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TALK OF THE DAY.

BY MAZEPPA.

*%* Dunedin horses that were unfortunate at the C.J.C. meeting are doing well since returning to the Forbury. Concerning Beadonwell's accident, Mr Mercer tells me that from all he can make out the colt trod on Thames heels, and that was how his fall was caused. He certainly trod on something in front of him, and Thame, who was at the time in the place where she would be likely to get in Beadonwell's way, had some cut-down marks on her hind legs on rsturning bo the paddock. The colt rose again shortly afterwards and cantered round by Ford's, where he was recaptured. Sam does not blame anyone. It was purely an accident. None the less annoying, though, Beadonwell had run a good mili and a-half at Yaldhurst— 2min 41-2-aec, with his snoes on, and he also shaped well when put against Clanranald at exercise, besides giving The Workman all he wanted at half a mile. It was these trials that made Mr Mercer hopeful of the colt Bhaping well in tho Cup, and now that the meeting is over he feels confident that if Beadonwell had kept right he would have won at least one race ere the gathering was over. Beadonwell is still on the retired list, his near foreleg being slightly strained, and there being yet a lump in the region of the near hock, but it is hoped that the colt will be racing again before tbe season is out. Britomart, the two-year-old sister to Blizzard, has recovered from her shin soreness, and, although the stoppage in her work has put her back a bit when she wanted the galloping, she will probably have a run in one of the shorter races at the comiDg Forbury meeting. She has a cut on her hock, but thSt is only a trifle.

*#* Strange to say, there is a conflict of evidence in regard to Beadonwell's accident. The generally-accepted story is that Response swerved and cannoned against the son of Dione, bringing him down, thus causing interference with Dilemma. It is added by some who were in a position to see that Dilemma jumped clean over Beadonwell, and in doing so was struck on, the upper part of one of his legs by the prostrate horse. Evidence on this point is furnished by the fact that Dilemma certainly showed marks of a blow on the part mentioned when he returned to scale. But one of the riders who was at the time behind the scrum says that Dilemma was never touched by Beadonwell, nor did the latter's fall interfere with Mr Mercer's colt. He says that if Dilemma had Btopped he rnubt have brought down Hippomenes, who was immediately in his wake. The varied accounts show how easily the eye ia deceived. There can be no doubt that Dilemma was stopped by something. One spectator, deeply interested in this horse, and watching him through glasses, says that he was brought to a dead standpom, Mr Paul's two-year-old sou of Wapiti and Legera, who was taken charge of by Bishop to oblige the owner, the trainer being unable to come straight on to Dunedin. Pomstill as though shot ; and there is pretty full evidence that Beadon well's spill was the cause. The more important consideration, however, is that Dilemma is now all righb again. The rest he was permitted to enjoy has set him up completely, and I am glad to hear that there is every chance of the little fellow racing at the Dunedin Spring meeting.

*#* While bringing back the three he took away, Skirmisher, Ambush, and Dilemma, M 'Guinness also took charge of Rangiatea, the son of Souinus and Wairuareka that beat Rosefeldt in the Hawke's Bay Spring Handicap. This is, as before remarked in these columns, a nice stamp of a horee, and 1 am glad to Fee him como to the Forbury. He is to bo trained from St. Clair on behalf of hie new owner, a gentleman belonging to the north. Another stranger broug ht down with the Dunediu horses is Fora

pom is now quartered at Stephenson and Hazlett's stable. Hippomenes, these owners' representativein the N.Z. Cup, has now begun to look himself again, having taken to his feed properly as usual. I scarcely think we shall see this good horse at his best till about Dunedin Cup time, but he is going on the right way, and may score at the Dunedin Spring meeting. Tempest also is nob altogether to be despised for this meeting, though she as well as the gelding will appear to best advanbage later in the season.

*#* The mile record in England was lowered at the Nottingham meeting in October. The three-year-old filly (Dornroschen by Prism out of a KiDgcrafb mare), won the Nottingham Handicap by a neck in lmin 36|sec, thus eclipsing the performance of the four-year-old Juvenal, who, on the same course last March, when carrying 7 2, won the Spring Handicap in lmin 38J sec. Dornroschen's performance also beats that of Bendigo, who, then a five-year-old and weighted at 8.5, won the Lincolnshire Handicap over the mile on the Carholme in lmin 36 4-ssec in 1885. Though a mile, before that year, was said to have bean covered in less time, the statement lacked sufficient confirmation, and the record of Bendigo could then be considered the best authenticated handicap time for a mile in this country. That performance is now beaten. I may remark, for the guidance of those who may be disposed to question the correctness of this record, that my authority for the above particulars is London Sportsman. If any doubt existed as to the accuracy of the timing, or the measurement of the course, this journal would have come reference to the matter.

