Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TALK OF THE DAY.

BY MAZEPPA. V* Selections for Dunedin Amateur Trotting

Club's meeting to-morrow -. — Maiden, Nell; Novel, Maori Jack ; St. Clair Trot, Beaconsfield or Myrtle ; Spring Handicap, Native or Jane; Electric Handicap, I'M?.

*** I hear favourable 'reports of a new starting apparatus which is to be tried inMelb A sort of shutter is let dovv-n from an overhanging bar, the horses aro backed up to it, and when in line, iheir noses touching the shutter, up it goes and the horses get away helterskelter. Mr D. O'Biien, who saw the affair tested, thinks a lot of it, and I hear that Mr Hordern's trainer (Day) is so impressed with the practicability of the notion that he has expressed his preparedness to advance a trifle towards the expense of introducing ib to general use,

*#* Jack Poole's gratification at winning the Hurdle Kace at the Forbury yesterday was somewhat qualified by the knowledge that for once in a way his friends were not in the good thing. Some trainers would consider this a stroke of luck, but Jack has no objections to others sharing with him to a moderate extent. The reason they did not do so on this occasion was simply that Poole himself believf d Rebel could not win, aud said so beforehand. As a matter of facb I believe the vet. was twice out to the horse in the two or three preceding days. That Rebel was able to last out against Magpie's rush shows him to be a really good one. He won on the point of staying. Magpie, some think, would have been more dangerous had he come earlier, but I think that Holmes knew what he was about. The early part of the Maiden was run so slow that I thought Errington would have a say at the finish. Such a hope, however, proved groundless. Aldershot went away from him as he liked ; and Aldershot is no wonder. I think Errington is best over about six furlongs. Brin, the Captain Webster geldirjg, ran very green, but he has a nice way of shiltiDg himself, and will do better later on. At the entrance of the straight the Otago Cup looked to be a good thing for Response, but she cut it badly when piuched, and Skirmisher swerving at one of the marks on the course just about the distance, Prime Warden ran home an easy wiener. He was ridden a waiting race in front, and that is how he goes besb. Skirmisher often jumps the mark referred to even in his work. It was there wheie he fell as a two-jear-old, and he remembers it. Rangipuhi was off his feed, they say ; and Clanranald galloped as though he had an anchor behind him, though he was very seriously wanted ; and of the others Liberator was the only one that seemed to be gallopiDg feebty at the finish. He would have preferred a little longer journey. Ambush had the Dunedin Stakes won at the start, but she moved so well that I think ehe might have beaten Pompom from a level send-off. The field were started well behind tho mark, and a couple of experienced timists made the go Imin 2£sec from post to post. Lady Zetland's gameness brought her home in the Federal. Wolf's Crag would have nearly won if he had got off at all well. Finetta broke a bloodvessel in the head while racing in the Selling Race — at any rate the was blecdirg at the nose as she pulled up a long way behind the others. Enfield was very lame on coming back to the paddock. Darolop, the son of Duulop and Dumb Crambo, that got home in the Maiden Two-year-old Handicap, is the colt that came over with Speedwell and was bought afc auction for £38. He is a fairish colfc. M'Uroj's horsemanship had a good deal to do with Maribrynong's win in the Welter Handicap. Further comments are held over till next week.

