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TALK OF THE DAY.

Br MAZBPPA.

*#* The position of matters in connection with what some call the racecourse problem— though I for one fail to see the need for the use of such a term, seeing that the question requires so very little figuring out— is that the D.J.O. has made to the Forbury Park Company ai offer of £600 a year for the use of the old course for five years, and that the company hM sent no reply — good, bad, or indifferent. *#* The Tahuna Park Club, finding itieli cut short of the use of the totalisator to the extent desired, has resolved to hold a meeting without the machine, and for the purpose a sum of £60 has been voted for an afternoon's sport on Labour Day. The notion beiDg largely iv the nature of an experiment, stakes of any size could not ba 'reasonably expected, but I should not bs surprised, if this venture meets with success, to find subsequent meetings more richly endowed. If there is any chance of this it will be helped by owners making a fair response to the invitation of the club and entering freely. I hope this will be the c»so for another reason. The goody-goody crowd seem to hays a special "derry" on trotting, and persist, in spite of evidenoe to the contrary, in treating it as specially sinful, thus throwing cold water on the efforts of the great bulk ot sports to really make the game decent and wholesome — efforts, I may remark, which have been largely rewarded. Let us show these folk that suoh treatment is not sufficient to discourage sportsmen, and that we huve enougb backbone to stand up for and patronise those manly open-air amusements which the enemy does not understand. *#* Ca-ptive, winner of the Timaru Cup, has had a life of ups and downs, and, since the horse has come so much into notice lately, these may be sketched. Ho was bred at Sylvia Park in 1889, two years l&ter than his distingaiohed brother Freedom, and no doubt it was the latter's success for the rose and black stripes that induced Dan to go to 225gs for the youngster when brought to the hammer at the great dispersal sale. The dam, Maid of Honour, was on the same day sold to Mr W. R. Wilson, of Victoria, for 330gs. Captivator, the sire, came over from Sydney, xfc was always understood, as the result of aswap for Anteros. The first appearance of Captive on the turf was when as a two« year-old, ridden by D*d Eingan, he ran last in the Middle Park Plato won by Vogengang. The others of the field, all of the same age, were Stepniak, Wakawatet, and Saracen. Tue colt next ran at the C. J O. Autumn meeting, and, ridden by Derrett, he finished second to Reflection. The following day, with Brown up, Captive scored his first win, this being in the Nursery Handicap, in whioh he had 7.5, and won by a neok from Reynard 6.11. That was on the day that Prime Warden won the Great) Autumn. As a three-year-old Captive proved a very bad spec for D*n O'Brien. He was tried at Christchurch, Wellington, and other places, and eventually came to Dunedin, and ran unplaced in Tempost's Dunedin Cup, this being his ninth race of the season, and the best result a third place. Having by this time run the celt' altogether 11 times and got only the one race out of him, Dan sold, and Captive then ran in the nomination of Stewart Waddell. For his new owner the colt ran third 7.7 in the Anniversary Handicap at Dunedin, three weeks later landed the Post Stake* at Timaru, and wound up the season at the Dunedin meeting iv May, where, carrying 69, he ran a dead heat with Melinite 7.5 in the Birthday Handicap. During his four-year-;old season Captive ran no fewer than 25 times. He scored in the Kensington Handicap; then went to Timaru and ran last in the Cup, for which he started favourite— the Face won by Liberator; and fared very little better at Oamaru, though he there rau more forward, being second to Dilemma ; and, after a series of decisive defeats at Dunedin Spring, he landed the Wnimea Plains Cup, beating Conjurer and Billy; next he had an unluoky trip to Gore ; then landed a double at Tuapeka, paying £4- 4s when on the second day ho defeated Wolseley in the Lawrenco Handicap ; after this came a couple of defeats at the Dunedin Cup meeting ; be fared no better at the Anniversary fixture, but captured a double at the Taieri ; then came his beating of Prime Warden at Timaru, where with 7.7 he ran the mile and a-half in 2min 38sec ; and he wound up the season-by annexing the St. Olair Welter, at Dunedin, paying £12 ss— -his besb dividend to that date. In his five-year-old season Gap* tire won only the Spring Handicap at Oamaru, carrying 8.0 and defeating Lady Zetland 8.13 by a neck ; but out of 10 starts he was five times placed. Last racing year he began by dividing Maremma and Gipsy Grand in the Kensington Handicap ; then, becoming the property of Mr T. Kett, be ran second in the Kurow Handicap, and shortly afterwards secured the Selling Race at Dunedin Spring, whereupon he was bought by Mr T. Grose, on behalf of a syndicate or. three, for £15, and given to Cotton to train ; but this arrangement did not last long, and via find Cwtivc, alter a snelL hrouahb out ta 1«4

