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TALK OF THE DAY.

By MAZBPPA.

*#* The Auckland Steeplechase meeting, the celebrat'on of whioh constituted this week's diversion, was inaugurated in 1885, when th« cream gelding Macaroni won the big event under, the top weight of 12.0, Albert Lyford riding him. A good finish was spoiled by Ngata ana New Year coming down at the last hurdle when in company with Macaroni. It was in 1892 th&t the meeting was first extended to two days. That was th« yeav in which Belmont (son of King Qnail and Winnie) won the Hurdle Race 'in the reoord time of 4min ,2£sec, beating ( Gouranto and four others, one of them being Fabulous, sire of Fabulist. Shillelagh won the Steeplechase at that meeting, defeating Couranto and a strong field, among whom wad Sciilfcheen, a horse that took part in this year's race. The totalisator investments for thoie two days oame to £7589; nexb year they dropped to £6809 ; the meeting of 1894- found a substantial advance to £8317 ; this was raised last year to £9928; and all previous record* are now put into the Bhade with the total of £11,779. This is indeed progress by leaps and bounds, .and the explanation is easy, the simple" fact being- that horsea are following the money. Going back to the results, tha 1893 meeting found a pair of outsiders who afterwards proved themselves good horses, winning tha double, Mutiny 9.8 paying £11 17s in the Hurdles, and Despised 9 7 returning the handsome dividends of £37 12s and £93 5s in the Steeplechase. In the foHowiog season Melinite started favourite for and easily won the Hurdles, and that fast but uncaitafn horse Bombardier got home in the Steeplech&so, paying £5 2s. Lest year, as wo have been often reminded, Liberator won the double, carrying 12 9 in the Hurdles and 11.12 in the Steeplechase. This year the brave old -battler, a year the worse for wear, found himself unable to hold his own for speed with the lightly-weighted Gisborne horse, and then, strange to say, ran a very fine second in the Steeplechase with a buiden of 111b heavier than he had on his back a year ago. We may admit, perhaps, that this feat on old Lib's put is nob so great as it looks, inasmuch as all the known good ones in this year's race were pretty well looked after by the handicapper, while the light weights were below the average ; still, I am very much impressed with the form the brave gelding showed, and maybe he it) » better steeplechaser than we have hitherto supposed. The only other matter that culls for comment this week is the fiae jumping display by Anna:* belle, who was able to score twice over hurdles on the second day. Up to the present this mar« has been known to (he public as a flatr raoer. *#* v A deputation from the Dunedin Jockey Club waited upon Mr Hudson, sub-intpeobor of railways, last week, to discuss the question of railway fares to the Taiori in view of the olab purchasing a site for a racecourse in that district. The Chairman (the Hon. George M'Lean) s»W that the club bad four suitable properties undac offer, all within a r'adiu? of from eight to 10 miles of the city, and asked Mr Hudson to fix the fares for that distance. Mr Hudson, in reply, said that the Railway department would assist the club ai muoh as possible in the way of giving reasonably ohenp fares, and he would refer the matter to tha general manager in Wellington, and give the club, an answer in a day or two. In this connection I may observe that the regular return fares between Dunedin and Wingatui are 2s 3d first-class and Is 6d second. It is not, therefore, too much to hope that the department will make it » shilling for second-class. With lots of fellows •• a bot " seems to be the limit of feeling. Ask them mote and they talk of not being able to afford it. The Railway department will understand this, and I have no fear of' their " sticking it on," as the saying goes. Representatives of the department went out on Saturday with the club's committee and Mr Robert Hay in order to consider the question of sidings and so forth, so that when the report is presented it will have a strong basis of fact.

