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TALK OF THE DAY.

Bt MAZBPPA.

*** There has been a olearanoa by means of the acceptance of a lot of weak sticks from the list or the New Zealand Cup, but very few good ones have gone out- excepting Dauntless and Chaos, and the smvivors constitute a formidable array from wh'ch to select the winner. I ehsll nob.rush on to that task bofoi'd being compelled to, but will bi> content in the meantime with the remark thai I consider the four moat dang«rou& to he Euroclydon, The Shrew (for whom I have had a partiality ever since the weights appeared), BnMicenb, and Day Star; while nezb to these I should, if asked to make up half a dozen, obooae ."Saracen and Aldershot. Euroolydon and. Alde.ivhot were taken up by Mr Goodman on Tuesriay. L*»t week they galloped a mile and a-h*lf together in very fair style, and on Saturday Euroclydon put | in a two-mile journey made not against the watcb, but simply as an exercise gallop, and | pleated his friends with the way he hung out j the distance. I am sure th&t on a dry course ■ last year's winner will tako a lot of beating. Lord Rustlyn was to go to Oamaru yesterday and there piok up St. Ouida ab the end of the wetk. Casket? has come on very well in the last few days, and Captive is oredited with ' the fastest mile and a-half gallop seen at the Forbury this seaaon.' One way and another Otago appears to hold a istroDg hand in this New Zealand Cup.

*** Cremorne, winner of tbe Cnulfield Cup, was not at &11 fancied by the public Though believed to be well, he had the name of being unreliable, and a gallop a few daya previous did not impress the touts. Thus it was that, in spite of his light weight for so good a performer, he was despised on the dny. Novr that he has won, lots of people are reproaching themselves for neglecting him. Th»y imy take bhe consolation that whatever won the same reproaches could have been uned. There was hardly a horse in the race thab bad not some special qualification, either on account of breeding or performances or private gallops. The fact is that we cannot pink these races, and bhe man who thinks he can is the one who helps the bookmakers to eam< their living I had a shot at picking the winner, and named Le Var, who finished close up third. The following are the recenb winnnrs of thia Cup s — 1886-Ben Belt ... syrs ... 7.6 ... 2min 42tec 1887— Oakleigh ... sjrs ... 6 9 ... 2min 41} sec 1888-Ohicago ... syra ... 7.4 ... 2min 3Sssec 1889-Boz 6yrs ... 7-7 ... 2min 43seo 1890— Vengeance... syrs ... 6.13 ... 2min 38sec 1891— G'Naroo ... syrs ... 7.13 ... 2mm 36sec 1892— Paris ... syra ... 8.8 ... 2iniu 38isec 1893-Sainfoin „. syra ;.. 7.13 ... 2min 38sec 1894— Paris ... aged ... 9.4 ... 2mi» 38s 3 c 1895 -Waterfall... 3yrs ... 7.3 ... 2min 3t»|3ec 189b'— Cremorne ... aged ... 8.9 ... 2min iftjsec Crtmorne's wins include, as a four-year-old, the Doucaster Handicap 8 2, the All-aged Stakes at Sydney, the Birthday Cup ab Sydney, in which he carried 9.9, and toade, exactly the same time rb now registered in the C»ulfield Cup; as a five year-old he got no wiua ab all ; as a six-year-old he was not once placed ; ab seven years he did. not run; and this season ha was twice unplaced ab Sydney. This is nob what I call good form — it is most irregular ; and if any persons backed Crumorne On his previous career they did not riesorva bo win.

*** The Leader writer " Javelin " tells this capital story : The force of habit was r«oently responsible for the failure of a big coup which the owner of a racing pony had arranged. For several months he had consistently entered the little m^re —which is a bit of a scorcher when her head is loose— but had nover let her have a "go," the invariable practice being to signal the jockey that he was nob "on ib" by waving a handkerchief. By this means the midget racer had become so lightly esteemed by the handicapper that at last she gob down to a weight at which "sbo could not possibly lone." A plucky punter was taken into the confidence of the stable, aDd after the field had left the weighing yard the good thing was baoked for every shilling in the ring. The punter was nob seen in the company of tho owner before the start, but when the barrier went up the former wa» horrified to see the mare get badly away, ruu in the ruck with her head in the air, and finish oub of a place— palpably pulled. Hastening to the owner he thundered out, " What's this all about ? Has that boy had us, or what does it meau, eh ? " The other replied, with despair in his face and voics: "It's my fault; you wouldn'b believe I was suoh a mug ! " And then he explained that after the commission had .been executed he planted himself in his usual corner, and as the starters were lining up to the machine he had, from sheer force of habit pulled out his handkerchief- and waved ib before the awful realisation burst upon him that he was giving the usual signal for •♦stiffening" the mare. H« endeavours to comfort; his confederate with the asiuranoe that as the performance will not increase her weight they can ' ' get ib all baok at the first time of asking " ; but the disappointed punster says : " Well I When you do have a oub either ring a bell or fire a gun as your signal, or tell the missis over-nighb to take your handkerchief oub of your pocket before you leave home in the morning I " The unfortunate parb of it is that the ringmen have heard the story, and the pony fakir is haunted by the fear that when next he and his friends go into the market in earnest they may find it congested !