Hankies, like a giant refreshed, at the last Birthday meeting, where he won first the Selling Race, paying £74, and then the St Oltir Welter. By this time fjhe horse had become the sole property of Mr T. Grose, the popular J.P. and ehsi'-fltroker, for whom he hat this season run two fi' 'sand a second, and will probably take fci!o;h« r stake or two ere his grand condition runs down. Captive's record in figures m&y be thus expressed : Starts. Won. Second. Third. Unp. Won.

, jLuciuuiug a ueau übik. The 17 dividends which Captive has paid come in the aggregate to £172 11s 6d, and a Bovereign put on him in each of bis 61 races would have left the net retur. ■ f £111 11s 6d. *** A cablegram from Australia infom-h t> that M&lua is dead. This horse was one of tho greatest performers the colonies have produced. He was bred by Mr John Field, of Tasmania, in 1879, got by St. Albans from fidella (who died seven years ago), by Peter Wilkinc from Resistance, by Bay Middleton j (eon of Jersey) from Diana, by Peter Fin from Curiosity, by Buffalo from Edella (imp.). I ■ am not such a firm believer aa some in the special virtues of (his or that pedigree, but this old Taemanian stock, particularly that which faaa its root in Jersey* is so- consistently fruitful of winners that one to acknowledge ' its worth. In tho case of Edella, it may be there pointed oat that she produced Stoolrwell as well as Malua ; and in< calling attention to

the fact lam not afrsi^ "r" r the obvious retort

that none of her othw p i duct was any good, since the two mentioned form a combination good enough to make any mare's reputation. Malua was at first named Bagot, and raced ac such in his two-year-old career. His initial

Appearance was in the Two-year-old Stakes at Carrick, Tasmania, when, carrying the colours of the Hon. T. Reiley, he started at evens in a field of 10, and, ridden by Tib-balls, romped home alone m lmin 2Ssec for the six furlongs. At the Hobsxt meeting ha also landed his race, but, going to Lannceston, he met with defeat in an unsatisfactory trial. Hobatt was first home, with Mfzpah second, and Bagot third. The owner of the latter protested against both the others for jostling, with the result that Mizpah was disqualified and Bagot placed second, the verdict in favour of Hobatt being undisturbed. In the following

season Bagot ran thrice at Assyrian's Melbourne -Cup meeting, landing th« Van Yean Stakes, and at the sale following the meeting he was

bought for 500gs by Mr J. O. Inglis, who reohrifltehed'the colt Malua, meaning " Wait-a-bit." And the new title was not without significance. Malua- did wait to some purpose, till the back end of his four-year-old season, when he made an electric rush, which wdn the Newmarket Handicap, and followed this up by ' capturing the O&kleigh Handicap and the Adelaide Cup. In the next racing year hs iron tbe Melbourne Cup with 9.9, beating Commotion 9.12 and Plausible 6.13 for places; as a ' aix-year-old he attached the Australian Cap nsder the burden of 0 9 ; ' and by way of show* ' ing his .versatility, he added~to bis victories the V.R.C Grand National Hurdles before his ' lacing career closed., This is but an outline of his performances on the turf. He won in stakes ' £7341, and retired Drowned with honour. As a cite, also, he has been very much to the front. Malvolio, winner of the Melbourne Cup, is one of his get, also M°lum& and other noted racers.

