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TALK OF THE DAY.

BY MAZEPFA.

*** Tho Dunedin Jockey Club has refused to endorse the Cromwell Tradesmen's Racing Club's disqualification of Lorna Doone. I understand that the merits of this mare were discovered by her pace in a buggy, and that she was handed over to the present possessor to train. There is no satisfactory evidence that she is anything else than what ehe is claimed to be, and from all that has come to my knowledge, I think the metropolitan has taken the proper step. So far as I can remember, this is the first time the D. J.C. has declined to endorse a country disqualification. *** On Monday of this week my holiday was spent at the Kaik. The racing was not up to much, the fields being small, but the outing was a very pleasant one, thanks largely te the good management of the club whose stewards are ever anxious to keep up the status of the fixture. The public are by this time assured of decent arrangements at the' Kaik, and the attendance was very satisfactory considering the doubtful appearance of the weather at the time people were preparing for a start from town. Derby, Francotte, and Mountain Maid each scored in turn, and the first-named may be accounted the hero of the meeting, as he showed pace and was very clever in getting round the corners. I hope soon to hear of that bad turn out of the straight being rounded off. It is really dangerous, or would be so with a large field. The club have an eye to it, however, and will effect this and other improvements, I am told, as soon as funds are available — which means as soon as the totalisator is worth having. At present the profits are nil, or next door to it, owing to the competition of the cash fielders. *£* The twentieth Auckland Cup is now a thing of the past, and the stake stops at home, having been kept there through the instrumentality of Msjor George's Pegasus, a son of Nelson, himself thrice the winner of the coveted event. The result was a complete surprise to

everybody. The watchers told us that Pegasus was in no sort of condition, that he had done nothing like a preparation, and that The Workman must beat him ; and the owner did not think much of the colt's chance, for he put only £3 on him in the machine, and wired to a friend afterwards that his pick on the day was Rosefeldt. The trainer,* l have also heard, fancied Ida or Rosefeldt, and these were the two that his colt beat for places. With such experts unable to detect Pegasus's ability, it is no disgrace to us newspaper folk to have missed it. I would not have Pegasus at any price. But my fancy, ' till he went amiss, was his stable companion The Workman, and now that the race is over I think that that judgment was sound. That is the horse that would have won if he had come all right to the post. Our Dunedin pair, Skirmisher and Dilemma, were altogether out of the Cup and everything else. I hear that Skirmisher was a good colt for a mile and three-quarters, and then tired badly. He cannot be himself. I never expected him to win the Cup, but in 6uch a slowrun race as it was he ought to have got home if within half a stone of the form he displayed at Canterbury. With this son of Ouida decidedly below his best, and Loyalty very well, the Derby was a poor race, Mr O'Brien's colt having matters entirely his own way. Pegasus, though able to win the Cup, had no Bhow at level weights with Loyalty. He beat Skirmisher, however, and thus showed what a soft thing he really had in the Cup so far as the Dunedin colt was concerned. I am quite satisfied that this running was not true form. All the, same Pegasus is a smarter one than he was generally supposed to be, and be will probably improve with age. Let us hope so, for the Major is a good sport, and the win of his home-bred colt was, we may be sure, particularly acceptable.

