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TALK OF THE DAY.

By MAZKPPA.

*'#* Last week was about tho slackest of tha year in the sporting world.' The light settlinf over the Wellington meeting had gone over ; nobody seemed to want anything for the New Zealand Cup ; and, with the handicaps for the Grand National just about due, this favourite double was hanging fire. But Mr Henry considerately came to the relief by issuing the weights for the leaping races in time for Satue<» day's evening papers, thus giving the folk oa the corner plenty to talk about and argua over. It will be seen by the list published elsewhere that Mutiny has got 12.13 in the Steeplechase. This is comparatively a high weight to commence the handicap with. Going back to the beginning of the " nineties," I find that in the 1890 handicap Mangaohane and Ahua were bracketed in the place of honour with 12.0, Mangaohane- did not start, Ahua fell, and Daddy Longlegs 9.7 won. The next year Chemist was top weight with 12.11 ; he did not start, and freeman, carrying 9.12 with his penalty, got home. In 1892 Whalebone was at the head of the list with 11.13, and he finished fourth, the race being won by Ahua 11.9. The 1893 handicap was begun with Norton 12.12, aud he ran second, being beaten close on a dozen lengths by Waterbury 10.8. This was the first year that Mutiny appeared amongst the Grand National entries ; he got 10.7 and finished third In 1E94- Mutiny, mercifully treated with 10 9, did not start, and Norton won with the top weight of 12 B— the only instance in the period now under discussion of the actual top weight getting home. In 1895 Norton was at the head of the weights with 13.0, and he secured third place, the race being won by Mutiny 11.5, with Roscius 11.11 second. Last year Liberator, weighted at 12 9, was given top place in the weights, and, failing to negotiate the big fences, he ran nowhere, the race being captured for fche second time by Mutiny 12 H, who won easily by 10 lengtht from Gillie 10 3. with Booties 10.11 a very bad third, just in front ot Cyrus II 9.7, while Nafc 10.0 was the only other horse to finish Com* men ting on this race, our Chrißtchurch correspondent, who is a thoroughly eouod judge o£ racing, wrote : "Mutiny must be considered the best steeplechaser now mnning in the colony, at any rate when big country has to be negotiated. Hope had an easier ride this year thin last, and I am qaito satisfied that had The Mute gelding been pushed he would have beaten the record of 7unin 26sec established by himself last season at Ricoarton."

*** There you have, ladies and gentlemen, some facts and an expert opinion to help you in yonr calculations as to whether you have a fair prospect or not of getting home iv the first leg of the double with tbe horse you have been rushing ever since the books were opened. There are other considerations which also apply. Mutiny, for instance, is an old horse, and must very goon start down the hill. Moreover, he has not been showing bis best form lately — at H&wke's Bay he was only third, with 12.13, to Morag 10 5 aud The Plug 9.12. And Mutiny's present weight ia greater than has ever been carried home flrsb in the National, the top weight amongst the winners being Canard's 12.10 in 1886. As against these facts we know that Mutiny can get over the severe Riccarton country. Twice in succession he has beaten all his opponents in that line— and ho hnd a stiff weight when he did it last year. AH things considered, remembering particularly his third at Hawke's Bay the other day as indicating souudees and some sort of form, I am inlined to support Mr Henry in hta calculation regarding ("his clever iittle horse. Twelve-thirteen is a big impost certainly, but at less tban say 12 10 Mutiny would have looked a really good thing, and we don't want a really good thing to paralyse the betting at the outset and suggest to owners the advisability of waiting. I isay tbat Mutiny has a show, aud that is all he could expect. If incautious backers who have been taking this horse freely in doubles don't; like their prospects so well now tbat the weights are out they have only themselves to blame. They had no right: to assume that Mutiny would be thrown in, if that is what they were going on ; and if that was not the basis of their calculation — if, on theother hand, they reckoned thatat anything like a reasonable weight Mutiny would beat hit opponents for jumping when they get to the trying Riccirton obstacles — wcl', they have the consolation of knowing that Mr Henry is of the same opinfou. Shortly put, I give Mutiny what he is entitled to — a reasonable show, but he is not a chuck-in.