*** Ernest B-i z ;n, who, while on his colonial tour, spent a term in Danedin, doing the grand md wasting hi* money, to the joy of a few— l am glad to say' there, were only _» few— looal hengers-on, is now on his beam ends in England. I hear of him in the police court reports. At Birmingham in July he was summoned by Walter Wnllis for refusing to pay a cab fare amounting to six shillings. Defendant did not appear, and a constable said he believed he had been arrested for debt on the previous evening. Magistrate*! Clerk: He is known as the "Jubilee Plunger," is he not? Mr Baker i Yea, and he wrote* book "How I lost £250,000 in Two Years." The cabman laid he drove defendant to & house and waited there for him. He drove a lady home, Benzon' stating that he was not going home that night. When he saw Benzon later and , asked for six shillings fare, be replied, •• Fiddle-de-dc, and be to you." The bench made an order for payment, and included 2s 6d for tho cabman's loss of time. At the County Court, Birmingham, Benzon was sued for £15 due to Mr T. B Sharp, engineer, mon- c . It was there stated that Benzon w&s already in prison for debt. Plain- ; tiff said defendant was a celebrated man once, . His Honor : Never mled the celebrated — I know S about that. Defendant had told plaintiff received £13 a week. Mr Frost, solicitor, said Benzon haunted the hotels and threw his money right and left. His Honor : I think you had better wait till he comes out of prison. He struck out the case, and plaintiff said he should forgive -Benzon the debt.

*** We hear from Wanganui of the death of Lady Artist, at the age of 16 yean. She ffM bred by Mr D. Scott, of Lower Rangitikei, Sot by The Painter from the Potentate mare Policy, granddam of Ahua. She began her racing career in the company of those wonderful "" Wanganni hacks " that are so often spoken of, and scored a couple of successes- to start with, tkese being at the Marton-Rangitikei meeting when Leonato won the chief event and Consul the Leger. She was then three years of age, and carried the colours of Mr Kawana, which being interpreted meam Mr Governor. Her Maiden Plate was won atFoxton the same season, and her first win in open company .was on the same course at the May meeting, when »$ welter weight for age she easily defeated Atraa over a mile and a-half That Lady Artist could cany weight was farther demonstrated before the season was out, for the easily accounted for the Ladies' Bracelet at the Hawke's Bay Steeplechase meeting. In her four-year-old season Lady Artist competed in the best races in her district, but apparently went a step too high, as in fire tiies the best waulfc was a third place. At a five-year-old the mare was only sparingly used, and she won a couple of . important events, the Turakina Handicap and the Feilding Handicap. She was then running in the name of Mr Ngapurn, lor whom, however, she did very little good, Ler whole six-year-old season being a dock-egg, , and after that she seems to have dropped oat from the winning list altogether. It cannot be pretended tbat Lady Artist wai a great or even a good racer, but she bad the makings of a useful brood man, in evidence of which she threw to Bomnus that good horse The Artist, who kuddenly blossomed less than a year ago into first-rate form and won the Metropolitan Handicap at Christchuroh from Skirmisher.

- #** In the Poverty Bay programme for •cbober it ii urovided tbat "in cmo ol (tie*

' graphic communication being stopped on date J of Domination and acceptance, entries wHI be deferred until one day after communication ia \ renewed." I quote this not for the purpose of ' criticising the wording of the condition — the meaning is plain if not well expressed — but with the objeot of calling attention to a possible danger. Say that tbe lines are down ; the local entries and some others will probably have arrived at the due date ; and word may get round as to what these entries are, thus giving & tip to outside owners as to whether they ought to nominate or nob, while in the case of acceptances the tip may be given as to whether it is worth while paying up. There is a period of grace intervening. The delayed messages will be received not on the d*y that telegraphic communication is- restored, but "one day after." There is the loophole through which may creep the very abuse the preventing of which is the main object of being particular about closing dates for entries.- There is no need to suggest leakage through a secretary or from his office. Owners themselves may talk, And what they say in confidence to their imMe.diate friends is always in jeopardy of wider circulation. One can readily understand how eagerly such information would ba seized on occasionally, especially in respect of acceptances, say, by the owner of a horse that would be deemed to be a good thing if another horse that was reckoned to be more formidable happened not' to be among the acceptors.' Suoh possibilities ought to be excluded as far as possible, and it seems to me that the Poverty Bay, Club's practice rather extends them. As to the remedy, surely that is not difficult to find. No one would be unreasonable enough to argue that entries which are delayed through accident - ought to be barred. They have been in time past, but that is not necessary. What might be. done, I submit, is to redraft the extending condition so as to qualify entries and acceptances which are geut in good time and suffer arrest in transit, say by providing that letters bearing the postmark of a sufficient period in advance-and telegrams of the morning of the due date are to be deem< d receivable notwithstanding their accidental detention. The essence of the qualification thould , be that such messages were despatched in plenty of time before the closing hour. The subject is of importance, not because of the Poverty Bay Club's practice, but because other clubs may unthinkingly adopt the same rule and thereby give it mote or less general application. I fear that if this were done we should hear frequently of "fakes" and objections.

