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THE NEW PARLIAMENT

PARTICULARS OF SOME OF THB MEMBERS^-. AUCKLAND. BAY OF. ISLANDS. Mr R. M. Houston is- the Bon of a clergyman and was born in Belfast, Ireland. He came out to New Zealand 33 years ago, and foe several years was engaged in teaching at Ofcirn School, Otahnhu. He afterwards went to Mougonui and started a general store, a bus!' ness at which he was engaged for about 15 years. He is largely interested in the kauri gum and timber trade. '. He is 52. years of age. In 1893 he defeated J. Trounson and F. Dargaville for the seat. MABSDEN. Mr Roberts Thompson is a 1 native of Belfast, and came out to New Zealand in 1872. residing at Whangarei, where he' has successfully carried on business as an estate and land 'agent and auctioneer. He has taken an aotive part in the affairs of local bodies, having baen ohairman of the Whangarei County Council. Iv the last election he defeated Mr J. Harrison for Marsden by a very narrow majority. Mr R. Crowther has been a hard working and painstaking member of the Auckland City Council for many years, and has also held the position of mayor. He has been identified with the progress of Auokland for matay years,'having Btarted a livery stable there some 30 years ago. ■ Last election he was elected in the Opposition interest, polling next to ' Sit George" Grey. ' ' * " Mr Thomas Thompson is a native 1 of Cork, Ireland. Upon the discovery of gold in Australia he came out? to Melbourne in, 1853, and commenced business as & carrier of stores from Melbourne to the various goldflelds in the interior., Owing to ill-healtb, he came to Auckland and started a grocery and provision buii« ue6S at jibe corner of Victoria and Albeit streets. He retired from business some years ago. Mr Thompson has taken considerable interest in the .volunteer mftvement, and w»» one of the first to take part in it when started in Auckland < .in 1858. He has been chairman of tbe Mount Eden Road Board and of the Mount Eden School Committee, and for many years was a member of the Auckland City Council. 'He was also for some time a member of the Auckland Harbour Board. In the general election of 1884 ho stood tor Auckland City (North), and det'pafcd his opponent, Mr Joseph Newman, by a luge majority. At the 1890 election he defeated Mr S. Vaile, the railway reformer, for the same seat. , He has always been an admirer of Sir George Grey, and in politics is a Liberal ladependpnfc X'aHNKLL Mr Frauk L&wry wa* born in the County of Somerset, England, and arrived in Auckland in 1864-. He took to the dairy business, and has been either directly or indirectly associated with this branch of farming up to the present^ time .He has been a member of the Epsom Road Board, and of tbe Executive Committee of the Auckland Agricultural and Pastoral Afsociatirm for many years. For a titne.be was also a member of the Auckland Board of Education/ 'Throe el' ctiotis ago he opposed Me HamUn For Fra'uklin South, but wes defeated by a small^majority. In the election TaeforG lafct he opposed Sir Maurice O'Rorke, but was again defeated At the last election ha was elected for Franklin North, defeating Mr W. F. Buckland by 4-1 votes. In £893 he was elected for Parnell by a ma jotifc? of 338. JS&EN. Mr John Bollard waaboro in County Wicklow, Ireland, in 1833, his father, being a large farmer. Mr Bollard was brought up on a farm, and was also trained at- the Royal Albert School of Agriculture. He came to New Zealand in 1860 He soon afterwards wtnb over to the Australian gold&Vlde, but returned to Auckland after a short- stay. During the Maori war he superintended a Urge shipment of horses for the Armstrong field artillery, and served for some time in the militia, eveutually settling at Avondale, where he has resided ever since. He has taken an aotive p*rt in public affairs for the last 30 years. He has been chairman of the Avondale Road Board for 27 consr-cutive years and chairman of the school commit^e for 25 years. He is also % justice of the peace and acts as coroner for tbe district, and in chairman of ths Auckland Hospital *nd Charitable Aid Board, and member of the Eden Licouaiug Committee. He takes a great interest in agricultural matters, and has acted as judge at the local agricultural shows. He has be?u approached on several previous occasions to stand for Parliament, and has always been a strong supporter of Mr Mitchelson. He is oppoued to further lm> rowing. MANUKAU. Sir George Maurice O'Kocke, Speaker of the New Zealand Hoiwe of .Representatives, was born in County Galway, -Ireland. Ho studied at Trinity College, Dublin, aud obtained classical honours. Upon obtaining his degree of B.A. he emigrated to Victoria, where he wns in turn gold digger,, resident on squatter stations, and c.verlander. . Iv 1854 he came to AuckUnd, and started farming in Papakura and Onebunga. In 1857 he was appointed clerk of the Provincial Council. In 1860 he wan elected, after a keen contest, as the representative in the General Assembly foe Onehunga. a position which bo has filled ever since In 1865 he was elected in his absence as one of the numbers for Ouehunga iv the Pro* vincial Council, aud wras then electfd Speaker of that body. Iv 1870 he was elected Chairman of Committees in thn House of Representatives, and in 1872 hs accepted a 'seat in the Waterhouso Miuistry, bub withdrew from ib in 1874- owing to proposals brought forward by Sir Juliu» Vogol. In 1879 h« was «Wt»,d Spenker of tbo House of Representatives, and was knighted in 1880. In addition to his Legislative duiics Sir Maurice O'Rorke has always taken a great inter? sb in educational m*Jf teri; aud has 6eeu a member of the Auckland \ Board of Education, chairman of the Board .of Governors of the Auokland Grammar School, chairman of the Auckland Univi-mty College Council, and a membpr of the New Zealand University Senate. In 1893 Sir Maurice O'Rorke secured a majority of 262 over Mr W. Buckland. ' FRANKLIN. , Mr Massey was born in Ireland in 1830. He joined his relatives in New Zealand in 1871. Fifteen years ago .he started farming in tha Mangere district, and has ' taken great interest in public affairs there. Fcr several years he has been president of the Auckland "Agricultural Association. Ho has fisen vicerprasident of the Natioual Association for the lastb two years. At the general elf ction 1893 -he was defeated for Franklin seat by Major Harrii, but gained theWaitemata contest at tHo bye-election in Marcl* . 1894. THAMES: ' Mr James M'Gowan is a native of Belfast, Ireland. He went to Auckland in 1863, la the old days, when Sir Frederick Whitaker was president, Mr MGowau was a member oj the Auckland 'Mndhast'.cs? Institute. Ho wsufc to