*#* They say that Loyalty is coming across from Sydney to compete in the Auckland Derby. Perhaps so, but I have my doubts about the correctness of the story. Loyalty is a very valuable colt, worth a couple of thousand at the least, and he will have important engagements at the Australian Autumn meetings. If he were mine he should not cross the water, even if a walk-over in the Auckland Derby were a certainty, at the risk of being knocked out of his chance of those big races in Melbourne and Sydney, the winning of which would mean not only fair stakes, but a nice bit from the Ring and a good sale to follow. Four or five days at sea on the trip dowD, and the voyage back — this is not the sort of preparation Loyalty wants for the tasks in front of him in February and March. I shall be very much surprised if Dan plays that kind of game. He is too cute to act thus. Besides, there is a double reason for wishing to get Loyalty at his very best for the Autumn meetings. He has yet to settle the question of the premiership with Carnage, and maybe Dan is not altogether insensitive to the sentimental as well as the commercial importance of such a contest. No ; I think I can name a likelier winner of the Auckland Derby than Loyalty. His name is Skirmisher. What a surprise the Aucklanders would get if the Ofcago colt were to go up and really meet and beat Loyalty. There wasn't much between them in the Challenge Stakes, when Skirmisher gave weight and had the worst of the luck, and then wa3 beaten by less than a length. 1 think the young Vanguard ought to have won that race. He was last but three to turn into the straight. Still, on latest form, Loyalty ought to win if the pair met.

* # * The Wellington Park catalogue is to hand, giving particulars of the yearlings to be offered at auction at Auckland on January 3. It is the eighth annual sale, and we may take it for granted that, as on previous occasions, there will be present in person or by deputy buyers from the prinicipal Australian colonies, as well as from the racing centres of New Zealand. I should very much like to j^ee a good sale for Mr Morrin. He deserves it, as a breeder who by sound judgment and hard work and enterprise has done a very great deal to maintain the reputation of New Zealand as a breeding place of blood stock ; and there is no eloubt that he will once more receive his reward in a large attendance and fair prices. Buyers who want racehorses that can win Cups and Derbies and those sort of races can hardly afford to neglect the opportunity. It is claimed on behalf of Wellington Park, the owner himself being the authority for the statement, that the value of stakes won by sons and daughters of the mares now located there amounts to nearly £85,000, and, without exception, every mare has foaled a winner. Notice the names of a few tiab Wellington Park marcs have thrown. Trenton, one of the best horses the colony ever produced, a good winner and a very valuable 6ire ; Nordeufeldt, whose name is onjy less distinguished than that of his mighty sire ; Stralbmore and Zftlinski, Mr Wilt>on's ''piir of nice buggy horses"; Martini-Henry, winner of V.R.O. Derby and Cup ; the never-to-be-forgotten Goldsbrough ; to say nothing pf Stepniak, Hilda, Rubsley, Cuirassier, Crackshot, and so on- 59 of them. Last autumn I had the pleasure of a walk round the farm and then saw the foala that are now announced as yearlings, and I must say that I was very greatly impressed with their appearance. Our Auckland correspondent will give some particulars as to the leading lots, and perchance drop a word or two of advice to buyers. My task is therefore a very simple one. It is to ask all who think of having a shot at the sale to make a special mark in their memorandum books as to the date. Auckland is a charming place for a holiday, and those who can manage to make a trip to the tale will be well treated, I cau assure them ; but i£ a personal visit ia not possible there are men there who can be relied on to undertake commissions.

*^* How Patron won the Canterbury Plate. "Freelance" has a story on the subject. A well-known Sydney commissioner, whose 50 years' turf experience has endowed him with a knowledge of the points of the game, backed Patron to win a good stake for himself, executed the 6table coninussion, and then abktd the

owner of the colt fco allow him to give the jockey his instructions how to ride the race. Permission was accorded him, and he told Power to " get a good position to the river turn, then rush to the front, and ride him home for the next mile and a-half like fury. They'll think you are making the running for Portsea, and they won'b be ia such a hurry to go after you." Power carried out these instructions to the letter until he got to the home turn, when, finding that Patron was going so strongly underneath him, he took a slight pull, and, coming a second time, fairly beat Loyalty home for pace. Another writer in the Sportsman reminds us that at Sydney, in 1888, Power worked a similar dodge with equal elf ect. The Australian Peer was in the Randwick Plate, and Power had the mount. Wy combe, ridden by M. Dunhey, also the property of Mr W. Gannon, was likewise engaged, but being the outsider of the party, he was sent along from the start for the purpose of making a pace for the colt. The consequence was that Power's opponents, T. Hales on Abercorn and J. Fielder on Lamond, quite ignored Wycombe, and shepherded the Victorian jockey's mount, and it was not until the race had been practically won by Wycombe that they found that ihey had been sold by The Australian Peer's rider.