*£* Results of the Goodwood meeting in July indicate that the sport provided was soarcely up to the level of first-class. There were only a few top-sawyers engaged. One of these, Kilcock, ought, they say, to have wen the Stewards' Cap, and would have done so but for being interfered with by the American hcise Ramapo. The incident ia thus referred to by the Sportsman's special : " Ramapo and Reiff were the evil genii of Kilcock, who, despite his 9.12, would surely have won hut for being called upon to almost carry the American horse for 50yds, and then being hustled right out of the race by him. lam not blaming Reiff for what occurred — no doubt it was unintentional on his parb ; but it is plain, one would think, to the meanest capacity that it is impossible to balance a horse and finish strongly on him if he is saddled right on to his withers, and the jookey site with his knees in his mouth. A man cannot have power on a horse unless he rides long, and thus directly a jockey of the American school tries to use his whip and finish away goes his horse all over the place. It is more than annoying in the present instance, for Watts had just got Kilcock fairly set to win his race, and that he won Id have wonandesfcablithed a splendid record it certain bat for the untimely interference of Ramapo, which was so persistent and serious that Kilcock had absolutely to be pulled back to avoid an accident. All honour to the horse, however, as if he had won ; and if Reiff will. gain wisdom by experience and ride about three holes longer in future, he will not have spoiled sport wholly in vain." A complaint being made as to Reiff's riding, the •towards, who on % previous occasion bad cautioned this jockey, withdrew his license for a fortnight, though they acquitted him of any intentional foul riding. The race was won after a fine finish by Chasieur, a son of Qalopin and Lady Gower, by Lord Clif den from Baroness, by Stockwell.

*«* Ohillingham, who eft'eoted a surprise in the Richmond Stakes at Goodwood, is by Chillington (sob of Chippendale and Duvernay) from Pavetta, by Springfield from Gardenia, by Macaroni. The colt was bred by hit present owner, Lord Durham, and is not engaged ia the classic races of next season. There was another facer for bickers on tbe following day, when Carlton Grange, son of Carl ton and the Munoaster mare Mystery, won the Stakes. This. colt was bred by Mr W. P. Greenall in 1892, and subsequently became the property of the late Colonel North, in whose colours he made his first appearance, when he ran fourth in the Hyde P*rk Plate at Epsom. In June 1894 he passed into the possession of Mr Hamar Bass for 600gs. The other leading races of the meeting went to the favourites. Rfgret made op for previous disappointments by smashing up in great style the opposition in the Surrey Stakes ; Bluewater, the half sister to Rampion, won the Rons Memorial for the same stable ; and Velasquez romped over his opponents in the Prince of Wales's Stakes, to the delight of those who profess to believe that in him Lord Roiebery has » second Ladas. That is a popular opinion, but not universally held. The Sportsman's chief writer is a heretic on the point, and I quote his remarks: "Now we have seen the winner of the Derby," said Mr Robert Peck after Velasquez had won his race in a canter. "He is clean, hard, and wiry, like his sire, and takes things quietly. If anything, he iB sharper than Donovan. I tell you, it's no use talking any more about it — Velasquez will win the Derby." Now, Mr Peck was equally ' emphatic last year after seeing Persimmon win at Ascot that he was the Derby winner, and consequently his words deserve full attention at coming not oaly from an experienced bat a lucky judge. Nevertheless, I must admit to being not ao wholly taken up with Velasquez as most people are. That he has superb action and won his race to-day in smashing style cannot be denied. Moreover, he had been tried, as I understand, so well that his defeat was deemed impossible. I read the other day a foolish observation about Regret's action being his solitary redeeming feature, as if action were, after all, not suoh a very important matter. In point of fact, it is action that carries weight, action that stays, and action that wins races. Action in horses is like charity, according to St. Paul, in men. If they have not action they have nothing, no matter how good looking and well bred they may be. The old saying, "They ran all shapes," simply means that so long as a horse has action it does not much matter what his shape is. Admitting, then, to the full that Velasquez gallops like a racehorse of the highest class, I do not necessarily depreciate him when I ,critioise him in other respects, for in real truth I sever saw one that got his hind legs nndei him better, *nd covered the ground in

