Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TALK OF THE DAY.

*** Presenb appearances indicate a large muster of hunting and jumpers generally ab the Otago Hunt Club meeting, in September. Already there are , a fair number qualifying, and from' far and near come reports of possible candidates. Tom Cotton has Stonehenge, Dun Joseph, and Highland Chief for this meeting ;¥; ¥ George Smith is commencing on Hero and Expectation; J. Ellis has Young Talisman hard at it ; Hughie Gourley is busy with The Broker, Banker,, and J. Allen has hopes of bringing Trimolite to the post; J. Poole will be disappointed it anything should occur to prevent both Rebel and Moonlight from taking part in one or more of the contests; and J., Loughlin can strip Rothamstead pretty fit in two or three weeks' time. So that, apart from the flab racers and trotters, there is safe to be agood local gathering of horseflesh, and others are sure to appear of whom tt present we know nothing. I would counsel owners intending to have a cub iv to pub their horses into work without delay, and not hold on to the superstition that a month or five weeks is sufficient 'time, to allow' for the preparation of a jumping horse.

* # * I turn into, a , bypath to notice the marriage of our mutual friend Jack Loughlin. In connection wibh such a momentous event in his life ib would, no doubt, be more proper to drop the nickname,, but somehow I can't. He always was "Jack" when a lad with Harry Goodman, and "Jack" he will remain to the end of the chapter. He must forgive the familiarity as coming from one t?ho wishes him well. The marriage took place on Wednesday week ab St. Joseph's Cathedral, in the presence of a number of friends of the bridegroom and a large assemblage of 1 the bride's relatives and acqaintances. The la.9y is; or rather was, Miss Julia Mary Hutton, 'daughter of the host of the St. Eilda Hotel. .. Presents flowed in freely, amongst them being a teapot from Mr T. Eett, a handsome occasional chair 'from Mrs Myers, a neat thing in hat-raoks from Mr Myers, and a couple of oil paintings from one of the bride's sisters. Mr and Mrs Loughlin are now comfortably settled in a cosy cottage adjacent to the stable, where they have received hosts _of congratulations. I beg to add mine to the number, and wish the newly-wedded pair a long life of happiness. After paying my respects to them the other day Jack led me round the atible, where I saw Rothamstead and Galtee evidently very well and, japidly' advancing towards readiness for the National meeting, -while Don Pedro and Mount Koyal were shown in excellent winter condition, and from appearances I should reckon thatf they may be ready fora flutter ab the. Canterbury and Dunedin meetings Jn>November. ;

*** Another wedding of interest to the sporting brotherhood has taken place lately," the following announcement appearing in the daily journals-— Finlinson— Forsyth.— On the 18th July- at Knox Church, by the Rev. Dr Stuart, William Wilkinson Finlinson, to Mary Ann Fotsyth, eldest ■daughter of Thomas Forsyte, South Dunedin. . fttt Finlinson is one of the most reputable and

popular of New Zealand's bookmakers, and his many friends throughout the colony will join with me in wishing him and his bride a long and happy life.

*** The report • presented at the annual meeting of the New Zealand Trotting Association shows that four new«clubs have affiliated during the year— two in the provincial district of Wellington, one in Marlborough, and one in North Ofcago. Thirty-four trotting programmes have been passed, besides many trotting races on other club's programmes. The trottiDg i meetings held under the association give an average of a very small fraction over two for each club, and the committee predict that with proper restrictions on the totaliaator there will be a still further reduction in the number of meetings during next season. It is also pleasant to note a decided improvement in the average speed aud quality of the horses now running as compared with those a few years ago, showing evidence of more care in the breeding and training of the trotting horse. The committee regret that the general system of handicapping is not more satisfactorily received, and consider that the time has arrived j when class racirig might be more largely adopted by clubs. The balance sheet showed a liability of £62 odd, incurred chiefly through the printing of the new set of rules. It was resolved that the committee devise the means of a levy on the affiliated clubs to provide for the debt incurred by the extraordinary expenses incurred during the year. The election of officers resulted as follows :— President, Mr H. M'llraith (re-elected) ; hon. treasurer, Mr C. S. Howell ; executive committee— Messrs Delamare, Mace, Marr, Ravenhill, and Derrett; auditor, Mr T. B. Craig. A vote of thanks was .accorded Mr M'llraith for past services. '