the Thames in 1870 and was chairman of the j school committee for many years. He was the means of changing tbe Thames Mechanics' Institute into the first public library in the province. He has twice filled the mayoral chair and acted as chairman of the Harbour Board. Ha defeated Mr E. H Taylor in 1893. OHINBMURI. Mr Alfred Jerome Cadman was born in 1847, being the eldest surviving son of the late Mr Jerome Cadman, who for about 20 years was a member of the Auckland Provincial Council for tbe Northern Division. Mr A. J. Cadman was educated in the old paroohial school of St. Paul's, Auckland, and afterwards at Wesley College. He has been engaged in the timber business at Coromandel. He made his first appearance in public affairs as member and chairman of tbe Tiki Highway Board. Subsequently he became joint chairman of the Coromandel County Council. When Coromandel was created a separate electorate in 1882 Mr Cadman stood for it, and wae returned as M.H.R. for the district by a large majority over his opponents, Messrs Mackay and Brodie. On bis return to the House in 1894 he took over tbe Department for Justice, and has since become Minister for Railways. - ■ waieato. Mr F. W.,Lang, a member of tbe Opposition, was elected 'for Waipa in 1893, securing a - TnKjdrityof v 9o^'vot€s. Be<M*y'birth'"a*Kentis&5 l man, was educated at Blackhaath, ia the southeast t>f London, and came to New Zealand in' .1872% jPor;fche las'tlO or 12 y&to he has held a «eat'in,tbe Waipa County. Council, acting- a? cuainnaniii 1887. „ WAIAPU. , ,Hon. J. Carroll, or Timi Kara as .the Maoris designate him, was born at Te Wairoa in 1857. Hi'b father was a trader, and. his mother belonged to the tribe of Ngat kahungunu. He was educated in a Native school, and while still ' a boy joined in tbe chase of Te Kooti in the Uriwera Country. He was mentioned in the derpatches, won the war medal and a gratuity of £50. After filling a position in the office of the 'Native Commissioner on the East Caast, .he was removed to Wellington to act as interpreter, and attached to the Native Land Court. In 1879 he became native interpreter in the Home, and a few years later entered Parlia- . ment for the Eastern Maori Electorate, taking a seat in the Cabinet when Mr Ballance. came into- office. > On Mr Ward's retirement he attained a portfolio. AUCKLAND CITT. Mr J. J. Holland was born in Leicester, England, in 1841, and was educated at the British School, Leicester. He left England in the ship Persia in May 1860, arriving in Aurktand in August of the sums year. In 1861 he went to tile OUgo goldfields, but returned to Auckland ' in 1862. He was drafted into the fir-t-class militia, and was made a sergeant in 1863, continuing to serve until the militia was dinbanded in 1864 - In 1686 he wax elected to r eyre* eat East Ward in the City Council, and held this position continuously till 1893, when he was elected Mayor of Auckland. He has now been mayor for three years. Mr Holland has been twice » member of the Auckland Harbour Board, and, by virtue of 4he mayoral effioo, has served on the University College Council and the Auckknd College and Grammar School Board of Governors. He has also be?n a member of the. licensing committee for five years, ', «ad r chairman of the city committee for three year's. He favours the present system of education and the referendum, but is opposed io an elective Executive. He is against farther borrowing, unless for something really urgent. BAT OF PLBNTT, Mr W. H. Herries was born in London in 1859. He received a first-class education at Eton and at Trinity College, Cambridge. He took his degree in 1880 — seoond-clasß in natural science tripos. He come out to New Zealand in 1881, and settled in the Te Aroba district. He has been for six years a member of the Piako County Council, and for three years a member of the Waikato Hospital Board. ' Mr Herries is a Fellow of the Geological Society of London. He is a supporter of the present system of national eduoation, and is opposed to farther borrowing. HAWKE'S BAY. hawke's bat. Captain Russell was born in 1838 at Sandhurst., and educated at tha Royal Military Oollrgft ; received bis first commission in the 58th Regiment, vieitmg New Zealand on military service in 1857 and ag*in in 1862 He has filled many public positions ; wa? Poetmastergeneral in 1884. and was Colonial Secretary and Minister for Defence from 1889 to 1890. H« represented New Zealand at the Federation Conference in Melbourne in 1800, and agMn at the Au-tralian N*tive»' Convention held in Sydney in 1891 He has shown great sympathy in all questions conoeraiog the vexed questions connected with labour and oapital, ■ and is respected by all parties for his straightforwardness, tact, and ability in dealing with public questions. - • WAIPAWA. Mr-George Hunter has not yet reached his fourth decade.' He is a son of the lat9 Mr Oeorge Hunter, wbo for many years repre-" sensed Wellington in Parliament and was universally honoured for his probity and high character both within tbe House and without it. ' His son is truly " a chip of the old block." He is a nhee'p farmer on a large scale at Parangabane, where his station buildings are like a township and are noted throughout Hawke's Bay for their completeness. Generous to a fault and solicitous of the good of every man ia the place, he is one of the most popular men in the province. He hss in his three campaigns developed into a ready speaker, dealiDg very effectively with all subjects. He married a daughter of Mr .Morrah, formerly an inspector of the Bank of Australasia, and has a family. NAWEE. Mr R. D. D. M'Lean, better known as Mr Douglas M'Lean,' tha new member for Napier, is a son of Sir Donald M'Lean, wbose name is ■ still a household word in New Zealand, and