*4* Some important transactions in blood stock were registered at the Newmarket sales in October. The elistinguished brood mare Geheimniss, by Ro&icrucian oub of Nameless, was knocked down to Count Lehndorff for 1550g5. Lord Durham took Lady Primrose for 850gs, and at 50gs le^s the stallion Goodfellow became the property of Count Louis Esterhazy. The disposal of the late Lord Calthorpe's stud drew a large and influential company to the Park paddocks. The Prince of Wales purchased two lobs — Marie Antoinette for 150gs and the two-year-old Nada for4oogs. Of the brood mares, Seabreezs was secured by Lord Rosebery for 3600g8, while among the stallions Satiety ran into four figures, being taken by Mr Forest Tod for 5000gs. There was considerable competition for the three-year-old Buckingham, who at 3400gs eventually became the property of Captain Machell. These prices were hailed with satisfaction by interested observers as indicating a recovered tone in the market. In France, also, there was a good result when Mr Lupin's stud was offered. One of the most important lots in this catalogue was the well-known stallion Xaintrailles, who has been the most successful sire of: the season in France, ay.d he was Bccurcd by M. J. Lebaudy for £8000. Of the brood mares, Yvrande was purchased by Count Lehndorff for £2120, and Brienne went into the same hands for £1280.

*#* The death of another celebrated racehorse is reported. Fryingpau died at Foxlow, New South Wales, on the day after the Melbourne Cup. This horse, says "Terlinga," belonged to the late Mr William Pearson, and was racing constantly for four years. He won the V.A.T.C. Foal Stakes as a two-year-old, and in the following season took the Guineas aud ran a dead heat with Segenhoe for second place in Navigator's Derby. Next year he won the Victorian Club Cup and Bookmakers' Purse on the same day, his weight in the last race being 10.1, and in the Newmarket Handicap Mr Barnard gave him 10.8. At the V.R.C. SpriDg meeting, when five years old, Fryingpan carried 9.7, and won the Van Yean Stakes. At the same meeting he accomplished a wonderful performance in the Veteran Stakes. A storm of rain came on before the start, and Power and the Pan were out in it all. In the race Kit Nubbles and Mr Pearson's horse came right away from the field, and Kit just won. Fryingpan weighed out 9.4, but ov/ing to the mud and rain, Power turned the scale at 10.1 when the race was over. Mr F. F. Dakin, who trained the Pan for all his races, considered that he improved in staying with every year, and he had hopes of him for a Melbourne Cup, but the little fellow was wanted to make a pace for Commotion in the Champion Race of 1885, and after cutting out the work for two miles he broke down, and never raced again. While at Kilmany, Fryingpan got Fortunatus, but Mr Pearson was not in love with his stock, and he was sold to Mr Ambrose Chalk. AS this gentleman's death he was sent to auction, anel W. Duggan bought him for Captain Osborne for HOgs.

*#* Horrible weather prevailed for the Ashburton Trotting Club's meeting last week, Heavy rain lasted all day, spoiling the attendance, converting the track into a swamp, and making good tests impossible. The money passed through the totalisator by Mason and Roberts was only £330. In the Maiden, a mile and a-half, they made Pardon lOsec favourite, six of the starters bsing absolutely unbacked. Mr R. M'Donnell's grey mare Alyth 12sec won easily from Myra lOsec, pacing £7 11s. The same mare won the District Race, two miles, later on, from a start of 40sec, beating Victoria II 26sec. On this occasion Winnie 40sec was most in demand, but could not get a place. Alyth paid £3 18s. The Ashburbon Handicap, two miles, produced a good contest twixt Barney O'Hea scr and Mountjoy 19oec, but the latter managed to hujg out long enough to stall e.ff the Ecratch horse. Her time was 6oiin 13sec, and the dividend £2 12s. For this performause Mountjoy was penalised in the Lagmbor Harness Handicap, two miles, comiDg bic's to llsec, and she had to accept defeat from M. M. 30sec. 3he form was evidently all wrong on the time tebt, but that is sufficiently accounted for by the state cf the track. The Dash Handicap, a mile, was won by lolanthe, who paid £12 16s. The race was run twice. OwiDg to a mistake about the start the stewards decided that the racs should take place again. lolanthe was again the first to get home, but on this second occasion she paid only £1 2s. Broncho Billy Bsrc won the Novel, a mile, and was sold to Mr J. Haseltine at £9 10s. The other starters were Jioamy and Fox, aud the divieleud was £1 "6s. Poo? business all round. Nobody's fault Fine weather would have meant an enjoyable meeting.