*#* Solid truth underlies the following remarks by an American writer : Were the horses ridden by the jockeys as severely reduced by weight at their riders, the distances run would be severely curtailed of their former proportions and the number of horses entered for a mile would soon ba f&w and far between. The Bostons, Lexingtons, Kentuckys, Longfellows, and their ilk, would nob be bred in such days of degeneracy of the turf. -It requires a man of sound judgment to pilot a winner in a race having a large field of fleet hones- to beat. No dwarfed arm and brain can do it. Boys nay do well in riding under a trainer for training, bub seldom in a race where reputation and large sumi are at stake. Few boys ever develop into Tarals, and Tarals can be bathed, starved, and sweated to death at approaching manhood, when hand and brain are at their best, the judgment soundest, (he band strongest, the will determined to win. The enfeebled body too often accompanies a feeble mind. Should the tune rale control the trotting and pacing traok the hope of two minutes would never ba realised. Men drive these raoes— men of experience, talent, judgment, physical and mental force and power, men or art and science, No boy, be he ever bo preca* don* can. lon* Anna tbe. we»t and tou q£a

flrst-olass jookey in kiUing races. Thd means to secure light and unnatural weight is an uujustifiabla cruelty to man.

* # * Town Moor, the stallion owned by Messes Luck Bros., of Tasmania, died this monbh of inflammation of tho bowels at Danbury Park. Tula horse was bred by the New Zealand Stud Company at Auckland in 1837, got by St. Legor from Miss Laura. He was therefore half-brother to Lenore, whose death was recorded a few weeks ago. At the company's yearling sale Mr D. O'Brien bought the colt for lOOgs, and took another at HOgs tho same day. One he named Town Moor, the other Freedom. The former made his first appearance on the turf in the Middle Park Plate won by Rosa' Argent, for which he finished a bad third, and he was then put aside for the Duoedtn Cap meeting, whioh he attended with Freedom. Both were started fa the Champagne Stakes, and up to the lasb moment the touts were not very sure which was tho bettor of the pair ; but when Derrett was seen to geL up on Freedom thin was taken a3 the tip by backers, and Town Moor started tho outsider of the party. As a matter of fact both were beaten, the race going to the eccentric Thackeray ; bat Town Moor, though only third, had the honour of beating the strongly-fancied Pygmalion. By April of the same season Town Moor had improved, and he won the Russley Stakes— his fltsb win— easily from what we must, in the light of after events, regard as a very weak field, Lady M»b baing second.' After this meeting Towu Moor was sold, and went to Australia; where, as a three-year-old, he won a small rsoo at Caulfletd and another at lilsternwick, and then, after, a single defeat, he retired for good from the tucf, being purchased for stud purposes and sent to Tasmania. He w»s a disappointment as a raoehorse, and go far &s I kaow ho has done nothing much at the stud, his only claim to notice being the fact that we at one time fancied he wrs to be brought out as another of Dan O'Brien's smashers.

*** The Cromwell Argus, in its account of the Tradesmen's races, a report of whioh was given last week, states that Frank, the favourite for the Maiden Tco?, kept breaking, and Polly really won all the way, though, by breaking in the straight, Little Rebecca gob within two lengths of her ab the finish. In the Tradesmen's Handioap the lead was taken by Quickshot, bub Baumber, riding Langley patiently, gob on terms in the last quarter and won easily. Frank won bhe Two-mile Trot all the way. Helen Douglas, the favourite, broke badly ab the cou&meucement of the race, and never bad a chance. Dunluce had 9.3 in the Handicap Flatter, five furlongs, the other weights befog Lragley 8 12, Biaok Bess 8.6, Aberdeen 8.4, and Quickshot 7.12 The latter, -eidd«n by J. Murrell, came with a run on the inside, and beat LtvDgley by half a head. The stewards over-ruled a protest on the ground that Murrdl was not a liceused jockey, bub fined Mr Clare, the owner, £1. Gipsy took the lead in the first half mile of. the Mile and a-half Trot, and won as she liked from The Laird. D unlace had 8.12 in bhe Hospital Race, and won easily frem La Favorite 7.0. Fine weather prevailed during the day.