*** The preliminary sales of blood Btock at Auckland last week were not characterised by much spirit. Buyers were probably reserving themselves for the Wellington Park auction, the result of which, it is to be hoped, will come to hand in time for publication in this issue. The six yearlings sent up by the Messrs Alison averaged a fraction over 75gs each. Friendship's colt by St. Leger perhaps fetched his value at 200gs, but 90gs is surely a low price for a filly claiming such breeding as Nelson — Tamora, a threefold Cup winner and a wellpei formed Musket mare, and the filly by Nel- j son from Torment was also a cheap lot. The average was, however, really spoiled by the inclusion in the catalogue of a roan colt whose dam's pedigree is not traceable. It is mistaken policy to put anything of this sort in an otherwise good catalogue. One low-priced lot sets buyers in an economising mood. Among the Messrs Duder's lots was the brood mare Gannet. She is described in the telegram as by Musket, but I have taken the liberty of altering this to Anteros, believing her to be the dam of Brigand. She was a very cheap purchase at 20gs, seeing that she had at foot a foal which is brother to Brigand. Mr Nathan'B rather miscellaneous assortment did not attract much notice, and it seems to me that a chance was missed when a filly bred so stylishly as the one by St. .Leger from Leopold's dam was allowed to be led away at 56gs. The breeding alone is | worth twice as much. 1 note that none of the purchases at any of these sales were on behalf of Otago buyers ; but I should not be surprised if the Nelson — Tree Deuce filly, bought at Major George's sale— where the prices were exceptionally low — found its way to Dunedin. The trotting stock sent across from Sydney by Mr Hordern were much more eagerly sought after than the thoroughbreds, and the very tidy average of 40gs was procured, every lot being sold, at prices ranging from 135gs for a two-year-old colt to 19gs for a gelding of the same age. Trotting is catching on in Auckland, and owners are apparently realising that the days of the promoted basket-carrier are numbered. He will soon drop out and make way for racers bred for the purpose. The sale must be deemed to be very .satisfactory, considering that Judge Beldon and Duke are not so far known in this colony as winning stallions. *** The Oamaru Tradesmen's Racing Club held its annual meeting, as usual, on Boxing Day. It was rather a quiet sort of affair. Backers found the good thing in one in the Maiden, Mr Longfellow's Toxa being quite good enough to win from the indifferent quartet opposed to him.. He waited on Comrade and eventually won with his mouth open. The Members' Plate, for which the sum of 30sovs was given as a stake, thus making a race for horses owned and ridden by members of equal value with the best of the other events — an arrangement which distinctly suggests an evasion of the rules as to added money — drew together five mokes of no repute even as hacks, and in a limited kind of way it was a good betting race, three of the starters being entrusted with some measure of confidence. The actual favourite, however, won. I suppose the public backed the man they reckoned the best horseman. That very clever grey pony Myrtle won the Three-mile Trot, giving Mick , llsec per mile and taking 22sec for the whole journey from Achates. It was a very tidy performance on Myrtle's part, as she had to break Bmin 45sec to win. Toxa and Vanilla were together most of the way in the Boxing Day Handicap, when the latter, who I am afraid is a bit of a rogue, had had enough of it, and the non-favourite went on and won by a couple of lengths from Lady Mac, paying £9. In this result we may find some justification of Pine's riding of Toxa at Palmerston. Tripp rode the horse this time, and could not do anything with him. Recompense for this defeat was afforded Mr Longfellow by the result of the Farmers' Scurry, in which Rangiora, the favourite, was nowhere, the winner turning up in Satyr, who paid £9 11s. Kauroo, though carrying the steadier of 9.12, romped over his three opponents in the Flying ; Phaeton got home after a rather good go with Bondville in the Two-mile Trot, the latter losing through making a couple of bad breaks at a critical stage ; and the day's proceedings wound up with the victory of Puzzle in the Farewell Handicap, this four-year-old mare having matters her own way in the last half mile. Messrs Mason and Roberts worked the totalisator, and passed through £489 for the day.

*** The Reefton meeting this Christmas was exceptionally successful for a West Coast fixture. Racing in that quarter has been for some time past in a rather languid state, but a spurt seems to be possible now, whereat we may rejoice, for there are numbers of good sportsmen in those parts, and they do their best to keep the game going in a legitimate manner. One of the features of the meeting this year was the consistent form displayed by the locally-bred Ahaura, who carried off three of the stakes after a determined struggle in each case. This son of Bundoora seems to be a really formidable racer up to a mile, and he should pay for training for some of the more important meetings. He has the faculty of finishing, and a bit of weight