*** About 80 horses were catalogued for the sale at Melbourne on the Monday following the Cup, but oaly 18 were sold. The bid of 1750gs for Loyalty was declined, the reserve being 3000gs. It is said that before his defeat in the Canterbury Plate 4000ga could have been obtained. Newman passed into the possession of Mr W. Kelfofor4sogs ; and E. Power secured Warpaint for 4-lOgs. An offer of 375gs was received for Donation, but this was below the reserve, and the horse was passed in. The Dauphine was passed in at 370gs, and other offers refused were 520gs for Beveriey, 350gsfor The Captain, 360js for Euclgeree, 220gsfurLmburn, and 150gs for Penance. Mr R M'Kenna bought Ali There for 190 ( -s<, and accented LOgs on his bargain from Mr W. T. Jones. Sydney Referee considers that Mr W. Kelso got a gre-it bargain when he secured the Newaiiuster gelding Newman for 4-50gs. Though Newman's dam is not known, • sho is certainly thoroughbred, and it is 1000 to 1 it is Benzine, dam of Newtou. There was another sale the next day, to dispose of a number of lots on account of the execute rs of the late William Pearson. The six-year-old Mac, by Veuom — Miss MacAilhui', waa knocked

down to J. Murray for 230gs. Wolf, by Com motion— Quality, fell to E. Power for 150gs. The three-year-old Sioux, by Commotion — Con tessina, was bought by P. Whitty for lOOgs.

*** This week's EDglish budget will repay perusal by those who are really interested in the horse for the sake of the horse and his doings apart from the golden consideration. Two big stakes at Kempton Park are recorded among other results, aud in each the first favourite won from a large field. The first of these was the Produce Stakes, a mile race for two-year-olds won by Lord Alington's St. Simon colt Matchbox, and the other was the Duke of York Stakes, a handicap at the same distance, in which Aiington, who was spotted as a good thing when the handicaps appeared, started at about 2 to 1 and won easily. Last year this race furnished a surprise in the success of Miss Dollar. The Newmarket meeting followed almost immediately. It was largely interfered with by wet weather. The first race, the Royal Stakes, proved to be a very soft thing tor Raeburn, who, despite his 10 b penalty, romped home in front of Masque. A little later the Newmarket Oaks went to New Guinea, winner of the Newmarket Leger. She had only two moderates to beat. The principal event ot the day was the Clearwell Stakes, for two-year-olds, a race that has been won in past years by such clippers as Bal Gil, Dutch Oven, Harvester, and JJdimi. On form, GallopiDg Dick looked a really good thing, but he dtclined to try and was smothered by the Frenchbred Le Nievre, sister to that good colt Le Nicham, who himself won the Champion Stakes the same afternoon. This is a somewhat notable coincidence — a sister and brother in the same ownership winning big events on the one day. Le Nicham had really nothing to beat in his race, as Simonian was lame when pulled up, and Lady Caroline is being difched wherever she goes. Ail the same though he was beaten in the Lowther Stakes by La Fleche next day. He is a worthy addition to the list of champions, of whom there is now quite a lengthy list, including such heroes aa Rayon dOr, Robert the Devil, Bend Or, Thebais, Tristan, Paradox, Ormonde, Bendigo, Friar's Balsam, Amphion, and Orme. What memories of gallant struggles these names recall.

