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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Redleap scratched for both Cups. — Camoola is doing well at Randwick. — Mr Bobbett's marriage is announced. — Langley is now being trained by Hawkins. — Mr W. R. Wilson has been very ill in Eng- *— Ives, the American billiardist, began life as a scratched for the Metropolitan — The New S rath Wales mare Vespasia is to be sent to Lochiel. .. __ . „ . -The hurdler Satyr (by Leolinus-Naiad) is a — . "Hotspur" says that Adulation has foaled dead twins to Medallion. . „.„ . ' — The Alexandra Jockey Club will give £150 in stakes at tho spring fixture. — Mr A. G. Cox, who used to ride Daddy Longlegs, has met with a fatal accident. # # — Elswick, brother to Merganser, is said to be doing very nicely on the other sido. -•'Vigilant" has put a lot of work into the sporting calendar issued by the Mail. — There is some talk of forming a Hack Racing Association in the Wellington district. — A wager of 500 to 1 was recently laid about the galloway Blazes for the Melbourne Cup. — Rebel did not accept for the Grand National Steeplechase, but he remains in the Hurdles. -Wlin Abdallah and Telephone both went to Christchurch by boat in preference to tram. — The Duke of Westminster has refused an offer of £20,000 for Orme, who goes to the stud next Se -After winning the Ascot Cup, Prince Esterhazy offered 15700fgs for Marcion ; but the price W fh^Victorian Railway department has refused the request of the associated racing clubs to red U -]£- e GolWs Oulloden and The Possible are among the non-acceptors for the Melbourne Cup. S -EISn Xusand four hundred hor.es were imported into the United States in 1892, at a total cost of £517,200. rwprhnrv -Specification, engaged at the Canterbury Trotting Club's meeting, was brought from V !^£ b y et«n?2rket was. very quiet when the last mail left Melbourne. Carnage remained favourite for the Derby at 6 to 1. — Sheet Anchor's dam, Queen Mary, by Castle Hill from Black Bess, died at the Calstock stud farm, Tasmania, a week or so ago. — kylvia Park, a younger brother t« Hippomenes, is said to be the making of a good colt. He is owned by Mr Goodwin of Waitara. — Mr Reid's beautiful mare Pibroch, of whom we were speaking last week, has broken down and been sent to the Eldershe paddocks. — Rumors have reached Melbourne that Projectile has not wintered well, and there is a disposition to lay against him for the Derby. ---The Town and Suburban Club is to receive jfrom the metropolitans two-thirds of the costs of the action brought against the club by ■Rota*""- — That smart trotting maw Frolicsome, who has been in Australia and otherwise out of sight for years, is now back in Dunedm, and has been Gloucester, N.J., a rider . named Ham had the mount on Hyacinth, Artillery, and Minnie J. in the first three races of the day. T - g Af Priding at Manchester on May .27, J. Watts and M. tiannon left the cotton city by special train, and were able to ride in the French Derby the following day. " ... '■ TO . 11 ,__ — Mr H. D. Bell, the president of the Wellington Racing Club, has accepted a retainer on behalf of Mr D. O'Brien in. his lawsuit against the C^wKmeffr°om b Western Australia of the was originally known as Wing. „ — The English stallion Quicklime has been sold for lOOOgs. His purchaser was .Mr W . Easton, and the sire Tof Rough and Ready, Nobleman, and other winners, goes to America. -MrMassina,the registered publisher of the Sportsman, a Melbourne paper, has been hnea 20i and cost 3 for permitting a consultation advertisement to appear in his paper. — The first Medallion made its appearance on the first day of the season, says Spectator, at Yaldhurst, in the shape of a chestnut filly from Mr R. J. Mason's mare Rainbow. — The Duke of Beaufort's colt Son* of a Gun, who is by the Musket horse Petronel, won the North Derby, one mile and a-half, at the Newcastle and Gosforth meeting ; on June 1 20. — Dr Hasbrouck, by Sir Modred from Sweetbriar, won the New Rochelle Handicap, seven furloiiga, at Morris Park (N.Y.),. carrying 9st lib, and covering the distance in lmin 26isec. — Mr P. Loriljard has talked seriously of taking Lamplighter to England at -the head of a select stable, and there was some idea of his taking a trip to Australia, but thatisnow abandoned. — From Adelaide comes news that Mr w. Blackler has had the ill fortune to lose the yearling sister to Fulham, who fell and broke her neck whilst gambolling in the Fulham Park pad- — Advices from New South Wales record the death of the thoroughbred matron Bronzewing, by Blair Athol from Bronzawing, at the Turanville stud. The mare was in foal to Fusileer, a son of Musket. " ... xt. ■=- Isonomy was the most successful sire on tne English turf up to the time of the mail leaving. His progeny had won nine races, of a total value of .