was born in Wellington in 1852. For come years he attended the Auckland Grammar School. He then went to Clifton College, England, and intended to go to the Cambridge University ; but bis health broke down, and he had to return to the colony. A natural love of study and a desire to fit himself for public life led' him to article himself to Messrs Hart and Buckley, of Wellington. He then returned to England and entered the Inner Temple, where he was called to the bar in 1882, passing tenth in a long list. He did not practise, bub came, back to New Zealand. He- owns Maraekakaho, a station of come 20,000 aores of fine rolling hills, every acre of which ia improved. The station is, perhaps, the model one of Nevr Zealand, so far as the provision made for the men is concerned. The buiidinga are. moat commodious, fitted with all tnodern conveniences, including bathrooms for ' Jbhe'mtn and a large library and reading room, while equal attention is paid to the wants of fcha "inner man." The shearing shed i« fitted with machine shears and every modern {contrivance. Mr M'Lean is a model employer in the best sense of the word, and is well served | t^* devoted band, most of whom are Hkh*

i landers. He is a member of the Heretaunga ' Road Board, the Hawke's Bay County Council, , the Charitable Aid Board, Hospital Board, &c. i He is a fluent and original speaker, his views j bearing the'impress of wide and varied reading. ( He promises to develop iuto an extremely ready and effective debater. TARANAKI. TARANAKI. Mr Henry Brown was bora in Lißoolnshire, England, in 1842. His father was a clergyman of the Church of England. He was educated at Neuwied and Lausanne. He landed in Taranaki in 1859, and has resided in the district ever since. He served throughout the wars with the Natives, holding a lieutenant's commission in the Taranaki Rifle Volunteer Corps, and has Bine* held a captain's commission in the New Zealand Militia. For some time he followed farming pursuit", but for the past 30 years has been eDgaged in the sawmilling industry, most of the time at Inglewood, where the firm of which he is the senior partner owns one of the most complete mills on thin ooast, employing a large amount of labour. Mr Brown has occupied various public positions in Taranaki : is a staunch churchman, is opposed to further colonial borrowing except for urgent necessities, advocates the rending of the Bible without comment in public schools, inclines to favour elective Executive, but does . not think the referendum would work satisfac- ■ torily in this colony. He thinks the liquor legislation has gone far enough He-will -.give aii independent support to -the late Opposition party.

EtJMONT. - . Mr Walter Synus, though not a native of New Zealand, waa - only about -two or three years of age nhen he arrived at New Plymouth, somewhere in the fifties, with b,is parents, who afterwards settled in the Waverley district. With the exception of about two years, when he wa6 in a lawyer's offioe, Mr Symes has been all his life on the land, latterly farming near Stratford. He has seen much service on public bodies, having been 15 years a member of the Patea County Council, 10 consecui ive years as chairman, for the same period a member of the Pntea Harbour Board, and is now on the Egtnont Licensing Bench and the Stratford County Council. He favours the referendum, but opposes an elective Executive. He alao opposes religious education in schools. He is in favour of moderate borrowing for reproductive works. HAWSBA. Mr M'Guire came from Fermanagh, Ireland. He arrived in the colonies when a boy. From Victoria he came to New Zealand, took part in the Maori war, and was mentioned. in the despatches. From 1872 until the abolition of the provinces he was in the Taranaki Council, wsw chairman in the Hawera County Couuoil, and was fi»t mayor of toe town. Ha secured the Egmont si at as an Independent at the last election. WELLINGTON. ' PAHIATUA. Mr John O'Meara was born in Melbourne in 1856 ; arrived in New Zealand in 1868 ; entered the ipost and Telegraph department in 1871, and remained in that service until he bt^an business at Queenstown. He was at one time ohaitman of the Lake County Council, and was also a member of tbe Borough Council of Qaeenstown. In 1893 he unsuccessfully contested the Wakatipu seat againsb Mr W. Fraser and the Hon. W. J. M. Larnach, afterwards settling in the North Island. BANGITIKEI. Mr Lethbridge was born at New Plymouth in 1852, and was educated partly in Nelson and Christchuroh. He wotked on his father's farm after leaving school. In 1876 he settled in Feilding, taking the mauagement of a run, owned by Lethbridge and Sons. Ou the flats on the frontage are the fiest racing track used in Feilding, the -local golf links, the polo ground, and cricket and football clubs' grounds. Mr Lethbridge has held tLe following amongst other public positions :— Member of the first Manawatu County Council, member of the Manchester Road Board, for 14 years (chairman for six years), borough councillor for Feilding, and mayor of the borough in 1882 and again ia 1889, member of the Feilding School Committee for several years. At the present time he is a member of the Wanganui Education Board, of the Palmerston North Hospital Board (of -which he was the first chairman), committeeman of the West Coast Agricultural aod Pastoral Association, president of the Feilding Jockey Club, Polo Club, Golf Club, Cricket Club, and vice-president of the Cycling dub. He wae for several years captain of tha Manchester Rifles, and was also a lieutenant in the militia. PATEA. Mr George Hutchison is a son of Mr W. Hutchison^ of Dunedin. He has bad good deal of experience in journalistic enterprises, but turned bis attention to law, and was articled to Mr (now tbe Hon.) Downie Stewatf, entered into partnership with Mr (now Judge) Denniston, and is now. practising at Wellington. Mr Hutchison is recognised as a power iv tbe House. He- won Patea last eleotion by 673 votes. " " ' PALMRBSTON NORTH: Mr F. Pirani, the proprietor of the Manawatu Standard, was born in Victoria in 1859. His first entry into public life was as a member of the school committee in Blenheim. He went to Palmereton in 1884, where he has acted as