*** For the Cesarewitch, on the second day of the meeting, there were 17 runners. Only twice previously has there been a smaller field for the popular long-distance handicap — viz., in 1839 (l.he inaugural year), when 10 started, and in 1882, v^iien Corrie Roy won from 13 others. Latest bsttiog developments left Molly Morgan first favourite from Red Eyes. The former ran disappointingly, but Red £yes, who had by her Goodwood Stakes victory shown tho possession of the gift of staying, lasted out a ding-dong fioish well enough to make a dead heat of it with the outsider, Cypria, who had not before earned a bracket. Lady Rosebery, hardly expected to last the course, ran third, while Insurance, second a twelvemonth ago, struggled into fourth place. This makes the third dead heat in the history of the Ct?arewitch. The first was in 1857, when Mr Ten Broeck's American-bred filly Prioress (4yrs, 6.9), Mr W. Robinson's El Hakim (3yrs, 6.9), and Mr Saxon's Queen Bess (3yrs, 4- 10) tied for first posilion, aud on the trio going to the post a second time Prioreeß, in the hands of the late George Fordham, beat El Hakim by a length and a-half. Prioress the first time started at 100 to 1, and in the run-off the bsHing was 5 to 4 against El Hakint), 9 to 4 against Prioress, and 7 to 2 against Queen Bess. The second dead heat for the race happened in 1859, when Sir W. Booth's Artless (3yrs, 5 3) and Mr T. Parr's Gaspard (3yrs, 6.9) passed the post locked together, and a second trial beiDg decided upon Artless won by three lengths, with 6 to 5 betted on her. In the first instance her starting price was 25 to 1. Curiously enough, in the intervening year (1858) Prioress and Brewer ran a dead heat for second place behind Mr G. Lambert's Rocket (3yrs, 6.4), who started at 14 to 1. On the third day of the meeting there were but seven runners for the Middlepark Plate, just half the number that went to the post last year, and Ladas, with 5 to 1 betted on him, easily sustained his unbeaten record. Lord Rosebery has now been the recipient of the Middlepark Plate twice, Kermesse having woh for him in 1881. The stakes amounted to £1935, the smallest sum since the race was instituted in 1866.

*#* Sydney SportiDg Gazette has interviewed Toby Moran, who rode Carnage in the Cup. This young gentleman tells a stirring etory of the race Irom his point of view. How did I lose the race ? he says. Hanged if I know? I only know one thiDg, and that is that both I Carnage and me was dead licked when we came !to a struggle with Tarcoola. I never thought anything would catch me when I left Newman aad that lot below the distance. Lord love you ! I knew I was taking a lot out of my horse, but what was a fellow to do ? I was on a good one ; he wanted to gallop and seemed untiriDg. so when I found I had a good shop I just kept him there, for God knows what would have become of my chances ii I'd got once back in that ruck. Why, 1 could hear 'cm yelling at one another and cursing, and letting go all routd, away behind, and some at least had all chance destroyed by the way they got hedged in. You can bet one thing, and tbafc is, that had Loyalty had Tarcoola's chance he'd have won the Cup They settled him ail right, but none of them drcameel Tarcoola could win, or perhaps he would cot have been left such a nice clear courfe. Yes, I led pretty well all the way, and, if you ask me, it was my only chance. I knew what I'd get if I didn't keep in the front rank, and though I just got done, you could not have kidded me I should when I shook 'em all off only a distance from home. Lovely ! Why, ib looked a monto, and I wa.s shaking hands with mjself and saying, " Toby Moran, you've won your Cup." I was not able to tea behind me, buf; I coulel toll tint Eomethiug fre h was corning afc me vtry fast, and I began to send the colt along. Before that he'd taken his own pace, and I could no more stop him than I could hold a locomotive. He answered at once, like the grand horse he is, but I could still see a bay head and neck come sneaking up, and I rode for my life, and brought my whip into play. The colt bounded under me, and for a moment I thought I would shake my adversary off. Then my horse gave a sob and lurched under my riding, and just as Tarcoola got level I saw Jeweller also at me. Of course I flogged, acd C -ri age aii'ual y drew out again, I should say a neck. Then ho tireel, and yeiuug Cripps, flogging and riding for his life, squeezed his horse home ahead of me about half a length. Je.vfl'ec came so fast that there can't be any doubt but that, had he started his run a bit sooner, heel have won from bath of us, for ho was doing two fe> J t to cur one at the end, and looked quite fresh betide our blown cattle.