* # * I rather prefer him to Levanter at a difference of half a atone. At Ellerslie I should take Levanter for choice ; bat the race is at Chrietchurch. St. Sinon is a dangerous horaeat 11.11. Even accepting his failure over steeplechase country at Auckland ss true form, there is time for him to learn to leap the taller obstacles, and his present weight is encouragement to hurry up this schooling. Bui he ought not to be backed until he has actually been through some schooling at Riccwton. Kingswood is said to be a good horee, but so far I don't see much in bis performances. Ifc will be wise to let the stable lead the way in thft betting market with regard to this horse. Tally-ho with 10.7 was beaten by Levanter 12.1 in the Auckland Steeplechase last month. She refused at Hawke's Buy, and fell at Wellington when carrying 11.7. These are the facts on which backers may figure out for themselves what Tally-ho's chance now is. As a matter c£ weight abe ought to have some say with 11.2, but don'fc you think Levanter should beat her if both stand up ? Now we come to four very d&Bgerous members. The Friar won fche Wellington Steeplechase, in which he had 9.12, by half a dozen lengths from Violence 9.11. The - latter gets the liberal allowance of a stone for the beating, so she cannot grumble ; bub The Friar is still in at; a very handy weight for a winner. Then we come to Morag 10 8, or only 31b more than ha had when he won the Hawke's Bay Steeplechase. He also must be reckoned with. Gillie has 10.7, or 41b more than he carried into second place in last Grand National, when Mutiny (now raised 91b) won. This is good handicapping, and it leaves Gillie with a show, which is all the more attractive sinco he is trained on the ground he will have to race over. The fourth of my quartet is Perform, who won two races at the Auckland Steeplechase meeting, and ia accepted by competent judges as a coming chaser of high quality. I do not care for Dummy, preferring him in the Hurdle Race ; but the ancient Booties if not quite played out, may be worth a saver on the day, while Bradihaw, winner of the Wanganui Steeplechase, must surely be counted well in with 10.2. Rangipai, too, it given a reasonable chance, and others of the light weights that take my fancy more or lees are Nat, Violence, Rhino, Claymore, and Flirt. I will not stand the Danedin mue Ulster until I know Bjw hit,

really got round the Rtccarton fences. Nat, the other Forbury-trained candidate, is much better property, for he led once round in the National last year, when very light in condition and quite unfit to last out the journey. Hastie has this horse in hand this year, and is building him up beautifully, and not sparing him either, and were I now attempting to pick the winner in half a dozen I should include this gocd-lcoking chratnut in the list. I deem ifc wiser, however, not to make a definite selection at present. There will be lots of time after the acceptances appear and the horses begin to shape over the racing track at Cbristchurch. The main reason of_ my diffidence is that I consider this Steeplechase handicap a regular puzzler, well thought out from top to bottom.

*** Coming to the Hurdle Race, we have, of course, St Simon heading the handicap, and his plaster is 13.5, or half a stone over what he had when he got home on the heavy Auckland course last munth. It is a tough weight, but St. Simon is a champion, an-1 we have yet to find out how good he is. He.was theu giving Annabelle 281b, aud that is now the differencebetween these Aucklanders, Me Heury calculating, I think with justification, that the rice in the scale is sufficient handicap on the gelding to make up for the little there was between him and Annabelle when last they met. While the Auckland pair have been put up 71b, Ilex, who finished third ia that race, has beeu dropped 51b, and, having this 121b allowance, it woald not surprise me to see the Oamaru horse beat them both, seeing that the lefthanded running is what he is used to. Mr Wise's horse is very nic2ly handicapped. There are, however, three others above him that may be hard to beat. I refer to Donald M Kinnon, who won this race two years ago, and is now let off rather mercifully in view of having done nothing of late ; Melinite, who a year or so ago was a top-sawyer, and Social Pest, a horse that will be quite at home. Tallyho, likewise, is a very dangerous member. Last year's winner, Dummy, is raised 151b, and that is not unfair, while Golden Plover is given a chance, and down among the light-weights I rather like 'St. Anthony. As for the novices, nothing pleases me better than Missfire, but it "would never do to rely on a beginner for a race of this sort. The chances are that Ihe winner will come from the performers. Which of these is to be preferred, in my estimation, I will say later on. Meanwhile I repeat my constant advice, Don't plunge on anything. *** The following figures show the average weight served out in the New Zealand Cup to bhe representatives of the various sires. It may he mentioned that St. Leger and Dreadnought each have six representatives ; Castor, four ; Gorton, Apremont, Artillery, Medallion, Torpedo, and Flintlock, three each ; Maxim, Vanguard, Perkio Warbeck 11, and St. Clair, two each ; the other sires named, one each. The avers ge per horse is —