*#* It is the fashion in some quarters to profess to altogether reject time as a test of merib. This is not warranted. We find our best trainers very particular about the accuracy of their watches. It must be confessed, however, that clockiDg is by no means a safe thing to rely on alone as a means of finding which horse is the best out of a given number ; and the watch by itself is also ot no use in telling us which hor&e in a list of winners should be adjudged the most meritorious. I am led to these reflections by a moment's thought about the records made at Christchurch the other day. We read of Warrington and The Workman winning at a mile on the same day, carrying practically the same weights, and Warringbon'd race is the faster of the two. Put these two horses together by themselves, at level weights, and where would Warrington be ? Again, Ich Dien won the Oaks in 2min 39sec. A splendid performance, all must admit ; but how was it that such a moderate as Busybody was able, with 8.10 up, to live with the winner up to the distance ? Mr Harris's mare has never shown any ability to carry weight, and still, with a steadier up, she keeps goiDg for over a mile and a-quarter at a pace which enabled the winner to break the record in the Oaks. Marvellous, if true. And this same Busybody is afterwards decisively beaten at Wellington in a mile race, wherein she is meeting distinctly secondclassers on equal terms (an ex-hack being the winner), and also in a six-furlong race, in which Rebellion was conceding Ist 3lb. What sort of show would Sea Serpent have at a mile with Ich Dien ? None, I 6hould say, at any weights ; yet he does not allow Busybody to get a place at Wellington, while at Riccarton this filly creeps up to Ich Dien at the distance. There is something fatally wrong about these Christchurch times — not wrong in the sense that they are inaccurate, but in that they are but an indifferent guide to real form. I may here remark that one of the most experienced timists I know of, a man accepted as an authority on the subject, made most of the races a trifle slower than the official record at Christchurch, but he admits that the discrepancies may have arisen through his watch being nicked at the fall of the flag, while the official took the actual time between the posts. My friend made Roscfeldt's race 3min 29|sec.

*** The handicaps for the Dunedin Amateur Trotting Club's meeting to be held at St. Clair on Friday, December 1, appear in this issue. The first evenb is the Maiden Trot, for which I have no particular fancy, but shall take Coal Queen to beat most of the others. There are several novices in the Two-mile Puny Trot. Leaving these out of the question I take Manton (27sec) and Carisbrook (35sec) to go well. The chief event on the card, the St. Clair Handicap of 70 soys, over two miles, comes next, and if Welcome Lass, with 4-2 sec start, was more reliable she should win, but failing her I like Native or Susan. The Novel should be won by Pirate or Maori Jack. I don't fancy Tommy can give Jane 17sec in one mile and a-half. Jane is very well treated and should win, with Coal Queen and Susan next best. For the one and a-half mile Pony I take Manton or Carisbrook. The final event of one mile looks a good thing for F.F. on her win at Tahuna Park. I shall make fiual selections in next week's issue. Acceptances close on Saturday next, 25th inst.

*.»* Herbert Cripp?, who rode Tarcoola, was escorted to the pressroom shortly after wt igh-ing-in, and there he dictated to the reporters his story of the race. Passing the training track, he said, Tarcoola wus running co strong that I began to look cub fur an opening, as I felt there was a chance for me from the way the horge was going. As we were rounding the bend into the straight for the fiai:«h the field opened out, and I shot up through the opening. Scarcely had I got there when I saw another opporbunity, which I also seized. When I turned into the (straight I was well up in frout The first hor>e I challenged was Vakeel. He was on the inside, aud I saw Loyalty coming on the outside. I had very little trouble in passing Vakeel, and iv so doing lost sight of Loyalty. I called ou Tareoola nearing tho distance* post, and he responded ab oi.e-*, c-howi»ig that he bad enough Lfc iv him for a fiual struggle-. Tlr* only horse then ahead of me was Carnage, and I set Tarcoola to catch him. Carnage was on the inside and was going well, but I rode all I kuew and gradually overtook him. When we were about half a furlong from the winning post we were on level terms, but as soon as I gob abreast of Carnage I knew that I had got him beaten, as I s;nv he did not answer to tbe whip. A second later I was leading, with the winning post close at hand, but 1 kept riding Tarcoola p.U I knew until I had passed it, as I was afraid some horse might come with a rush and snatch the victory out of my hand on the post.

