dick Dunn was desirous of backing the field in some other part of the sameenclosure." It seems to be contemplated on all hands that the defeated party will further appeal to the House of Lords, but in the meantime there will be a suspension of prosecutions, which had become well nigh intolerable. Probably the best thing in the interests of a'l parties would be a direct reference to Parliament by the introduction of an amending statute. The cautious and sober-minded Times advocates this, saying : "It can easily be understood that legislators are not anxious to deal wifh this thorny questios, yet it may be doubted whether anything but fresh legislation will satisfactorily extricate us from the existing confusion. The reading of the present law which would make bookmakers impossible would equally condemn all private betting, and by putting vexatious power in the hands of tbe fanatical opponents of gambling would lead to a great deal of hardship and injustice. On the other hand, the reading of the law just given by the Court of Appeal certainly does create a sort of sanctuary within which not only private betting but'booktnaking in its most aggressive forms may flourish unmolested. It would seem that we want something between these two extremes — some legislation that, would abate the admitted evils of professional gambling without attempting to attain tho.-e impossible altitudes of public and private virtue at which no man ever puts a sovereign on a horse or otherwite backs his fancy."

•"?** It was duly reported last week that the Canterbury Trotting Club stewards held over for further inquiry their decision ia regard to the Bed.o' Stone-Linda protest. Bed o' Stone got home first in the Final Handic*p, and was then protested against on the grounds of iuconsisttney and jostling. Wten the stewards met last Wednesday the owner of Linda set up a further claim to the stake, alleging that Bed o' Stone was on the forfeit lisb at the time of entry. Mr Vie. Harris then said tbat sivoral of the stawards, knowing the letter bad been sent in, bad taken legal advice as to the eligibility of the mare, and the solie'tors consulted had stated that (-he was not qualified to compete. Under these circumstanc s the stewards passed a resolution disqualifying Bed o' Stone, but they resolved that investments on her be returned. I must say that when I was in Christchurch I felt sorry fov Tommy Cotton, who has Bed o' Stone. I -saw the race, the Telegraph Handicap, in regard to which the original protest alleged stiffness, and could not di-cover any reason for supposing that Bed o' Stone was not wanted in that event. The other point relied on in the first place — namely, jostling— l could not say anything about, as I left betore the race in which this was taid to have occurred came off. But, believing from what I saw that Bed o' Stone was an honest trier in the Telegraph Handicap, and knowing that Ibis was a harness race, and the one she got home in was a saddle race — two very different things — aDd seeing Tommy Cotton in a great ttew over the protest, and apparently with no one to stivk up for him, I felt, sorry that he was in a fix, aud hoped, as I expected, that he would g--t the sake. Seemingly, however, even if ho had no particular friends, the stewards saw that "he got jastice in regard to the more 'serious' allegation tfaab the mare . was in the foifeit list. I interpret the stewards' action- in taking legtl advice on so simple a point to mean than they wanted, if possible, to find a way of escape for Cotlon from tbe consequences of the second protest. They probably thought it a bit rough. on Cotton to cm*h him with this afterthought. Possibly, also, they realised that thßy were in an ogly corner themselves, since, though the thing is unfortunately common enough, a club tbat has to disqualify on the ground of ineligibility because a horse is in the forfeit list cannot expect pity if reproached with the remark that the ineligibility thus sticking out a foot ought to have been discovered before. As things have turned out, I cannot Bay tbat anyone is to blame for Bed o' Stone's disqualification except the owner himself. The stewards could not get away fiom the facts. And the owner of Linda is not to ba blamed for asserting all his right* and making his case as strong as possible. Still,. I should have been rather pleased if some flaw had kept the eligibility question out of the issue, leaving tbe stewards to decide the protest on the original grounds. And I repeat that it is the duty of stewards or tbeir officers to guard against such an occurrence »9 the receiving of an entry from an owner whose hone" is in the forfeit list. I fancy that clubs generally often get into scrapes by eagerly snappii g up every possible entry without regard to the rules and regulations.