*** A correspondent a«ks to be told the treat* ment used by Mr Goodman for the cure of a wart on one of his colts, I have seen the trainer named, who counsels me to give the advice of authorities on the Bubjeofc. Sir F. Fitzwygram says : " Warts should always be removed whilst yet email. The best practice' is to scrape the surface and then dress it with chloride of z'ne. Large warts may, however, require to be removed by the knife. Some cure is needed in the operation. The divided blood-vessel should, if necessary, be staunched by the application of the hot iron. In "some cases, where there is a small base, the wart may be deprived of its nutriment by means of a silk ligature tied tightly round it, and in due time it will perish and drop off. The best treatment, however, is arnenic made into a paste — arsenic and lard— in the proportion of ldr of arsenic to loz of lard. Two scratches should be made on the wart and a small quantity of the paste applied. The wart will fall out in a few *iys." The writer adds that with warfcs that have no appreciable base it may be necessary to slough them out. A thin paste consisting of sulphuric acid and sulphur, spread over the wart, will produce the sloughing process in a few days. The part must be afterwards treated as a simple wound. Captain Haynes, in his book, says th&t the appearance and position of the wart will sufficiently indicate the proper means foe its removal, whether by caustics, the knife, the scissors, tying them with (ilk, thread, or. horsehair, or by the firing-iron. The hot iron may be used with advantage after the wart has bean cut off. Dr Moore, in his homoeopathic treatise, recommends the snipping of small warts, and, to prevent reproduction, a touch" ing two or three times a day with thuya. A course of Gale. carb. is useful in correcting the constitutional or the cutaneous derangement; whioh is the essential cause of warts of all kinds. The large fibrous bunchy wart must be removed either with the knife or by separating it from the skin at its base, and shelling or dragging it out. In> some caieß twisting and pulling is better than excision. Gradual removal may be effected by the oooMiona^appli* oation of finely-powdered arsenic to the baia ' surface, but care must be taken against possible arsenical poisoning from absorption, and also against excessive local cauterisation. These methods of treatment are the latest available-* and my correspondent may take his choice or, what would perhaps be still better, ooniult a vet. ' I have noli much faith in the application of general principles indiscriminately. II fj}

I,

always safest to got a competent man to 'inspect. "- *** English advices by mail give us particulars of the Bpsom Summer meeting. The Great Metropolitan Stakes, the two miles and B-quaiterhaudiotip, was instituted in 1846, juit half a century ago, and won in that year by the three-year-old Chamois, the added money baing SOOhovs, m those days a large sura. Paris—he (rill never be Paris 111 with us— was this year made a red-hot favourite at 2 to 1 against, though burdened with 99 in a field of 15. It Would be a very poor crowd of that dimensions Ihtt Paris with that weight and out of his distance would neat in the colonies at this period Of his life, snd the surprise is not that fie got done, bnt tbat he should have started at so short a prica and then looked like a winner within a very short distance of the post. Someone from the colonies foreshadowed the defeat gn writing the following for publication :—" I hope owners in England will train their good snes to beat Paris over a distance, because in Australia he could not win a decent weigbt-for-age race over any distance— even his own, Vhich is between a mile and a mile and a-half . fefaxim, Carbine, Tirailleur, Mas ton, Nordenf eldt, Trenton, and many others would have Ciide very easy work of little Paris. Very gm»rt handicap form was bia class. He likes bard going." To some extent this is true. At srny rate, Paris got dished in the Metropolitan. Watts had all his work to do to hold him ha the first half-mile, says one spectator. Apparently tile race was ran at a capital pace from end to end, and a quarter of a mile from borne it seemed to be any imaginable odd« on (ha favourite. Just, however, as we exoected to see him shoot .out and oome home id his STerthampton style, he suddenly collapsed, and there appears to be good reason for the doubts expressed by tboae who knew him bent in Australia as to whether the distance would not " prove a little too far for him. Fatherless, the winner, was bred by Mr C. D. Rose/ got by Isonomy from Orphan Agnes, by Speculator from Polly Agnes, by The Care, and in his lengthy career hart previously won seven races. Bis tune, 4min 13»eo, is oaly I 4-seec slower thau that of Tbc Cob in 18S7. Worcester was ttfter all the winner of the City and Suburban. Some cables, it will be ' remembered, gave the winner as Amaudier. The last-named suffered most at the start. Worcester, though regarded by Some as not likulj to quite stay out the mile and went to the post a decided favourite, and won easily, Khus at the first attempt recouping Mr Bmnato the 2000ga for which he privately purqhaaed him at Newmarket last December. He was sent to the post in rare condition by J. Cannon, and gave Mornington Cannon bis fourth winning ride in the race He <Kon it last year on Rominder, on Reve dOr in 1880, and on Nnnthorps in 1891 The. time record since 1881 U held by Quicklime, the 1884 winner — via, 2«>in lOjec Worcester's was a Beoond slower. .

