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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Hova scratched for Caulfield Cup. — Pied. Harrison is training the Cup colfc Britain.

— Rangipuhi is now being trained by G. Blanche.

— Sortie was one of the best mares put to Wolverine last season.

t, ~; G^ 160 **^ <by Galopin) won the Kempton Park Two-year-old Plato.

— Mr D. M'Kinnon, owner of Scot Freo, is doing a trip in Australia. > — Noyado lately met with an accidont which will lay her up for a while. — Waterbury will not win the V.R.C. National Steeplechase. He is scratched, — ftlemphis, Sister Agnes, Florence, Vendetta, and Fiesole are in foal to Nelson.

— Mr H. Garrett, of Sydney, is Quadrant's new owner. Kelso has the training. — The Washdyke Trotting Club gives £120 iv stakes at its inaugural meeting. — The Upper Wairau and Marlborough Clubs are taking steps for amalgamation. —Mr W. Gannon has had the misfortune to lose the Lochiel— The Orphan colt. — A private wire to the Press states that Wakawatea won a race at Moorefield (Sydney) on Saturday.

— Mutiny 11.0 ran very badly in the Rosehill Steeplechase won by Alarm Bell D.7, but managed to finish second.

— J. L. Brown, of Caigan (New South Wales), has purchased the sire Krupp, by Musket from Crackshot's dam. — Banda, forwinningtheA.T.C Steeplechase, had his weight for tho V.R.C. Grand National Steeplechase raised to 11.1.

— Nightingale's record for two miles trotting is eclipsed by that of Greenlander, who went the distance in 4min 32sec.

— Frank Slavin, now in England, is bankrupt. He owes ±657 and has nothing. He admits having made £1000 at bookniaking. — Trenchant, winner of the A.J.C. Derby, has been sent to his owner's station for a spell of which he was much in need.

— Mr Chaplin, owner of the famous Derby winner, Hermit, is reported to have declared that he never saw a finer horse that Ladas. — Osterley failed to concede 33sec to Prince Edward in a two-mile trot at Aspendale Park on the 19th ult. The time was smin 36sec. — Mr S. H. Gollan's two yearlings, Cuirass (by Maxim— Florence M'Carthy) and Freda (by Maxim — Fair Nell) have left for Melbourne. — The list of Tasmanian winning horses for the 1893-94 season is topped by Bessie Creswick (by Creswick) and Marc Antony (by British Workman), — Weeing Salute weighted for the Grand National reminds me that Mr Reid's filly of that name will have to be re-named. Salutation might do. — Guardsman (by Vanguard— Titania) and Amoush (by Vanguard— Fairy Maid) have been struck out of all engagements with 'the Auckland Racing Club. — Megaphone's two-year-old brother is not expected to carry silk. Veterinary science is said to have been unequal to removing a swelling from his near hind leg. —S. Waddell has brought with him from the north the gelding Esparto, who once paid a big dividend. This horse is five yeara or age, by Vasco di Gama from Toi. — The younger brother to Pegasus has been named Neptune, and the yearling by Nelson— The Maid is called The Master. Major George nearly always selects nice and appropriate names. | — Sporting Roview says that Morag reopened the wound in his leg in the Hawke's Bay Steeplechase, although he cleared all tho jumps without striking, and will have to be spoiled for a time. — Mr John Henderson offers the thoroughbred stallion Taiaroa, by Tubal Cain— Ace of Hearts (imp.), for sale. If not sold will travel the Maniototo and surroundiDg districts. See advertisement. — The Newmarket Stakes is an old race revived, and was established in 1835 as a sweepstakes or 50sovs each, half forfeit, for three-year-olds ; colts 8.7 and fillies 8.2, and' was contested over the Ditch Mile.

— To stop the bleeding of a horse or other stock from a snag or wound, says a correspondent of the National Stockman, make an application of dry manure, and it will stop the bleeding of a wound every time.

— Mr Oxenham's Pilot Boy keeps on winning. His latest recorded performance was on the 23rd ult., when with 9.9 he ran away with tho Juno Handicap, a milo and three furlongs, at Iloschill. Projectile 7.12 was third. — Amongst the horses recently registered under the Trotting Union of Great Britain is Mr J. Wood's chestnut gelding, Our Fred, a pony standing 12hds lin, and five years old. This littlo fellow was bred in Iceland.

— After a short sojourn in New South Wales, J. Nicolson, who trained Dunlop when the son of Neckersgat won the Melbourne Cup, has returned to Flemington, bringing with him two jumpers in Lord Lynn and Frederick.