*#* The disposal of the entire stud of the late Mr Fulton proved a strong attraction when Mr Tattersall opened the July salts, of blood stock at Newmarket. The highest price was paid for the well-known mare Laodamia, who was knocked down for.3soo<s to Lord Marcos Beresford. She was purchased on behalf of (he Prince of Wales, and joins the royal stud at Sandringham. Of tbe other brood mares-sub-mitted, Crystabelle (with a foal by Cherry Ripe),fe)l'to JMr. C. WtbU.y'a bid of 1450g5, and Comedy became the property of Mr T. Lewis for 1150g8,~her-yearling filly going into the Bame hands for 410^8. St. Michael, among the horses in training, was bought for 1400giby Mr Clayton, and the two-year-oid filly by Surefoob from Loversall went to Mr Heaton for 810gs. The yearlings sent up by Lord Londonderry attracted attention, and" one of them, a. colt by St. Simon out of Daisy Ch»io, named Simonside, went to Captain Machell for 2000gs. A colt by Sir Hugo from Ice was obtained by Mr Singer for 1350g8 after a spirited compe'ition. On the last day of the sale Captain Machell paid llOOgs for the yearling colt Lorme, by Orme from Lotus, Mr L. Cohen took the filly Fairy Gold (by Bend Or — Dime Masham) at 1150gs^ a yearling colt by Sheen from Footlight was purchased at 1400gs by Mr E. C. Clarke, Sir J. Miller gave llOOgs for a colt by Crafton from Hampton Agnes, and Mr Larnaoh took the fitly by St. Simon — Hampton Rose at 1350*8.

*** Mr Stead attended these July sales, and, finding himself in the company of the choicest yearlings the world has to offer, ifc would hare been a wonder had he come away without making a purchase. No New Zealand colonist has done more for the improvement of our thoroughbred stocky than Mr Stead has. He has taken up the position held in the early days by "The Guvnor," Mr Henry Redwood, and dutk'g bis lengthy patronage of the turf, whether in buying or breeding or importing or in racing, he has always gone in for the best blood that money ' could procure, carrying out the business of his stable in a lordly and scientific manner. Look at bis previous purchases of mares in England. Some of these have cot directly produced anything very -remarkable. Crinoline, Lady Ravensworth, L'Orienfc, Miss Laura, Sweet Cicely, and Titania have been more or leas disappointing go far as. their immediate produce are concerned, though their influence on future pedigrees may be expected to be of advantage. Bub if these mares are

partial failures so far, the colony has others of Mr Stead's importing that have helped considerably to raise the reputation of our stock, fairyland gave us Kubezthl, sire of Dilemma, Mnrembaa, and the champion sprinter Goldspur ; Florence Maearthy would be a famous matron had she produced nothing alter the celebrated Tirailleur ; Nelly Moore's name will live for ever through the race performances and the wonderful stud successes of Lochiel ; Pulohra is the ancestress of St. Clair, Multiform, and several others that promise to keep the mare's memory green ; and Stepps has given us a line of racers, headed by Russley and Stepniak, that constitutes a type of its own, and a very fine typa too. These are" some of the thoroughbreds that we have to thank Mr Stead for. On his present visit to England the fquire of Yaldhurst did not apparently enter the sa'e ring for the express purpose of buying, but he picked up three yearlings of unexceptionable pedigcee, and I understand thatthey arenow on their way out to tha olooy. Oae of these is the chestnut cjlt Obligado, got by Ocville (con of Ormonde and Shoto?er} from Flirt. This Flirt is said to be by Trappist, but I cannot understand how that can be, for the Trappist mare Fiirt wai sent to Buenos Ayreß in 1888. ' Peihups tha Flirt reftrred to is The Flirl, daughter of Uncav We shall know when the colt arrives. Mr Stead paid 200gs for tbii youngster. The other colt purchased is by Fiiar's B*lsam (con of Hermit and Flower of Dorset) from a mare by Btndigo — Lady Paramount, by Toxophilite. sire of Musket. This colt also co.t 200,;f. The third yearling, for whom lOOgs was paid, i« a filly by Simonian (son of St. Simoa — Garonne) from Boyue, by DonOBfiter from Shannon, by Lambtou from The Me«ey, by Newminster (cob to be cou'ounded* with Carbine's dam). Me Stead also bid for other lots, but did not go up to owners' vAu?*, and thsfc is what makes me think that he entered the ring for pleasure rather than teal business.