*** Mr Monaghan's letter, reproduced in these columns, on the subject of the two Miss Websters showed plainly that the confusion waß of Tasnianiah" origin, and that Derrett's mare of that name is the proper possessor of the pedigree of Manuka — Pussy. I now have a letter trom Mr Richard Sj mmons, dated Zeehan, July 3, which fully eatabiishes the claim. Mr Symmons writes as follows :—: — Noticing under "Mazeppa's" notes that a que 1?-1 ?-' 1 tion and dispute have arisen as to the genuineßess of the pedigree of Miss Webster, I write to let you know that there has been a mistake on Mr Field's part. The New Zealand Miss Webster, b f, of 18S2, is by Manuka out of Pussy, and the filly fllr Stephenson returned to Tasmania on my behalf was a bay filly by Manuka from Cora (the dam of Pussy). I bought both the fillies and shipped to New Zealand by the Ringarooma, along with several others. At the sale Mr Hazlett bought the Manuka — Pussy bay filly f or 60gs ; the Manuka — Cora bay filly was passed iD, and later on my agent (Mr Stepbenson) forwarded her to me in Tasmania. There is no doubt Mr Field has got mixed up between the two mares, as they were both oay fillies, foaled the same year (lf-82), and both by the same horse (Manuka), and being bred from mother and daughter a mistake could very easily be made. The pedigree of Mr Derrett's Miss Webster '.if it is the filly I sold to Mv H^zlett) is b f, 1882, by Manuka (N Z.) from Pu«sy, by Cervus (imp.) from Cora, by Boiardo (imp.) from Merry Maid, by Jersey (imp ) from Diana, by Peter Fin (imp.) from Curiosity, by JBuffalo (imp.) from EdeJla (imp.). I have lately written to Mr W. Lindsay Field to this effect, and pointed out the mistake hjs father and cousin have made. Trusting you will publish this, as fraud is mentioned in " Mazeppa's notes, — I am, &a , Kiciiard Symmons. In thanking Mr Symmons for his letier I would remark that in my notes of May 20, referring to the subject, I set forth all the facts in my possession as to Derrett's mare, and argued from these that she was the Simon Pare, and the only mention of fraud was for the purpose of saying that in my opinion no fraud had been perpetrated, my contention being that it was a mistake for which no one who had had the New Zealand marc was responsible. Since penning these lines I notice by the Christohurch papers that Mr Wanklyn ha* received a" letter from the compiler of the Australian Stud Book stating that he has letters from Mr Field and others which clear up the mystery, and that the New Zealand mare will be entered up as the 1882 daughter of Manuka and Pussy.

*** About the end of last year Mr Mat D&wson insured his young Minting mare Vinery for £1700 through the International Horse Agency and Exchange for six months. She 4rM in fosl to Kilwarlin, and was to visit St. Simon. She foaled all right, and was up to then as well as possible, and she was duly put to the horse ; but she wa» presently found to %iave contracted some wasting disease — consutnption of the abdominal viscera, together in all probability with some internal growth — and, becoming quite unable to digest food, developed blood poisoning and fell right away to the merest skeleton. Mr D*wson bad her brought away from Welbeck and consigned to the care of Mr B. H. Leach, of Newmarket, with instructions to keep her alive, if possible, till the expiration of the insurance term. She reached Mr Leach's place on May 6, tnd, despite all he could do for her, gob rapidly worse ; indeed, at he said, had she not been a blood one she would have died within a day or two, and it is quite certain that if she had ever got down Bhe could never have got up again. She was in acute and constant pain, and though the insurance had little more than a fortnight to run, the underwriter*, on certificates from Mr Leach and Mr George Burrow that she ought, as a matter of humanity, to be destroyed,

gave the necessary permission and will pay on the loss. London Sportsman says that this is no isolated instance, for many similar ones could be cited — indeed, there i* never any difficulty experienced in obtaining the underwriters' consent to have an insured animal destroyed when such occasions arise, if only they know that the business has been throughout in trustworthy hand*. Such a liberal and humane policy must in the nature of things be alao profitable, for the volume of insurance must naturally increase with the knowledge that losses are so freely paid.

*** Mr Yuill'e, ""compiler of the Australian Stud Book, writes bo Sydney Mail :—"I: — "I have read Mr Morton's letter about the breeding of I Gipsy with interest, for I have often tried to ' discover her pedigree and taken a great deal of trouble about it. As Mr Morton says, she was a black mare bred in 1840, and taken to New Zealand by Mr John Beit early in 1845 He was said to bay« bought her at the clearance sale of Mr C. Smith's stud in 1844. During her r&c'ng career in New Zealand, which was a successful one, she was always described as by Rous's Emigrant, so it may be taken tor granted : that horse was her sire. Respecting the breed- j ing of her dam I have never been able to find j out anything definite, though it is possible, as 1 Mr Morton says, that the mare was by Bay | Camerton out of a mare imported by the Government of New South Wales in 1827, and foaled abjufc 1825. Ib is improbable, however, that this imported mare was by Muley Moloch, for the Well-known English sire of that; name • war foaled in 1830. Even so, there is little doubt that Gipsy must have come from a good running family ; her descendants have shown such high-class racing form in each succeeding ! generation there cau have been no stain in her j pedigree. Btisides, for some years before 1840 Mr C. SiMrth had several marcs of pure lineage in his stud. Were a catilogue of the sale in 1844 } forthcoming no doubt Gipsy's pedigree would be found in it."