#** Some fast pacing is reported from America. Joe Patchen, going against the world's record, did a half mile in one minute, bub came home a tired horse, badly beaten. Then we read of a raoe in which Robert J., Frank Ag*n, Star Pointer, and John R. Gentry were the competitors. In the first heat, says a local writer, the horses went down the hill bo the half-mile pole in lmin l£?ec, and. Robert J. made a break in climbing the hill. The struggle for honours was then between Frank Agan and Gentry, and the latter came with a tremendous rush at the finish and won in 2min 3sseo. In the second heat Robert J. was not well together when the word was given, and he fell to the rear and remained there throughout the mile, Frank Agan leading, and Gentry overhauling him in the home stretch. The time was 2min 3^sec, and a loud cheer went up when it whs announced. In the third heat Roberb J. was carefully driven, and ib looked ab one bime as if victory would go to him. The desperate challenge down the home stretch was stubbornly met, and John R Gentry won in 2min 3^Bec. Robert J. was gaining at every stride, bub the drive o*me a little too late, and the wire was too near. Besides, there is news from Fleetwood, not a very fast course, of the three quickest heats ever trotted or paced on any track, John R. Gentry being bhe hero. Our trotting men will be interested in the fractional timing :—

Robert J. held the three-heat record previous to this, made ab Indianapolis, Ind., September 5, 1894, as follows : 2miu 3Jico, 2min 2£seq, 2min 4s3€c. John R. Gentry's time averages a quarter of a second' faster 'than the previous record.

*** There were three dead-heats at the Melbourne Hunt' Club meeting on the 3rd insb. Homespun 7.12 and Preston 9.2 divided second money in the principal flat .race, the Melton Handicap, a mile and a-quarter, finiihing together a head behind Damien 7.6. Later on 1.0. and Federation came home abreast in third place for the Hunt Club Chip, a welter steeplechase ; and the Narre Warren Handicap, a flat race of six furlongs, resulted in a division between the well-preserved New Zealand-bred Ilium 7.7 and Labour in Vain 7.13, neither of which was much fancied, the punters going bodily for Malula, who finished last. The Hunt Cup has been run continuously since 1865, when Mr Herbert Power won on Freetrader. Mr Adam Lindsay Gordon, Australia's race poet, won on Babbler in 1868. The most successful cider in the Hunt Cap has been Mr Godfrey Wation, who has scored four times. Mr J. O. Inglii has been singularly unlucky in connection with this particular race. For the last 20 years he has ridden in almost every race, and has never succeeded in riding the winner. The racing this year was particularly good all round. " Terlinga " reports that there was a desperate battle for the Open Steeplechase. Qrandwing. looked an easy winner after jumping the last fence, bub he died to nothing in the run home, and Nipper just struggled past him. Both horses were very tired, and small wonder, ai they had been ridden hard for fully a mile. Sixteen ran for the Melton Handicap, and"Damien jmt won after a capital set-to, in whioh half a dozen took parb. - Damien was a rank outsider, the ftabla not patting a shilling on him. Why this was so after the way Damien if a* backed for the Sydney Cup is hard to explain. Ib looks like a ease of bad judgment, as with a good boy in the saddle Damien could have won by more than a- head. There are some advantages In training privately, bob there are also disadvantages. If D»mien had been working with other horses at Plemington bis chance would probably have been dkeovered by his trainer. As ib was nothing was known •bout him, and the gelding has been exposed for the sake of % £70 stake. Damien is by Off Colour, from The Ntuu two oood terformera

and fov a long time he has been spoken of ai likely to take a good race,

. *«* Mr Marcus Daly is said to have made a hanl of £33,000 by Ojjden'e win in the Futurity Stakes.- The American bookmakers had the hardest knock that many of them have ever felb. Spirib of the Times remarks th*t the Futurity of 1896 will go down into turf history as the greatest Burprive of the decade, and will always be regarded as the Marcus Daly Coup Futurity. Never in this country has a great coup been so skilfully manipulated not so successfully carried into effeo't. Moreover, ib is doubtful if ever a Urger sum of money was taken oub of the ring by any stable upon any single event, a conservative estimate by a wellknown bookmaker (who waft hioii<elf caught to the tune of 20,0C0dol) placing the amount at 165,000d01. This sum wculd b&ve been larger bad not the ring cried, " Hold ; enough I " before Mr Daly's commit-sioucrs had finished their rounds. Campbell, trainer for Mr Paly, who discovered the gre^t npe«d of Ogden, performed his share of the coup to perfection, preparing the horse at Saratoga's deserted course, securing an almost unknown though competent jockey to pilot his candidate, and sending him. to the post in thepink of condition.