*#* " Terlingn," of the Australssian, baa been on a visit to St. Albans. After the youngsters had cantered and trotted on the grass gallop, he sajs, Aurnrn and Maufri-d took the sand for a couple of rounds at an easy pace. The Derby favourite has, probably, lengthened and thickened a little 'since he ran in Sydney. Mr Macdonald h»s not measured him lately, but he thinks him just on 15.2. Not a big one S8 far as height goes, Aurtim is a marvel of power, and as he went away from us, side By nide with Manfred, he looked almost double t;be width of h<s companion, and Manfred would not be called narrow. Aurum looks to be in blooming health, and as far as I know be has never been sick or sorry since he was not broken in. All thoughts of selling him have no* been abandoned, and Mr Wilton is coming out to sea him run in the Caulfield Guineas. He was for sale when Mr Wilson went to England, but, as I stated at the time wo*ld ba the caie, it was — at a price. The price wai a very stiff one, and I think thai when it came to the point Mr Wilcon did not lik-*- the idea of parting with the colt He is too foud of seeing his colour* to tha fore in the V.R.C. Derby, which he has already won three time* since 1891. It will not be long before the public will see Aurum again, as he is to run in the September Stakes nest month, aud it is more thau probable that he will meet Key in this race. If the crack colt and filly of last season come together in this race, the Victoria Racing. Club will get good value for its £100. Majestic, by Trenton from Bonnie Rosette, by Bucaldine, is a colt some people have a fancy for, and a grand-looking fellow he is, but these very big fellows seldom shine^over a distance. Unlike most giants — Majestic stands 16hd« 3in — be is a weil-furninhed colt, showing plenty of muscle and good sound condition. Some people would 'object; to hi* four white feet, bub this is only a fad. Mr Macdonald tells 'me be has never kuown a real big one " like Majestic come to hand quickly. He scored twice in the autumn, and he won his second race in very handsome style, but he looks much more solid now, and I can quite believe that he has given every satisfaction pi nee he left off racing. Reliance was trotting the -reverse way, and alone. He apparently inherits some of the fiery instincts of the Galopin tribe through his, dam, Elsie, but he is a remarkably Dice colt, and if he stands he will yet show that he is a.good colt. Reliance must have shown good form in private, or he weald never have been backed as he was on two occasions laat autumn. He seem* free enough on bis pins now, but hardly looks as set as Manfred, Majestic, and Aurum.

*** After Charley Wood won the Derby on Galtee More he was asked to write an article for a London newspaper. He said that riding in a Derby was very simple. All that was wanted was a saddle, a bridle, and a good horae. It was a weary wait during those nine years that he was disqualified from riding. He loved horses, and he loved racing, and he-was not ■shamed to say that he* never 'went to bed a single night during those nine years tbat he did nob- dream of racing and horses. Last year he went to Epsom to see Persimmon win, and whilst watching the race the old feeling came' back. -He was really riding the race in his* mind, and beads of perspiration stood out on his' forehead as he saw the "'Prince's horse' coming along the straight. Mr Ryan, who trained for Mr Houldswortb, stood at his side,* and he said to .Ryan, " I would give £1000 to be back in the saddle and riding a Darby winner." Ryan replied that he would remind him of what he bad just said some time in the near futur?. That time came. After he won on Galtee More Ryan said, "What did I tell you, Charley ? Here you are, the rider of the Derby winner, and you haven't got to pay that £1000." During the* long period of his disqualification Wood says he never neglected bis riding. He was fit to ride any day because he never put on flesh. His weight now stood at 7.12 He had never had a sweater on for years, and as for a Turkish b&th or •physic he didn't kuow what they were. Whatever misgiving the public may have had about him, Wood hopes they are set at rest now. He wanted it put into cold print, however, that' when be rides — as he ever did — he rides to win. When he got bis license he was not retained by any stable, and that was how he came to ride. Galtee More. He was exceedingly anxious on race day/because he knew that after j a nine years' absence it wonld be a. great feather in his oap to win his second Derby — though perhaps he should say his third Derby, because in 1883, having won with St. . Blaise for Sir Frederick Johnstone, he made a dead heat riding St. G&tien with Sam Lo&tes on Sir John Willoughby's Harvester. In regard to Galtee More's race Mr Gubbine, the owner, gave him ' very simple instructions. " Don't be afraid of the ' corner,' and come home as soon as you can." He gave the horse two tastes of the spur - during the race and he won in a canter uneztended.

*** The end of the Australian season generally sees the sire of the winner of the Melbourne Cup at the head of the list of winning sires, and the year just closed has not proved an exception to the general rule. The Australasian's sporting editor tells us that Newminiter tops the list with £9181. about

two-thirds of which must have been won by Newhaven. Trenton was without the services of Quiver andAuraria, while Resolute and Cydnus did next; to nothing for him, but Aurum proved a splendid ally. Trenton had 22 winners ot 40 races, and altogether his stock won £7326. Lochiel's sons and daughters won 59 races among them, tbe total value being £7122. The Prince Charlie horse has quite recovered his place in the estimation of racing men, and Tom Hales must bo very sorry he let him slip through his hand*. Robinson Crusoe, with £4950, i» fourth on the list, about £150 ahead of Splendour ; and then come Boolka, Gloriouo, Trident, Grand Flaneur, andGozo, all well over £3000. Of these 10 horses Newminster and Glorious are dead, while Trenton is in England and Robinson Crusoe in^New Zealand. Next to TrentoD, Thunderbolt shows best of the Musket horsea, and he is eleventh on the lint with 31 raots, wor'h £3334. Carbine ia next, and then come Neckersgat (dead), Abercorn (only five winners of eight racea), Richmond, Malua (dead), Battalious, and Padlock. Sunrise has a peculiar record. He claims no less than 30 winners of 65 races, but' the money won is only £■'338 ! Carlyon has moved up a good deal, thanks principally to Carlteo. Of tha veterans Goldfcbrough has dropppd below £1000, Gfcng Forward is down to £735, and Gran.dirn.9cer to £704. At the end of 1895-6 Trenton headed the list with £13,126, Carbine being second with £6189.