chairman of the licensing, school, and other committees, and has filled many local offices common to budding politicians. ' He has been a teetotaller all his life, and has always taken keen interest in politics. He polled very heavily and successfully for the Palmerston seat last election. TVAIBABAPA. Mr W. C. Buchanan was born in 1838 at Greenock, Scotland. He arrived in Australia in 1857, came to the South Island of this colony in 1863, and settled in Wairarapa in 1873. He may be considered an excellent specimen of the " social pest," is intimately connected with the frozen meat industry, and is chairman of the Wellington Meat Export Company. He is on boards innumerable, and is president of the Agricultural and Pastoral Society. He is a staunch Freetrader, and has Eat for Wairarapa since 1881. MASTERTON. Mr Hogg was born at Glasgow in 1845, em'grated to Victoria in 1861, and came to New Zealand in 1878. He joined the staff of the Otago Guardian, and subsequently conducted the Dunedin News and Age, and later the Ashburton Mail. From Timaru he went to Masterton, where for nearly^ 10 years he was editor and part proprietor of the Wairarapa Star. He has shown a great interest in the welfare of the small' settlers. - In 1893 he secured 1236 more votes than the next highest candidate for the representation of Masterton. 1 . otaki. Mr Henry Augustus Field was born at Wanganui in 1852, and is therefore 44 years of age. He has spent the whole of his life in the colony. Hia father and mother were early colonists. Mr Field in 1868 entered the Government service as a cadet in the Survey department. Ho qualified as a surveyor in 1872, and in conjunction with bis cousin immediately on

the close of the last Maori (or Te Kooti) war undertook on behalf of the Government the trigonometrical survey of the Waitnarino and ether conntry in the Upper Waugnnui and Taupo districts. These two gentlemen were the first Europeans to enter this country, and they were accompanied by none but Natives, though the country was then in a most troublous and disaffected state, and the country through which they passed had only just before been the t c -ne of war, rapine, and murder. Mr Field's survey and engineering work was highly thought of by his department, but he was obliged to relinquish his permanent engagement with the Government in 1878 owing to severe rheumatism, contracted by long exposure to wet and cold while on the survey. He still, however, practises hi« profession, combining it with eheep-l arming at Wftikanae. Mr Field i« a licensed Native interpreter, a thorough Maori scholar, and an expert in Native customs. In politics, though he comes from on old Conservative stock, he views the general policy measures of the present Government with favour, believing, as he does, that they will assist to ameliorate the condition of the great body of the population. At the same time he is independent in his views, and declines to be bound to any leader or party. MANAWATXT. Mr J. Stevens is a Wellingtonian born, and has resided in the now '* Empire-City " fiome- . where about 53 years. He was at one time an auctioneer, and has twice vkitf d India. Twelve years age be defeated Sir William Fox at an elecMon, so oaonot be Btyled "a '• green " politician. He defeated Mr F. Loth bridge at a contest for Rangitikei in 1893. "WELLINGTON CITY. Sir Robert S*onr, who sought <he favour of Wellington in 1893 in preference to again contesting Tnan^whua, which he secured at a bye-t-lecMou in 1893, or Dunedin, where ha was defeated by Mr Allen in 1887, is well known to our readers as a mo3t experienced and able politician Unsuccessful in snatching the Premiership from Mr &eddon in 1893, he proved a bitter opponent of the {Seddon Government. Sir Robert was born in Sootland in 1844. Ia 1863 he emigrated to this colouy, and for some time was employed as schoolmns'er in Duotdin. He passed as a barrister and solicitor io. 1871, and entered the Previncisl Council of Otago in the following year. In 1875 he entered the Lower House, and was A'torn"y-general in Sir George Grey's Administration. Resigning bis eeat in the House of Representatives h" did not return to Parliament till 1884, when he was elected for Dunedin, and joined Sir Julius Vogel in forming the Stout- Vogel Mini-try, in which he was Premier, Attorney-general, and Minister for Education. In 1887 he lost his te*t, and again retired from puWic life. He was created a X.C MG. in 1886 and is a Fellow of the New Zealand University. Mr John Hu^cheton is 41 years of age. He is a native of Dumbarton, and wan educated in the Dumbarton Burgh Academy He succeeded in gaining the South Ktnvngtun science and , arts scholarship, and in consequence of this he qualified for a c&detehip as a naval architect in Messrs Denuy Bros.' famous chip-building yards. He worked in the drawing offioe there | for' about a year ; but, desiring to see some- j thing of the world, he engaged as en apprentice ! on the Allan line <5f steamships. He became A..8., ; flecohd,andchiefmatein.aijiecr.urfe. Heb'asbeen, to use his own expression, " pretty well round j the ring." He wa« m St. Jago de Cuba during i the -rebellion of 1873 74, and from 1876 to 1878 j he resided in Oregon and California. His occupations have been almost as varied as his travels, for he has l>een clerk, painter, boilermitker, labourer, ealmonnMier, shiprigger, aud other billets, as auctioneers say, too numerous to mention. Mr Hutcheson arrived in Wellington in 1880, and worked at anything he could gnt. He was obief mate of tbe Hioemoa, second mate of the Stella, and also engaged en \ several of the New Zealand coneUng steamer*. ; Eventually he entered the service of Messrs E. , W. Mills and Co., as rigger, and worked there for 10 years. Mr Hutche? on has made a favour- i able impression on the political platform, and there is about him a refreshing individuality that stamps him as something out of the common. For instance, in reply to my request for some facts in regard to his career, after stating that he got " sacked " by a certain firm in Wellington for asserting his right to receive a certain payment for special service, he concludes a characteristic note in the following terms : — " Got my pay and the 