£16,373, to which Isinglass alone had contributed £13 ; 6f0. , „ . , i.- •4. — The Caulfield Grand National meeting is to be held on Saturday of this week. Memgal 12.5 is top weight of the acceptors in the Hurdles, Captain Webb haying 11 3, andßusaco 12.12 heads the Steeplechase lot. . . . — "Nemo," of the Sydney MaiJ, is of opinion that the winner of the great Flemington handicap will be found in the following half dozen :— Malvolio, Zalinski, Ascot Vale, Ronda, Carnage, and St. Albans 11. „ — The Hauroto took five racera to Sydney— vi^., Stepniak, Melinite, Ich Dien, Loyalty, and Launceston. Mr Mason is in charge of Mr Stead's three, and he has Kingan with him as jockey. 'J hey all an ived safely. — At the s**le of the Tathwell stud, Lincolnshire, on June 11, the German sportsman, Count Lehndorf, gave 2000gs for the brood mare Empress Queen (dam of Minting Queen), by Strathconan from Annora, by Rataplan. — Princess was second in the trotting race at Richmond Park on July 10. Tho N.Z mare, who started 24sec behind scratch, and was riddtn by D. Price, was favourite at even money. Glencoe, lOsec, won by a length and a' half. — Mrs James White does not intend to let the Kirkham Stud go down. She has purchased another splendidly-bred hoKe in Gossoon by Galopin—Fetal, by Hermit from Gardenia, by Macaroni from 'Auracaria, by Ambrose. — There was an enormous attendance at the Paris races on Grand Prix day, and the gate money exceeded £16,000. More than £130,000 was taken by the mutuals, no less than £60,000 being invested on the Grand Prix. — The Hungarian Jo'ekey Club" is considering a proposal for an international race > at Buda Pesth, for three-year-olds, on the occasion of the Hungarian Millennium Fetes, in 1896. the stakes to be the largest on record— viz , £25,000. — An electric apparatus for starting has beetf invented by a Melboi rae electrician The model shows that the starter presses a button, which dops a red semaphore 10 paces in front of the horses. Th'eV.R.C have it under consideration. — Sporting -Review says that L. Holmes, who trains for Mr Maramaru, is still in the hospital from the injuries he sustained in being shot accidentally by Price the jockey. Some of the shots have not been extracted, and his recovery is very — The arrival at .Melbourne is reported of the Queensland quartet— Tridentate, by Trident from Aine ; The Wandering Jew. by Agamemnon from-Maritana ; Ayeshah. by Robinson Crusoe f«>m Blonde; and Splendide, by Splendor from Colima. — It is stated that while one section of Wright's establishment was backing St. Hippo recently, another was supporting Royal Rose. This stateis published in Colonel Fraser's paper, the Thames Advertiser, and the member for Thames is the owner of Royal Rose. —The stock purchased in Australia by the San Fra.nQis.oo epTortsman, Sir J, J. Moore, has been

doing very well in California. The mare Marcelle, by Marvellous from Beryl, whom he bought from Mr W. Kefeo, has more than paid her way, having won five races off the reel. — French horses have won the Grand Prix for seven successive years, the last English representative to score being Minting, who won for Mr Vyner in 1886. The course (one mile seven furlongs) was covered this year in 3min 38 3-ssec, and the stake amounted to £10,677. — "Sir Modred" hears that Mr Timpany's horses (Reflection, Dandenong, and others) are to be trained at Invercargill, and that before long theS.R.C. intends having a portion of its race track made into a ploughed gallop, which will be a great convenience to local trainers. — Dictator, one of the greatest sons of Hambletonian, foaled in 1863, died a few weeks ago at New York. He got 40 trotters and pacers from 2min lOsec to 2min 30aec, and among them were Jay Eye See, 2min lOsec trotting, 2min 6Jsec pacing; Thallass, 2min 13Jsec; and Director, 2min 17sec. , _ ," , . — Many who saw the Grand Prix were certain in their..pwn minds that it was a dead heat between K&gotsky and Ravensbury, while a story is afloat that an enterprising photographer snapshotted" the finish in a line with the judge, and Ravensbury came out on the negative a good head in advance. „ . , — In the Epsom Handicap of lOOOsovs, to be run at a mile on the first day of the A.J.G. meeting, Cremorne is handicapped at 10.4, Bungebah at 6 9. Paris 9.6, Ascotvafe 9.4, Trieste 9.2, Stepniak 9.0, Impulse 8 6, Launceston B.fi, Wakawatea 