* k * The opening event at the Town ;.nd Suburban Racing Olub'K inctting on Uie 9t,h was the Maiden Plato, a mile, in which Llicy all carried 9 5t. B u-kers selected Flaneur, one of the Hou. J. D. Orruond's team, who was entered for the New Zealand Cup, as favourite, but he was beaten easily by Vasco, a son ot" Vasco di Uania, brlonymg tj a Maori owner. The dividend was £6 18s. There was a boil-over also in the next race, the Prince of Wales's Handicap seven furlonge, this being taken by bhesama

stable with another Vasco di Gama horse, Allan-a-dale, a three-year-old, carrying 7 A. His nearest attendants at the finish were the aged gelding Cold Steel 7.2 and Water Lily 8.2. Chris 8.12 was among the beaten crew. Dividend, £12 16s. Investors made a bull's eye, however, in the Hurdle Race, their fancy, T. Rose 10.12 corning home as she liked from The Joker 9.9 and a fairish field, and paying £3 2s. In the Taradale Handicap of 70 soys, a mile and a-half, the starters were Mystic 8.8, Scot Free 86, Como 79, bt. Malo 7.7 T Zaccho 7.2, and Premium 6.12. St. Mala made a good run when the racing began, but; was worried down by Como, who in turn was beaten on the post by Scot Free ; the favourite. Mystic, finishing a fair third. Scot Free pa;d £4- Is. Jessie won the Meanee Handicap, six furlongs, beating a large field, including Flaneur. The dividend was £10 18s. Then came the surprise of the day, Lobelia beating Vasco at; level weights in the Welter, a mile and a quarter, and returning to her backers the nice dividend of £18 4s. T. Rose, who was giving 161b to both those in front of her, came iv third. The Flying Handicap, a capital betting race, found Avis (by Emir Bey) a winner from Scot Free and Como, at a good concession in weight. Chris, St. Malo, and Spinaway were in the field. Avis paid £9 4. The machine investments for the day came to £3033.

*** Speaking of the first day's rasing at Flemington, " Asmodeus " tells us that Alpine, bred by the Middlepark Company, is a lengthy, racing-like colt. Carnage's victory in the Derby consummated a splendid score on the part of New Zealand-bred horses, and it is a thousand pities that some of the leading equine seminaries in Maoriland, which has given the Australian turf its mightiest giants, should have been devoted to other uses. To hark back to the first of the New Zealanders which proved successful, Alpine only succeeded in getting home after a desperate fight with his countryman, The Possible, a finely designed colt who may later on succeed in turning the tables en Alpine, should the opportunity ever present itself. Close as was the struggle between Alpine and The Possible, it was not nearly so deadly as the subsequent contest between Loyalty and Newman, a duel which was characterised by a display of tenaciousness and bull-dog courage on the part of both contestants seldom witnessed on a racecourse. Other than a dead heat it was about the closest thing ever seen between two horsey, there being just sufficient of Loyalty's noee in front to swear by as they fctruck the line. The writer who penned those observations is not alone in recognising the credit due to the Maoriland representatives. fr'evt Zealand is, in fact, all the rage, and a consignment of well-bred hordes sent over at obcq would probably sell to advantage. Further afield, also, our stock continues to be highly valued. Americans think a lot of anything really representative of the colonies, though they will persist in calling them all Australians. I have juafc come across a few remarks recently made by Mr Marry. He contends that Chester was a far better stallion than LexiDgton, Revenue, or Boston, and that Goldsbrough was the equal of Longfellow, Iroquois, or Enquirer, and he speaks very highly of Neckersgat and Musket. Mr Merry considers Martini-Henry and Carbine superior to any three-year-old ever foaled iv America, and concludes as follows : — I am an American, and as proud of the genius of my countrymen as any other man from under the old flag. But I never allow the prejudices of nationality to run away with my native judgment, and when I say that Australia, settled 150 years after the United States, is 50 years ahead of us in breeding the thoroughbred horse I mean every word that I say.