*** Ib transpire;, says " Silverspar " in the New Zealand Mail, that Day Star put up a bulldog run in the Hawke's B»* Spring Handicap, which he won by half a length. In the Guineas the day previously GtUlagher did nob know what the opposing three-ye»c>ulds were like, and kept with them. When he shook Day Star up the colt ca:ie away and won anyhow. On the second day he made the mi&t»kft of lying too far back— in face he was Absolufety last for over, a mile. His jockey though', he had nothing to beat, and the one grcvat run he put in was about as good as could be expected from any youngster. The race for the Final Handicap was a very olose thing, and, as is usual in nip and tuck finishes, a great many people thought the second horse bad won So did the interested jockeys. Derrett; came with a magnificent rash on The Shrew, whom he had bten carefully nursing all the w*y He lost by a uose, according to tbe judge, Solit&he just getting the verdict." Wbit«, on the winner, thought Derrett had won. TbV southern jockey was of the same opinion. " I'll save a pound with you," said White, as they turned round to go to tbe scale. " Right," said Derrett. But fcbe clerk of the course went over to SoliWirc's side, and the mare gob the pool. This k-cident g<es to chow that when riders themselves -aren't sure the public shouldn't m«ke ■ a fu«s because the judge doesn't give th« verdict to the animal they baoked.

*#* J. Allan definitely announces the arrangements for the season, of the three trotting stallions which he control*. Kerlin Abdallah makes a shift from his old circuit by going to Gore and Invercwgill, white Brooklyn and Good Wind are ab the /service of Dreaders in the Taieri and Peninvula districts. Berlin Abdallah is a fine upstanding horse, a true trotter, keeping his feufi very close to the ground, and hit rt cores are bwo miles in 5m. l\ 21«eo and two and *>-hs.lf miles in 6miu 37seo, the latter being within a fraction of a eecond of the colony's betrt time (or this particular distance, I regard Berlin Abdullah as a hori'j likely to get stuufc and fast stock from atiy suitable m»re», and to be well adapted for raising and maintaining the quality of. superior roadsters. Brooklyn's recent record-makiug perrormanoea have set the seal on his fame as a kibg among track horses, and he remains the champion 9b two disbances — a mile and a-half in 3inin 40$seo and two miles in 4min 57-jrivo In appearance ho also recommends himself, buing a"horse of high quality and »tyl»sh carriagejust the sort of stallion that ocmld be safely recommended to the attention of owners of mares who are anxious to breed up a bib and give a lifb to stock inclined to coarseness The other stallion in this stable is Good Wind, a truly-made and bandy and well-bred horae who has the credentials of » recent winner.

##* Tasmanian-bred Ocoident will bold court at Berwick this mating season, and on his merits should get a fair share of patropaga from owners of mares. , His deeds proclaimed h'm a racehorse of high type. For two or three seasons he was the mainstay of a stable (Messrs Stephenson and Hszlett's) whioh has made racing pay, and ib fell bo his lot to undertake' many tiresome tasks, oub of which he secured a fair percentage of wins, generally over long disbances. As a matter of fact he oculd gallop a sprint with most of the speedy ones, but others in the stable were good enough for that work, and Occident was usually reserved for the game in which he had the pull over the generality of racers— staying. A truer stayer has seldom been seen in the colony. By this I mean that he could run a long race right oub v from end to end, taking on in succession all who tackled him. His Exhibition Cup and his Dunedin Cup , were cases in point, and be also ran a great horse under difficulties in the New Zoaland Cup won by Tirailleur, his troubles being firstly tbats, he went off after going to Cbristohurch, and secondly that he was ridden all oycr the coarse, yefc managed to finish third, making a late ran that for a moment or two threatened danger. Occident was, in short, a very fine . performer, and his breeding is singularly stoat on both sides, in consideration of which facts, coupled with the further one that he sired an undonbbedly fast filly in the defunot Mirage, I shall predict for him a good season. Mr Crogsan advertises that the trotting stallion Kremlin will alio stand ab Berwick. This horse, now four years of age, waß Wanderoo's first foal, gob by Berlin. The sire's name is famous, and Wanderoo made the three-mile record of Bmio, which stood for years as the besb in tho colony.