*#* The annual raoes promoted by the South Canterbury Turf Club were held last week on the Pareora station, about 11 miles from Timaru. Thi« fixture reminds one somevrhut of old-time country racing, and I should like to 'see such meetings more popular throughout the colony. It is far better, if amateurs really desire to show their ability in public, that they should do so in their own class, aud leave the company of professional rider*, for tbe mixing of the two classes often leads to ambitious undertakings on the part of the " gentlemen," and they thereby run undue ricks. It it one of the legitimate uses of hunt club me-tings to jjive these amateurs their opportunity, and for that reason alono they have their value. Another good thing about these meetings is that a be-tkhy sporting feeling is called into existence, np&rfc from money considerations. Here at South Canterbury, for examp'e, there was less than £20 given as money prizea, yet there was just aa rouoh genuine trying as there would have been for 500jov stakes. I am sorry to h&ve to state, however, that the, fields were small. Only four went out for the Open Steeplechase, and one of these, Mr G. Shaw's Poundkeeper, was not permitted to start, it being discovered th*L thie horse was on the' forfeit list. It is a. wonder that no one found this out till after weighing. Duugat won the race very easily, Hollytboru, the only one that promised to make a race of ir, falling at the last obstacle, a gorse hedge, giving Mr H. Jowsey a natty spill. In tha Hunt Club Cup the pace was made by Lucifer, who, however, was collared in plenty of time by Bellbii-d, the latter, nicely handled by Mr Jack Mcc, winning with a bit to spare. These were the only two horses to finish, as Catesby baulked and Blarney fell, giving Me Ortou a sevare shaking. Dr Drew 1 attended the sufferer and saw him back to consciousness.

*** Cariosity drew a large and fashionable company to Newmarket H- a ath when the authorised trial of Gray's starting machine took placer About a dozen racehorses were collected for the purpose, aud the peraobs present included the Drike of Portlaud, Mr Leopold de Rothschild, the E«l of Durham, Mr Jamea Lowther, Mr J. B. Platt, Mr Milner, Mr W. Cooper, Captain Clayton, Me T Jay, Mr H. Bailey, &c. Of coune, writes Mr Allison, there was a great deal of ignorant comment-, just as there was about railways when first instituted. Some thought the gate was not wide enough for Newmarket, disregarding the facb that it can be made just as wide as wanted, as it consists, so far as width goes, of nothing but two tapes with light cross, pieces at considerable intervals. Now, it is, of course, us ridiculous to expect horses to jump off the flcst time under such novel circumstances as to expect them to walk into a horse box the first time without nervousness,' or to allow a man to ride them without being broken, but it was somewhat astonishing, especially to those who vowed that no English. horseß w6uld go near the gate, to see them lined up there, close oo it, without showing^ any tendency to shy away. Acid, what is more, when the gate went up, though some flinched back, there was no squandering over the coarse as was anticipated ; indeed, bad the boys on the horses been really determined to get away then and there instead of gaping at the machine, they could have made a very fair start the first time. Two or three more trials followed, and each time the horses got away better, showing little or no fear, but being naturally new to the business. Any one of those horses in about three days would thoroughly understand what it all means, and there are scores of good sportmen at present in Eogland who can, from practical experience, assure all- who are not wilfully * deaf and blind that after a brief,' schooling horsea will set themselves at the gate just as- a hundred yards runner does for .his start, and get away like a flash the -instant it gpes up. I know, as a matter* of fact, that not a few, such -as Mr James Lowther, for instance, were more or less agreeably surprised, and as the machine will be allowed to stay up we may soon ccc a start under it with horses that know what they are about. If Mr Jersey would lend Merman and Malnma, and theee were reinforced by Paris and Acmena, a fair show would be given, bat in any case a few days' schooling is all that is required. Mr A pear, who hag seen a lot_of racing in India, tells me that no one was more prejudiced than himself against the machine at the outset, bat that he now regards his period of prejudice as one of most benighted igndrance, for the advantage of the machine system is so crushingly obvious that no man who has ever had experience of it in actual • racing would dream in his wildest moments of reverting to our primitive method.