*** Handsome little Daydream has won another race in England, the Palatine Handicap at Manchester. Particulars are given under the proper heading. Ib will be seen that she had 13 opponents, that she started at 100 to 8, and got home by a short head af ber a tremendous setto. We shall hear more about this mare now. Already one of the leading scribes refers to her as a picture in the lengthy, Bhort-legged type— • such length and power of haunches he does not think he ever saw— and if she should ever land one of the big stakes we shall hear of all tho swells wanting her photograph. There's nothing like success. We ourselves would not have discovered Daydream's beauty but for her winning form. The Manchester race referred to is the second won by Daydream since her arrival in England, her previous success having been achieved at Liverpool last spring, when she won the Hylton Handicap from Bombshell, Rouge Dragon, and seven obhers. Other English results to hand include an account of how Ravensbury at last succeeded in breaking his long sequence of failures this year, by winning the Triennial Produce Stakes at Newmarket, for which 20 to 1 was betted on him, against two opponents, Low Moor and Travesty. He waited on his opponents for awhile, and eventually won in a canter by a length from Low Moor, to whom he was conceding 81's. Then we have the report of the Lancashire Plato, in which, at the weights I guessed at the time the cablegram was received, Raeburn managed to inflict upon Isinglass the latter's first defeat. Raeburn won, according to some authorities, because the race was not run to suit Isinglass. The Derby winner, says one writer, cannot make his own running. In the JVliddlepark Plate he was last off, virtually left at the pose, but he was cflcr them, and his long stretching stride pulled him through his opponents, aud didn't he win with something in hand? At Manchester he had to mess about iv advance and sec his own pace, and there was Jack Watts, with his toes stuck out each side of Raeburn, watching the perf ormauce in front, aud waiting to bring eft that last rush for speed which brought disaster to the so far unbeaten Itinglass, and a great big sum of sovereigns to tho Duke of Portland's account at Weatheiby'a. Isinglass was beaten — but not disgraced.

*** Isinglass bolted a quarter of a milebuforo tho bUib in the Lancashire Plate. When the flagfeil, nothing seemed desirous of making tho pace, and very soon the favourite carried his colours to the front, followed by La Fleche. Thus early, says a spectator, the doubt struck me : Can Isinglass make his own running fast enough to stall one of the other, for speed ? There was little time to think, however ; he went pounding on, and some excited ones cried, "He'll never be caught! " '"He'll come in alone !"' yelled others. Round tho agonising top turn the same order was maintamed, and as they faced for home Isinglass on the rails was still aioue in his glory, but the others were atter him now in good earnest, and though La Fleche was goii'g none too comfortably shu began to close up tho gap. So: intent were men's eyes on tbesc two that a sudden cry from the ring, " Well, huw much K-ieburu ? "' was positively startling, and then, at a glance the whole position seemed changed. Sure enough there was Raeburn on the btands side, and Jack Watts silting moiionkss as ;v statue. Yes, Racburu wins ; bub no, they have a few hundred yards to go yet, and Ibiuglasa will wear him down as usual. Such thoughts flashed through many minds ; but the sou of St. Simon was this time ou a course exactly to hia

liking; he came striding on full of fire and heart, and though Isinglass struggled gamely, as we all knew he would, while the mare, under all her crushing burden, ran her race out to the bitter end, Raeburn was not this time to be denied, but won very cleverly by a length from the at last vanquished champion, who was half a length iv front of the mare. Such a struggle was worth going any distance to see, and it will certainly never be forgotten by those who saw it.

* # * Few sporting writers are able to get out of the stereotyped style of reporting races. "Nemo" is an exception — as witness his description of the finish for the Melbourne Cup. As Vakeel aad Oxide made one more heart-breaking appeal for their respective colonies, he writes, Newman, Tarcoola, Port Admiral, and Loyalty cleared themselves from the beaten field, but Carnage's 6tride was still unshortened, and the Cup looked a certainty. He was, however, nob long unchallenged, for Newman made a desperate run at him at the distance. Thus called upon, Nordenfeldt's son shook him off like a racehorse, and once more the big race appeared within his grasp ; but suddenly the blue and gold of Tarcoola was borne into the brunt of the battle, and as they passed the distance Moran had to sib down and ride for his life. On, on, like a tornado came Tarcoola. Stride for stride he gained on the Derby winner, and Moran, feeling the sobbing of his colt under the saddle-flaps, was compelled to drop his whip upon the bloodstained side of the son of Nordenfeldt. The colt lowered his brave head, stretched out his neck, and, extending himself for one final effort, held his own for a dozen strides, and then, weariedout Nature asserting her claim, he choked and reeled for a few strides, recovered himself, and renewed the battle ; but the great running he had made told its inevitable tale, and although he fought it out to the bitter end with the greatest gamtness, Tarcoola's long, never-tiring, terrible stride wore him down, and, passing him in the "■* last half-dozen strides, defeated him by a short half-lengfch.