finer style. His main faulty to my mind, ia his small, contracted feet, which, of course, in on way interfered with him on suoh goiDg as we now have, but which are by no means desirable attributes for a Derby . horse. In other rospeots he .has plenty of good points with a good de&l of Donovan about him, and yeb bearing a family likeness to his half brother, Sir VistD, especially over the quarters. He shows more quality, however, than last year's Derby winner, and it is unquestionable that he is all over a workman, with depth of girth, good heart room, and a ganerally hard look ; but withal he is a plainish customer, and on looks alone I would sooner have Galtee More for next year than two of him. Still, looks clone do not win races.

* # * Thunder Queen, winner of the South Australian Derby, being by the New Zea'and-bred Thunderbolt (brother to Neoklace), her performance is one which | can be read about with interest in j this colony, and no excuse is necessary for ' quoting the local writer, " Tar^um." on the snbjec*. He says that the merit of Thunder Queen's suscess was found in her last brilliant run, when to all appearances she was beaten. Certainly it may have heen that she won be- ; cauf c the other two -ware stopping, but, on the other hand, it is only fair to infer that bad she not been interfered with her victory would have ! been all tbe more sign&l. Having said so much, t and remembering that the mile and* a-half was 1 cat out in 2 coin 43* ec, it may be remarked that she is not an Auraxia. Mr James's craok occupied half a second longer to negotiate the journey, but she won in a far more pronounced manner than the sister to Thunderer did on Tuesday. Auraria'a other performances also at weight for age eclipsed anything that Thunder - Queen has yet »ho«m us, and while wishing Mr Rowen the be«i of luck on the other side he should not forget that his filly's latest performance was hardly good enough to win a Caulfiold Cup. No doubt it will be said that Thunder Queen is susoeptible of considerable improvement during the next six weeks, bub she will require to show this to annex the important V.A.T.C. mile and a half race. There is the one fact to be ' got over, and that is half a fnrlong from home Princes 3of Wales and Royalist both had her practically beaten. Mr James was naturally elated with the bold front displayed by his filly, and Hill made no secret of tbe fact ' after the contest that taking a line through her Eleusinian would have won. Whether this would have been so time alone will prove, but i the E'euds colt was going strongly when he i was interfered with. Princess of Wales cut i across him approaching the half-mile post, and I collided with him with such force as to nearly \ bring him down. In turn; he swerved on to i Helena, and also completely spoilt her chance, i It must be very gratifying to Mr Rowen to hava won a Derby within 12 months of commencing 1 his career on the t,ru-F *** The American journal called Torf, Field, '. and Farm argues for a raising of weights. The ; top weights in handicaps, it says, are always too low and not more than any ordinary horse ought to carry comfortably, especially when the ' impost is within the compass of a skilful 1 jockey. But starting with too light weight, by the time the handicapper has scaled down to 1 the lightest weight he has gone entirely beyond ' the pale of jockey skill, and the light-weight 1 division have no chance whatever. A hundred ' years, or more ago the weights carried in Eng- \ land by the best horsss were as a rule heavier ' than now and the distances longer, not«>ith1 standing the racehorse has been continually im1 proving in size, stamina, and speed during that period. At Newmarket, in 1726, Bald Char1 lotfce, a chestnut mare, five years old, won four I miles, carrying 18 3 ; Flyiug Childera ran six miles with 10 0 ; Eclipse carried as much as ; 12.0 and won King's Plates. Thene are, of j course, exceptional performances, bub give an idea of the ability of a good horae to carry | weight. It is true the time test was not considered in those days, nor is it at present in | England. The weight carried in "steeplechases ' and hurdle races, when a horse must not only \ run but jump, is another evidence of nob only weight-carrying capacity, but also of how much , assistance a good strong man is to his horse. Increase the weights and distances, put less 1 stress on the time test, and we will have more sport, better racing, and prevent the deteriora- ( tion of the thoroughbred, which must eventually result from ligbt weight and sprints.