*#* New South Wales ia the colony for large | fields. At Canterbury Park on the last day of { the season there were about 40 horses left in tho Cup, of 130sovs, one mile and 100 yds, an hour before the race. It was not the -130/ovs that i was the draw so much as the sweep which Tattersall was running on the race. The club considered it desirable, for safety's sake, not to start so many horses together, so three divisions were made by lot;, the arrangement being that the three winners were to run off for places. It is said, that the police had given a hint that a big- -field such as was promised might lead to accident, and from what can be made out the owners and trainers whose opinions were made known said that they preferred the divisional arrangement to taking the risk of mishap. But as soon as the draw took place the scratching pen came into full use, until only 22 horses were left. It was then too late, however, to go back on what had been done, and the three division! were sent off. Eight started in the first, won by Kelao 9.0 ; nine ran in the second, won by Survivor 9.0 ; and five went out for the third, Tramp 8,4- winning. Ia the

final meeting of these three Survivor, son o Lochiel and Melissa, won by a length from Tramp. The question of whether the rules wero infringed by dividing the field caused a loti of discussion, and the matter eventually came before tho A. J.C, who fined the proprietor of the course £50, and warned him that a repeti* tion of the offence would result in the registration of the course being withdrawn. Had the A. J.C. parsed over the case, it was, says " Martindale," the intention of Warwick Farm to offer a good prize for a race to be run in divisions, which, with the final and a selling race, would have made up the day's programme. From this it is evident that the A J.C. is quite right in sitting at once on racing in divisions. Probably, however, a rule will be introduced to meet the case, as thera is a deoided difference between "heats" and "divisions."

*V* The celebrated English racehorse Petronel died at the Cobh&m Stud in July of the rupture of an artery. Bred by the Duke of Be&nfort in 1877, Potronel was a black-brown horse by Musket cut of Crythoia, by Hesperus out of Palm. He commenced his racing career as a. two-year-old by running respectably in the Middle Park Plate, won by Beaudesert, and won his only other race that season, beating Strathardle by a neck for the Troy Stakes at the Houghton meeting. In the followiug year he started with iv victory in the Two Thousand Guineas, for which race he beat the gigantic Muncaster by a head, Mr Naylor's unlucky colt, The Abbob, finishing third at an interval oS three-quarters of a length, with M Lefevre|B Beaumineb fourth, and 14 others behind them. Putronel waß not much fnncied by the general public, and was allowed to start at 20 to 1, in spite of the fact that he was the mount of George Fordham, who was always especially dangerous when riding at Newmarket. In 1881 the Duke cf Beaufort's colours were carried successfully by the stout son of Musket in various races, including such important events as the Great Yorkshire Handicap, from 13 opponent*, and the Doncaster Cup, for which he beat Tristan, Madame dv Barry, and Voluptuary. In 1882 he went down before Foxhall for the Ascot Gold Cap, which the American won after a sharp tusale with Ptrfcronel's stable companion aud paueonaker, tho lightly-weighted Faugh-a-B*ll«gb. Petronol afterwards won several Queen's Plates, and in 1883 ran second to Picador 6.13 in the Liverpool Spring Cup, carrying 9.0. His last race was in the Cambridgeshire, won by Bondigo, at the end of thnfc season. At the Mud Petronel had for years few cbances, but Ragiraunde and Son-of-n-Gun showed clearly by their performances that he was capable of siring stock possessing rare staying powers, and a few years ago he was sent to the Cobham Stud, where he w*s in great request in consequence of bis pedigree, the sueces-es of Carbine in the colonies having caused a. demand for Musket blood.

*#* '* Ajux" has the following comments on the Cnulitald Gcand National Hurdle Race :—: — Buzzi was one of tho few natural stayers we had, and it was unfortunate that he should have fallen where be did — at the second last hurdle — as be was making his run at the time, and was bound to have made a fight of it at the fioish. He got over the. hurdle all right, but stumbled on landing. Mr Allan telis me that Buzzi broke his neck ia tiro places aud both jaws, ao he must have come a terrible cropper. The unjortunmte circumstance in connection with the race was the mistake made by the riders of Blitz, Nora Oreina, and Charon ia fancying that there was another round to go. Hoy steel on Blitz was taking matters so easily at the finish that the stewards carpeted him, and accepted bis explanation that he thought there ' was another round. Hoysted sajs he could have gone to the front at any part o£ the journey with Blitz, which is not very sootbiog to the numerous baokerß of the Sunrise gelding. Though His Grace may not have been beaten under any circumstances, I fancy tint; the horse that would have troubled him most would have been Nora Croina, not Blitz. The mare wr.a never extended until the last half-mile, when her rider, G. P. Brewer, seemed to think that His Gract) wa* gatting too big to break on, and the way she made up her ground was a caution. Had she been nearer -the leaders when she made that run I feel confident that she would have won. Blitz was, it must be confeasf-d, goiug nicely all the way, and he would but for the mistake of bis rider have been close up ; bub I do not think be would have beaten either His Grace or Nora Craiua. The best-bred horse ia the race, His Grace is al'O bred to stay. His sire, The Australian Peer, could do a distance, and his half-brother, Penance, it may be remembered, run third in a Melbourne Cup. M'Laughlin rode him a fine race. He kepb him well in hand until the last mile, when he no doubt felt that he was going strongly, And decided to test the staying powers of the others by sending him along, fast: Batfcy is a good judge of a horse, and he made no mistake when he boaghb His Grace, who may be pu'o rlown as one of the best; hurdle-racers we h£ve at. the present time. - ' _ •