*»* Here is a case for the Psychical Research Society, cited by the Melbourne Age. A gentleman connected with a well-known Melbourne wool firm, whose character for truthfulness is undeniable, dreamt that Glenloth would win last year's Cup in plenty of time before the event to tell his friends, some of whom ventured a small sum on the strength of the dream, and of course profited to the extent cf the very long odds. Three weeks before the present Cup the same gentkman again had the winner revealed to him in a vision of the night, and upon announcing that a horse called Tarcoola would be the lucky winner, was subjected to a considerable, amount of good-natured chaff by his friends. About a fortnight before the race a special visit was made by the dreamer, together with a good judge of horses, to see Tarcoola at his training quarters, and the expert's report was to the effect that no horse in such condition as he was could possibly win the Cup, even if he were a favourite, instead of a rank outsider. It was then concluded that the dream of this year was a dream indeed ; yet, after all, Tarcoola proved the winning horse. Now here are certain facts that can be substantiated, and all the society has to do is to reduce them to something capable of being worked into practical shape in time tor next Cup.

*** In a notice of Mr Archie Yuille, the Tattersall of Australia, the Leader tells us that the largest single " line " he ever sold was the Sfc. Albans stud, on behalf of Mr John Crozier, the sale of which, with stock, buildings and everything complete, to the present proprietor, Mr W. R. Wilson, for over £70,000 he successfully negotiated. Probably Mr Yuille's most successful yearling sale was at St. Albans in 1891, when the Australian yearling record price was broken by Lord Randolph, the well-named brother to Churchill, falling: to the bid of Mr Andrew Chirnside for 2300g5. While Mr Yuille is credited with seldom losing a chance of drawing the last possible guinea oub of a bidder, he gets through a catalogue with wonderful rapidity, as those can testify who at the dispersal of the Bryan O'Lynn stud heard him sell 158 horses, reading and expatiating upon each separate pedigree, in less than four hours. Another great record was in^November 1890, when he held a remarkable sale at the firm's Newmarket yards, selling 91 horses (out of 120 catalogued) for an aggregate sum of over 12,000g5. Amongst the highest-priced horses that have changed hands under Mr Yuille's hammer may be mentioned, in addition to Lord Randolph, Tradition, 3050gs ; Carbine, 3000gs ; Archie, 1850gs ; Darebin, 1550gs ; Commotion, MOOgs ; Pell Mell, 1400gs ; Manton, MOOgs ; Gar^on, 1400gs ; Redbourne, ] 325g5 ; Abydos, 1300g8; Teksum, 1200gs; Chetwynd, 1200gs ; King William, 1200gs ; and Ascotvale, 1050gs. On being asked recently which he considered the greatest bargains he had ever sold, Mr Yuille replied, '• Carbine, 3000gs ; and Malua, 500gs " ; and he was probably correct in his deduction, as the records of the turf indicate.

*** The history of cross-country racing contains the record of many remarkable occurrences, says the Leader. Many racegoers of to-day will remember Adam Lindsay Gordon riding and finishing a steeplechase on Prince Rupert at Flemington after falling, and discovering when he had weighed in that a couple of his ribs had been broken by the fall. Denny Callanan was the hero of one of the most startling incidents which ever took place at Flemington. It occurred in the steeplechase on New Year's Day, 1869. There were 12 starters, and after negotiating the last fence the favourite, Ingleside, was winning, but he took the wrong course, and Babbler, ridden by Lindsay Gordon, and Ballarat, with Fred Johnson up, followed him, being prevented by the crowd from seeing the gap into the straight. Each saw his mistake, and turning, hastened to rectify it, but not before Denny, on Viking, coming along fourth, had hastily taken in the situation, and in the absence of a gap had put his horse at the crowd who filled it. Clearing them without causing any more serious trouble than knocking one man down, Viking cantered up the straight an easy winner. Remarkable incidents might be multiplied, but one of the most sensational occurred on the Bth inst. at Sandown Park. Five horses started for the Steeplechase, Toprail, ridden by Corrigan, being a Btrong favourite. After going about two-thirds of the distance Leo ran off. at the back of the course, and Toprail, falling at the next fence, appeared to give Corrigan a very bad fall, as he lay motionless. The next fence brought down Warrior, and his rider, Jim Barbour, escaping injury, immediately ran to see if he could do anything for Corrigan. The latter was still unable to move, but was soon able to walk about, although considerably shaken. Toprail, however, was not so fortunate as his rider, for he broke his leg. These mishaps left only St. Elmo and Tyro in the race, and after negotiating the last fence they raced for the gap through which the run into the straight is made. Coming through Tyro collided violently with the fence, and St. Elmo passed the winning post alone. When Tyro had gofc