*a* la conneotion with the above it may be observed that, though * the association is open to some- measure of reproach for its tardiness in bringing into force the new'provision as to the stake limit, there is evidence that the executive realiso their responsibilities. Proper restrictions on the tofcalisator are prayed for, the further adoption of class rac'rag is advocated, ib is made a recommendation to the incoming committee that no new clubs at centres where other clubs *exist be affiliated to the association, and a further suggestion-i s that balance sheets be demanded from each club before programmes for the .nexb season are passed. .This last -named recommendation sounds like a hint to the proprietary clubs to set their houses in order. Whether the association is in earnest in the "matter, or simply wishes to giye the clubs a fright, remains to be seen. The present intention is no donbb quite sincere, bub ib is almosbboo much to expect, I fear, thab any bub an absolutely independenb body should have the backbone to insisb on a thorough test of this nature being applied to the clubs generally supposed tobe run as proprietary affairs, and personally I hardly think this will be pressed. It is against human nature to be so objectionably candid towards one's friends, and the duty, if necessary, should properly be undertaken by the Colonial Secretary's department. So far as I know the metropolitans have never yet demanded balance sheets from any of the ordinary racing clubs. The duty of requiring Buch statements is discretionary, not mandatory, and up to date the rule on the point has been practically a dead letter. It would indeed be strange if the trotting folk were to head the search for persons suspected of running the sport for their private ends. It is no doubt just as well to have on the rules a provision authorising such a duty, but to speak plainly I would nob care to make one to act the policeman in this respect.

* # * Mr H. Goodman has had the St. Clair— Mountain Lily yearling gelded. This makls the third youngster so treated in the stable this season, the others being Solano and the Malice colt, and Mr Goodman is pleased with the way in which tho operation was performed in each case by Mr W. Roberts, who has an effective and quick way of throwiDg, and only ties the hinder legs. The unsexed offspring of Mountain Lily will probably be in work again in two or three weeks, thus making his spell about twice that period. The horses now working from this stable are Blizzard, Paramu, the Malice colt, and Casket. All are doing very well. Blizzard bo far shows no signs of weakness in his limbs, and there is every probability that he will race again. Whether he will stand a Cup preparation is of course to be yeb ascertained, but he will pay up for the thousandpounder nexb month, and may be relied on to receive the best possible attention with bhe view of being landed ab the post. The owner has £1000 to £10 aboub him. I know also of a few hundreds being held by others at the same price, and should say that Blizzard would be one of the very worst horses for the Ripg if he were to turn up a winner. ' How much more there is available at these extreme odds I don't know, but I should say ib would be a little unsafe to treat this resurrected member as practically a dead ,'un. Speaking of this stable, I understand that Solano has been sold, and will reappear some day, please the pigs, in another owner's colours.

*$* Once on a. time a man put into two hats the names of the horses entered for a couple of jumping races at Dunedin, and, extracting one paper from each, he presented them to a bookmaker and took the odds blindfold, and, moreover, won. The same course might as Well be followed for all the chance a fellow haa of picking by judgment the winners of the double at the New Zealand Grand National meeting. Neither the Auckland nor the Hawke's Bay meetings exposed much real form ; the Wellington meeting had but few of the National horses at it ; and when we further consider that in each of the National events there are some candidates whose merits are absolutely unknown, I reckon that it would be sinfully hazardous to advise too positively until owners have given some idea of their notionsthroughthe-acceptancelist. My remarks, therefore, shall be brief, and of a general nature. Speaking first of the"e>teeplechase, it is the generally-expressed belief in Duoedin that Norton's 12 12 is quite enough, if not too much, even allowing that he is a clipper at the game. This weight has never yet been carried to victory in the Grand National. Canard's 12 10 in 1886 stands as the highest winning weight so far, andconcerning that performance it may be remarked that Canard was at that time quite aa good if" nob a better steeplechaser than Norton now- is, and he (Canard) would not have won but for the misfortune that befell Peter Oabecktwo fences from home. Farther, the field that Norton will have to meet will be a bib stronger than that over which. Canard luckily triumphed. I am aware that Norton made very easy work of carrying 11.4 into second place last year, but with the rise of 221b he must be aided by good fortune if he gets home. Freeman is supposed to be on the sick list, Couranto is at least under suspioion, And Shillelagh, has been scratched ; bub