*#* " Phaeton " has been visiting Fabulist at Maugere, and,,*_of course, interviewed ;at the same time" the .owner* 'IHe first' howe 6f anynote that 'l remember Mr'Lennard claiming as his property (says my brother - scribe) was tbe game little Malvern, who while, racing on a murderous course at Elleislie Gardens tripped and fell, breaking oue of his legs. Shortly after this Mt Leonard became .possessed of Kenilworth, and he afterwards picked up Dewdrop for a mere song. In subsequent years Mr Lennard's colours were most known in- connection with jumping races, and with Shotover, F*lcon, and Chandler respectively he won a good few races. In 1884 Chandler carried his colours to' victory in the Auckland Steeplechase, and three years later Falcon brought off a like feat. Thia old horse, it is worthy of remark, was picked up at Waiuku by Mr Lenuard after he had wou a race at some sports promoted by the Waiuku Troop of Cavalry ; and, if I njisfcake not, he got him for something like the sum of £50. Carty-looking to a somewhat, pronounced degree, Falcon had very little of tho vacfhofse abont him ao far as looks were concerned ; but he was as hone«t as tha sun, and would jamp a fence without apparently shifting so much aa a hair's breadth. The day that Falcon won the race of his career at E.lerslie I went over to see John Rae hoittod into the saddle, and the frail nature of 'tha appendage in which Rae had to seat himself to undertake that stiff four-mile ride over country did not seem to augur any too well for his seeing the end of the jonrney, for, mountings and all complete, it could not have weighed more, than slb. However, old Fslcon made no mistakes, and carried Mr Lenuard's colours to victory,- amidst an outburst of enthusiasm. Old Falcon is, I understand, still in the land oE the living, and ib now engaged in drawing the plough on a farm at Te Aroha, in which occupation he is said to excel. Mr Lennard nevec. tires of saying that the best was never teen of Shotover ; and be holds strongly to the opinion that had the son of Dead Shot not gone wrong he would have won some high ■ honours over, coantry. Sh»tover was undoubtedly a vet#

fine stamp of horse, and I am mysolf quite in accord with hie late owner in the view (hat he holds, that the bßst was not eesn of the haudeome chestnut by a very long way.

"V* Longtown, winner of the British Dominion Two-year-old Stakes at Sandown Park, is a son of Necromancer (bj Touchet— EnchaDfcress) fiora Bride of Netherby, by Galliard from Heroaione, by Youug Melbourne. He beat the more fancied Paladore very easily. Cortegar, in receipt of 171b, was the only one that bad a out at Galtee More for the S»ndringha.n Gold Cup, and, apart -from affording an opportunity of seeing tbe Derby winner under silk, the race had little interest, fielders were content to accept odd* of 9 ro 1, bnt the Sportaman says they might have been 90 to 1 for all the daDger there was of their being upges. Galtee More jsimply^cantered in f roafc till three furlongs from bbc finish, and as, when set goiug, Cortegar was helplrss for anything like an effort, Mr Gubbins's champion had practically nothing to do to win. JFcr so valuable a stake a very poor field contested tbe Clarence and Avondale Stake*, and the race will not in future fitfrl a place in tbe Sandown Park programme. Merle and Brechiu were mo.-t fancied of the eight runners, and they managed to fill two of the leading places at the finish, but were well beaten by Ben Armine, who, though having the reputation of being a thorough . fcbit f , etayed on well to win by a couple of lengths. ' For the Ooronat ion Cup, a favourite was found in theAmericHD gelding Sardia, tbe public doubting whether Victor Wild cauld give this visitor ' three stone over the mile course. But in the r&ce Victor Wild had got in front after travel- ; ling six furlongs, and though Morniogtou Gannon bad to drive him for a few strides, it . was inertly on account of an exhibition of the .'.azinees characteristic of many good horses. When asked for his fin»l eft'ott he respjuded jame'y enough, andiu disposing of Chasseur in {allant style by three-pat ts of a length ndded Another excellent perfo:marce to his already high reputation. The career of Victor Wild has been of the most brilliant character since he became the properly of Mr Wortrn, and be is without doubt tbe greatest performer of <he many gcod horses that were once in the ranks of the selling platers. He has been in tho present ownership tince his two-year-old days, and it was the luckiest stroke of fortune by which be 'was obtaiued for the small sum of 330gs after winning the Brockhuret Plate at Portsmouth Park five jearß ago.