'sack' ; started | 'on my own ' ; making three meals a day ever j since ; credit good ; bank account nil. Ap- ] pointed to harbour board ; running for Porlia- ! ment; think I'll get ia — Youtb faithfully, John Hutcheson." Mr Hutcheson stood for Parliament as a Labour candidate. He is a follower of Mr Seddon. •WEIXINGION SUBURBSi • Mr T. M. Wilford was born on June 20, 1870, and was educated at Christohurch College, Canterbury, under Mr C. G. Corfe. He matriculated at the Canterbury University, and on coming to Wellington he was articled to Messrs' Brandon and /Brandon as solicitor. While in their employ he passed his final examination at the age of 18, and wat then the youngest solicitor in the colony. He had to wait for two years before he could be admitted to practise. In 1891 Mr Wilford went into partnership with Mr Travers, a well-known Wollincffcon barrister and solicitor, and in 1894 he started practice in Wellington on his own account. Mr Wilford resides at the Lower Hutfc, where he has taken a prominent part in the administration of local affairs. He has also taken great interest in all field sports and athletics generally, and has represented Wellington on the football field. Mr Wilford married a daughter of the Hon. George M'Lean, of Dunedin, and in his political campaigns he is greatly assisted by his wife, who is popular with a large number of eleotors. In 1893 Mr Wilford contested the Wellington Suburbs with Dr Newman. Mr Wilford, who stood in the interests of the Seddon Government, polled 1715 votes to 1839 polled by Dr Newman. NELSON. Mr J. Graham is a son of one of the original settlers of 1842, and was born at Riwaka over 50 years ago. He is one of Nelson's successful business men, and for many years has been a member of the City Council. He was chairman of the Nelson School Committee, a fluent speaker, and acknowledged to be a man of ability. He defeated a previous parliamentarian in 1893 for the representation of Nelson. TVAIBATT. , Mr T.*L. Buick, who is not yet 30 years of age, is entirely self-taught, and a strong temperance advocate. He first came before the public of New Zealand in connection with tha Home Rule question, on which he lectured in various parts, of the colony a few years ago. He was appointed secretary of a branch of the Irish National League, and took an active part in political questions. Was firet elected to Parliament in 1890, and acted as whip for the i Ballance Government. He secured Wairau ia I 1893 with a majority of 299 votes.

WEST COAST. BULLER. Mr P. J. O'Regan Is » young New Zealander 28 years of age. He was born at Charleston (West Coast), hia parents being pioneer setters. He was brought up on a farm, and is to a greet extent a self-educated man. He was defeated by Sir Robert Stout at the bye-election in 1893, but won at the general election the same year. He hai lectured in various parts of the colony on the single tax, and wishes the referendum introduced into New Zealand. Until entering on his political career he was for some years connected with newspaper work. WBSTL/LHD. i The Hon. Richard John Seddoß, son of Mr Thomas Seddon, was born at Eccleston, near St. Helens, Lancashire, and emigrated to Melbourne, Victoria, in 1863, and was married in Williamstown on January 13, 1869, to Miss : Louisa Jane Spots-wood. Having removed" to I New Zealand, Mr Seddon bee ame a member of | the Westland Provincial Couacil, and was 1 chairman of committees of that body. He was I also chairman of the Westland County Connoil i and firfit mayor of Kumura, to which post he was re-elected for a eeeond term. Mr Seddon was returned to the House of Representatives for Hokifcika in 1879, and represented Kumara from 1881 to 1890, whoa he was returned for Westland, for which he *till site. Mr Seddon, who is a mechanical engineer by profession and I au associate of the American Institute of ; Mining Engineer.", Accepted office in the | B+llanoe Ministry in January, 1891, a» Minister for Mines, and on the death of Mr Ballanoe he succeeded to the Piemiership. GREY. Mr A. R. Guinness is a barrister and solicitor, who ha^ bsenin practice at Greymooth siuco 1867. He was born in Calcutta in 1846, was brought to New Zealand when only six | yeu-s old and edacated at Canterbury College Grammar School. He has held many public <fffic.'S in the province, and was chairman of the City Council for many years. He was | nppointed Chairman of Committees by the | Premier in the first seatiou of the late Parlia- ! ment on the resignation of Mr Rees to. contest Auckland with Mr Cadman. CANrERBURY. ASHLEY. Mr R. Meredith was born in Carlow, Ireland, aid is 50 years of age. He was edaoated privately and at Tullow School. He was a schoolmaster for a few, years in Ireland, and when he arrived in New Zealand in 1866 he continued the same profession, teaching in several schools in Canterbury uatil 1889, when he retired In 1890 he was elected on the North Canterbury Board of Education. He is a total abstainer, and has taken a prominent part in the temperance movement. He was returned for Ashley in 1890, and with the exception of a change as to the incidence of taxation holds the views that be then advocated. Mr Meredith gained the Ashley seat at the general election of 1893, polling very heavily over his opponents. AVON. Mr Tanner, one of the Labour members, returned at the general election of 1893 by a substantial majority, is by trade a journeyman shoemaker, and came from Northampton. He was born in 1850, 'and educated in & Church of England denominational tohool. He came to New Zealand in 1879, and has taken a prominent part in local .affairs and co-operative and friendly societies. LYTT ELTON. Mr John Joyce is a Cornishman by birth, and 57 years of ag^. He reached New Zealand from Australia at the time of the Otago gold rush, and was appointed clerk to the local bench at Port Chalmers. In 1868 he wac articled to a lawyer, and in 1873 passed bio examination. Iv 1879 he went to Christchurth, and is now practising in that city. For the last nice years he has been in the North Canterbury Board of Education. In Parliament he was the originator of early closing, and in 1891 carried the Veto Bill over the (second readiDg. He U a strong temperance advocate. He won She Lyttelton seat with a majority of 1895 votes in 1893. EI/LESMERE. Mr W. H. Montgomery is a New Zealander, was born at Christchurch in 1866, was educated •at Christ'e Collge and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he took a degree in law. He was called to the Eoglish bar, and on his return to New Zealand became a barrister and solicitor of this " colony. He owns a small area of land in hia -district, and does not follow the legal profession. He is a staunch Seddonian and a firm upholder of the present education syteem. His defeat of the Hon. W. Rolleston at the 1893 election was a great surprise to the country, RICCARTON. The Hon. William Rolleston is the son of the late Rev. George Rolleston,! M.A, who for more - than 50 years was rector *of Maltby, near Doncas'er, in Yorkshire. His brother, George Rolleston, F,R.J5., was the well-known Professor of Physiology ' at the University of Oxford. .