Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TREE-PLANTING- AT QUEENSTOWN.

MR L. HOTOP'S PLANTATION, " TANBACH." (By Odb Wakatipu Correspondent.)

Mr L. Hotop, who counts with the early pioneers of the district, also ranks as one of, the most active and public spirited members of

our community. He has served in many capacities, with benefit to the public and honour and credit to himself. Queenstown has honoured him as its mayor upan repeated occasions, and he has been busy on the school and several other committees. It was while a member of the Queenstown School Committee that he initiated and introduced Arbor Day two years prior to any town in Otago, and to the townspeople of Queeustown belong the honour of having taken up the movement before any other town in Otago, Queenstown being, I believe, the second town in New Zealand catching, at the idea.

With equally good taste and judgment Mr Hotop fixed upon the hill face over-looking Queenstown, immediately opposite tbe bay, for the scene of operations. Already the young firs are a conspicuous feature in tbe landscape, and in a few years more the plantation will have gro^wn into a forest that will present a very pleasing and impressive appearance to tourists as they arrive by the steamer. Haying always %d a panchant tor treeplanting. Air Hotop about 10 years ago con.

iceived the idea of planting an 80-acra paddock, situated upon the eastern terracs overlooking Queenstown and the lake, with forest trees, tha land being especially adapted for a park. An undulating hill sidling furrowed by creeks and gullies and broken here and there by rocky knolls and precipices required only being clothed with traes to convert it into a park of great attractiveness. The situation in itself calls for special mention. From several of tho promontories which abound on the ground views may be had that rival any in New Zealand. You see Lake Wakatipu divided into three large sheets of water. To the south stretches in one long defile the Kingston arm, Hanked on the right by tha wonderfully cwved precipices of the Remarkables, while on the left the castellated Cecil Peaks, the Jaue and the other peaks of the torn and rugged Byre Mountains incite the imagination to flights of fancy into the realms of romance and witchery. At your very feet, and extending east, lies the Frankton arm, where the lake empties by tho rapids into the Kawarau. Here, hemmed in by the northern slopes of the Remarkables and QuesnaLown Hill, the view is bounded in the far distance by the Crown Range and its famed terrace, while iv the middle distanoe liea Franklon and its hospital, the home atation of what once was Boyse's run and other point? of interest. Between the Kingston and the Frankton arms of the lake winds in mighty sinuosities Boyse's Peninsula like some huge»sea serpent. To the west the middle bend of Like Wakatirm opens a magnificent view into the very heart of the rocky ramparts that crowd round the lake. In a sweep of view of not less than 30 miles in extent are arranged in diminishing succession the piled-up records of the convulsions and disturbances that makes the Southern Alps of New Zealand one of the wonderlands of the world. Near at hand up on the right Ben Lomond rears its graceful peak with the v c»lm dignity of lofty superiority over the lesser crumbling giants near it. In the midst of the towering ruins of a long past is now springing up a new life of peace and quiet, evidences of which lie immediately before you, where Queenstown, with its straight and regular streets, gives promise of a now order of things and of the dawn of a new time. Tho park occupying the peninsula forming Qaeenstown Bay, the gardens that surround tha town, the well-ordered roads — all speak of a beginning the purport of which cannot be mistaken.

So much by way of digression, but as the object of this article is a practical one we must return to our subject. Although a great deal has bean achieved in the tree-planting line by Mr Hotop, it was not attained without per«everauce aud energy. Three times failure defeated the planting out of trees, but at last with proper preparation of the ground and more care in setting out the young trees success was attained, and after years of constant assiduity and care Mr Hotop looks upon hia plantation as one of the best investments ho has ever made, snd is more than satisfied with the manner in which the trees are coming on.

It was found that BeedliDga procured from other places did not do vjjry well, and early in the experiment Mr Hotop laid out

EXTENSIVE NURSERIES in suitable situations, all of which have done much in stocking the ground with trees of a strong and healthy growth. Sowing and planting out is going on all the time, although the gums have begun to seed and propagate themselves. Hitherto it wa« a preconceived notion that gums would grow only round the borders of the lake, but Mr Hotop has proved that they do equally well up to aa altitude of at least 600f o above the level of the lake.

There are now on the estate 15,000 gum trees that may be considered out of their infancy, and which are well rootsd and henlthy ; 2000 larches, 500 ash, 500 silver birch, 2000 sycamores, 5000 pine 3, poplars, willows, fco. Spanish chestnut, hazel, and other forest and fancy trees are doing equally well. The trees planted out are beginning to make a show, and when the spurs and knolls stand out against tho sky they are quite a pleasing feature in the landscape. If they continue to prosper as they have bpgun in this and other instances Queenstown will noon be able to boasb of its forests raised by the energy of its citizens.

As to the puraly practical value of treeplanting, it may be mentioned that gum trees have been cut down in the neighbourhood of Queenstown that gave two and a-half cords of ficewood, which, valued at 34s par cord, the ruling price, gives a money value of £4- 5s — quite atpappreciable irem.