does not break down his determination. Among the other prominent performers another one was Geraint. This son of Lochiel and Enid, now the property of the partnership that did so well with Liberator prior to the sale to Mr Butler, secured the Cup after a splendid race, the news of which must have been gratifying to Mr Dowse, the handicapper, and likewise captured the Boatmans Handicap, besides finishing second in the Midsummer Handicap. This is a good record, even if the opposition was not very strong. The same owners also managed to annex the two hurdle races, the winner in each case being the North Canterbury-bred Regalia, who was not doing over well on this side of the island. Daisy Clipper, one of the few representatives Sou'wester has trying for him, ran a dead heat with Yon Tempsky under circumstances which show this pair to be about a match at 1-avel weights, and the mare landed the chief event on the second day. I think that England's Pride, one of the competitors in the Produce Stakes, is a son of Exchange, but of this I am not quite certain. If so he is the first of this horse's stock to shape in public. The handicapping throughout the meeting seems to have given satisfaction, and the affair, as a whole, passed off so well as to encourage hopes that racing is about to boom in this quarter.

*** The Manawatu meeting was one of the most successful of the Christmascide gatherings this season. The weather proved flue. There was a large attendance, interesting racing, and extensive betting, no less a sum than £10,720 being handled during the two days by the workers of the totalisator. How on earth do they manage to attract so much money to the machine P King John, one of Mr Redwood's breeding, being by King Cole out of Moana's dam, Wainui, ran the seven furlongs in the Telegraph Stakes in lmin 34sec — not by any means an indifferent gallop. One of those behind him was Variety, who in her two-year-old season was reckoned good enough to start in the Challenge Stakes. The Waikato-bred Oaklands, favoured by his light weight, made a certainty of the Hurdle Race. Spreydon, winner of the Hack Hurdles, is half-brother to Somnambulist by the Australian-bred Country Boy. For the Cup of 250sovp, a mile and a-half, there were six starters. Pill 6.7 was the first to make the pace, but Au Revoir 8.6 went after him, passed into the lead, and stopped there, going so strongly that the race seemed to be over. At the distance, however, Monte Carlo 7.13 made a forward move, and so deadly was his rush that he got past Au Revoir before the latter could be set going at top. A desperate race ensued, and it needed all the favourite's gamencss to make an impression on the challenger, but Au Revoir is a bulldog at that kind of thing, and he managed to get home by a head. Krina 7.4 was a couple [of lengths away. The time was 2min 46f sec — not fast, but the course was rather dull. The Magazine that won the Hack Race is a daughter of Torpedo. Whitiano was so badtempered that his rider dismounted at the post and the horse did not start. Variety got home in the Grand Stand Handicap, paid a dividend of £7 Bs. The stewards held an inquiry touching the apparent inconsistency of the mare's performance as compared with that in the/Felegraph Stakes, but the explanation tendered was deemed satisfactory and nothing further was done. The second day's events resulted in further wins for Variety, Oaklands, Spreydon, Magazine, and Au Revoir. On this bare statement of fact it would appear as if the handicapper had underrated the first day's winners, but on looking through the figures one can hardly come to that conclusion. Variety certainly was handicapped for the Summer Handicap at the weight she got home with on the previous day, but in her second race she had Monte Carlo to meet, and he had pretty nearly won the Cup; Oaklands, the hurdler, was called on to give Caloola 201b extra ; Au Revoir was meeting Monte Carlo on 31b worse terms at a distance rather in the latter's favour ; Spreydon was raised 151b as compared with Lonely ; and Magazine was shoved up to 8.13. Evidently these increases were not quite enough to stop the first day's winners, but on paper they looked sufficient to give the others a fair show, and that is all owners can ask for. *** Of the eight events on the MastertOnOpaki programme on the 26th ult., four were reserved for those horses competent to class as hacks — apprenticed racers we may call them, of whom a goodly proportion turn out fair workmen. One of these races, a mile and a-half spin over hurdles, was won easily by the favourite, a grey gelding called Vivacious, belonging to Mr J. Armstrong. The winner, a son of Puriri, carried top weight of 10.5, and was ridden by the veteran Buckeridge. Pikihuia, the only one of the other starters that seemed likely to trouble Vivacious, ran off. For the Maiden Hack Race there were eight starters, and Mr T. Ray's four-year-old Minora, by Somnus, secured a very easy win, paying £2 19s. In the Hack Handicap, a mile and a-quarter, the public made the ancient Brookfield (son of Mangle) favourite, and he won, all out, by a length from- Makomako, who was receiving 21b. The report to hand gives the time for a mile and a-quarter as a tick under 2min Baec. Let us add lOsec thereto and say no more about it. In the Flying Hack Race Brookfield was again most in demand, but he met his match in the three-year-old Voltaire (son of Master Agnes,', who, in receipt of 261b, got home by a neck, paying £8 18s. There was nothing wonderful about the performances in these hack races, and we are not told of any coming terrors among those that started in them. The Waipipi Handicap of 60sova, a mile, produced a capital finish betwixt Sea Serpent 8.0 and Sedition 7.3, the first-named getting the best of it only in the last three strides. Revolt 8.0, who started favourite, lost his chance by a bad bolt before the flag fell. Dividend, £3 12s. The Opaki Stakes of lOOsovs, a mile and a-half, was rather a soft thing for the four-year-old Kent, by St. George— Red Rose, and hence a brother of The Shah and Red Ensign. He raced for the lead from the jump off, secured it, and held his position all the way, winning by two lengths from Senator, of the same age, carrying the same weight. The winner did the distance in 2min 45§sec. Dividend, £3 193. So little was taken out of Kent that he was able to also annex the Telegraph Stakes of 50sovs later in the day, and I reckon it a good performance, inasmuch as he waited on Revenge, who got away smartest, and smothered him and the rest in the straight. Dividend, £1 15s. The Consolation Handicap, a mile, found Primero, a five-year-old son of The Premier, able to give Princess of Whaleß 81b and a beating. Dividend, £2 19s. Mr T. H. Hill started in a very efficient manner. The sum of £2542 was passed through the totalisator, this being about £700 more than at the last meeting.