V" The explanation of the strange name which Lord Rosebery has given to his unbeateu colt, by Hampton out of Illuminata, is rathe; interesting. One of the first thoroughbreds the head of the Primroses ever owned was Ladas, by

Lambton out of Zenobia. He ran in the Derby of 1869, was ridden by Custance, and started at 66 to 1. These odds must have fairly represented the chance of Ladas, for he fiuished nowhere. Lord Roscbery, then an undergraduate at Oxford, was, however, much disc .imposed by the defeat, especially as he had pub miny friends on to this promising outsider. "I'll tell, you what," he said at a wine party next evening, " whenever I've got a really good horse wibh a prime chance of winning the Derby I'll call him Ladas, and wherever you are, mind you all take the tip and back him." Years passed. Lord Rosebery nearly won the blue riband in 187* with Couronne de Fer, but he was a purchase. 'Twas not indeed till the present year of grace the noble carl had a Darby favourite on which he felt he could safely confer the fateful name. As a matter of fact, he had determined to call the Illuminata colt Hampton Wick, when he suddenly remembered the incident of 1869, and telegraphed to Wttherby, " Call my colt Ladas, not Hampton Wick."

*** Why nob have all racehorses branded ? It would not disfigure them. Lots of horses thab race in New Zealand have brands on them, and no one but those who are shown the marks would have any idea that they exist. Most, if not all, of the sbock bred by Mr M. Studholmo cirry a distinguishing device ; if; is a common practice wibh Tasmanian and other breeders ; and the winner of the last Dunedin Cup is very plainly ma ksd. The advantage of the system is obvious. Once branded with a mark that is known, a horse is fairly easy of identification throughout its lifetin.e. Thus it can hardly be made the medium of a thieving swindle. If the marks were registered the chances of roguery would be still further lessened. I am led to make these remarks by reading now and again of certain horses being suspected of being this, that, and the other. It is generally concerning trotting stock that thesa suspicions arise, but the galloping division are not entirely innocent of these things. We all remember the Warepa case, and two or three later instances point to the need of something being done in the direction indicated. The subject is one that might fairly be considered by the conference when the question of the Studbook comes up for discussion. It is to be proposed, I understand, that this useful and indeed indispensable publication be established on a satisfactory footing. If so 1 would suggest that registration of thoroughbred foals bo made compulsory, and a full description of all natural and made marks. The branding proposal would suitably follow. I have thought over the subject for a long time, and can see many advantages to be gained by following out these ideas, while there is absolutely nothing to be said on the other side. Not the least of the benefits that would follow compulsory registration would be the protection of buyers. An American writer, taking up this subject recently, remarked very truly that without a correcb record of all horses foaled, and full reports of everyi mare in the stud for each year of her breeding career, tricksters, of which there are many, can manufacture pedigrees by the wholesale, falsify ages, and institute numberless other kinds of frauds. Suppose a certain mare has not been reported for eeveral years. What would be easier than for some hharper to slip in a horse for a year unaccounted, and jwho could prove the fraud unless there had been an authentic report of her for that year ? The owner of the mare might never be aware of it, or might be dead or otherwise out of reach, and where would be the end of such fraudulent transactions. IF, on the contrary, every year were accounted for and recorded in a register open to the public, such things would be impossible, and would not be attempted.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18931130.2.88

Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2075, 30 November 1893

Word Count
4,754

TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2075, 30 November 1893

Working