*#* What an extraordinary career has been that of Clwyd and Victor Wild, the winner and the third in this year's Jubilee, says an English exchange We remember the first-named was purchased out of a selling race by Captain Homfrey at Newmarket, and that gentleman, after backing him several times, won a selling race with the horse, and allowed Stevens to become his possessor for £360 at Leicester. Hit new owner, however, does not seem to have been very pleased with hi« purchase, for we find the hog-maned son of Beauclerc again changing hands, and this time he goes back to his first master, Mr Dobell, to be sold, after winning several races, to Colonel North, in whose ownership he remained up to the time of that gentleman's death. The reason, we were told, that Clwyd was so frequently disposed of as a two-year-old was owing to the fact oi his being so thick-winded as to lead his different owners to imagine it was only a question of a month or two for him to develop bad roaring tendencies, and so one after the other allowed a "gem" to slip through their fingers. The excellence of Victor Wild was also not discovered as a two-year-old, and to show how little he was thought of, Mr Merry mentioned to us that once when he was third in a selling race, with old Victor second, on as'sing his owner, Mr Golding, to " claim friendly," that gentleman wanted a ."pony" for doing so, as he said he would much prefer Mr Merry's horse Raglan to his own.

* # * Response, the daughter of Richmond and Bis Bin, who when owned by Dan O^Briea won the Dunedin Champagne Stakes, , made her first public appearance over hurdles in the Maiden Hurdle fUce at th" VR C National meeting, and, ridden by Keunedy, she won from end to end. Her starting price was 6 to 1, and she carried top weight amongst the nine starters of 10.1. She jumped only fairly well, but smothered them all for pace. Damien shaped very badly, and atao broke a blood vessel. The Two-year-old Handicap, seven furlongs, proved to be a soft thinsj for Mr J. Wilson's Carbina, daughter of Carbine and Azalea. She was blocked s.t the distance, but got through rather luckily in plenty of time to catch and dispose of Wild Raven and Carlos. This gives Carbina a penalty in thß Melbourne Cup. Then came the Grand National Hurdles, won by Buzzi, who is owned by Mr J. Fart ell, was bred by Mr J. Evaua, of Waittfields, near WanKaratla (Vie), tfMd is by The Plunger from Barratti, by CJ^^fct (V.) from Poetess, by Topsail from Eli^^MQ^by Jersey from Mirror, by Sir Herculec^^^^^k win seems to have surprised even !^^V pariy. "~Ajax," of Sydney Referee, this" subject : "Now that the race is over^Perybody you meet tells you that you ought to have backed Buzzi. No one denied that the horse'was well handicapped — at 911 he was only raised 111b for his win last year — but his form lately has beeu so bad that one could not tip him straight out, though I had him as one of my selections. Even Mr Mark Wbitty, his trainer, told his friends on Saturday that his chance was a very outside one. Fortified by last year's experience, no notice should have been taken ot Buzzi's suburban form. He is a thorough stayer, and in the suburban flutters never gets properly going. Even at two miles and a-half he had no show on Saturday. At three miles he was running over everything, and, if the distance had been another mile, he would have gone still further away. Buzzi may not, however, have won but for the absurd race ridden by Barbour on Soult. After covering half the distance Soult was driven t.long for all he was worth, and by the time the home turn was reached he was completely baked. So-and-So, who had to chass him, was in tho same condition, and so were one or two others. Then Buzzi, who goes one pace all the time, passed a lot of distressed horses, and beat Castillio, who looked a certain winner 100 yds from home, by a length. If Barbour had not ridden Soult the race he did, it is quite possible that So-and-So and Soult would have fought out the finish." The Maiden Steeplechase was regarded as a match between Hayseed and Mailboat, and, as the betting indicated, the race was between the two; but, as Mailboat blundered badly at the last fence, Hayseed won easily. The winner hiss plenty of size, and a rare jumping pedigree, being bj Boolka from Camba, by Dante (sire of Redle&p) from Coolyrie (dam of Renmark and Iris), by Panic. The Winter Handicap went to Catspaw 7 4, a five-year-old gelding by Neckersgat — Cyclone, who was backed at 7 to 1. Mr Cook's mare Dora 94, starting favourite, finished third.