*#* By cable we know the result of the Derby. The world's chief stake was won by the Prince of Wales with Persimmon, the colt that got badly beaten in his trial for the Two Thousand, and was oonnequenUy withdrawn from that race, and he bas beaten a red-hot favourite, after an exciting finish, in record time, a second and a fifth of a second quicker than 'the fastest perbya previously run — namely, thos^ of - Kettledrum, Blair Athol, Merry Hamplun, Ayrshire, and Isinglass, each of the»c colts having registered 2min 43seo. Up to this year ffcat seemed to be th« limit of speed attainable in the Derby", even as lmin 40sec appears to be Unbreakable for a mile in the colonies and lmin l4seo for six furlongs. It was once cabled out — 1 think U Ayrshire's year — that 2miu 43sec had been lowered, but that proved to be a mistake. Snob errors, however, are very rare, and I am backiDg the wire in its statement tbat jpersimmon has lowered the record. Thin colt was* bred by hia owner, the Prince of Wales, v and is the fourth foal of Fcrdita 11, a mare bred by Lord C*wdor. Hot first fool was Derelict in 1689 ; he died as a four-year-old. The Hoond was the filly Barraeouta, by Barculdine ; Chen, after & year's rest, the mare produced that sterling horse Florizel 11, and, after another season's spell, Persimmon, who is full ffother to Florizel 11. The Derby winner's great rival, St. Frusqain, also oame to band after a year's intermission in his dam's returns ; but I shink hte mother, Isabel, was put to the horse in the odd year and proved barren, while Perdita II had a season of absolute rest. I mention this because it to some extent supports a theory which suggests itself as reasonable that a mar* will not stand inceMant breeding from year by year with maobine-like regularity, and that one way to ensure good stock is to give Bares an occasional, if not a periodic, rest from labour. Persimmon gave J. Watts his fourth Winning mouit in the Derby, he having been previously successful on Merry Hampton, Sainfoin, and Ladas. The three placed horses this -year are good performers. The doings of the , first and the second are well known ; and tho third, Earwig, placed to his credit last eeai-on the Prince of Waks's Nursery Plate at Doncastsr and tbe Clf-a< well Stakes at Newmarket. As everybody is remarking, this is tbe first time the Prince has won the Derby. I think it may be added it is the first time he has had Anything like a fair look in. We are told, and can well understand it, that the win was immensely popular ; and it can be imagined thatjbhe circumstance will quite settle tho hash of the Cold Tea Party who have been trying to spoil sport in England. Their opportunity will not arrive until England has lapsed into effeminacy, by which time she will be fit for spoliation at the hands of some more robust nation. Meanwhile the country generally will / rejoice with the Prince. He can well afford to smile at those who lift up their hands in horror. More serious to him will be the report, circulated so long ago ss April, that tbe race was to be given to him. I refer to this paragraph from a London paper:— "lt is well known that the Prince of Wales is very anxious to win the Derby, an honour which has not yet been reached by him in his long career on' the turf. It is suggested that in case bis candidate Persimmon should continue as he has begun, and should almost rival St Frusquin in bis public performances, it is conceivable that Mr Rothschild, out of a feeling of loyalty, may make th» path to success easier to him by taking care that St. Frusqain ib not quite truiued to concert pitch. The holders of this simple theory possibly forget that Mr Rothschild himtelf has never won the Derby, or the Two Thousand Guineas either, for that matter. Nor has any member of his family been successful in the big Bpsom event since Baron Rothschild won with Favonius ia 1871."

*** Referring to this* rumour, the editor of the Sportsman says: — "I have no hesitation in witting that this is a ridiculous, scandalous, and disgraceful innuendo. Of. course every racing man. well knows that tbe idea of Mr Leopold de Rothschild intentionally running St. Frusquin out of condition for the Darby, in order to get out of the way of the Prince . of Wales, with Persimmon, is too utterly- absurd $0 need comment. There are plenty of ethers, however, who— like tht originator of ths Oftnarct

m question — are hopelessly ignorant of turf matters, and for their benefit I may remark that, so far from displaying a • feeling of loyalty ' towards the Prince by following the course of action hinted at, Mr L. do Rothschild could not possibly soleot a more certain method of offending And insulting hica. The owner of a Derby favo««rit '<»« * duty to pwrform towards the public, ami the idea 01 his- giving orders to bis trainer that his horse is not to be ' trained to concert pitch ' could not possdbly occur to anyone who knew anything of the matter. My own most fervenb wish, in common with that of every good sportsman in the land, is that the Prince of Wales may win a Derby as speedily as possible. When he doss so, however, he will win because he owns the bast horse, and that is the only sort of victory which- would give him the smallest satisfaction. It was perfectly certain that the ciroulator of such a report as that which I have quoted above could not pen a dozen lines without displaying his gross ignorance of his subject. He informs his readers that no member of the Rothschild family has been neca^nful in the big Epsom event sinoe Baron Kothuohild won with Favonius in 1871, whereas every tyro in turf matters is uerteotly well aware that 'Mr Acton,' whose Sir Bevys won in 1879, was the norn d$ course of Baron Lionel de Rothschild." To this I may add that the report; of the race doos not look like a "give-away." We have a time record, a close finish, aud the beaten rider breaking a stirrup ; besides, though no such favourable chance of giving-avray has ever occurred in the Derby, there have been plenty of opportunities in other raceo when the Prince has got dished. Strong evidence is wanted to establish suoh. ft tale as this as the truth.