Empire must be mighty dangerous if as good as some folk make him out to be, and. I don't know that either Gondolier or Clarence can complain. These are a likely three. Tiritea's best deeds are rather old now, and I much prefer Magpie, who with 10.0 ran into third place last time, while Victrix is another possible on her Wellington form, and Waterbury reads very well. Mutiuy and Marechal Niel are perhaps better over hurdles, but the nexb on the list, Despised, is not crushed for a winner, and he shall play on my side. Rebel is to be preferred •to Cajolery across country, the former, indeed, being very well treated. Ib must not be forgotten, however, that so far he has never seen a National course. Poole will probably take him up early, so as to give him as much schooling on the ground as possible, but somehow I half fear that this son of Duntroon will still be at a disadvantage in this respect. I must, however, give him a show. Passing by Morok, who once led the National field for about three miles, I take the most formidable of the light weights to be Regalia, Otakeho, Worth, and Scaltheen. Thus I have mentioned 13 out of the 28. As a fancy I should say that Empire, ClaroDce, and Magpie are the pick of the bunch, but I am not prepared to argue that out as a hard and,fast conviction, preferring to make a close, selection a little later on.

*** In the Hurdle Race the handicapper is by no means unmerciful to Norton. This hor6e has what I should call a really good chance at 12.3. Bab backers ought not to forget thab Cajolery in the same stable is nob overburdened with 10.7. He will jump hurdles all righb when in company. His recenb bad disphy in private counts for little or nothing as against public performances. There is Eulnine also to be considered, bub in the differences of opinion that exist as to this horse's position in the handicap I take the . side of those who think 12.0 quite as much as he can carry in such a field aa he will meet. Clarence at 10.12 reads to me much more like a winner, and there are five others closely following— viz., Gondolier 10;9, Magpie 10 9, Mutiny 10.7, Eapua 10.7, and Marechal Niel 10 6, all of whom possess claims to attention as sound and reliable performers. I once saw Clarence run a splendid race in Dunedin in fast time, and the others mentioned have also capital credentials over the little sticks. After these come a mixed lot of four, followed by a dangerous member in Unity, nob far from whom is Rebel. These, with Erin-go-Brah and Smuggler, are the lot thab seem tp me to possess the best show at present, and I would as soon take Norton and Gondolier as anything else. Some of the novices are, I observe, pub in at the minimum oi 9.0, while Quilb, Liberator, and Melinite are in the lOst division. The last-mentioned three are fairly enough handicapped considering their performances ' on the flat, and the lob on bhe minimum are so poor, as far as w«( know them, with the exception of Abel Tasman, who has never raced, that I suppose they could nob have had ' much more, bhough ib is a libtle risky as a rule to assume thab beginners are absolutely no good. I must look closer into these handicaps as the date of the meeting approaches.