*#* On the subject of cheap yearlings an English paper says : It seldom happens that two yearlings sold at the same time eventually both loecome the dams of Derby winners. Suoh a case was witnessed, however, when Mendicant, who won the Oats, was purchased *vt Donoaster for 400»», and at the same time Queen Mary was sold for a hundred guineas leas. Mendicant was the dam of Beadsman, who won the Derby in 1858. while Queen Mary became the dam of the celebrated Blink Bonny, who had won the Derby of the previous year, and granddam of Blair At hoi. It saern* strange that the Derby should be won three yeara in succession by horses which had been low-priced yeailiugs, while their high-priced companions tihould turn out comparatively worthless The coveted prize was gained in 1859 by Musjid, and in 1861 by the mighty Kettledrum, both of which winners were purchased aa yearlings for 400gs each. In 1860 Thormanby defeated 29 opponents, which was exactly the same number as Mu«jid had beaten the previous year ; but as a yearling he only fetched 350g#. For a like sum Virago (the winner of the One Thousand Guineas of 1854), who- was undoubtedly one of the finest mares ever seen, was purchased .when a yearling.

* # * Fine weather prevailed for the racing at Sooth Canterbury last week, and tbe goiog, though a bit rough, was firm and good enough to provide fair trials. Len. Smith rode Invader in the Hunters' Hurdles, and won with not a great deal to spare from the consistent Dundonald. Silverstream was again slow over the hardies — he really must learn to jump quicker if he is to win money at this game — and he was beaten after striking one of the fences. In the Maiden Plate Dandy at once rushed to the front and held the lead for half a mile, when Remorse II picked him up, got to the front, and showed the way at & great pace into the straight, being at that point nearly half a dozen lengths ahead. Inside the distance, however, the Oama.ru horse grew feeble, and Salvo Shot got up in the last few strides for a win by a neck. The two "horses that took the public fancy for the Timaru Cup were Plotter and Quiltiri, the former, much the better favourite, being backed down to a 47s dividend. It was agreed that as Hippomenes had beaten Captive decisively at Danedin and as the owners had elected to send Plotter in preference to Hippomenes, Plotter was bound to beat Captive. The reasoning seemed sound, and probably it was as sound as reasoning about horse races generally is. My experience of calculations of this kind is that they generally come oat wrong of some oversight — a conclusion not complimentary to the general judgment; but I do nob mind that, as I am set

to tell the truth, and in doing so must acknowledge that I occasionally come within tbe s*me condemnation. To be plain, we horsey folk are not clever. The element of weakness n\ r.hia oalcul*tion about the Tlmaru Cup was iv overlooking the fact that Plotter, having run only once previously, was practically green at tbe game, and therefore not reliable. lam fairly satisfied that this greenness at rao-ng helped to bring about the colt's defeat. In other words, I he will race better when he has learned to obey his jockey. Ido not, however, believe that he could have beaten Captive in^any case.