* # * The Oako was won by Lord Derby with Canterbury Pilgrim, whose pedigree, 88 set forth in another column, r^ads something like some of our colonial pedigrees. The present Lord Derby has never previously won this race. His distinguished predecessor, it .will be remembered, scoured the stake the first time it was run, with Bridget (daughter of H«rod), and again in 1794 with Heimioue (by Sir P.ter). Pilgrimage, the dam of this year's winner, was bred by Mr Cookson, and ohe afterward* bename the property of Mr W. 8. Crawfurd, who »ent her first to Hermit and then to Sterling ; and subsequently Pilgrimage passed to the Duch ess of Montrose, who in turn patronised Seftou, Galopin, Clairv&ux, and leonomy (in ouh year), Clairvaux, Isonomy twice, and then Tristan, who got the O*lt6 winner Canterbury Pilgrim is Pilgrimage's teuth foal. Other kn -wa racers from the same mare are Knight Templar, Shrine, Pilgrim's Progri-8% and Mecca. Pilgrimage herself was a performer of no small repute. Racing for Lord Lonsdale, she started favourite for the Oaks in 1878, und was beaten a length by Lord Fal mouth's flyer Janette. The favourite for this year's race was probably the One Thousand winner Thais. She was quoted the day previously *t 2to 1. Canterbury Pilgrim's public credentials wore not particularly impressive, she having beau beaten in each of her four races last seaaou, and she in all likelihood started at a fair price.

*** There is a suggestion that the Viceroy's Cup, the big prize of India, should/be tuned into a handicap. By doing this, says Calcutta's leading sporting authority, the stewards would silence that body of. awuers who are inclined to cry out at' so much-money being voted for the benefit practically of three long-pursed owners. 'It would, further, be produotive of a larger field, for many an owner would be flattered into starting his not quite first-class one if he thought he had a small bit the best of it at the weights with the cracks. OF coarse we all know that weight-f or-age races are instituted nominally with the idea of drawing a better cl»ss of horse into the country, and so improving the strain of blood, but whether the racing stock which is yearly bronght to Calrutta ever does much towards this is open to doubt. Certainly the record of recent years does not support the supposition, for the race has been for che mo*t part won by either mares or gttldings, no stallion having won since Moorhonse won in 1891, and before him Metal and Statesman in 1835 and 1384 Of the mares who have run in the Cup Metallic ba« been taken back to England, and Good Hope has also been sent to the stud at Home. Mmtrbouio, by the w»y, who was bought for the stud, died before he served a reiaiv So that as far an improving the breed i» cim< eruad, the enoouragemnnt U hardly worth proceeding with. W» believe that the time is come when were the Viceroy's Cup turned into a big handicap it would be, what it ought to be, the best race in every way in India ; whereas, though we think the Calcutta Turf Club is right in raising th# stakes, it may, under the preeeut condition*, continue to be a du«-l betweeu the few opulent stables for all time. The average Indian owner cannot afford to pay £1000 for a hone to win 10,000 rupees-, whereas he might afford 5000 rupees or even 10:000 rupees with a. chance of getting in on. favourable terms with; the more expensive horses of his antagonists.

#«* The Age tells us that a smart dodge was tried with success outside the Victorian Cub on the 20th alt. While settling over the previous day's Epsom races was in progress, an iragcrapulons individual overlooked the betting book of a vrell-kimwuppnoiller, and presumably took the names nf several clients who had to pay. The bookmaker moved aw*y from the footpath for a few minutes, and in his itbsnnce the individual, seeing one of the clients approaching, ran- up to him, and drawing out something which looked like a batting book, said, " Oh, Me. , you owe a tenner. Give it to me — he asked me to oollec 1 for him." Not suspecting that the claim was fraudulent, tbe backer, who in noted for the promptitude with which he meets bis obligations, paid the amount, only to learn a Few sconndft later from the bookmaker that h«- had been victimised. It is creditable to the bookmaker that he stood the loss rather than allow -his client to pay twice over.

" *#* A 0A 0 apoplectic attack is said to have been the came of Baron Hireoh's death on April 21. It took plaoe at his residence near Romorni Hungary. From one of the obi vary notices t learn that he was born in Munioh 63 years ago,, and went to Brussels as a boy. Four years after he went into business, and almost at once commenced to display marvellous financial capacity. Everything he touched turned to gold. In 1866 the commercial collapse of M. Legraud Dumonreau, th<* Brunnels banker, gave him his opportunity. He bought the bank with all ifa depreciated assets, including th«< Turkish railway, and at once beoame our of fchi- fir-fc financiers in Europe. His woalth, which was estimated at more than 10 millions sterling, came mostly from Oriental railways. Baron Hitvch married th« daughter of an Antwerpmerchant and Belgian senator named B soboffflheim, who brongh' him a gre*t fortune. He had two children— * daughter, who died very young from consumption, and a son. Lucien, in whom he centred » 1 his hopes for the future. Baron Hirsoh beynn to put by money for his BOofßNtvtibfljMooieat of his birth.. Ho paid