*y* The Hastings course was heavy for the Boxing Day races of tho Hawke'a Bay Jockey Club ; no fast time could therefore be made. The new starter, Mr Dove, did not succeed over well, and his method of standing behind the horses was criticised. Other flag wielders may take a note of the fact. In the Weller, for which Freelance 8.10, ridden by Arthur Smith, was farourite, Zaccho first showed in front,

but the brother to Thackeray got to the lead before long and stayed there till the home turn was reached, when Como passed him, and a good finish resulted in Freelance getting up in time to win by a neck. There were only two starters for tho Hurdles, and tho least fancied of tha pair, Vasco, making all the running, won by six lengths. He was receiving 91b from T Roße. The Summer Handicap proved to be a pretty race all through. Scot Free 7.10 and Queen of Trumps 7 8 were the favourites. St. Cecilia 6.10 made the pace in the earlier stages, resigning to Queen of Trumps and Noyade 7.10 1 , who in turn were dispossessed of the lead by Scot Free. At the home turn Dreamland 8 7 challenged the Scotchman and outpaced him in the run along tbe straight, winning by a couple of lengths. Time, 2min 48sec. The Hon. J. D. Ormond secured his second win of the day when Flaneur, who had been left at the post, got home in the Trial Stakes after working his way very steadily through the field. It was a good performance on the part of this son of Miss Rusaley to fight out a finish under the whip after coming out with Prairie Grass at the head of the field. Lyrebird, a half-niece to Gorton, being by St. Leger from the Patriarch mare Lyre, scored the third win for Mr Ormond by getting home rather meritoriously in the Two-year-old Handicap. She carried top-weight and had a bit the worst of the start, yet she dished Tartan by a length, and the latter was well away. Pinrose could not draw weight in the Post Stakes, being 21b short, and the stakes were awarded to Avis. In the Christmas Handicap there was the worst start of the day, just when a good start was wanted, the distance being six furlongs ; and the two that got off best finished first and second, though from the full report it does not appear that the result was due to the advantage secured at flag-fall. As a matter of fact Zanella and Scot Free, .the two referred to, were steadied after rushing away, and Allan-a-dale made the running till the straight was approached, when Scot Free went to the front, and was in turn headed by Zanella, who got up in plenty of time. Goosander, the sister to Merganser, of whom we have heard so much, finished last, and a bad last. Her time has not yet come ; perhaps it never will come, though I believe she really is the making of a good one. The sum of £4087 was passed through the machines during the day. *** At the Christmas meeting of the Southland Racing Club the racing was detidedly more interesting than usual, but the attendance was only fair on the second day and absolutely poor on the next, while tho speculation did not reach anything like the proportions that might have been expected in such a prosperous district as that of Invercargill. Mr Dowse, who was present, gave general satisfaction with the handicapping, his calculations in several instances beating the judgment of the owners ; and Mr Mitchell's starting was very fair. Once or twice he was bested, bnt as a rule he had firm charge of the fields as they came to him in turn, and he always had his wits about him ; wherefore it may be as well for jockeys who go that way to mind their p's and q's. In the Hurdles pn the