- The Hon. Mr-Rolleston was born on September 19, 1831, and was educated atßoesall School, Lancashire, under the law Dr Woolley. Entering &b Emanuel College in 1851; he became foundation scholar of his college in the following year. In 1855 he graduated with? classical honours. He emigrated to New Zealand in 1858, and settled near L&ke Coleridge. In 1863 he was appointed a member of the Education Commission which framed the educational system of Canterbury, and in 1864 he became Provincial Secretary and a member of the Canterbury Board of Education. He was subsequently Under-secretftry for Native Affairs and inspector of Native schools under the Colonial Government. He was Superintendent of hi« province from 1868 to 1876. From 1868 to 1884 he was M H.R. for Avon, and in the latter year ho - w&s returned for Geraldine. He was a member of the Hall Government from October 1879 to April 1882, holding the portfolios of Minister for Lands, Immigration, Justice, Mines, and Native Affairs for successive periods. In the Whitakcr and Atkinson Governments which succeeded he was Minister for Lands, Immigration, and Mines from April, 1882, to August, 1881-. In 1891, on the retirement of Mr John Bryce from the leadership of the Opposition to the Ballance Government, he was unanimously elected to succeed him. He did much to promote the adoption of the system of perpetual leases. Mr Rolleston was not returned at the general election in 1893. He opposes prohibition, elective Executive, further borrowing, and religious teaching in schools. SELWYN. Mr J. C. Wason's early youth was spant in that wild desolate country desoribed by Crockett in " The Raiders." He was educated at Lalebam-on-the-Th»mes and at Rugby. Arriving here in the last hoars of 1867 or the first of 1868, he bought the Corwar run the following year, and shortly took steps to get a road district formed and a public plantation made. He was elected as member for Coleridge in 1876, and was selected at whip to his party in the following year. Hit legislative efforts were confined to a mining bill, which tha Go7Qnunen.fe took op, and a very strjngenb &pn > £pr fcho iiceveaiton ci adulteration o2 food Ana

drink. Private affairs called hita to England] in 1879, and in 188 dho was again elected to Parliament, this time for Waksnui, but owing, to a mistake of the returning offioer, through no fault of his own, the judges declared the election void and he had to pay oa enormous bill of costs. He fought Sir Julius Vog«l in 1884, but before tha eleotion PAi'liameat was dissolved, and coming »g*in«b a looal man he was ju*t beaten by a very small majority. In 1893 he again stood for A«hburton, and but for Mr Pucnell splittiag the votes he would undoubtedly have been elected by a very large majority. As it was he was beaten by Mr M'Lachlan by only 26 vote*. Mr Ri.<by Wason, his father, sat for many years as Radical M.P. for Ipswich, »nd his brother, Mr Eugene Wason, has been twioo eleoted M P foe South Ayrshire, and holds somewhat Radical opinions. Mr J. C. Wa»on has meroiIcstly attacked the elective Executive, the referendum, national option, ,the Alcoholic Liquors Bale Control AcC, and the F*ir Rent Bill. Mr Wason is a member of tbe Inner Temple, an Eoglish barrister, a fellow of the Geographical Society, a mamber of several London clubs, and an ardent arboriculturist, having planted more trees than any other man in New Zealand. ASHBURTON. Mr E. G. Wright is & - civil engineer by profession, axid came to the colony 35 ]e*rs ago. He carried out a large amount of railway works, bridge-building, and ro-*d-m«4siog in the early.days, but for the p»et 20 y* ars he has mainly followed the pursuit of farming »t Winder* m?re in the Ashburton district. H« Bit in several previous Parliaments, but was defeated for RangilMa by Mr Maalin at the general election in 1893. He is at present chairman of the Lyttelton Harbour Board, chairman at directors of the Christoburch Gas Company, chairman of the Afhburton County Council, and has been a member of the North Canter* bury Education Board and other local bodies. He is in favour of religious education, and against prohibition, the elective Executive, ant) farther borrowing. GBBALDINH. Mr Flatman is 54- years of age, and -an old resident of the Geraldine district. ' He followed the occupation of a carter at Gerttldtne for Rome, time ; subsequently, io conjunction with Ur R. Taylor, establishing a saw mill and general store at the Waihi Bu«h, now known a« Wood* bury. The firm also took up farming, and opened a uawcaiH at Peel Forest. Th« firm dissolved on the Waihi Bash beiog cut out a few years ago, and Ur Flatmau continued to carry ob tbe store at Woodbury. Mr FiAtman has for many years duvoted much time and conscientious work to local Government matters. He has been chairman of the Geraldine Road I Board for a long time, and is a prominent i member of the Timtru Harbour Board. He secured Pareora iv 1893 against Mr A. E. &, Rhodes, an old parliaov nburian. TIUAIiU. Mr Hall-Jones, a young New Znalander, first entered the House in 1890 as a follower of Mr j Ballanoe. He is a supporter cf the temperance movement, and owes his seat to the temperance vote. He became Minister for, Public Wurk* in the Seddon Ministry during the year.