*** Ted Hankins had this horse half a stone better than when he started at the Otago Hunt Club meeting, and, ridden as he was to the best advantage by Alf. Rainbow, there was practically only one in the Cup. Rainbow's instructions were to lie behind for the first mile and let the others rush away as much as they liked, and he followed his orders carefully and intelligently, winning eventually without making a serious call on his mount. It was important; t*>»t Captive should win, as the stnke was w ' th going for, and it meant only the fleabite (.•or.'Jfcy of 31b for the New Zealand Cap, and the trainer had his bit on. The owner, I understand, fancied Plotter. If Captive had lost, no doubt there would have been plenty to point to the paucity of his backing — only £19 in the machine— and shrug their shoulders as much as to suggest that he was a corpse. In this way many an injustice is done on the turf. Captive was very mnoh alive, as the result showed, but with th*t small amount of support things would have looked suspicious had he been beaten. It was, of course, a false price tbat he was permitted, to pay. Under the old bookmaking system Captive would have been quoted at not more than sio lat the outside. The story of the race is a simple one. Plotter and Esau were last and Vandyke first to move from a good start. When fairly going Vandyke showed the way, Prime Warden bringing up the rear. After going a quarter of a mile Plotter had made up into a handy position, and when half the journey was completed he was challenging the leader, QuUtiri also making a bid for the front place. At the bomt- turn, Vandyke being done with, Plotter, Qu'itiri, Chaos, and C*ptiv6 were pretty well together, the rest beatec. Plotter was the first of the four to cry a go ; Quiltiri had had enough at the distance ; and Captive drew clear of Chaos in plenty of time to win by a length and a-quarter. The wiuners of the Cup since the courie was made a mile and a-quarter have bften :— 1894-Saracen syrs 8.12 Shaw 2minl2Jscu 1895-Outpost syrs 8.1 W. Pine 2min 15 see 18U6— Captive aged 7.12 Rainbow 2minl3Jsec There is little doubt that Captive would have won again on the second day in the Rhodes Memorial Stakes but for the accident which happened. He was racing Quiltiri in the lead half a mile from home when Plotter, in making a forward rush between them, effected a c&tmon which knocked himself out and sent Captive up against a poßt, which he grazed roughly, giving Rainbow a shock, knocking him out of tbe saddle, and quite destroying Captive's chance It is reckoned that with a fair run Captive would have done the mile this trip in lmin 43sec or lmin 44iec. The rest of the form at the meeting calls for no special comment, save that Ilex managed to win the two hurdle races, giving weight exch time to Nat, who appears to ba an overrated horse. The . handicapping of Mr Dowse and the starting of Mr Piper seem, to be generally praised, and the meeting was quite the success generally that h*d been expected, one test of which is that £4351~was passed through the totalisator by Mason and Roberts, or £1217 more than last year.

*** New Zealand had a considerable Bay on the second day- of the A.J.O. meeting. Old Clo', winner of the Shorts, i<i by our exiled Loohiel, who ought not to have been allowed to leav* the colony ; Sabretache was not only bred, but is sfcill owned in Auckland. True Blue, one of the Wellington Park product?, was good enough to carry top woight into second place in the Metropolitan ; Chris, who for once in his life jumped grandly, was the means of the Steeplechase money, and perchance iv bit more, coming to Napier ; Royal Rose, winner of the Squatters' Handicap, was in his day the crack two-year-old of the- Auckland district, and to all appetr&nces Le Var, son of Loohiei, ought to have won the N**w S osk*s. We hear by c»b!o that the A. J 0 held an inquiry into tlrs colt's performance, and found that the instructions given by T. Payten, with J. B. Clark'* oonseut, to the jockey Macnamara amounted ib effect to this : that Le Var was to be run in the interests of Coil ; that Macnanoara allowed Coil to pass him in the straight without miking an effort to prevent him, and afterwards did nob persevere with Le Var. It wa,p resolved to censure Cl»*k and Pnyten for net giving more explicit instructions to the jockey to win if he could, and that as, notwithstanding the want of such instructions, it was the jockey's clear duty to endeavour to win, and he failed to do so, Mscnamara be suspended for the reniMpdur of the meeting. The third day's racing found Mr D. O'Biian winning the Sydney Handicap with the unlucky Response; and the concluding daj's programme found Maoriland again to the front, absolute wins for our own breeding being thoie of True Blue in the Waverley Handicap and Tire" in the Rand wick Plate. The last-mentioned performance must not be rated very high, since Newhaven was not a competitor ; but, though Toreador and Newman are only small potatoes at weight- for-age races over three miles, a win is a win, and Tire" could probably have beaten better ones had they come forward.