*#* I' was r **• Rucker who made the first big offer, 25,000g5. for Galtee More. This is disclosed by Mr Alison in a communication to the Sportsman He writes : " The offer which I, through Mr Vigors, made for Galtee More — viz., 25,000g5, together with 2500gs out of the' Derby Stakes and a similar sum out of the Leger if he won or 30,000gs in all— was on behalf of Mr Rucker, and Mr Gubbins wired refusing it. I do not know whether a. bigger offer than this has ever been made for a horse in training, but it was really not in any sense an ixtrvagant one, having regard to Galtee More's engagements and his subsequent value as & stud horse. There is, of course, a risk about any investment

in horseflesh, whether it be 30gs or 30,000g5, but, given good luck, Galtee More would soon get back all the money. Some people saem always to think such offers incredible, but there is nothing incredible or unreasonable about them when regarded with ordinary common sense. I have in my time offered the Duke of Westminister 20,000g8 for Omie, and Lord Rosebery 20,000gs for Ladas, both of which offers were refused, and there is really scarcely a limit to the value of such horses so long as stud fees on the present scale are co cheerfully paid. Mr Platt gave something like £20 000 tor Eendal after that horse had been ?ome years at the stud. It seemed a very big price, bub no one ever made- a better investment "

*** The Age, in its notes on the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdle Race, gays: — "The pace was medium ior the first round, and when they passed the judge's box the second time, Barbour on Sonic, who had been reefing less than was anticipated, slipped the field and, driving his charge along, soon put a distance of a dozpn lengths between himself and his nearest attendant. The adoption of the Nowhaven tactics a mile and three furlongs from home in a Grand National Hurdle Race did not commend itself to the admirers of the Camperdown representative, and when Barbour commenced to urge his horse along, and increased his advantage at the river sf.retch, the spectators realised that Soulb woald indeed be a champion if he could win under such conditions. At this stage the pursuers realised that delay would be dangerous, and hslf the riders could be observed urging their mounts to get nearer to the o*3 iug leader. Larrikin in his endeavour took off too far, and striking a hurdle, broke his neck ; and Glendower, who was going beautifully at the head of the bunch, and gaining every stride on the tirißg pilot, crashed over a hurdle — a fate which also befell Gratiauo ; while Favour broke down and was not persevered with. Soulfc was done with, as, indeed, was only to be expected, when the turn for borne was made, and So-and-So, Nora, Creina, Buzzi, and Castillio on the inside seemed to be the only quartette that had been able to survive the trying chase. Soult, displaying the gameness which is characteristic of his stcck, made another supreme effort as the last hurdle was crossed, but died away immediately, and G. P. Brewer, on Castillio, had the mortification of being cut down in the last 100 yds by last year's winner, Buzzi, just as he had been 12 mouths ago, when, with Tirnoni, he ran second to Dungan in the Grand National Steeplechase. Deposed and the South Australian Conventioner, running through ihe distressed rank and file, were two late to catch the first pair. So-and-So fought it out resolutely, but having to make a special effort a mile from borne killed him, just as it did Nora Creina, Exchange, and Woonooke. The riding ot Soult was most unfortunate, as Barbour, it seemed clear, made an error of judgment. His instructions were to lie in his field, and if the horse pulled to let him run a'.ong for half a furlong or a furlong, and then take hold of him again. This he did not do, and his explanation was that as the field was not going above the ordinary pace, and Soultwas going well, he thought he might increase hi« chance by gettiug away from his opponents. The result, unhappily for the stable, for those who backed the horse, and for the jockey himself, was exactly the opposite."

* # * The stallion Retreat, considered by good judges to be the best of all Hermit's sons, died of enteritis at Bath a couple of month* ago. He was bred by Lord Bradford in 1877, got by Hermit ont of Quick March, by Rataplan, and did not win a race until he was four jears old, when he took the Royal Stakes at the Epsom Summer meeting of 1881, although the same year be finished first for the Ascot Stakes, but was disqualified for caunoninj; and boring, Teviotdaie being declared the winner. He was an easy winner of the race the following year, and also secured the Rous Memorial at the same meeting, and later proved successful in the Doocaster Cup. In 1883 he was unplaced for the Ejsom S r akes, and was then sent to the stud at the Falmouth Paddocks, Newmarket, and we find Fastness and Father O'Flynn of his stock winning in 1887. The latter was then a two-year-old, destined to win the Liverpool Grand National Steeplechase in 1892. In 1890 Retreab was sold to M. E. Blanc to the place of Energy iv France. There his beat son was Andree, wbo won the Grand Prix de Paris in 1895, bnt two years previcu- to thin he had been purcliised by Dr Freeman for 1250g5, and he returned to England to finish his days at the Heather Stud.