- ■ , OTAGO. WAITAKI. Major Steward was elected Speaker of tbe Loxver House in 1891 in succession to Sir M. O'Rorke. Born at Reading, in Berkshire, in 1841, Major Steward migrated to New Zealand in 1862. He is proprietor of the A*hburton Guardian, was a member of the Provincial Council, and has represented Waimate Bince 1881. In oont<wtiag Waitaki in 1893 Major Steward secured a majority of 1083 voto3. MrHW Dut3o»d, who once more represents Oamaru, is a great supporter of the " struggling settler." He left the Old Country when a mere boy, and lived in Canada for some tims before emigrating to this oolony. /2>/rt**- **-<■ J^JtlA-^U- WAIHBMO. The Hon. J. M'KeDzie was born in Ross6hire in 1838. He came to Otago when he wan 20 years of age, and was for come years, manager of a station near Palmerston. He was defeated for the Waikouniti seat in tbe Otago Provincial Council in 1868. but three years later was successful. In 1881 be entered the Lower House, and was appointed Minister of Lands in the Ballance Ministry. ! •waikouaiti. | Mr Edmund G. Allen, who has been elected to represent Waikouaiti, was born in 1844 in Lancashire, and 10 years later came to Tas- ! mania, where he acquired a knowledge of agricultural and pastoral pursuits. In 1863 he removed to New Zealand and engagod in contracting, carrjiug out railway works in Canterbury, Wellington, Hawko's Bay, and Otago. Since 1879 he has devoted himself principally to : developing the stone tr*de in Port Chalmers. Eleoted mayor of that borough in 1884. he retained the position continuously until 1893, when he contested the Chalmers seat against Mr J. A. Millar, but suffered defeat. He was | .last year again elected Mayor of Port Chalmers.' Mr. Allen has served as chairman of the Ofc»go Dock Trust, and has taken much, interest -in social and athletic organisation's. In 1893 he was a follower of the l»t« Mr Macandrew, and described himself as a Moderate Liberal, hut on this oeoasiou he has stood as an out-and-out supporter of the Seddon Government. CITY OF DTJNEDIN. Mr Scobie Mackenzie comes of a Scotch family who settled in British Guiana (the- colony now in dispute with Veaezuela) in the early portion of the century. His father was a planter, bub, suffering reverses at the time of the emancipation, returned to Scotland. Mr Mackenzie was born in Ross-shire iivlß4s, and was educated in Edinburgh. He came out to Victoria in 1860, and took to station life. In 1870 he was appointed manager of Deep Dell station, Macraes, and five years later purchased Kyeburn station — which he still holds, though his principal avocation is journalism. He entered Parliament in 1884 as member for Mount Ida. He took a prominent part in the overthrow of the Stout- Vogel Government, and in 1887 had to fight against Sir Robert Stout, who took to the platform in support of Mr Hodge's candidature. Mr Mackenzie gave Sir Robert, per« haps, the fint serious reverse of his political career. In 1890, Mount Ida having been, joined to Waihemo, he fought a memorable battle with the Minister for Lands, and was defeated. Mr Mackenzie's famous reply to Mr Seddon at Eaitangata on the occasion of the Brace bye* election may be termed almost historical. Two years ago he contested the Tuapeka seat with Mr Larnach, but, entering the field late, he was defeated bj a narrow majority. Mr J. A. Millar was born in 1855 in India, and b the eldest son of Major-general J. 0. Millar, of the Bengal Staff Corps. At the olose of the Mutiny he went to Scotland and was educated at Edinburgh. In 1870 ha came to New Zea* land with the intention of learning sheepfarming, but on t^e voyage out took a fanoy for tbi sea and was hound apprentice to Messrs Hen* derson and_Co. a few months after reaching Daoedin. Ho also served in the Shaw, SavilU and Albion CVa line, bat left the latter in 1881 with the intention of settling fa the colony. Subsetiaeafcly ha entered the coastal service

remaining thus employed for six years, acting as mate and master ; but in 1887 be finally gave up the pea upon bis election as general secretary of the Federated Seamen's Union of New Zealand. He defeated Mr E. G. Allen in 1893, contesting the Chalmers Electorate. Mr H. S. Fish, who re-enters Parliament as one of the members for the City of Dcmedin, was born in London in 1838, but bos spoilt the greater part of his • life in New Zealand, and bus been closely identified with politics in Dnnedin for the past 30 years. He has been five years mayor of the city, being elected for the first time in 1870 and on the last occasion - in 1894, while he was unseated on another occasion after his election on the ground that be was a contractor nnder the corporation. On three occasions he was elected to represent Dunedin in the Otago Provincial Council. In 1881 he was first elected to a seat in the House of Representatives ; but in 188*, in tho contest for. Dunedin South, he was defeated by Mr Jarbf s Gore, upon whom he turned the tables in 1887. Mr Fish was one of the successful candidates for the amalgamated City, constituency in 1690, but he was rejected in 1893. CAVEESHAM. Mr Arthur Morrison was born in 1846 at Darvell, Londoun Parish, Ayrshire, Scotland. He -attended the parish school until nine years of age, after which he received some education at various night schools, but coneiders himself principally aeif-taught. Was engaged in farm ■work in the old country till leaving for New Zealand. Arrived here in 1874, and has since 1875 been employed as ccal salesman by the Walton Park Coal Company. Mr Morrison is a Past District President of the Druids Society, by whom he was sent to Melbourne in 1887 as a delegate to the Grand Lodge of Draids ; is a member of the New Zealand Masonic body ; and has taken a large interest in temperance work, having been connected with the 1.0. G.T. cud other sister organisations. He has been a member of the Caverstaam Council and is now one of tbe Caversh&m School Committee. Mr Morrison has always taken an active part in all matters of public interest. , He,, secured the Caversh&m Electorate in 1893 ' in the labour interest, and proved a faithful supporter of, the, Beddon Government. TAIEEI. Mr CarncroßS was born at Bendigo in 1853. He arrived in New Zealand in 1862, and was educated privately. From an early age' be has been connected 1 with the press, his first effort being a short story contributed to the Saturday Advertiser. He established a weekly paper in Danedin, but it was not a great success, and in 1881 he started the Taieri Advocate in Mo«giel, and the paper has grown with the district. la 1884 he contested his seat with Mr Fulton, and again in 1887, but" was defeated. He was elected for the Taieri in 1890, and' defeated j Mr J. C. Buckland for the same seat at the 1893 election. j bruce. . I Mr James Allen was born in Adelaide in 1855, and came to New Zealand when a child. He was educated at Clifton Colledge, England, wtere he gained a natural science exhibition tenable at Sb. John's College, Cambridge, where he -took his B. A. in 1877. Returning to Dunedin, he? was elected to tho City Council, and- gained 'some reputation iv the football field.