over to bis account a great part of the profits of his speculations and industrial undertakings, and when the young baron died, at the age of 20, he had in his father's books a fortune exoeeding four millions sterling This sum the bereaved parent resolved to devote to charities and foundations in the name of deceased, pledging himself, so it is reported, in 1891 to expend on oharity three millions sterling. The Baron registered his racing colours in 1889, and he entrusted his horses to John Porter. Be began In somewhat modest style with a few animals purchased at the Newmarket First Spring meeting, when the stnd belonging to the late Mr -Robert Howitb was <lisperM>d and bis first yearling was a colt by Si>rinpfi-ld out of Lady Binks, for whom he pu.id 950 gn at one of the Hampton Court sales, but who turned out a failure. Soon, however, he launched out in far more "extensive fashion, aud paid a very big prioa for Vasfctas after that colt had won the Grand Prix. Never was there a more unlucky colt than 'his. He seemed fated to be near, but never to be tirst until he pulled off the Chester Cup. Nofchnsg daunted, howerer,»Baron Hirsob continued to buy bloodstock very freely. An investment of 1050jr« for the two-yoar-old Erica, and another of 3000gs for Isolation, a filly by Isonomy out of H^rmita, did not turn out by any means happily. Romance (1950g5), by Hermit or Galopin oufc of Burgundy, earned a br«okefc or two ; but the outlay of 5500ga for La Fleche was a really good speculation, and the giant colt Watorcress, by Springfield from Wharfedalfr, more 'ban paid his way During the six seasons the Baron was racing he won £58,832 sa. He was interred at Paris.

<f # # Mr Phil. Gleniater, cornered at Adelaide by a scribe, talked as follows t When Chester won the Melbourue Cup in 1879 I backed Savanaka, the favourite, for £43,000 without leaving the room in one night Firat Water, which ran second in the Melbourne Cnpin 1883. was backed for £60,000 in Sydney, the late Hon. James White's Martini-Henri beating the Adelaide oandidato. When nix years ago Carbine won. the big Cup of the spring I bucked the great son of Musket for £40,000 altognrher, and in the interest of the owierl took the nice little wager of £21,800 to £1020. Highborn, who ran second to Carbine in that year, was heavily backed. I have often taken wagers to the extent of £20,000, and in the year Nad a was vanquished tor the greatest race in Australia I backed her for £33,000. In 1876 Briseis won the treble — Derby, Cup, and O-l«— though but for a glimpse th-it Mr Gleuister gpt of NowmUmter after & g-illup, when ho noticed that; the colt had broken into a nasty black sweat, the filly would never have started for the Derby. As it was they had som* difficulty in getting Mr Wilson to send her, and his ultimatum' was t "If you can get me 2000 to 100 she starts." Up till the last moment the stable connections would hear of nothing but Mr Herbert Power's mare Feu d'Arrfiee, who had beaten Bri?ei* every time they were tried at two miles. W hen everyone else was satisfied as to the superiority of the five-year-old Mr Wilson alona wavered. " I can trust what I have bred," was his argument. " I know what our: own are, but I know little of this other mare." And so firm .was his faith in Briseis tbat on the night before the race he wired to have her' baoked to win £2,000 for Mr Power. " It's no use telling him she's better than his mare," he explained, " and I shouldn't like one in the stable to win and he not on it." When Mr Glenistor told Mr Power that night that, fen had backed Briseis to win him £2000, he added by 'way of explanation, " The old man said I was to do it," and the reply was, •• Whatever the old man says is right."