* # * After Sandown Park racegoers had the Newmarket jmeting to atlend. On the firet day <he old-established July Stakes !»<tr>cfc- i d but four runner*. Otlds were laid on thcPrn-ce ef WaleVs Mousme, and she had no oifficully in landing them by a couple of lengths from Pold »nd Pheon, who made a de«d heat of it for ef coftd place. The winner ia by Sf. Siraon' from Fanchette, by Speculum from Reticence, by Vtspasian — Seclusion, by Tadmor. Many of the competitors for the Trial Plate were fancied, including the American-bred Glaring, and the latter won to easily that bidding was brisk when he was brought under the hammer. The result of the competition was that Sir J. Miller became the owner of the jjelding for 670gs. On the second day that fast coltOrml, son of Ayrshire and Merry Miser, won the Eteter Stftkeiin a eaufctr, and the next day the richlyendowed Princess of Wnles' Stakes brought out a field of nine; of whomVelagqurz was mndo a Btron? favoniite, anfl'won after a good finish witte Kuight of the ffhisfcle. The Sportsman's special remarks concerning this race :—Velasquez has come on"well with the suuny weal her, and i* clothed now with muscle which he never *ca<ried before this season. He is an ideal sort to tackle the ascent of the Butjbucy Mile, and but for fearing that he would not stay the distance the public would have made Hoi a better favourite. ' Roquebrune was if anything light in condition. Goletta, however, w»s looking better tban at any previous time this year, and sbo no doubt ran up to her best terra . Knight of the Thintle is a grand type for~wii»ning Queen's premiums, and right' well did he inn. After Regret had swerved, and refused to struggle in the dip, and Labrador, who ran Blow, "could not take his place, Velasquez came along with the race seemingly in hand, until the Kuigbt bora down on him. So bold was the challenge that those of us who 1 believed Velasquez could no 1 ; really get the distance expected to see him die out, but he did nothing of the sort. On the other band his (.'ppoueut fairly choked on the final ascent, and was easily beaten at last; so the universal query was. What manner of horse must Galtee More ba after this? What, indeed? I hardly think, however, that Galtee More has yet met Velasquez in the condition he was to-day. Goletta ran a gord race, and Vesuvian and Labrador finished close together, there being little to choose between them,'

*«* Welsheiß ancj characters of that sort are said to flourish at meeting* held in the South of England. Says a recent writer : — One will open a book .with the sole stock-in trade of a check eulr, a raucous voice, a pencil without a point, and an empty bsg.- He gets good custom, for t not being troubled about squaring his book, he will lay the handsomest prices — " ja»t ODce to you, sir." Sometimes the game happens to be profitable enough for him to pay out on winners ; but there comes a time when the tip has to be seat round, and the firit**unhappy man to demand money gets his ticket BDatched away by an unknown hand. Or, if be is too cute for that, the bookmakersdenies his obMgation. "Wnat did he back, Bill?" he a*k's his "clerk." The clerk rea^R solemnly out of an untouched page, '-'No. 3946: 25s to 5s Nevermore ; ran second." There are men jostling the man by this time, and he is well advised if ha retires and pockets bis lo?s ; for on further trouble men seem to rise from the ground like magic, he is the centre of a sea of taces, and the next thing he. knows he is sitting on the graf s, far away, wondering what cyclone has struck him. On the Jubilee Stakeß day in 1895 a well-known bookmaker observed that hi g clerk was so excited that he could hardly record the business done. It was an easy guess that the clerk had more interest in the race than was due to a weekly salary and an occasional flare-up with the boss. As a matter of fact, the youth had made a big plunge 'on Victor Wild, even to his last shirt, and when the gallant animal rolled he me he gave one mad ■hout, threw down his book and pencil at the "feet of his employer, and exclaiming, •• Get another blooming clerk, 1 ' walked off to draw his cash and start on his own. The fielder was a kindly man, and feared for his future ; so he gave » timely hint to one of the boys. An hour later the clerk came back, misery in his face, and black despair in his heart "Take me on again, 'bo***," he pleaded. He had been betting with a TTtlsher acd didn'fc'gefc a cent.