* # * The Napier Park meeting prospered sofar as totalisator revenue was concerned, the 1 amount handled being £10,283, or £1288 morel than last year. The Shrew, a mare that seemß to race well in the springtime, accounted for; the Park Stakes, with very little to spare, apparently, but there are very few persons! besides the jockey who can form an opinion a* to whether a winner is really all out, and maybe this good mare was nob in desperate trouble after all. The winners of this raea since the distance was settled at a mile and a-auarter have been —

The time here given is to the nearest quarter of a second. There oughb to be a rale forbid* ding the splitting up of records inte finer frac tlons than quarters. To try to do so is liberally hair-splitting, and quite useless. Among the| other winners I notice that promising youngsten Dmdevll, who may become a good one as ha grows : and Armilla stems to have performed nicely in the Flying i while Eapna did all rightj oj> the first day, bub disgraced himself on tha lecond whin a»ko4 to oaznr m bib ot vai&hj

thereby failing to show the consistency rf the trial hardier Prairie Grass, who, by the way. Is among the last of the Albanys left on the turf. The feature of the meeting, to my. mind, was not 4o much the form of the winners as the want of form of some of the losers. Lotion took a lack seat altogether, The Possible certainly did Bot enhance his reputation, and others fcbafc could be mentioned shaped very poorly.

All torts of inconsistent) stories having been circulated about the Trot at Alexandra, I have made independent inquiry-on the subject, indltam that this !• what happened t When ■the race wm started several of the nonet got •way before their proper time. Highland Lad, ■% hear f was some 6ieo too smart, and Ophir Cribbed 16 or 16 seconds at the least. The start was altogether a regular muddle. Ophir got in first and Highland Lad second. Both torses were protested against on the ground that they got away before their time, and as this teemed to be generally believed, and the *ihole start was impeachable, the stewards prdered tbe race to be ran over again. At the ■eoond go the muddle was even worse than, at first. The whole crowd moved away pretty much as they liked. It was so bad that the stewards did not allow the horses to finish, bat called them back as they came to the box after going once round. Mr W. Hazlett was then , asked to start the field, and he did so without a • mistake, the pnblio rewarding him with & cheer - as he gave the word to the scratch horse. Highland Lad won this time. Then there was a protest by Waldron on the ground that Highland JLad had jostled Dagmar, and it was round this protest that the trouble arose. The stewards mcxc by no means unanimous as to who should •le called as witnesses, and the upshot was that ' *he evidence of only three persons wac^'taken — namely, the riders of the two horses and the clerk of the course, the stewards declining to ad* mifc as witnesses several men whom Waldron was > anxious to call. That, at any rat*, is the statement made to me. lam also informed that the clerk of the cbarse referred to h brother to the rider of Highland Lad. $he decision arrived at .was to dismiss the proteifc. On the merits of ■tbe decision I cannot, of oourse, offer an E* aiou, but if what I have here set down, on information supplied, be true— that is, that protestor's witnesses were excluded while a brother to the rider on tha other horse was admitted—ifc does seem that the inquiry was not a fair one. I don't argue that stewards should be compelled to sit all day listenisg to a crowd of witnesses. Stewards must have some discretion M to shortening the proceedings when they have reason to think toe facts are sufficiently before them. But surely that discretion is exercised rather early if it stops the witnesies after three have been examined. There may possibly be some answer to -all this. If ao, I eball be very glad to print it. Meanwhile it seems to me that the Alexandra stewards have illustrated very forcibly how an inquiry should Hot be conducted. .

*** Wallace has been scratched for all spring . engagements. This means, of oourse, that the son of Carbine and Melodious has failed to re- ,' cover from the. lameness or soreness or what- ' even it may be with whioh he hi affected, and 'ieeing tbat tie is now four years old, there must tea doubt as to whether he is not done altogether 'jasaracer. Mr Wilson, his owner, seems' to i)bave been hopeful up to about a fortnight or 'three weeks ago that the colt would poll round, 'And no doubb it is a grievous disappointment to iliave to come to the opposite conclusion, though ■re may thank him. for making an early deolarapion on the subject, thus preserving the interests 'tf backers .all over the colonies. It was on the 14th that the scratching took place. Wallace's first win was in the Flying Stakes at Melbourne. £Thfs was the only time he actually got home as a two-year-old, though be made a good fight of It with Hova at a mile in the All-aged Stakes, weight for sge % at Flemhigton In the autumn. UIS a 1 tbre«>year-old he won the Oaalfleld Guineas, followed this up by defeating Osculator and Auraria in tho Derby, divided the jFistier Plate with Auraria, drrided the Champion Stakes with Quiver, won the A. J.O. Leger, won the Sydney Cap under the fair burden of 8.12t and also won tie Cumberland Stakes. That be has been a somewhat erratic colt cannot jbfr denied; that he could gallop under a weight •and for a . distance when well is indisputable j Hhat he Is, or was, or ever will be a second Oar*ine is wmsenw. If there is a second Carbine jln the colonies we have him nearer to oar own lioora.