*** S* IX or seven years ago, says the Westminster Gazette, the turf knew not. Mr Harry M'Calmont, the owner of Isinglass. He was a happy younff subaltern, serving her Majesty in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment— he has since changed into the Scots Guards— and he awoke suddenly one morning to find that an eccentric uncle, from whom he bad no particular expectations, had died and left him somebhing jusb over three millions. In his determination to leavehis money ,to someone he deemed fully capable of taking ,care of it, the excellent old gentleman had passed over three or four of hit nearer relatives and pitched upon young Harry, for the reason — and here creeps in a great moral lesson for other young men with expectations — that he had heard thab'bis nephew had only £1000 a year, bub kept his expendibure inside that amount— or, in other words, lived within his income. We cannot help noting how similar was Mr M'Calmont's luck in respect of this very unexpected inheribance with that of the* present Duke of Portland. He, too, was in the service —of course* he was only plain Mr Bentinck in those days— and it was his custom to have his servant bring him a brandy ano\ soda when, he came to call him each morning. One day the fellow presented himself as usual, but said, " Your Grace, it is half-past 8." Bentinck did not immediately vault oub of bed and slap the man on the back, as an ordinary plebeian would have done, nor did h£ give way to any other vulgar demonstration of joy; no, he merely raised himself upon his elbow and said, " • Your Grace,' Simpson? What do you mean?" •• Well, sir," replied bhe valeb, " I heard bhem balking of ib in the canteen, and they do say that,- owingto the death of some elderly relative Dr other, your Grace is the Duke of Portland." "If that is so," replied the Ddke, still perfectly calm', " first drink that brandy and soda, then go and get me a pint bottle of Pommery " ; and that is how the Dake of Portland is said to have received the news. Mr M'Calmont's career upon the tutf has been one continuous run of good luck. He is but in his 31st year, and a widower. *

* # * While lamby no means deairous of robbing the Town and Suburban RaciDg Club of whatever credit is due to that body for defending itself in the action brought by the man known as " Murrumbidgee," and thus forcing a decision which may be useful as a moral check on the cash fielders who frequent racecourses, I am unable .to go all the way with one of the Napier papers, which asserts that the judgment of the Chief Justice in the case has altogether taken away the occupation of fiuch undesirable persons. Would that ib were so ; but as I read the decision referred to ib reveals no new interpretation of the law, the ground of the judgment being merely that offenders of the class named may properly be given into custody without warrant. Is there anything in this more than the law of trespass ? I do not think there is, and if my supposition be correct we are "no forrader " than the case of Wood v. Leadbitter so often referred to. By that celebrated case any club with a sufficient title to its ground may eject at pleasure, either with or without reason. Therefore lam afraid we have not yet triumphed over the cash fielder. Unless the Napier case goes further than I reckon it does, tho man who competes with the tcte may still defy such clubs as do not feel themselves strong enough as regards their title to venture on ejectment. It is these clubs that need help. The law of trespass is of no service to them. Whether some further legislative protection is or is not necessary is more than I can say ; but, speaking as a layman, I should think that the | police have ample power to remove cash fielders from any course at the request of the persons properly in occupation for the time being, and if this opinion is sound the whole nuisance could be suppressed without trouble if the Minister in charge were to instruot his inspectors to attend to this duty. The expense of putting on a few extra men to deal with the trouble should not be a hindrance now that the State is lifting something like £11,000 a

year out of racing. I take it, also, that the Government are morally bound to interfere on another ground— viz., that the revenue is being defrauded. lam led to speak thus, not from a desire to see decenb bookmakers suppressed— l never did advocate such a thing— but from a desire to see a dispersion of the characterless pirates who have recen'ly invaded our racecourses in hordes.