*#.* Bright and genial weather favoured the Sydney Turf Club's Birthday meeting. Of the jhalf-score who started in the Hurdles three fell, the favourite (Mountaineer) coming down at the last fence, and Thor, belonging to Mr Kelso, galloped home a winner. As this horse's previous displays had been very moderate, he creatgd a bit of a surprise. Sixteen started for the Royal Stakes, of 200sovs, six f urlougu, and a firm favourite was found in Mr M 'Sweeny's three-year-old filly Akarini (pidgeon Maori for " Auckland "), who stood at the bottom of the card at 6.8. This filly, a daughter of the Melbourne Cup winner Mentor from "that flying mare Mitrailleuse, was heavily baoked by her party, patrons of the Kelse stable, who of course were in good keart and had something to play up with after Thor's success. Collaretfe 80, by Castor — Necklace,, made, the running up to the distance, ..where Akarini flashed past for a clever and decisive win by a length and a-half from Patrons 7.12, whilo closely packed behind these wera a whole orowd, consisting of Hurefc 7.12. Collarette 8.0, Buroka 7 4, Ponse-a-moi 70, GteudMtuon 7 13, Thespian 7 12, Attachment 90, and Pharamond 7.13. All this mob rushed pasted past the judge in a pack, and he was smart if ' he picked out the right ones for placos. Akarini's time was lmin 17oeo. Of the remainder of the racing that day it is sufficient to state that Wakawatea, who is still honoured with thumping weights in welters, finished one nf the la*t in the Am a tour Welter, won by Vagabond 10 6 after a good race with the favourite, Little Agnes 12 9 ; that the Auoklander Ballyhooley refused in the Steeplechase won by the Aucklander Othello, who started at 7 to 1 ; and that the Turf Club Handicap, a mile and a quarter, went to the light-weight of the party. Cooee, a son of imported Agamemnon and The Echo, his starting price being 10 to 1, while the favourite, Newcastle 8.2 at .3 to 1, finished third behind The Meddler 7.10. Ruyal Rose and Cartridge were among the beaten crowd. Od the second day Thor won again in the Hurdles, and, despite his rice of a stone, he fairly romped home. In the M»y Stakes, six furlongs, Mr Hardern's Cravat (by Castor — Necklace), carrying 8.0. got away pretty wall and soon established a lead which enabled her to win by half a length from San Maroo 8.3 the favourite. The Birthday Cup provided a really fine coutest from the home turn. At that point Response was in front, but inside the di«tanoe Form and Tbe Captain challenged her, and the last-named won after- a great struggle by a bead. This made the fourth win for Kelso's stable, and he got another turn when M Anton's son Coombewood battled home in the Nursery Handicap. How they do pick winners in some races in Australia. There were 19 starters in this raoe for two-year-olds, and backers took 2 to 1 and got on to the pea in one pop. Mr Hungerford ran a filly called Lady M»rgaret Botreaux, who fiuUhed last. Little Agues, burdened with 12 13 in the Farewell Handicap,, went out a warm favourite and won.

*a* 'L'uruado, winner of the Brisbane Cup, was priced at 5 to 1 when he run the dead heat with' Newbold, the favourite being Young Buckthorpe, who finished third. Music started with top weight. For the Leger, run the previous day, there were four runners, and very little indeed need be said of th« raoe, remarks the Sydney Referee's correspondent;. Ou the strength of the good gallops he had been doing there were a few (und I must confess I was amongst tht-m) who thought that' the Archie — £*p Blue Bell colt Daln&ir had improved jufli-

oiently to down Black Diamond, but the black colt had things all bis own way from start to finish, and won without an effort in 3min 20aeo, whioh was Bsso slower than Young Buckthorpe's Leger time last year. Faba, byZingara— Mws Bean, was the nearest to the favourite all the way to the last quarter-mile, but here Daluair and Eventide beaded him, and Dalnair beat the filly for bhe 20sovs second money. The sucoess of Black Diamond can hardly be said to have been popular, for because of some sort of schoolboy fall-out between the owner, T. Gallagher, and one of the dub's officials, the former has stated his intention to have nothing more to do_witiß the olub. When he won the Darby he said he would keep the colt to win the Leger, and then the olub could go to heaven for all he would ever have to do with it again. Under these circumstances it was perhaps no wonder tbat no one oared to take the trouble to pnt the red ribbon round the handsome winner's neok, and that not even the semblance of an applause was ruised.

*** I saw Mr Mace, of Christchurch, in town the other day, and enjoyed a quiet chat with him about trotbing matters, concerning which he is decidedly an authority, being a breeder who is not afraid to open his purse in order to secure his pick of the blood, and owner of an establishment; at New Brighton which is one of the sights of the place. I hope to pny it a visit one of these days, and see some of the standard bred young stock, of which Mr Mace is properly proud. Among these youngsters, by the way, is a filly by Del Paso (the Hon. G. M 'Lean's stallion) from Brooklyn's dam. She should be fast, for in ' the opinion of many judges Del Paso is the ' best-pedigreed trotting horse in the colonies, and Watlaas must be good goods when she is able to produce such a horse as Brooklyn. I understand that it was on Brooklyn's account that Mr Mace came south to make arrangements with James Allan to travel this stallion in Otago during the coming season. This matter is settled, I believe, aud breeders who are in possession of good trotting mares will have a chance to send them to this particularly eligible horse, who boasts of an undeniable pedigree, and is himself a racer of considerable repute I myself have seen Brooklyn on the track, and can vouch for his general suitability as a covering stallion.