Referring to Mr Hotop's individual effort, it mnst be explained that he did not make treeplanting his sole occupation, and whatever care and attention he devoted to it wa* done in his "spire time, he having his business in Queenstown to attend to evary day. In his tree-planting enthusiasm, hower, he was ably and actively assisted by Mr Thomas Mantle, whose advice and aid Mr Hotop acknowledges with grateful recognition. Comparing what has been done by private enterprise in the neighbourhood of Qaeenstown in the tree-planting line with what has been achieved by the efforts' of our Government in this direction, the balance of tbe evidence is in favour of private enterprise, in which enterprise Mr Hotop's efforts take a conspicuous place. The plantation, which is christened " Tanbacb," after Mr Hotop's native place, abu'e upon the Frankton — that is to say, the main road from Dunedin to Queenstown— -and is easily accessible from several other points.

TAIERI COUNTY COUNCIL. The ordinary meeting of the Taieri County Council, held on Friday afternoon, was attended by Mr Charles Samson (chairman), and Crs Thomson, Miller, Harrison, Todd, Peat, Douglas, and Oughton.

inspector's heport. The County Inspector (Mr John Whyte) reported aa under : —

I have the honour to report on tbe county works generally. Tho road grading at Hindon was finished early in the month. Very good work has been done, and the Hindon district looks quite a different place. A few culverts aye still required, which, will be attended to by the local surfaceman.

Tbe metal for maintenance of the road to Hindon railway station is well advanced, aud will be ready for traffic in good time before the weather breaks up, thereby saving tho roads carted over.

On the Strath-Taieri Riding the road through Blair-Taieri township has been completed by Mr John Ryall satisfactorily, and the next thing to do would bo to gravel the parts that are likely to get soft in winter. A small contract will have to be let of cutting and banking at the bottom of section 5 (perpetual lease), Sutton, to give better access io the railway— the remainder to Kent street can be luade with the road grader. The road from Rock and Pillar station is well surfaced »3 far as Lug Creek ; another month or six weeks will put the road in fair order as far as the Camlet. I have inspected tbe new route to the homestead and claims on section 7, block I, Nenthorn, and find that it will shorten the distance considerably, and be an easier grade. The cost will be about £100.

iiyoll aud party have gone back to Nenthorn to start, the road through M'lutosh's and Dore's. This work is a little late in the season, but 'the party is strong and good progress will be made. Junge's gravel contract is not started yet, and time is up ; but lie makes fair promiaos to get through this month. A culvert has bean put in near Castledeans on tbe main road, and another on the road between Messrs Jones and Tisdale's properties. Kaikorai Riding. — The slag is now on. Matfet*son's hill. I think the heavy iroa slag is preferable to metal ou light roads — suck aa the abovementioned,—and would suggest that more bo secured for other works of the same nature.

Otakia Riding.— Surf aciog is being attended to — Christie's hill and the Kuri roaj* 1 , near Mrs Reid's, by Finnic ; Crane's to Christies stage (which is very bad) by Westwood. This road will require a coat of metal before winter. East Taieri Riding.— The old culvert at Mr Haiiey's, on the Outratu road, has given way. It is very far gone, and the next repair should be a pipe culvert, whioh would, I think, take all the water.

Outram Riding.— Surfacing has been attended to, and the metal on Centre road is well advanced, 234 yds being measured, and is being spread by tho, surfacemen. North Taiori Riding.— The surfacemen have been employed continually for the last two months on tha Wliaro Creek road repairing damage done by the flood in the spring. There is a lot more to do yet, and more help must ba got to enable the men to attend to other urgent works.

Maunptatua Riding.— The surfacing is being attended to by the local men, who are going to the back roads for a few weeks' to prepare tor the winter. The Poplar road ditch is being deepened by the Berkley people taking about JByds to the chain out of it. The material would benefit the road, but is rather too bis » job ,for tbe surfaceman to do aud attend to his other duties. I would suggest that the work be let or done by day work. The C drain contract not being finished on my last visit, I have therefore nothing to report, but would call the council's attention to the fact that the road is reduced to 19ft iv front of Mra Roxburgh's farm. Opeuine Owhiro Road to Cullen'a Road, East Taieri Riding.— About 30 chains of this road is completely covered with a strong growth of gorae, coming from Dowie's and Shand's fences. Four culverts will be required and some banking and, levelling. The cost will be £25. From Cullen's r-iad to Allanton thfre. are a number of swamps that would require culverts and the necessary banking even for stock driviDg. The cost of. same will amount to £40.

Kaikorai.— A new pipe culvert through the main road near Mr Samson's, and a nevr bxid^e or culvert at Mr James Thompson's (late Mrs Hamilton's): I don't think that so large an opening is required in this place ; two 18in pipes, I think, would be sufficient. The laying of the waterpipes has been done to my satisfaction. North Taieri.— The foot bridge at the Wingatu; ford is urgently wanted, and as the council fjoruu time ago promised £5 towards it a few poundmore would find new timber and make a better job than what was intended, and as the stream is nearly dry now would be the time to get it fixed. The old bridge over the drain on the road leading to air Milner's hill is quite rotten, and will have to be renewed.