* # * The English stallion Wisdom, by Blinkhoolie from the Stockwell mare Aline, dropped dead at Mr Hoole's stud farm the day before the Derby was run. Bo great a horse deserves a notice. He was not always famous ; indeed as a racer he proved an absolute failure, never a win falling to his lot during the two seasons he had on the turf. As a four-year-old, in 1877, he was put to stud duties, and in that capacity also the sporting world was beginning to tire of him, as he produced nothing of conspicuous merit for ever so long, when suddenly his daughter Florence blossomed into fame, and the derived lustre gained by her successes in the Cambridgeshire, the Manchester Cup, and other valuable stakes, brought Wisdom into prominence and demand. That revival began in 1884-. Another spell of mediocrity, and Wisdom was restored to renown as the sire of Veracity, who carried off the coveted Lincolnshire and also the Cambridgeshire. Snrefoot was next in order of Wisdom's celebrated stock, though there were good winners between whiles. This Surefoot is known as a Two Thousand and Eclipse Stakes winnner, and one of the best horsts of his' day up to a mile. Last year Sir Hugo came as a crowning climax to Wisdom's credit. If he had aired no others than those mentioned, the son of Blinkhoolie would have well established his reputation, but he has had in addition a host of lesser lights to call him "daddy," among whom may be mentioned Silence, Screech Owl, Chesterfield, Old Boots, Worldly Whe, and Thessalian.

* # * The Epsom Summer meeting opened with fine weather. In the Craven Stakes there were but two garters, and backers made no mistake in [picking Lower Boy to beat Favoro, but they came a cropper in the Egmont Plate, a five-furlong handicap, in which the 100 to 8 chance Floss, a daughter of Beauclerc, slipped away at the start and ran home an easy winner from a large field including two classic candidates, Mrs Butterwick and Milford. The last-mentioned pair were trying to meet the five-year-old winner ab something like level weights, so that it was no disgrace to them to be beaten after losing so much ab the start. The Woodcote Stakes, run the same day, was established as far back as 1807, two years before the Two Thousand was inaugurated. It is a race in which Fred Archer was often successful. This year there were bub half a dozen starters, the smallest field since The Baron won in 1886, and odds of 3 to 1 were laid oh Mr Daniel Cooper's filly Glare. She ran very well, bub while disputing precedence *wibh Mecca the unnamed son of Hampton and the Rosicrucian mare Illuminata swept down on them with a splendid stride and polished off both rather easily. The winner was bred by his owner, Lord Rosebery, who has in him a colt full of promise, and a striking contrast, they say, to some of the weedy specimens that have been scoring in the juvenile department this season. The Derby was a fast-xfjn race from the outset. Lord William- was the firsb to force the pace, then William without the Lord took np the leadership, retiring later on in favour of Rasburnl While these changes were going on Isinglass was steadily working his way to the front. At one stage, when Loates lifted his whip, an offer was made to take 6 to 4 that the favourite* did not win, bub thechallenge was not repeated, for in an instant Isinglass responded by a rush to the front which settled all hope of a surprise unless the fast-coming Ravensbury could effect it. ' Only for a second did this seem possible. A couple of strides more and ib was seen that bhe bask was beyond his powers, for the son of Deadlock fan Oh with greab determination, and vigorously ridden to bhe end, he gob home by a length and a-half. The winner was marked with the whalebone, blood marks on his belly showing where the lash had caught him, yet he finished with marked gameness, though it is said to have been the first time he had ever felt such a stimulant.' The race did not pass off without a mishap. Just before entering the straight Lord William's saddle girth broke, and Mulles, who was riding, was thrown, sustaining a severe shaking and spraining bhe muscles of his neck.

* # * The Dnke of Portland was half a mind nob to start Raeburn in the Grand Prtza, but as j the colt seemed fresh at morning exercise he was ordered to fulfil his engagement, Kilmarnock, who broke a bloodvessel in the Two Thousand, being sent as an accompanist, though the stable declaration was for Raeburn, this making him a warm favourite. He ran a good race, but had the steel taken out of him to overhaul Harbinger, and when the.presumed non- stayer Tanderagee began to crawl to the front the favourite was unable to make anything bufc a feeble reply, and so the outsider * gob home. This ' Tanderagee had been outstayed ab Eempton Park in the Whitsun week, and how he managed to live to the end of the mile and a quarter of the Graxd Prize is a mystery that very few could find the key to, though to be sure it is always possible for a horse to improve, and no doubt Raeburn must have felt the effects of his struggle in the Derby. The Riddlesdown Plate, the last item on the day's card, proved to be a very soft thing for Siffleuse, the more-fancied and previously unbeaten Portrush making a dead heat of it with Reaping for second place. For the Oaks on the next day there were 17 starters, the largest field since 1873, when Marie Stuart won. Mr Merry's Stirrup Cup, who was made favourite at 7 to 2, soon gob to bhe fronb, and stayed there till a quatter of a mile from home, where Tres3ure issued a bold challertge. In turn Mrs Butterwick made a demonstration, and this supposed sprinter/who had never before started in even a mile race, lasted out to the bitter end, thus landing for the Dake of Portland one of the luckiesb wins he has ever had. It is said that had Dame President been able, to start fib and well she could nob have lo3t the race. As it was she was galloped into by the riderleES Lord William in the Derby, and had her near foreleg damaged.