about half way up the straight he was pulled up, and his rider, Anderson, swayed in the saddle and then slipped off. His left knee and leg had been terribly lacerated. He was taken to the hospital. While Anderson lay oh the ground a spectator mounted Tyro, and riding him past the post he was placed second by the judge. Tyro's "pick-up" rider having weighed in and drawn more than the weight, a protest was immediately entered against St. Elmo for forcing Tyro on to the fence, which caused the accident to Anderson. Before the latter was removed his evidence was taken, and the stewards held an inquiry, which was adjourned until next morning, when the protest was dismissed.

* # * Mr Evetfc doubtless smiled as he saw the perplexity of investors in the opening event of the Wellington meeting, the Grand SLand Handicap. Eight of the nine starters were well backed, and the actual first favourite would have paid over a fiver. The race proved to be rather a good thing for Sea Serpent, and after this son of Piscatorius got home there were some to talk about the handicapper's disinclination to take notice of hack form ; but this is playing the after-game. Handicappers cannot possibly foretell results ; the most such an official can do is to mystify expert backers, and this was done, wherefore the genial Joseph scores. He was less fortunate in the Hurdle Handicap, inasmuch as the firsb favourite, Waterbury, won as he liked ; but perhaps he would have had to stretch himself if Langley the Devil had stood up, though bar accident I think Waterbury must have won anyway. Dreamland, winner of the Spring Handicap, paid a rattling dividend. This was owing to her defeat earlier in the day. The facts are not commented on in the telegraphed report, so I suppose the public were satisfied with the results. It may be that the longer distance Berved Dreamland. If so, and the race was truly run, the must be as good as Rosefeldt at a mile and a-quarter. That is good form. But Rosefeldt seems to be always stopped by weight. Eight stone is about as much as she can carry over any distance. Rebellion, the best of the Treasons that we know of, made an easy task of it to defeat Busybody at six furlongs, and the Christchurch filly failed to score at all during the meeting. Musket and Swordbelt were two others who triumphed 'over her. Swordbelt should be a good one by his breeding, being by Sword Dance out of Necklace, bub the total results show him to be no more than a match for Banner, who is two \ears his junior. Banner claims Escutcheon as hissire and Caller Herrin' as his dam. Krina ran a good mare each time she started ; and Senator, a son of our old friend Administrator, effected a surprise in the Consolation. One of the competitors in the Hack Hurdles on the first day — Stratford, ridden by Cronin — fell while doing his preliminary, and broke his neck, the rider escaping unhurt. On. the second day Adam M'Morran got into trouble. He had the mount on Unity in the Hurdles and was reported to the stewards for having struck A. Mayne, rider of Jacob, across the head during the race and inflicting a serious wtund. After a lengthy inquiry the stewards decided to disqualify M'Morran for life, and cancelled the trainer's and jockey's license held by him, and he was warned off all courses in the colony. M'Morran is well known throughout the South Island. He was, I think, a Dunedin boy when he began his career, and afterwards went into Cutts's stable.