*#* I have been looking back, says "Terlinga," to sea hew Aurum's weight for the Melbourne Cup compares with the imposts given j crack two-year-old performers iv past years. I ; find that in 1883, when Commotion was top , weight with 10 1, Archie was given 8.3. This j was the heaviest weight ever given a three-year- j old (they are three-year-olds at the time of running) until Aurum had 8.6 placed againsb his narus this week. In 1892, when Strath more and Maivalio headed the handicap with 9.8 each, Autonomy started the three-year-olds with 8.0. Newha-ven's 7.13 was a pound more than Segenhoo was allotted in 1882, when Darebin headed the handicap with 99. In 1890 Titan was the ■ supposed top-sawyer, and he was given 7.11, j Carbine being top weight with 10.5. Cat bine '• and Volley, as, three-year-oldc, had 710 in ' 1888. In 1891, the year Carbine was handicapped at 10 12, Lord Hopetoun and Stromboli each had 7.9. the same weight Cnalleuger was awarded in 1895. These are the highest ■ weights ever given three-year-oldß in the Mcl- j bourua Cup. Since 1880 Carbine has started the handicap on three occasions, and so has Commotion, who was top weight in 1883, 1884, : and 18S5. Strathmore and Wallace have , started the handicap on two occasions. 1

■*#* Epsom is believed to be the richest race meeting in England, «ys Truth, but instead of the vast revenue being devoted to increasiog the stakes, as at Ascot, it is mosbly grabbed by the owners of the grandstand and other persons interested, whose cupidity wouid really seem to be insatiable, as the programmes are always miserably meagre, and the amount of added mouey is utterly paltry and contemptible. Epaom, indeed, is in no respect worthy of the support which ifc receives. The card is principally made up of T.Y.C. events (mostly handicaps and selling races), the fields as a rule are very large, and it is about the very worst course in England. The running track is down hill nearly all the way, and there are almost always long delays at the post, the ultimate result being that the starts are usually bad, and the owners have practically to rup the chauces of a lottery. A man who has a highly-tried animal which he intends to back heavily is an infatuated noodle if he runs it at Epsom, as, if the creature gets a bad start, as will probably be the case, the race will be over before it can recover from its mishap at the post, and it will have been useleisly exposed, while its owner's money will have been thrown away. Results at Epsoua depend far more upon lnck than upon the merits of the runners, and sagacious owners

will keep their good things for Ascot, Newmarket, or Goodwood. ,* *#* According to the Horseman, a cure for roaring has been discovered by the Belgian I veterinary surgeon, M. Gendens, who says that \ he has effected the complete cure of two aged horses, both suffering from broken wind in advanced stages. His treatment, though we I cannot learn the quantities of the first two ! drugs named, consisted in the administration daily of small doses of araeniates of strychnine j and iron with 30gr of iodide of potassium. The iodide of potassium, M. Gaudeus relates, ' " operates to regulate the circulation," and the combination of this action with that of the arseniates completes the cure. These substances are closely allied to others which are used in relieving horses not seriously affacted with the disease, and of the remedies suggested that of M. Gendens appears to be the most likely to be effioacious, in the light of established fact. In short, so well has this alleged remedy been received in some centres that it is actually worth a trial. Veterinarians know what doses of the arseniates of strychnine and iron may be given, and the ratio iv which they should be compounded before administration may speedily be determined by experiment. The matter is well worth investigation. The proclamation of the di-oovery was only made after long research and what seemed to the investigator thorough trial, and ho long as he claims that he has cured broken-winded horses his formula should be given a trial. A broken-winded horse is worth very little ; the drugs nutned are not at all costly, and hence the experiment may b8 made without much expense.

j *jf* A country owner sends me a letter in references to the proposal of the D.J.C. to race at Christmastide instead of in the spring. He does not think the change would bring country folk to the meeting, an a lot of country meetings^ take place about thut time, and people like to see their district races. My friend goes on to say : " But if the D.J.C wants to get the country people to attend its meetings, would it not be a good idea to place on the programme a handicap tSat would suit country horsoo, then each county would send representatives, and the people would follow. In Central Otago we have not horses fast -enough to run in open handicaps at Dunedin, but if there was a race like the followiug we might try :—: — Maiden Handicap, of lOOsovs, seven furlongs, for horses five years old and upwards that have notwon an advertised pr.za of over 50sovg. Ido not think there are any races in Lake, Vincent, or Maniototo over that amount, and any horse that has been running at big meetings till he is live years without winning a 50sov race would not be too good for the country horses. If there was a race of that sort you would get a big entry for it, as it would be a sort of champion race for country horses, and where the country champion race was run there the country people would go." I have to thank my correspondent for so neatly placing before Witness readers the question as it appears fro en a country resident's point of view ; but I hardly think that the notion would work well in connection with the proposed December meeting. Country clubs that have their race meetings iv Christmas week might very reasonably qu stion the fairness o' the D J.C offering special inducements to district horses to leave their own meetings in the lurch and patronise the metropolitan gathering. Under existing arrangements, each country C9ntr*" trusts pretty well to its own and neighbouring hordes tor the Christmas meetings. Palmtrston is supplied by the region from, say, Waikouaiti to Oamaru — Cromwell drawn its horses from Central Otago, and so on, and if Dunedin fakes up Boxing Day as a date it must be s«ti fied witn its own horses and those from Canterbury, and perchance a few from places beyond in either direction. Uniier this arrangement no club is entitled to complain of interference, and so long as the D J.C. sticks to a programme that dots not tempt the bona fide country horse to forsake his home meeting there can be no grievance to anyone about the change of date. So, at least, it seems to me. But, while not agreeing with my friend in this respect. I think that a race somewhat on the lines he suggest* might with advantage, and without prejudicing anyone, go into the May or February programme, and I pass on the idea, to the Programme Committee for consideration .