Maungatua Riding.— Bridge over small creek running into Lee Creek, at Carruthers' : I intend to construct a box with paTt of tbe old timber from Allanton Bridge ; and also to make a crossing at Woodaide from the same mater jail, carted free of charge by Mr Morgan. In anticipation of the allocation of next year's revenue, I would suggest that blue atone metal ba procured for Fulton's Bush road (WooJside), and that it be done before winter, provided that the settlers cart same from Outrani. NothiDg has been done to the river bank between B drain and Lawrence'B, which is a work that ought to be done in case oi flood. Tenders. — Tenders have been called for the several works authorised at last council meeting, and will be laid before you. It was resolved that the manager of Berkley estate be requested to spread the spoil taken out of the Poplar road ditch to the satisfaction of the inspector ; that Mr William Shand and Mrs Dowie be notified to .clear the gorse at Owhirio road opposite their respective proper*ties ; that tenders be called for 400 yds of gravel on Owhiro road ; that tbe two culverts at Samson's and Hamilton's, in the Kaikorai Riding, be proceeded with ; that the erection of bridge* recommended in the Taieri Riding beprocenaVd with ; and that the work* recommended for the Maungatua Riding be carried out.

CORRESPONDENCE. Mr John Feat requested that the road through section 12, block I, Lee Stream, be continued for about 40 chains. — The request

was approved of. Messrs Ross and Glendinins wrote that tha

information relative to their firm brought under the council's notice at last meeting was entirely without any foundation in fact. — Received-. A letter received from the Bruca County Council enclosed a report of the chairman on the fords on the Waipori River and Taieri Month punfc. The Bruco Council intended to call for tenders for the punt approaches on the upper site and other works in connection with the same. The chairman of the Bruce Council stated in his report, further, that he had had a conference with the chairman of the Taieri Council with regard to the Waipori fords near Berwick. The fords in question were necessary owing to the roads on the Taieri side of the river having been washed away. The chairman of the Taieri Council attted that hie oouncil would take no steps towards a new road. As it was unfair for the Bruce Council to contribute to the making oF a ro*d for the benefit of rate- ! payers in the T*iori, and as none of the Bruoe i settlers suffered inconvenience, he recommended that nothiDg be done to the fords in the meantime. A report from Mr H. Clark was also attached. Mr Clark stated that he had informed Mr Samson that the Government had voted in all £500 for a punt at the Taieri Mouth, £200 being p*id when the punt was first erected, and £300 for a new punt, of which £165 had been paid for the new punt at present lying at Taieri Mouth, the balacoe being available* for the erection of floating stages, &o. Mr Clark < added that be bad told Mr Samsou that the i Bruoe Oouncil was strongly opposed to placiug the new punt oa the present site, and th*t to j place the punfe on tbe npper site was estimatsd to cost £200 more. Mr S&msou approved of thin, and said his oouncil would be prepared to carry out the agreement formerly entered into — viz., to pay one-third of the cost up to £100. — The action of the chairman was approved. Mr Sydney James asked, in view of {jhft ; races beinsr about to be held on tha club's proi perty at Win{j»tui,' aud th-s iaoreased traffic that would take place, that the road from Mosgiel to Wiixgatui be widened. — Received. Me John Stevenson (Henley estate) wrote j requesting that 30 chains of the B road line j be formed on the west side of Lee Canal. — Cr ; Miller and the inspector were iusftruoted to j report on the work. l Mr William Bennett wrote at some length as j to the rates tife was pitying, and considered he j was beiug rated too high. — Receiv«d. I Mr Houry Harraway (Buinside) wrote with j regard to the pollution of the Kaikorai Stream, j and requeeted that steps bo taken to abate the nuisance. — The Chaiumah stated that no doubt j the Kaikorai stream was being terribly polluted, \ and he believed M'Leod Bros, were the greatest ! offenders. — The clerk and inspector were in- : etructed to pay tv visit to the spot and take the ' necessary stops to remedy the matter. FINANCIAL. The Finance Committee recommended that { accounts amounting to £498 0« 6d be passed for • payment. — Adopted. THE ABATTOIRS. Cr Ouqhton stated that damage was beiug done by the carting of gravel to tho abattoirs. The gravel was being taken from his properly. They were taking it for' nothing, and they had no business to do it. He moved to the effaottbat the City Council be written to stating th*t unless they were prepared to repair the road or pay the cost of samo the proprietors from whoao properties the contractors for the Dunedin Abattoirs were getting the gravel would stop the supply. The motion was seconded by Cr Todd and • carried.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18970311.2.14

Bibliographic details

TREE-PLANTING- AT QUEENSTOWN., Otago Witness, Issue 2245, 11 March 1897

Word Count
2,971

TREE-PLANTING- AT QUEENSTOWN. Otago Witness, Issue 2245, 11 March 1897

Working