*#* The Dunedin Jockey Club's Spring meeting opens on Wednesday of next week, the 29th — a week ahead of the date of writing, and there areea number of horses yet to arrive, those that had put in an appearance up to yesterday being Lady Zetland, Prime Warden, My Jack, Rangipuhi, Addington, and Pompom. Under these circumstances there is hardly a fair chance of spotting winners, but I shall do my best in a general way and reserve final selections for the Daily Times. For the Hurdles ib will take something very good to beat Rebel. They tell me that Empire is vastly improved, and if so he may avenge his defeat of last September ; but I prefer Poole's horse, Of the four in the Maiden three have a show, and I pick Addington as absolutely the best, though he will need to gallop to beat Al3ershot. The Otago Cup is an open race. There is hardly one of the nine that I should care to mention as having no show. The present favourites are Prime Warden and Skirmisher, but there will be loyal backers for Clanranald ani Liberator if they come, also for Response, while Rangipuhi has distinctly made a good impression since arrival. I think that the finish will lie between the better of the pair of topweights, Skirmisher and Rangipuhi — that is my present notion — and possibly the lastmentioned may be good enough to win, though I should like to reserve a final decision concerning this northerner till the day of the meeting. Pompom is the only winner among the five that have paid up for the Dunedin Stakes, and as such he must be reckoned dangerous, though the conditions may bring the best of the others upsides with him. Golden Fleece and Ambush arp, I think, the ones he has to beat. When the weights appeared I mentioned Warrington, Vogengang, Lady Zetland, and My Jack as a likely quartet in the Federal Handicap. The only alteration I care to make now is to substitute Bay Bell for Vogengang. The best of the reconstructed bunch is, I fancy, Warrington ; but here again further information may be useful. Swivel, Lord Aston, and Roseguard are not the worst of the Selling Race candidates. I Bhould take Ambush to win the Maiden Handicap for two-year-olds if she misses the Dunedin Stakes ; aud Exile or Kauroo are probably to be preferred to The Idler and Cajolery in the Welter. With regard to the Trot on the second day I leave backers to make a selection as between Jane, Little Bob, and Welcome Lass, unless Beaconsfield should look at his best, in which case he might win right out. The list given elsewhere shows a splendid lot of j entries and acceptances, and the meeting promises to be a marked success.

*#* I am reminded by the Australasian's notice of Commotion's career that this great horse did not always run iv Mr W. Pearson's colcu'S. Commotion was bred by the late Mr Henry Phillips, of Bryan O'Lynu, and not being sold as yearlings, he and Pell Mcll — another son of Panic — went into W. Lang's hands to be trained, and il was for his breeder that the future champion ran in the Derby. It was after the horse had unexpectedly beatf n Pell Mell in the Town Plate that Mr Phillips sold him. Mr Pearson bought at 1400gs. The policy of taking Evening Star's son and leaving Pell Mell was questioned at the time, but it never was afterwards, the cne colt turning out as great a failure as Commotion was a success. From the time he first caw a racecourse, in 1881, until he broke his shoulder in All Gold's Bagob Handicap, Commotion was never out of training, and twice he was placed under welter weights for the Melbourne Cup. Never was there a sounder horse, as far as limbs were concerned. During winter he felt the inconvenience of rheumatism, but with the arrival of October

Richard was always himself again. Once he was from a bruised tendon, and his trainer can only account for the injury by supposing that he had been struck, either accidentally or by design, with a fork or some other stable implement. He was a delicate horse iv the stable, and it was never safe to take any liberties with his digestion, but when well in health he was good-tempered and generoup, and Mr Dakin says that, apart from his great stamina and ability to carry heavy weights, he was a faster horse than most people supposed. Speaking of the Melbourne Cup of 1884, the writer observes that during the winter Commotion had not done well, and Plausible, a lightly-weighted five-year-old, was Mr Pearson's first hope for the Cup, and before the big fellow was thought of he had taken £20,000 about Plausible. As the day drew near, however, Commotion came en so fast that it was determined to let both go on their merits, and on the day the owner had £20,000 about each. Malua had won the Melbourne Stakes, and was about an equal favourite with Hastings, a commission from Adelaide to back the latter for £2000, which arrived at the last moment, just giving poor Teddy Sampson's horse the call. As a rule chroniclers of this race have ascribed the defeat of Commotion to Power looking round for Plausible. This I believe to be altogether a mistake. Power did let the old fellow ease down when he came into the straight with everything apparently beaten, and before he knew where he was Malua came with one of his marvellous rushes and beat him. But the mistake was not made in the interests of Plausible, and those who think Commotion should have won are probably not aware that Robertson declared afterwards that Malua got such a bump at the turn that he was knocked all abroad, and if it had not been tor seeing Commotion stop he is doubtful if he would have persevered. On the last day of the meeting Power rode Commotion from end to end in the Canterbury Plate, and he beat Malua pointless ; but in the meantime Mr Inglis's crack had run a tremendous race with Newstead, and may not have been at his best when he met Commotion for the third time.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18931123.2.146

Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Volume 23, Issue 2074, 23 November 1893

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6,184

TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Volume 23, Issue 2074, 23 November 1893

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