* # ' c Gatwick races are reported in this week's English file-i. Oo the first day Cyllene followed up his Liverpool success by capturing the Worth Stakes in good style, thus landing his venturesome backers safely. The winner is by Bonavistafrom Arcadia, by Isonomy — Distant Shore, by Hermit. In the Prince's Handicap last year Paris 111 had only a single opponent to beat. This time there were eight runners Shaddock, on the strength of his Chester Cup win, was made a strong favourite, but he ran disappointingly, getting no nearer than third. Greenlawn, on the other hand, shaped like a racehorse, and his win is tiken as evidence that he should have been nearer the winner of the Lincolnshire Handicap. The Epsom meeting was the next in importance. On the first day the " moral," Perthshire, for whom 10,000i?8 was recently refused, failed to stay out the Woodcote Stakes distance, and was headed all tha way by Orzil, who in that race made bis- first public appearance. Orzil was bred by Mr Simons Harrison, who sold him, together with his dam Merry Miser (in foal to Sb. Simon), to Mr L. B-assey at the July sales two years ago for 1050gs. The Derby was a one-horserace. " The special "of the Sportsman reports: u Prime Minister and Oakdene made all the early part of tho running, but at no great pace, and thi», of course, exactly suited Velasquez, who lay about seventh. Galtee More was always within strikiDg distance of the leaders (as also was History), and, as I expected, came down the hill so readily that he was nearly, if not quite, in front at the foot of it. From that point; the race was over, but the carefully-nursed Velasquez had his rare dash of speed still in hand to finish with, the result being that he and Galtae More came right away from the rest as if they were the veriest backs. This mattered not in the remotest degree to the Irishman, who lobbed heme the easiest possible winner, but it exposed to a remarkable degree the inferiority of all the others, for here we have it proved that Velasquez, an admitted non-stayer, would, in the absence of Galtee More, have won the Derby in the commonest of canters." Limasol, winner of the Oaks, started at an outside price, but won easily, having more stoutness under the weight than any of the other starters. The winner was bred by Mr T. Jennings, sen., and in the course of her two-year-old career, during which she failed to win, she was privately disposed of to her present owner, Lord Hiudlip, and the daughter of Poulet and Queen of Cyrus wan him his first race of importance. It may ba noted as a rather extraordinary fact that neither in the field for the Derby nor the Oaks did the famous St. Simon have a representative.

* # * There were a dozen runners this year for the French Derby. Showers fell before the race, and the heavy going did not suit Castle-

nail, the favourite, who, labouring a good deal, failed to finish in the first three. Pal mist c had his field settled three fnrlongs from home, and scored in easy fashion, but an exciting struggle for second place between Doga and Flacon resulted in the pair making a dead heat of it. Baron A. de Schickler, the owner of Palmiste, won the race in 1892 with Chene Royal, and the following year with Ragotsky, while in 1886 his Syoomore ran a dead heat with Upas, and Suzerain won for him so far back as 1868. Palmiste is by Le Sancy (son of Atlantic and Gem oE Gems) from Perplexite, by Perplexe (son o£ Vermouth) from a daughter of King Tom and Mincemeat, by Sweetmeat — a thorough English pedigree in its sources and most of its developments. We have by the last mail particulars also of the Grand Steeplechase de Paris. The field for this crois-country event numbered 16, and included English and Irish representatives in Grudon and Detonator. Solitaire, purchased a week earlier by Mdlle Mars-Brochard for, it is said, 5600sovs, started a very warm favourite, as little ai 6 to 4 being accepted about him. His position in the market he fully justified, as he was practically in front all the way, and passed the post a twenty lengths' winner from Valois, with the English horse Grudon the same distance away, third. The winner covered the course (rather more than four miles and 110 yds) in 7min 39jec, and the stakes amounted to £6136. Amoagst the competitors tor the Grand Hurdle Race was Solimau, whoae career, both over hurdles and on the flat, has been so successful since he became tho property of Mr. Higham, and the son of St. Simon and Alibech started a strong favourite at sto 2. His best form over the sticks was reproduced, and in the hands of Captain Bewick* he won with much ease, being immediately followed home by the French horses Marise and Belisaire. The course (three miles, and a furlong) was covered by the winner in 6inin 42sec, and the stakes were worth £3104.