*** The ranilfe of two important EngHih (races reach ns by cablegram. The Cesarewitch 'stakes, tfie long-distance handicap of the autumn season-,' was run at Newmarket on Wednesday of last, week, and resulted in a win for Mr W. Low's three-year-old St. Bris, one Ilf PorterV Scan, handicapped at 6.6. It was- a Might handicap this year, the' top weight being •Jite French hone Omnium II at 9.6. Second "place was filled by Chit Ghat 6.4, who belongs ' to 0. Peck's stable, and Laodauia 8.& gained ' third position. St. Bris did not ran last year, and I do not know anything about him, or her, as the case may be. The second leg of the bfg ' arable, the Cambridgeshire, it to be rua on the - 28th* Paris 111 was handicapped in that, event •at 9.0, and can hardly be considered overestimated.. The Middle Park Plate, at the lame meeting m the Cesarcwitcb, was set down Tor Friday," but as the news did not come through till Monday there may have been a postponement through rain, The winner proved to be Mr Gnbbins'n Galtee More, s bay colt by Sendalfrom Morganette, and we may b&sure it Xras a surprise that he should have beaten Lord «bsebery's craok oolt Velasqusa, the son of Donovan and Vists, who had been regarded as Jrell nigh invincible. Wreath Or, who occupied third place* is a bay colt by Kflwarlin from Field Azure. It is a somewhat peculiar fact . that Bone of these colts placed in the Middle Park Plate are engaged in. the Dewhurst Plater |o that the position of Velasquez fs unsettled: for the winter without any chance of re-«6tab« tishing himself over the testing seven-furlong tsoorse.. Colonial owners, half of whom are hard up,, may, well be excused for saving money In regard to early nomination when the wealthy lurf prlnots of England do the same thing. Concerning Qaltee More,. Mr O. R. Wise writes from Oamarut. " I am sure that all Irish sportsmen la New Zealand will be pleased to know through your paper that the wianer of the fciddfe Park Plate is Irish bred, Irish owned, •ad Irish named, being owned by my cousin, Mr John Gubbins, of Braree House. County B met , id il. Bnd ***** aftot &* G*tee fctounlaina in the County Tipperaryt 1 *

*?£>?? • X - Dnne f n ««». " Wck * Cohe* „ d f Lop Lyons, now in partnership in Melbou. i*, to th«Btibj#ct» of an appreoiatory notice by * r*»ebj**» ? ol the Sportsman, under tne - icading of "Typical Turfites." The writer lay* that Mr Cohen, who was born in fflan- < Chester ia 1848^ received the rudfmenta- of a found commercial education at St. Enoch's Grammar School, Glasgow, and wa* originally destined for mercantile pursuits* be was, in fact, one of the most widely-known young oommarcial traveller* throughout- Great Britain «Mtt he entente* to AutnJfe &+ oom.