first day Rebel was made favourite, and in the early stages of the race the onlookers thought that he would go to the front whenever wanted ; but he failed when the pinch came, and Poole did not abuse the chestnut when his chance was gone. Juno was looking dangerous just before she ran off. Silvertail. a grey that used to be owned in Christchurch, outstayed Comeaway, and won rather easily. Aldershot had a ridiculously easy win in the Guineas, and would probably have won with another stone on him. The local representatives in this race are a terribly poor lot* Report, a son of Fusileer. and a fairly good district horse, won the District Handicap with a bit to spare. It was not Billy Brown, the crack jockey, but a local rider of the Dame who rode Remembrance in the Cup. He put up lib overweight. The race was an interesting one as between the placed three, but Conjurer, has gone off badly since the Dunedin meeting, instead of coming on, as was expected, hardly looked like a winner at any stage, and Remembrance, going with marked determination, always had a little advantage of Baybell. j The winner is by Fusileer from Jealousy, by Cassivelaunus — Envy, by Traducer. When Joss came to Dunedin for a recent trot his party backed him spiritedly. At Invercargill they did not put on a penny piece, the only ticket taken on this horse being that held by a man who sold two crowns' worth and then a halfcrown's worth. Foremast looked ragged and stale and quite destitute of muscle, and his days of good records are about over. Paramu, taking it into his head to go, won the Flying from end to end. Napier was the disappointment of the race. He ran sluggishly and altogether very much below the form he displayed at the Forbury Spring meeting. Emperor gave none of his opponents any show in the Selling Race, in wlich the now infirm and utterly-wrecked Mokoia was a starter ; and ' the day's sport concluded with a good go between Dora and Paramu in the President's. The latter bolted a mile and a-half before the start, and having had a race earlier in tho day, he was not wanting so much preparation for his conflict with Dora. This is a fair mare, and might have beaten Paramu even had the latter behaved himself. On the second day Rebel 12 7 was an acceptor for the Hurdles, but Poole scratched him and took a ride on Silvertail, briDging tho grey in a winner with nothing to spare. The Maiden Platers are a very bad lot. I don't know what Mr D )wse thinks of them, but my informant, who saw them, gays that the best of the crowd might be sure of petting the minimum in any handicap at Dunedin. Baybell had no real difficulty, though carrying top weight, in settling the three opposed to her in the Racing Club Handicap. Specton was not very much knocked about, and was able to upset the morefancied Report in the Welter, thanks largely to Tom Buddicombe's knowledge of the game. The favourite's party were very much disappointed. Thinking they bad a good thing, they backed it more spiritedly than any other local horse was backed at the meeting. Oreti's big dividend in the Two-mile Trot went chiefly to strangers. The owner held a half ticket only. In the Shorts the unlucky member was Paramu. He lost ground at the start and was run wide by Emperor at the turn, while Reflection, who was improving with every race, was smartest away and roused along every inch of the journey. Paramu easily beat Napier in the Waihopai Handicap, and the Consolation was a splendid set-to to the distance, where Mariner came gradually away to an easy win. Maßon and Roberts passed £2182 through the totalisator.