*#* With the Wellington meeting on July 10 the racing season came to an end, and " Pentagraph " publishes in the Referee the first bitch of statistics of winning horses and sires The leading winning hordes are : Multiform £2761, Gold Mpdalliet £1921, Lady Zetland £1600. St. Paul £1406. Day Star £1269, Goldspur £1039, Waiuku£lol9, Nestor £969, The Miser £838, Levanter £836, Blarney £801, Uniform £763, Tally-ho £670. Angler £637, Armilla £634-, Lord Rosslyn £631, Enroclvdon £593. St Simon £589, The Shrew £540. Defiant £538, Speculator £508, Arquebus £507, Skirmisher £506. The principal winning sires are : St. Leger £6981, Hotchkiss £4147, Castor £3564, Medallion £2827, Sou'wester £2785, Dreadnought £2684, Apremont £2518, Vanguard £2430, Perkin Warbeck II £2251, St. Clair £2169, Torpedo £1734. Foul Shot £1504, Nordenfeldfc £1474, Puriri £1316, Chainshot £1354, Mute £1285, Artillery £1275, Nelson £1239, Caprivar.or £1222, Cruiser £1110, Forerunner £1101, Maxim £1085, Rubezahl £1048, Ingomar £1011.

*** Hero worship on the turf will, the Argus says, stop at nothing. A striking proof of this was witnessed at Fletningfcon, when Larrikin in the Grand National Hurdle Race fell and broke his neck. The poor animal was hardly cold when some of his admirers among the crowd hurried round to the back of the course, where he lay, and began in the most systematic fashion to pieco the dead hero up amongßt them. One person .by the aid of a penknife cut off the tail and carried it away in triumph ; another appropriated the ears ; others knocked out the teeth. The hoofs, too, went, and were it nob that the vultures were hunted from their p'ey it is possible that the carcase would have been picked as clean as a dead snake on an anthill. There may be an element of utility about this particular form of hero-worship, for the hoofs and the tail of such a noted steeplechaser as Mr Glassccck's ill-fated bay have, when properly mounted, a certain marketable value.

* # * The first of the Jockey Club Plates, instituted by the ruling turf authority last backend, was on the card of the Bath meeting in May, but it turned out a failure, as nothing could ba found to oppose Count Schomberg. Playwright was in the paddock, but, though the second horse would have received the entrance money, hn was not sent to the post. The Jockey Club Plate at York, a week later, fared little better, for ifc narrowly escaped another walk over. As it was, Eclipse came out to oppose Diuna Forget, but the odde laid on the last-named were duly landed after his backers had for a moment beea uneasy as to their investments. It seems obvious, remarks a leading writer, that if these races are to serve the purpose for which they were instituted the conditions must be revised in order to prevent a few horse 3 something above the ordinary class practically farming them.

*#* The Kentucky Derby, run before an immense assemblage at Louisville on May 17, was won by Mr J. C. Cahn's Typhoon 11, by imp. Top Gallant (by Sterling— Sea Mark), who started at 11 to 5 agst. There were five other runners, including Ornament, who, ridden by Clayton, started first favourite. The track was very heavy. Typhoon II made all the running, finally winning by & neck from Ornament, whose rider made a waiting race or it, and when at last he brought his mount up with a final run on the side of the track where the going was heaviest, he could not quite succeed in making up his leeway. The time for the mile and a-quarter was 2 rain 12-^ee.

tt #* Au observant racing man who knows his way about Australia gives me Fleet ADiiißAr. or Reliance to win the Melbourne Cup. Let ijs see how this very early tip comes out.

St. lb. Fabulous ... 810 Total Eclipse Maxiui 8 0% Mozart ... Son-of-a-gun ... 713 Torpedo ... Gorton 7 12s Brigadier Apremont ... 7 9 Chain?hot Castor ... ... 7 82 Flintlock Vanguard ... 7 8J Ir.gomar... P. Warbeckll... 7 8* Waterfall Artillery 7 8 Cuirassier St. Leger. 7 7$ Oap-a-pie Crawfurd Priory 7 7 Ascot . . Newminster ... 7 7 St Hippo St. Clair... .... 7 5 Wolverine Dreadnought ... 7 4i Trident ... Medallion ... 7 4J Trenton ... St. lb. ... 7 4 ... 7 4 ... 7 3 ... 7 1 ... 7 0 ... 6 12g ... 6 12 ... 6 11 ... 6 11 ... 6 10 ... 6 9 ... 6 8 ... 6 8 ... 6 8 ... 6 7

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Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2264, 22 July 1897

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2264, 22 July 1897

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