1 menoed his fielding campaign !n Maoriland the year before Lurline won her Dunedin Cap, and speedily built up a reputation for himself as a rfngman in New Zealand almost on a par with that held by Joe Thompson in Australia. Perhaps the magnitude of hie transnotions os • bookmaker and baokcr —he mixed the game in the old days— will be better illustrated It I mention a few of hils biggest win* in each of the three colonies. As a result of Mata's Dunedia Gap victory Mr Oohen was certainly the heaviest winner in the South Island, £4000 being the amount he netted over the suooess of the son of Dead Shot, Thanks to Fishhook, he raked in £2300 when he won his Dunedln Oup, and cleared £1000 as a result of the success of Natator in the Wellington Oup. When Pnngawerewere, i the dam of Tranter, won the Donedin Cap, Mr \ Oohen followed up his previous successes in connection with this race by scooping in £1800, 1 after laying the stable £2000. Then, at Ohrist1 ohuroht he took it into hie head to fiald heavily against the first favourites for the Canterbury Oup, Mata and Trump Card, and as a rank outBider in Guy Fawkes came to hit rescue he scooped the pool and captured close upon £3000 !of backers' monoy. On going to Melbourne Mr ■' Oohen won a few thousands over Little Jack in > the Caulfield Cup, had a big win over Blink | Bonny in the same race, cleared £4000 in Sydney on the double, Matchlock and Cerise "and Blue, was £2000 to the good when Lantern captured the Goedwood Handicap, stood to win a' fortune over the double of Ben' Bolt (Caulfleld Cup) and Trenton (Melbourne Oup), and 1 won £1600 when Patroness got home in the Sydney Cup. As to Mr Lyons, who was born in London in 184b, we are informed that he made money and lost it, made it again in Maorilxad, and that on his return to Australia he made £6000 aver Lochiel't Newmarket, £10.000 when Glenloth won the Melbourne Cup, £5000 over Arsenal, £4800 over Tarcoola, and £5000 over Auraria, while Waterfall's win at CauLfidd meant a profit of £4000. On the other hand, he lest heavily over Carbine. His brother, Mr Emaimel Lyons, had cabled ■him when the colt was shipped: "Never be bad against Carbine; he is a wander." Fortified with this information, L. L. backed the colt for that extraordinary Derby when, thanks mainly to Tom Hales, he was defeated by Ensign. Then he ejaculated "No more Carbine," and that resolution cost him the bigger portion of a fortune. He became biassed and prejudiced, not merely against Carbine, but also against his son Wallace, whose Sydney Cup victory last season was almost as disastrous to the ringmen as was the success of his famous sire. However, this was only one of a few of the many adverse fortunes of war experienced by Mr L., whose, natural modesty probably prohibits his expatiating on the details of the ebbs and flows of the turf tide. •

V I * m quite sore that "Mick" himself is not responsible for the comparison with Joe Thpmpron. That oompsri-on is no doubt the complimentary and pardoriuu.-e flourish of the scribe. Thece were so books in New Zealand anything like the size of the L&viatban's, and, besides, "Hick" had a partner, and nob a sleeping partner in any sense of the phrase, but a particularly industrious grafter, ea that the business was the business of two. " Freelance " ha* evidently beard' of. the partnership, but he falls into an error in saying in a aentenca which I Bare out out that this partner was " Mick's " present metallic mate, too Lyons. ** Mick's" chum was Loo's - brother, "Manny" Lyons, who, I am «l*d to say, fr still with us, enjoying himself in a quiet way, but keeping oat of the magic ring, being content to look on and Bee bow the yonDger men practise the game at which In his more active d&ys he was no imsrgnifloent operator. And, at the s»m» time, Loo Lyons'* partner was- Natey Hart. In the, main, however, the account given in the Melbourne papers' is correct. Mick and Manny did have a good win over Mata'* first Dunedin Oup. Those were the daya in which the big event at tht, Forbury was tha betting race of the year, and all the layers made their ' biggest straight-out books on iS. I remember having he*rd that the firm In question laid 2000 to lEO iv one act about Mata that year, on a £4000 book, and then, whipping round, they backed the hairy-legged geldinr, so that he should (as he did) leave them well on the right side. Another large line the partnership were reputed to have laid was £2000 Fishhook on the night bsfore tih hor«e won his Cup; and even then they won handsomely. The reference to a good win over Guy Fawkea in the Canterbury Oup must moan, of course, not straight-out betting, but doubles and trebles. A lot of business was transacted fn those day* fn treble-event wagering on C. J.O. Handicap, Derby, and Canterbury Oup, at prices, ranging from 600 to 2 upwards* aooordi&ff to the quality of the goods. It comes back [to my memory that Ariel was a bad [ horse for the firm when he won the Canterbury Cup in 1877: and Templeton the | following year did all the fielders damage — he always did whenever he won. I suppose there never was a horse in New Zealand that coat the bookies, so dearly as- this gallant little horse, who was a great favourite with punters, they being ready to back hint at prfcos which tempted the boys to the full extent of their tether. Speaking of these times also brings to my recollection the big Derby book that C. and L. made in 1877, Trump Card's year. As usual they began with £500, and gradually extended it as business warranted till the book was a £1300 one. This was no doubb the biggest straight-out Derby book we have ever had in New Zealand. One way and another, those were lively days, and, though they embody many an unpleaiaaV reaallection, I am not sorry for having gone through the experience that was mine— that, namely, of an interested onlooker. We have racing on. a better footing nowadays. Still the ptst had its attractions in some respects,, and most of us who are getting thin on the top of the head like to recall occasionally the memory of the deeds and the men who were to the front whett we were lads. In reminiscences, of that nature Mick Oohen played a prominent part, and both he and his present partner are well spoken of in their old haunts. That is something, isn't it E