*#* English news to hand this week embraces the reports of the Liverpool and Derby meetings. The Liverpool Cop of lOOOsovb, a mile and three furlong?, was run on November 10, and resulted, as the cable informed us, in a win for La Fleche, who in capturing this stake under 9.6 has eclipsed the performances of Sterling and Thebais, who each scored with 9.4 in 1873 and 1884 respectively. There were a dozen startup, Prisoner 7.7 being favourite at 5 to 1, while 11 to 2 was obtainable about either La Fleche or Quiesilum 6.13. The start

was most unfortunate, as with Phooion jumping up in the air just when the flag dropped some of the jockeys were of opinion that it would be a "no go," and Aborigine in particular was a great sufferer. The effort of Gough to make up his ground for the first half mile told a tale, as he was effectually settled more than five furlongs from home. At this stage of the contest, The Jew was sailing along from May Duke, Old Boots, and Quantum, with La Fleche in the middle of her field, and quite capable of going the pace. In the straight May Duke and Old Boots collapsed, and then the order of the leaders was The Jew, Quassitum, La Fleche, and Prisoner. If driven for a stride or two a quarter of a mile from home to reaoh The Jew and Qutesitum, there was no doubt inside the distance as to the result, and drawing away at every stride La Fleche then won by a length and a-quarter from Prisoner, who in the last hundred yards deprived Qusesitum of second money by half a length. Time, 2min 24sec. The Great Lancashire Breeders' Produce Stakes, a mile go of 2000sovs, for two-year-olds, resulted in an easy win for Mr Blakt'a Delphos (by Necromancer— Sybil) by a length from Colonel North's Northampton (by Royal Hampton — Gebeimniss). At the Derby meeting Childwick won the Doveridge Plate, notwithstanding his penalty, like a workman, beating CanniDg and two others. For the Cup of 2000sovd, one mile, there were two dozen runners. While at the post Gangway displayed much temper, and kicked Brocatelle severely. Pensioner also was extremely restless, and inflicted a nasty flesh wound upon Raeburn by kicking him in the shoulder. Raeburn 9.0 aud Harfleur II 7.5 were most fancied by backers, and in the result filled two of the leading places, though the verdict went to Best Man 8 4 by a short head after an exciting finish with H»rflour 11, the winner covering the mile in lmin 37 2-ssec. Best Man is by Ormonde or Melton from Wedlock. *#* Three well-known sires have died recently. One of these, Treason, the property of Mr Devonshire, of Pahiatua, was bred in 1873 by Mr Isaac Frceth, got by Traducer from Lady Jane, by Riddlesworth from Medora, by the Arab stallion Glendomer. This breeding shows Treason to have been half-brother to The Field and Greyhound, who were fairly successful on the turf. None of their names appear in the later editions of the Stud Book, as Lady Jane was not, strictly speaking, a pedigree mare. One of the first of Treason's stock that I can remember was the black gelding Erebus, who, after a somewhat chequered career, came to the Forbury, and was eventually sent south. This horse was in his best days a payable hurdle-racer. Of late, however, Treason had been turning out a fair lot of gallopers — Resolution, Violence, and Rebellion are his get — and his reputation as a sire -was about at its zenith when death interfered. Figures show how Treason came on. For the season of 1888-89 his stock won only £167; the next season an increase to £195 was noted ; 1890-91 found him up to £230 ; then there was a leap up to £742; and last season's statistics as prepared by "Pentagraph" gave him a prominent position with eight winners of £1357. It is a rare experience to find a stallion steadily improving with age, as was the case with Treason, and we must take him to be a better horse than his breeding would have made him out to be. Another death to which I have to refer occurred in the Blenheim district, where Louis dOr was mercifully put on