— Tho recent examination of the bankrupt Earl of Buchan disclosed the fact that he had transferred his estates to his eldest son some years ago, in exchange for an allowance of £500 a year. Tho Earl now earns his living as a jockey. — At the recent dale of racehorses'at Hastings none of the lots were quitted, Kenipeufeldt being passed in at 65 guineas, llenata at 50/ Lady Hamilton at 100, Goodwood at 111, Prairie Grass at 75, Dainty at 50, Como at 40, and Kopere at 25. — Sons of Wellington captured the leaping double at Caulfield on the 23rd ult. Apsley scored in the Hurdle Race, for which Titanic was one of the starters, and Banda put down a large field in the Steeplechase, Darnley being one of the beaten crowd.

— Only six nominations for the Cromwell Derby. Local owners have mostly taken fright, expecting to be out-classed, and outside owners have failed to make a satisfactory response. There are in the six entries the possibilities of a good race, but so far the results are seriously disappointing. — From San Francisco comes tho news that a son has been born to the famous Ormonde. The dam of the colt is Kissing Crust, an English mare, imported with Ormonde. The youngster, which is the first of Ormonde's get born in America, is coloured and marked very much as his sire. — The Canterbury Jockey Club's Spring meeting will bo held on November 6, 8, and 10. The summer date has been changed to February 2, and the autumn gathering is fixed for April 15 and 16. The stakes for the whole season are increased by £500 as compared with last season. — Mr G. Smith's sister to Beadonwell, that had the soft lump on her lower leg, is now nearly right. The place has been treated with hose application regularly and a small blister applied. This sort of thing has almost taken the swelling away, and the mare is apparently sound on the leg.

— The Somerville Stakes, at Newmarket, won this year by Joe Cannon's smart filly, Ariettc, was founded by Messrs Tattorsall, who contribute two-fifths of the stake. It is for horses purchased as foals or yearlings at the sales of the Albert Gate firm, and never fails to attract a large entry.

— The English Jockey Club has adopted the following new rule : " No horse shall be disqualified bolely upon the ground of incorrect or imperfect description in the entry, but the stewards may inflict fines upon, or otherwise deal at their discretion with, any persons responsible for such errors."

— Among the most inveterate gamblers in Sydney are a couple of blind men in a public institution. These men know every horse that runs at Randwick or Rosehill, his pedigree, his age and his performances, though they lost their sight before any of the quadrupeds began to run.— Bulletin.

— The rage in England for chestnuts is even getting bo great that the judges and the public both ignore the old adage : Three white feet, Keep him if you can ; Four white feet, Give him to your man ! V — The costliest whip in the world was made in Massachusetts in 1880 for the late Mr Vandcrbilt. The whip is 7ft long, and made of the finest whalebone, costing 403 per lb. This is covered with an exquisite braiding of split whalebone which took a month to work. The handle is of carved ivory. The cost of the whip is estimated at more than £500.

— Sportsman says that Hopetoun's full sister, Ambition, a really attractive mare, with a good turn of speed, has gone from Tasmania to run in Victoria. Ambition is owned by Mr J. T. Field, who when asked to name a price for the daughter of Proto-Martyr — Pandora some time ago is reported to have mentioned £1500.

— The cable brings us the result of the Princess of Wales's Stakes, of 10,000sovs, run over a straight mile couwo. Isinglass . won, with Bullingdou second and Ladas third. At the weights proidod as the basis for this race Isinglass would ye 9.5 and the others 8.7 each, but penalties are arranged for, and I pannot say exactly what these would bring the weights to. — Pensioner is the second horse that the Bedford Cottage trainer, Jewitt, has lost under peculiar circumstances, for Danbydale diod from heart disease after competing in the Jubilee Stakes, won by The Imp ; and Tommy Loates, the rider of Pensioner, was on the back of tho Prince of Wales's Counterpane, who fell dead after running for the Stockbridge Cup in 1886. — A Wellington man who takes a great interest in horse-racing recently came back from the other side with a really good tip for the Melbourne Cup — The Trier. His friends clubbed together and backed the animal for over £30, and the day after the weights came out they had the mortification of seeing a cablegram in the papers to the effect that the horse had been scratched.— Sporting Review.