*£* Fine weather and the promise of good racing oaused a record attendance attheOhoka and Byreton meeting last week, and the totalisator investments, reaching- £16664-, came to £500 more than at last meeting. Some pretty fast hunters competed La the Hunters? Race, the mile and a-balf on- the fiat being' carved out: in 2mm 54seo. Btt. Wolfstan was responsible for most of the pace-making, but fa« died away in the straight, leaving. Breeze to gain tfie verdict. The winner is an aged daughter of Btulington, who since Vogengsng'* retirement from the front rank wants a winner or two to keep his name before the public. • Mr Bush generally- has. one or two useful horses representing him at this fixture, but his best this tftne^ the roan gelding Camel, was quite oatclassed by Saracen in the chief event. Tha Oup bone waited on. the opposing pair to the home turn and then buried them, paying the fair profit for a real pick-up- of Bs. How poor 1 ilevcomiMuur was that Saracen bad tomseft «»s

shown very luridly later In the day, when the three-year-old Black Eagle (a highly-bred youngster, but quite unkaown, this oeing his first reason) beat Camel easily at practically level weights, while he in turn could not get » place in the Welter, Jewel, the six-year-old daughter of Artillery and Trinket, won her two races in rather good style and fast time, and maybe she is worth following in a trifle better company. That wretchedlydisappointing horse Bangiatea was tbe one that uhe had to beat in the Flying. He had every chance, being first away, but Jewel raced him down in the straight. I notice that at this meeting two horses that the O. J.O. refused to issue trainers' permit? for were running. 1 refer to St. Clair and Revolver. If the O. J.C. was justified in declining to recognise' these names— and there oan be no doubb on the point, — surely the country olub should have made it a point of duty to insist on rechristening before the horses ran. The neglect to do this reads something like defying the metropolitan, and certainly will give the owuers tbe extra trouble — that is, unless tha point is abandoned— of adding "late so-and-so" after the new name.

*#* There was nothing very striking about the form displayed at the Tahuna Park Club's ■ extra meeting on Labour Day. Jane was really the best of the horses engaged. was what the form indicated. She beat Moonbeam from scratch in the October Hnudic&p. And Jane, though a useful mare, is not a champion. Her forte is that she will sUnd shoving along without breaking. The bookmakers who got a license at £2 per head for the day did fair business, and laid what I coniider fair odds— quite as large or larger than the tot&lisator would have returned. Somehow or other, though, the public have got cut of this style of betting, and they do not rush it. The abolition of the tots'isator would bs very sternly resented by the people at large. This- is its safeguard. It would soon go if ie had to depend for support on politician!.

*«* Burnett and Grant advise me thus : Through a rumour having been circulated in the North Island depreciating our stability, we were called upon to stake over the New Zealand Cup. Accordingly we have lodged with the secretary of the Canterbury Jockey Club £2000, which entirely covers our liability over the New Zealand and Melbourne Cups.

*#* My selections for the North Otago meeting are as follow -.—Maiden Plate, Plotter ; Hurdles, Lobo ; Publicans' Handicap, Mab.rasr; Spring Handicap, Lobd Rossutn ; Novel Bace, Lotjsgeb; Ladies'' Bracelet, Dtoazd Blohb ; Flying Handicap, Plotteb or Specuiatob The meeting promises to be a pleasant one if fine weather is- enjoyed.

*** Tha nominations for the D.J.G. Spring metting s^re such as to indicate interesting racing. St. Clements is evidently intended to come from Auckland, and it will be noticed that each, warrior? as Lady Zetland, Hippomenec, Saracen, Gipiy Grand, and Eurocljdon are entered, while there ia a particularly strong repreientation of the. two-year-old division.

1889— Tirailleur 1890— Kotuku 1891-Rosefeldt 1892— Revolution 1893— Rosefeldt 1894-6. Plover 1895-Splndrift 1896-Shrew - mm. see. 3yrs 8.7 Reeves ... 2 18 syra 8.0 Browo ' — 3yra 7.9 Price 2 1« syra 7.12 Reed ... 2 161 syrs 8.8 Lind«»y „. 2 131 Ayta 7.1 Whitaker... 2 15 4yrs 8.2 M'Ph.rsoa 2 13 Byra 8.6 Fairbrother 2 IB?

juarter. 301 sec 30Jsec 31 sec Half. 1 lmin ljsec lmiu ljsec ltuin lisoc rhree-quarters. Mile. lmin 32sec 2min 3Jsei lmin 33iaec 2m in 3|sei lmin 3l|sec 2min 3±se<

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18961022.2.134.9

Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2225, 22 October 1896

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6,954

TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2225, 22 October 1896

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