%* Drizzling rain and greasy going were the circumstances attending the Queen's Birthday meeting; in Melbourne. Backers pounced on Mr Miller's Leslie as worthy oU2 to 1 chance in the Hurdle Raca, and this nix -y ear-old won from end to end of the race Geometry, on whom Brewer took the ride, seemed dangerous at one stage, but fell, giving hie jockey an ugly spill. There was a field of 17 for the Royal Stakes, six furlongs, and- in a crowd of commoners such a* they were the talent found themselves puzzled for a pick. Th«-y eventually selected Beau Brummel (8 4) and Eureka (7 9), and with the first-named of the pair (hey got a capital ran which sufficed to l«nd the horse second, a couple of leugbhs tighind Emon-na-Knuck 8.3, who started at 18 to 1. Dart, honoured with top weight of 12.1, made no show in the Steeplechase, much to the disappointment of those who had made him 1 favourite. The winner turned up in Confusion 10.4. who went out at 7 to 1 and won by h»lf a dozon lengths,^ Mikado II finiuhing third. Backers got square, however, on the Birthday Handicap Th«y had the pluck to take sto 2 about Lochiel'e son, The Chevalier, in a field of 20, and this time the good thing came off. Tho Chevalier 7.11 was the flrat to make a move from Culzean 8.7 and Wolf 71. Along the back Alone 6 7 deposed Culzean of the lead, Tb^ Ohevalier being n«xb. nhen Wolf, Brl King 9.8, Disparity 9.7, and Disfigured 9 7 At the abattoirs Alone and Wolf were together. Disfigured appeared very dangerous at the distance, where The Chevalier challenged her, and, holding out the longest, won a splendid race by three-quarters of a length ; Straigh fire 8.4 a length of! third, Wolf fourth, then came Erl Sing, Galant 7.2, and Disparity. Time for the mile aud a-quarter, 2miu 13Jseo. The final event, the Two-year-old Haudioap, was won by Boston, eon of Boz and Peerage.

#** Not many people, perhaps, know that the Toieri Club hns been having a bit of a job in the financing 1< o It is a matter that has not come murli before the public. To tho parties inimc'i c y conenrnrd, however, it has been some trouble, now bappily ended, I am glad to say. The details are not; of general interest, and of them it will suffice to say that the stewards who became responsible to the bank for the overdraft have bought the oouraa and relieved the club of a liability. So far as the public are concerned, it all means that the club, not A 9 a club, but virtually the club, has purchased the property, aud the management are now free to wire in safely with whatever improvements may be possible as .. funds come in. There is, I believe, a future before this club. Some folk seem to think that if the D. J.C. goes out there it will do the Taieri Club haim. How that can bs I do not know. On the other hand, the D J.C.s meetings being held at the Taieri will rathe> educate the people to travelling out there. The only thing is that there will be the greater necessity for the Taieri Club to put up a stand and provide some accommodation for ladies. I bolieve, however, that this will all come in good time. The club is only just beginning to lift its head out of the water, and we cannot ask it to do too much till it feels its feet.

*#* Mr Barr-Smith won the double at Adelaide. We heard by cable of his lauding the Birthday Cup with Destiny, and it appears from tha full details that he pulled off the Oity Handicap on the firat day with the English-bred horse Mostyn. The stable thought Destiny had a show, but, the pair getting badly off, which was an important disadvantage in a Beveu-fur-long race, Moityn proved the more, reliable, as, after worrying throngh a large Bold, be fought out a battle with Homespun and won by a neck, paying £9 3s. For the Cup, on the second day, Trentham 7.11 was a most pronounced favourite, his price in the maohine being * to 1. Hova 10.3 eanae next at 6£ to 1, while Port Admiral 8 8 carried most m«tal ot the Adelaide horses, end was quoted at a shade under 9 tol. Detttiay 7 6 was comparatively neglected, and when he won, in the fair time of 2min 4-Osec, bis baokers were rewarded with a dividend of £19 lls. The raoo is easily described. Littlfr Dudley 6.7 mtde the running for a little more than half the distance, then retired beaten, and Destiny went along in the lend, increasing it as he went till he was three lengths clear. Acton and Trentham and Port Admiral and Warpaint e»oh came out in turn and tried in vain to oat dowu thtt-outsider ; and the final efforts of Lord Gretville and Lord Richmond" merely sufficed to land them in the inferior places, Destiny winning easily by a length and a-half, while Hova finished last. Lake, who rode Lord Grenville, had been badly kicked by Koran when riding in the Maiden Plate, and was bleeding internally, but despite a suggestion to allow O, Power to ride he declined. He could not do, the h-irae justice at the finish, otherwise good judges think Lord Grenville would h,ave won, Koina, the Uoisa that did the damage^ but wan. %

hie raoe, was got in England, and .'foaled at BtJ Albans. He is by Hagioscope from BonmV Rosette, a mare imported into Victoria by Mr W. R Wilson In August 1892. - After the racs the stewards asked Mr Tennant, owner of Staffa, if he was satisfied with tbe way In which his horse had been ridden by GaU*naa r Mr Tennant replied that he was not, ani said be thought Staffa should have woo, bat as the decision of the judges could' not be reversed by holding an inquiry, be did not wish anyftrrtfc« proceedings.