*** Though one cannot altogether admire the way in which the Auckland Club got its permit for the meeting held on Saturday, it must be confessed that the club itself can hardly be blamed for "working the oracle." If blame is to be apportioned, it belongs to the Government for weakly concenfciug to listen to the specious reasoning against its own decrees ; and any suggestion that the club sought to promote a met ting that was not wanted is amply answered by the results. Good fields came up for every event, and a fine lot of horses were engaged. It will be noted, howver that the winners were picked all the day. eitfier the first or second favourite getting home every time. Day Star won his race, thus pleasing a not inconsiderable section of the Auckland public who fancy he has a say in the New Zealand Cup ; and Fabulist ran well enough to show that he is sound and coming on, which, under the circumstances, is as much as could be expected of him. Armilla might have shaped better, nnd Oma made no show at all ; but his defeat seems to. have been anticipated, judging by the investments. The meeting was specially interestisg in th»t it provided the first two-year-old race of the season. A field of 11 young aristocrats contested this event, and the public put their fingers on the pea the first pop, choosing Coronet, a son of Castor and Necklace, who won, apparently, in good style. St. Clements' win will attraot more attention to his show in the Otago Cup, in which he has about two (tone lets to carry than on Saturday. If ha can

really stay a mile and a-half he must take s power of be*ting.

* # * Speaking of big sales, " Nuuquum Dormio,"of B«U's Life, Wert Australia, tells an old itory. Lord G«orge Bentinok, wheu he had finally decided to relinquish the turf for politic*, offered Mr George Payne " tbe lot. from Bay Middleton to Httle Kitchener, the jookey, for £10,000." Mr Payne said he would give £300 for a consideration till breakfast time next morning, and next morning handed Lord George his cheque for the amount, refusing the offer as nonchalantly as it was made. Then Mr Mostyn, seeing the negotiations concluded, said very quietly: "I'll take the lot, Bentinck. at £10,000, and will give you a cheque before you go to the course." "If you please," replied Lord George, and the bargain was completed. In that purohase for £10,000 was included Bay Middleton, who was the St. Simon of his day ; Crucifix, who was the La Fleohe of the time, and a colt that afterwards won the Derby and Bti. Leger.

*** Here is an extract from the leading writer's article in England's leading sporting paper:

Some irreverent Australian has been making I free with the name of Mr Stead, and a horse so ■* described lias actually shown scandalous rapidity |of action. Vide the following press extraota J— I "Mr Stead's times for the Auckland Derby werei Quarter- juik, 27fcec } half-mile, BSsee ; three* quarter-mile, lmin 19i*ec ; one. mile, lmin 46Jsec"{ one mile and a-half, 2min S9isec. The official time of the race was 2min 89|sec." I am not so fully puffed up with what some call colonial conceit as to suppose that the men ol our island are known to everybody, but surely if we have a sportsman who ought to be remembered in England it i« Mr G G. S. : , seeing that hs ha* ai time? been a purchaser of high-class blood stock in the old country, and has hia name recorded as a winner of the Payne Stakes

with Splendour. One is driven to suspect that this ignorance of colonial' men and things is sometimes assumed by English writers, and the assumption seems reasonable ia this case when we find Auckland referred to as " Australian."

*** " Reviewer," of the Auckland Sporting Review, writes j After Dummy won the National Hurdles, sever*! cotacidenoes in connection wifcii him and Mutiny, the winner of the Steeples, fiitfct d across in? mind, and I did intend jotting them down, but. before I had done so I received n letter from his owner, Mr F. Watson, of New Plymouth, wbo has enUrged on the list. Botb. Mutiny and Dummy are by the same sire, Tbe Mate ; they are the sr.me colour, chestnut ; both were bred by the same man, Mr W. Douglas, of Hawke'a Bay; both were purchased by residents of New PI; month, both won the Stratford Cup, both won thei p first National Hurdle Race from sttrfc to flnio h, both were schooled the same number of times (five) before thej raced over hurdles, acd both were schooled by Percy Johnson, and ridden by him in the first National hurdle races they won. This list of coincidences will take some beating.

*#* The programme of the Taieri meeting comes to hand just as we are going to press. 1 defer my remarks on it till next issue.

Lt 2yrs ... 3 Lt 3yre ... 13 it 4yrs ... 25 it oyrs ... 10 Lt 6yra ... 7 it7ym... 8 61 • T_ 1 •2 8 1 3 _8 17 1 0 3 2 J 9 0 2 0 0 10 1 95 9 185 8 442 6 93 2 199 0 124 S5 £1141

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Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2221, 24 September 1896

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6,713

TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2221, 24 September 1896

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