8.6, Loyalty 7.10, and Heather Bell 7.10. Trieste is scratched.' — The yearling by Donovan from Alone, purchased for Mrs James White's stud in New South Wales, is a colt ; the price-paid being HSOgs. He was previously the property of Mr H. D. Brocltlehurst. At the same sale Mr W. Conper, formerly of Sydney, purchased a yearling colt by Hampton from Nettle for 1250g5. , — With reference to the endurance of Australian horses, a correspondent writes to the Corowa Free Press stating that in the early seventies a Goonambil horse was, on urgent business, ridden from Wahgunyah to the home station at Goonambil, a distance of a little over 40 miles, in two hours without being distressed. — The death is reported«of Mr John Finnie a pld Queensland champion, Sydney, who, in addition to a host of races under all weights and at all distances, won the Brisbane Cup of 1879, the Sandgate Handicap of the same year, after a dead heat with Mr Henderson's Orphan, and auo the Sandgate Handicap of 1880, under 9 0. The balance sheet of the Victoria Racing Club for the year ending June 30 has been issued The overdraft at the Bank of New South Wales has been increased from £3663 at the end of the previous financial year to £18,023, and the excess of liabilities over assets is now set down as £18,642 as againßt £2040 at the end of June 1892 — The following office bearers are elected by the Cromwell Clvb :— President, Mr S. H. Turton: vice-president, Mr D. A. Jolly ; treasurer, Mr G. H. Stephenson ; secretary, Mr J. Marshall ; committee, Messrs W. Foreman, V. R. Moss, T. M'Cracken, J. Kane, C. G. Mountney, F. Deiiham, E. M'Nulty. T. Huddleston, and A. Cowan. — The Oaks, the famous hunting seat of the 13th Earl of Derby, from which the great horse race derives itß name, was brought to the hammer on June 18, at Tokenhouse Yard. It is situate within easy walking distance of Epsom Downs, and contains altogether about 181 acres. It failed to reach the reserve price, and was bought in at £30,000. —In making reference to the Cowboys Race which was to, be held in connection with the World's lair at Chicago, a cable from Omaha to England said ; The route will not be made known before the start owing to a proposed interference on the part of the Humane Society, which has offered a reward of BOOdol to anybody who will stop the race. — A fatal accident happened in the Steeplechape at Sandown Park (Victoria) on the 29th ult. Kalydor, ridden by Jenkins, fell at the last fence but one, and the jockey expired before reaching Melbourne. Jenkins, who was a capable rider, had won several steeplechases on Kalydor. The race was won by Apremont's son Mikado 11, carrying 12.2. — "Hidalgo" understand that no more of Darebin's fillies will be offered for sale. Mr Haggin says the old horse has long since paid for himself, and he will keep his fillies for breeding purposes, and lease their running qualities fp wellbehaved and reliable trainers, exacting bonds for their return to him at four-year-old (autumn), to be bred in their five-year-old form. — The man who has seen more Derbies than I ny man living is Mr Joshua Haines, who has ever missed seeing the " blue riband since the ear 1822. He went down by rail to see Jsinglass's Derby, but for 50 years he has walked down and back. He was born on May 24, 1798, and is still hearty and well. He has been an inmate of the Butchers' Almshouses at Waltham Green since 1871 — London Truth speaking of the bookmakers' alleged losses on the Derby won by Isinglass, says : There never was a Derby which excited leBS public interest, and the betting on the race was simply beneath contempt. The only person who had a really good bet about Isinglass was Mr W. M'Calmont himself, who took £5000 to £100 before the horse had ever run, merely on the strength of his good looks. — Speajring on the new rule of racing prohibiting betting by jockeys, Mr Frank Madden stated a£ the V. H.C. meeting that the committee had made inquiries which showed that a jockeys' ring actually existed, .and jockeys had been known to biast that their mounts were only ridden to win when it suited the interests of the ring. Ihe drastic proyisiong of the rule were framed specially to extinguish the ring. — An appeal by the owner of Pateena against the decision of the Caulfield stewards in declaring Myra the winner of the Hurdle Race, run on July 22, was dismissed by the Y-R-C Committee. The committee felt disinclined to upset the verdict of a body of stewards in a case where only a matter of fact and not of principle was involved, and therefore dismissed the appeal. Foul riding was .alleged on the part'of Myra