- In 1883 he again went to England, and studied at the North Kensington' Royal School bt Mines, passing his examination with -credit. -In 1887 he entered Parliament, defeating Sir Robert Stout for the Dunedin seat. ' At the bye-election ' of 1892 he defeated Mr Smith at Bruce, and in 1893 was unepposed. CLTJTHA. Mr J. TV. Thomson, of Clatha, is a Scotchman about 63 years of age, and took the degrejjj of M.A. ab Edinburgh University.' He ennis to New Zealand in 1859 *nd settled in the Clufcha district. In 1864 he was elected to the Provincial Council, and retained his seat till the abolition of the province*. In* 1870 Clutha preferred him to the late Mr Macandrew for the . honour of M.H.R , and he represented the district till 1887, when Mr T. Mackenzie , defeated him. When a convention met in Dunedin in 1876 to protest against the abolition of provinces Mr Thomson waß elected president. In 1884 Mr Thomson joined the Grey Ministry as MinUter*for Lands, and he had, as the mover of a no-confidence motion in the first SfcoufcVogel Government, an opportunity of formipga Cabinet, but he failed to do so. ' At tbe general election in 1890 he was elected for Bruce, but ce&igned. ' " matatoa. The Hon. G. F. Richardson, who returns to ¥»rliament as representative for Mataura — his old constituency— is the son of Dr F. H. J Richardsen, and was born and educated ab Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. He arrived in Otago in the ship Dominion in 1851, and three years later took up Oaklands farm, MaUura, ! having been tfce first person to proceed so far ! south overland from Dunedin. He afterwards | learnt surveying under Mr James M'Kcrrow, and has followed the practice of that profession for" 30 years. In 1884 he was elected for Mataur» t and accepted the portfolio of Minister for Lands in the last Atkinson Government. In -that capacity he introduced* a liberal Land Act," which largely 'assisted'tho settlement of' Crown lands. He was twice re-elected for ftlatuura, but in 1893 lest bis seat, bis defeat being ascribed to the presence of another Opposition candidate in the field and the strength of the prohibition vote, which west solidly for the pucce*sfol candidate. Mr Richardson is in favour of the referendum, and supports borrowing to complete the main railways. WAKATIPU. Mr Fraser is the only surviving eon of the late Captain Fraser, of the sth Madras Cavalry. Be w&» educated' partly at St. Peter's College, Guernsey; and partly in France. • He arrived in tho colony in 1859, and for some years was on a station at Waihemo, but afterwards purchased E&rrtecleughrClyde,- which he sold some four years ago. He represented his district in tbe* ProviLcial Council and was chairman of the Vincent County Council. He entered Parliament as an Independent in 1893. AWAHT7A. Tha Hon. J. G. Ward was born in Victoria in 1857, but arrived in New Zealand when he was ► child. He has held many positions of authority in tfie province of Sonthland. and was oaptain of the Bluff Naval Artillery Volunteers, winch corps wns raised during the Parihvka trouble. In 1887 he entered Parliament for Awarua and was returned unopposed for the lame constituency at two subsequent elections. On tho form*tion of the BaUance Ministry he was appointed Postmaster-general, and on the re^arrangetaeiijb of portfolios, consequent on the death of the Premier, he took over the department of ■ Golonial 'Treasurer. Ris retirement from thte po'iti'ca'l arena during tin past few few months is a matter of present-day gossip. waixacb. - Mr Michael Gilfedder is 31 years of age, and was horn in Southland.' After working some time on his father's farm be entered the Training College in Dunedin, and was then appointed ' teacher at the Roman Catholic School, • Invercargill. Three years ago he was appointed master of Wrey's Bush School, and still holds the position.. Mr Gilfedder supports an Selective Executive and the referendum, Hq

will uphold the present education system, leaving the question of grants to denominational sohools to a referendum. Ha favours borrowing at the rate of half a million a year for the next fiva years for public works aud land settlement. IKVJERCAKGILL. Mr 3. W. Kelly, a native of Lanarkshire, Scotlaud, is 4-1 years of age. He was left an orphan at 14, and had to fight his way in the world armed with merely a village school education. After serving an apprenticeship to tailoring, he left his birthplace for New Zealand, arriving in 1875 He took an interest in public affairs, and was elected councillor for the South Invercargill Borough Council and afterwards mayor of the sfcme borough. He was secretary of the Southland Trades and Labour Council, chairman of the Southland branch of. the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, ' and president of the Shearers' Union. Although originally returned as a Ministerialist, Mr Kelly a couple of sessions ago definitely broke with his party, and has on this occasioa been returned as an Independent Liberal. He defeated Mr Joseph Hatch for the Invercargill seat at the 1893 general election by a majority of 1241 votes.

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THE NEW PARLIAMENT, Otago Witness, Issue 2232, 10 December 1896

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THE NEW PARLIAMENT Otago Witness, Issue 2232, 10 December 1896

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