— Mr T. George, of Berwick, tells me that his son Dick, the rider, lias gone bliful. This is very sad. The doctor says, although the lad was not aware of the fact, that one of Dick's eyes has been useless for years, and now that the other has failed he is quite in the dark. I am very sorry to hear it. It is supposed that the trouble was caused originally by a horse falling with him in a paddock, — The fashionable cant of the day is to point to the turf as an object lesson in trickery. Yet we find Bookmaker Oxenham racing his horße Pilot Boy to four successive wins on the eve of the appearance of the big spring handicaps, when, if he had chosen to lie low for a month or two, he could have got his horse into the Gaulfield Cup at such a weight as to give him a mortgage over the race.

— The V.R.C. Committee has decided with the view of improving the status of selling races that it be a rcoommendation to members to alter the rule so that a surplus over the selling price of a winner be divided among the club and the owners of second and third horses in the following proportions -.—The club five-tenths, owner of the second horse three-tenths, owner of the third horse two-tenths. — Besides this year's tie between Rod Ensign wnd Shancrotha, the history of the Manchester Cup records two similar instances. In 18(54, when the race was known as the Tradesmen's Cup, Captain Gray's Trust and Mr Wilkinson's Oldminster ran a dead heat, which was run off, with the result that Trust won ; while in 1867 Mr Sutton's Dunsany and Mr R. Osborne's Deceit could not be separated by the judge. In the latter case the stakes were divided. — Sir Modred's stock still continue to do credit to their illustrious sire in America. On the Bay district track, near San Francisco, on May 1, the two-year-old filly Model, |by Sir Modrcd from Gipsy, defeated a good field over six furlongs (the track being very heavy), in lmin 18isec. At the same meeting, the Hobartville-bred colt Tren tola, by Trenton, from imported Gondola, for whom Mr A. B. Spreckels gave 3500d01, won a sixfurlong race in lmin 14f sec. — At a meeting of delegates of suburban and country registered racing clubs held at Melbourne n, trotting association ' was formed. It is to be known as tho Victorian Trotting Association. Mr Thomas Haydon was appointed chairman, and Mr P. Cousidiiie secretary. The objects of the association arc to foster and encourage trotting in saddle or harness, to protect owners and all persons interested in the sport, to hear appeals, and to deal with persons guilty of fraud, &c. — Looking through the Australian Stud Book I came across the breeding of the filly by Boz — Governess now in M'Guinuess's hands. Governess was bred in 18715, got by Lecturer (sou of Kingston) from Grecian Bend, by Troubadour (son of Sir Hercule) from Belhari, by Indian WarriorBlink Bonny, by Egremont. There is, however, a mistake in the Stud Book entry, tho filly being described as a chestnut instead of a grey, and I find that she has a name— Jane Eyre.

— There is a hearty gladsome silliness about the proceedings of the Anti-gambling League which, says the Pall Mall Gazette, we do not pretend to dislike. Thoroughness is pleasing, even when it is directed to a bad end. But it must not be allowed to interfere with the pleasure or the welfare of the lieges. We do not deny the evils of gambling ; we deplore them, and would help the world to avoid them if we could. But there is gambling and gambling ; and only tho wildest infatuation dreams of preventing the less harmful kind. — Concerning Pensioner, late files tell us that he dropped dead after running third to Hombre and Hcremon for the De Trafford Handicap. He started favourite for the race, but never took a prominent part in the contest, and after passing the post he faltered and died instantly. The presumption at the time was that heart disease Was the cause, but a post mortem examination made by Mr Lawson revealed extensivo inflammation of the stomach and bowels, and the cause of this not being clear the intestines were handed to Mr Esk« court, the Manchester city analyst, for examina* tion. The analysis no doubt furnished the basis for the conclusion that the horse was poisoned. T. Loates, who rode Pensioner, fortunately escaped with a slight shaking, and was able to take part iji the next race.

— I am reminded (says the Sportsman's commissioner) that a condemnation of Stockwell blood as soft by no means applies to the Prince Charlie branch of it. Not only is Salvator, by Prince Charlie, the most popular stud horse in America at the present moment, but Lochiel is doing wonderfully well in Australia, and it is pretty evident that he is going to found a permanent family. lam glad to note this, having always maintained that Prince Charlie was the best horse I ever saw, while for gamencss and soundness of limb he and his sons have never been surpassed. The way in which the "Prince of the T.Y.C." and his family stood their work is the more remarkable on account of their being big, heavy horses, but there was no such thing as breaking them down.

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IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2107, 12 July 1894

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2107, 12 July 1894

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