one side in order to save him further suffering. This horse was bred by the Middle Park Company in 1878 and was the first produce of the French-bred Rupee. His sire was Traducer. This breeding makes him full brother to Florin and half-brother to Spade Guinea, Apropos, Silvermark, Exchange, and Merrie England. As a yearling the colt was knocked down to Mr Stead's bid of 4Zsgs, at the sale where Idalium fetched top price of 1025g5. Louis dOrs first and only race as a two-year-old was in the Welcome Stakes, in which he was unplaced, the stable relying on -Hinemoa, who was beaten a neck by La Mode. As a three-year-old Louis dOr made himself known by unexpectedly running second (6 3 up) to Grip 8.6 in the C.J.C. Handicap, beating Lady Emma 7.10, Le Loup 9.8, and four others. At the rails the three-year-old looked dangerous, haying been handy throughout, but the lightweight Sturgess seemed unable to finish, and Derrett brought IGrip home by a length. The next day, with Wattie on his back, Louis dOr was unplaced.behind Grip, The Dauphin, and the Peeress colt in the Canterbury Cup, and he went out against Grip in the Christchurch Plate on the tbird day, being disposed of with the most perfect ease. Mr Stead then appears to have parted with the colt, for as a four-year-old we find Louis dOr racing at Marlborough in Mr Redwood's colours. He ran only once, however, being beaten by Liability in the Maiden Plate. After that he was withdrawn from the turf — total earnings in place money, £55— and put to tho stud in the Marlborough district, from which, so far as I know, he never removed. Among his winning progeny [are Lignite, Louis, Miss dOr, Yon Tempsky, Gladstone, Beggarman, and Eupbrosyne. His stock were decidedly promising, and if he had had a fair show -with good mares Louis dOr would no doubt have made a name for himself. The third death, happened in Otago, Revolver (by Musket — Erycina) haying been shot at Ophir as the result of an accident by which one of his legs was broken. This horse was the property cf Mr Lefevre, of Hampden. Revolver was foaled in the same season as Trenton and was of undeniable lineage, but it was not; till towards the end of his career that he paid his way on the turf. As a stallion he was of high value. *** At a full meeting of the stewards of the Palmerston Club held on Thursday" last, tho hon. secretary, Mr Gwynne, opened up a question as to the decision of the stewards in regard to the protest in the Three-mile Trot. Ho considered from the talk and letters in the newspapers that the stewards should make some move in the matter. In bringing up the question he (the secretary) might say he had no interest whatever in the race, and had no axe to grind, but only had the honour of the club in view, and he wished to show the public that the stewards of the club were not so black as some persons tried to make out. He moved the following resolution, which was seconded by Mr Jeffs and carried unanimously : — "That, in view of the general diesati&faction apparently existing in the public mind regarding the decision of the stewards in the protest lodged against Magpie in the Threemile Trot at the late meeting, and seeing the owner of Magpie is desirous of appealing to the Metropolitan Club againbt the said decision, but ia debarred by the rules of racing from doing so, and the stewards beipg willing to have their decision revitwtd so an to meet Allan's wishes, hereby agree to submit, if desired, the evidence taken in the matter to the secretary of the committee of the Metropolitan Club to say if tho decision given was a just one or otherwise ; and that each steward voting for the upholding of the protest bo requested to take an affidavit that they had no interest whatever in the race."

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TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2080, 4 January 1894

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2080, 4 January 1894

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