*** Writirjg on the subject of the racehorse In repose and in action, a correspondent of the Sportsman says : Would anyone, on looking at Victor Wild standing still, take him to be the great horse that he undoubtedly is ? I think not. I can remember two other horses of the same fort— The Hero and Teddington. Iha Hero wsb the meanest of the three in looks, «th fifcraJ«b.fc hocke.'ana very stilly, upright

forelegs ; also he was the very worst walker that I ever saw ; yet he won the D jneaater Cup ia 1846, and the Ascot Cup in 18+7 aud 1848, besides innumerable long-distance races. There is a capital engraving of Teddington in the July number of the Sporting Magazine of 1851, with a description of the horse, which is a perfectly correct ode, for I knew the horse well. " Tedinglon is a light yellow clusbnut horse, standing 15hds l^in high. He has an expressive, bloodlike head. His shoulders, however, are bad — short and upright, us well as thick and coarse near the withers ; he has no great depth of girth, has a slack, light middle, but good, fairsized quaiteis, and really good aims and hecks. He is not large in bone, stands upright on his p* c terns, and has small feet ; altogether a short, light horse. In action, though, he improves wonderfully, being one of the finest, most slashing goers ever seen." I saw Teddinglon win the Derby in a cauter, beating the second largest field that ever started for it ; but his greatest triumph was when he baat Stockweil for the Ascot Cup in 1853, carrying 90. I have always coosidered this to be the fiaest race I ever witnessed. Teddington looked like a pony beside tbe great horse, and it appeared to ba any odds on Stockweil a few lengths from the winning Po3t, but the pony had the courage of v lion. Ab the same time Stcckwell ran as gitue and t.ruo as auy horse could. If the two horses h">d been seen s'iandipg side by side there would have been no comparison between them.

*** "Javelin " reports that while the winner of a Victorian selling race was being submitted for sale uiulsr tbe hammer, ore of the assembled compauy, every time the auctioneer looktd towards him, gave a little forward jerk of the head, such jvs earnest silent bidders are accustcmsd to aftVct, aecjinpauied by a smart snao of the ejelids. When the second "hundred" was reached, tho owner, wiio, althongh anxious to retain his horse, knew that he was uot wo'th the money, felt that he couldn't go on much longer, and surely enough at 210sovs he lost him. As " Clear the yard, please," was called, ' somebody touched the supposed i-urchaser on I thf shoulder, and told him that tbe secretary would like to see him in the office. Then ib j transpired that the man, who had simply b:en i a'tracted by curiosity, and who still continued to jerk ),is head aud snap his eyelid*, was i *fft?cted by a chronic twitching of the facial nerves. As the horse wos put up again the looked diggers and the secretary ' buyonets ; bub the original owuer, alter getting his nag back for 6550 Vi«, forgot his resentment-, and fo'd the man with the twitch that he thought it would tun to a sni-Ul bottle.

*** I hear on reliable authority that the next Tahuna Pa'k programme will make more tban the usual provision for harness races, and I pass on the newa fo that owners may get ready by ae'custorninij their hordes to wheels and have sulkies provided. The prop >sition ip, I understand, to hnve tfareu harness races each day. If carried -out, as I believe is will be, this new arrangement -will be distinctly a step in advance. America's txp^.rienca is all in favour of wheel races ; Canterbury is following suit; and Danedin musb do so in order to develop trotting on the most approved lines. Besides, the public like harness races. I congratulate the Tahuna executive on bringing their ideas up to. date in this respect. It is au indication of vitality in the clab, and it comes at a handy time, when there is a prospect of l)unedtn taking a forward step iv regard lo trotting generally.

*#* The death of Mr Toaa Logan is annouueed. Be died in the Dunedm Hospital from a general break-up of the system. Mr Logan was ft poor man when h« landed in Otago from Victoria, but after several disappointments he struck it rich at reefing in the Cromwell districb, aud for years was oue of the most prosperous of miners. In those days he owned Dead Heat and Cloth of Gold. Of late years he had been interested iv contracting in Australia, and travelled backwards and forwards occasionally. He was k< own to be~a tuosfi generous-hearted man and a man of good principle?, and many of our readers will regret to hear of his death.

*#* Nominations for the Duuediu Jockey Club's Hunt Club meeting include the New Zealand Cup horsea Euroclydon, Lord Rosslyn, Venus, Fulmen, Mountebank, and St. Ouida, and no one can complain of (.he calibre of the candidates all round, though the club's friends might have wished, and doubtless expected, a longer list. Whsre are the Canterbury jumpers this time ? One thing about the nominations gives me great pleasure. It is that Mr James was wide awake to head off a forfeit-list horse whose entry was offered. Secretaries ought to do this always, but unfortunately they do not. Perhaps they will exorcise a little more diligence in this respecb now that Mr James has shown the way.

*** Mr Jowitt sent in his resignation as a member of the D.J.C. Committee on Friday last, and the filling up of the vacancy thus created will be one of the duties of the committee at their 'meeting this evening. Presumably the choice will Tall upon on« of -the persons who were defeated at the ordinary election.

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Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2269, 26 August 1897

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2269, 26 August 1897

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