•y* There are 84 nomination* for the New Zealand Cup, or eight above lost year's total. The well-performed division are represented by Euroolydon, l*sb year's winner ; Gipsy Grand, t&« colt f.ftat many still say would have won ff tow had met with ordinary luck and run kindly; Belli' cent; .winner of the Autumn Handicap, bat » grievous disappointment at the Birthday mee£ ing ; Bombshell, the champion of bis sessoit, who iff bound to be well up among the thre£ year-olds ; C*«ket, winner of the Dunedin Capr Bince whioh time he has been mostly on the re> tired list ; Searchlight, one of the fastest raoer* we have, as demonstrated at Hawke's Bay v* the Autumn; Culvsrin, who woo the Easter Handicap in good style, and forced the wianejf of the mile and a-half raca to stretch herself; Dauntless, the Challenge Stakes winner; Bessie Maearfcby, a noted performer on "the other side*'; The Possible, who, fchougtt a grave disappointment in the Auckland Cup* has good public performances to bis credit ; Bonnie Scotland, hero of the A. J.C. Derby) Mahaki, who a year ago counted as one of tofl best horses in the country ; Brooklet, winner of the Wellington Cup; Anita, the sorprißeworker of the last Auckland Cop; the -erratic but undoubtedly fast Bnracen ; Lord and L*dy Zetland, of spidery physiqoa, bat porfeoj wonders at standing work ; Quilfciri, winner of the Birthday Handicap * r Fabulist, who cawtured the Auokland Derby. In this lot quality is very fairly represented. Besides these there are a orowd of promising possibles — such as Black and Red, Irish Twist, Lorelei, and New Forest, — of which the best has not yet been seen ; ana the three-yoar-olds include a likely crew in ' Lord Rosslyn, Armillb, DffUnoe, Epaulet, and Antares. As usnal| a few names in' the li»t are of horses whose qualifications sewn doubtful* but I do not think the "siok, lime, and lazy" division ia a strong one. > Mr Henry's handicaps will soon provide us with oox winter job of dis> cuising the prospeots.

*^* It is happily rate indeed that cams 0* ringing in are heard of in Booth Australia, remarks the correspondent of the Sydney Referee, but one hat come to light, and title participators have, as the Mikado would say, met with punishment whioh fits the crime. At the .Yankalilla races on March 17 last, the Maiden Plate fell to a horse which raced under the name of Lo<d Boxfcon, and who had been nominated by J. H. Ecniban, of ReynrfU, as ft chestnut. The animal in question which won turned out to be a brown, and it was said that he -was identical with Revenged, who, by the way, had run at the Port Adelaide fixture three days before that. The matter came before tht S A.J.C., and that' body called upon Eenihan and J. O'Dwyer, the latter being the owner of Revenged, to sh»w why they should not be dealt with Neither,, however, appeared on the first sunim na, bat evidence was taken, and it was ascertained among other fcbiogs that Revenged had been cold at auction, subsequent to- the inquiry, and that be had been shipped to India. Again the committee oomnnoicated with Kenihan and O'Dwyer and intimated to them that if they failed to appear they would be dealt with in their absence. Kenihan obeyed the SDBimons, and «»kl the horse hf> rw at Ymokalilla was Lord Buxton, and was the animal he had entered for the Maiden Plata. He had bought; him for £6, but did not know from whom he had made the purchase. Tho committee told Kenihwa fch*the would have to produce the florae, and if they found that he was not the same animal that ran at Y»ukalil^ then he would be liable to disqualification for life. He was also informed that he could call any evidence he liked. Eenihan did not, however, follow* this out, but wrote declining to .produce the horse. He admitted that he had incorrectly nominated him, bnt he did not, he said, ran Revenged, as alleged. On Wednesday tha enmraittee came to *. dtoiiion by passing tha following resolution:— "That J. Hi Kenihnn, of Reynella and th*» horn? call*'? Lord Bnxton be. and arc hereby, dfsqualifl-d for ever for corrupt practice*, and that J. O'Dwyer be notified that unless he appears before this committae when called upon aid rebuts the. evidence against him in this matter be will be also di*» qualified.

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Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2206, 11 June 1896

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7,304

TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2206, 11 June 1896

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