s jockey. — Meddler, the colt whose sale at 14,500#s was reported by cable, was knopked down to Mr E. Weatherby, who, it was understood, was acting on behalf of Mr Forbes, a wealthy American connected with the Morris Park racecourse. At the same sale a yearling sister to Meddler, by Saraband, was sold to Mr Hamar Bass for 2500^, and Chimera; ayearling by Sheen from Distant Shore, was purchased by Mr J. A. Miller for 2000gs. — The JtLsh hunter Longstride, the property of the Monmouth County Hunt, recently cleared a clear 34ft leap. The horses, without rideis', numbering 123 / all told, were started forward, rushing at full speed to the pond's edge. All strained and jumped b t Longstride alone 'anded on the other side, cleariug the 3lft in grand style, whli every one of his companions fell short, splashing into the,water at different distances. — A writer in an exchange has it that there is not now any such thing as welshing in Brazil, the racing authorities in that distant country having taken measures to stamp out at least that one evil associated with the turf. All the regular rnotallicians, so the .correspondent referred to says, are locked up in a huge stine building with grated windows, through which they b^t with the public, and are not free to leave the racecourse until their clients have departe 3. ' — A large amount of success has attended the riding of T. Lane in the Grand Prix da Paris,- and in the steering of Kagotsky to victory in June last he repeated the experience of the three preceding years. A twelvemonth ago he rode M. Blanc' 3 Reuil, in 1891 he rode Clamart in the colours cf the same gentleman, and in 1890 he -was successful for BVon A. e'e Sphickler on Fitz R-ya. In 1889 Lane was second on Pourtant, while in 1888 he was the ridrr of Le Destrier. He has thus ridden the Grand Prize winner five years out of Bix. — Stiff running was not unknown even in the time of George the IV. The chronicler of the time, speaking of a sweepstakes of lQs'oys e.ach, for horses the property of and to' be ridden by members of the Household Brigade, says : The race excited but little interest. There is not much dependence in the sporting world. upon gentlemen riders. And again : The gentlemen jockeys, as if anxious'to show their horses to advantage, cime in single file, -and throughout the run kept a most respectful distance That took place at Ascot in 18k . ' — Thus an English writer on unlucky horses s Yetyow Jaok a misfortunes occasioned, him to be

quoted when similar examples' cropped up in successive generations of thoroughbreds ; and. most of us remember tho disappointments experieuced by the followers of that peculiarly-marked grey, Oxford Mixture. Isobar and Tib had their full share of minor honours, but all these were thrown into the shade by Grey Friars, who, at five years of age, competed in 13 races, of which he won four, but was disqualified in three instances, was five times placed second, and twice placed third. — Speaking of Ravensbury after his return from Paris, the Sporting Times remarked :— Of course, with a big race in him and a long journey, he would not be ss fresh as could be wished ; but he looked well. He seemed rather tired after his journey from Paris, and when he was watered at night a tumblerful of fine old liqueur brandy was poured into the bucket. It was beautiful brandy, 30 years old. We know, because we tasted it. The horse drained it up to the last drop, and then looked up with a sort of expression of that s-the-best-water-I-ever-tasted on his face. He then devoured the last oat in his manger. — London Sporting Life is responsible for the following :— A most remarkable wager came off at York on the second day's racing. A gentleman (Mr Finlay) had Ssova on Finlay's first mount, which wasa 6to 4 on chance. Smart and determined to work on the " all on" system, he put the £5 on the next race, which was Black and White, at 6to 1. That made his stake £35. Finlay s next mount was Timoreso, who won at 6 to 1 odds to £35, making £210. The sum accordingly went on Towton at 7to 1 f or the Flying Dutchman's Handicap, which brought £1470, so that, with all his stake money back and winnings, he had £1710 in hand, as Finlay did not ride again at the meeting.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18930810.2.111

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IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2059, 10 August 1893

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3,141

IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2059, 10 August 1893

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