*#* There were no fewer than 20 reported misadventures at the Wellington Hunt Club's race meeting. Six baulks are spoken of in the reports, a dozen falls, and two horses ran off. This is a very heavy list of troubles, and there were probably others which are not mentioned. The heavy going no doubt had a lot to do with these misfortunes, but I fancy also it would be found, if all the truth were told, that indifferent riding led to some of the falls and the infirmity of some of the competing horses to others. The boys there engaged don't all ride as well as Hickey. Parnell may be reckoned very lucky in getting home first in the Open Steeplechase, inasmuch as he ran off at the outset and later on fell. It happened, however, - that every man jack of the other starters fell too, excepting Sir Garnet, and he baulked, so that aa regards falls ParneU had ai)

equal chance. What makes his success surprising is that he inourred a further disadvantage by running off. Halicore's win in the Hunt Club Steeplechase was confessedly the result of good fortune, yet the performance was by no means without merit, for the ancient stood up whenothers went down, and kepfcpunching away while his opponents were otherwise amusing themselves. This Halicore must be one of the oldest horses we have raoing in New Zealand, so far as my memory serves me. He used to be running in the Wairarapa seasons ago, and nobody then ever seemed to know his breeding. I thought he had dropped out finally, yet here he pops up and actually wins. No wonder he paid a dividend ! One reasbn I have for thinking they were a poor lot of horses at the meeting is. that .The Idler* was | able to win both his races. The finish in the Hurdles seems ,to have been pretty close, but an hour or so afterwards he was able to romp home in the Welter. The divided in this race, by the way, is given iv the Mail as £3 133, instead of £3 10 j as stated in the telegraph report. lam pleased to hear that several of the Dunedin boys followed The Idler through | his Wellington trip. A sovereign on each of the three races would have netted a profit of £6 j123,j 123, which may be reckoned good enough. Tho Idler has not returned to Dunedin, and will not till after the Grand National meeting ab Chmtchurch. M'Grath has taken him thither.

*** The opening eveafc on the first day of the V R.C. Grand National meeting (the Bth inst ) was the Maiden Hurdles, of 300sovs, about two miles. For this the field numbered one short of a dozen, Walter Hiekenbofcham's Comedian 9.12 being chosen favourite at 5 to 2, but this horse had the steel taken out of him by hirting a hurdle hard, and could only get third place behind Mr Dargin's Oxenbam 9.12 ( judiczonsly ridden by Underwood) and Mr Cripps's Eclipse 9 12. The winner, who started at 5 to 1, is a son of Marvellous and Alma. The Hon. D. S. Wallace Bcored a popular win in the Two-year-old Handicap, of 300sovs", 'six furlongs, his grey filly Taupo,-.by Malua from Verdure, carrying her 7 5 home four lengths in front of Amadeus 70/ who in turn beat Matai 7.9 by a length. -The favourite, Ike Foulsham's Lochuess, a daughter of Lochiel, was, fourth. The time was lmin 22pec. For the Maiden Steeplechase, of 300sovs, aboub two miles, the " Ballarat gelding Dohdi 10.7 was a strong order, owing no doubt to some extent to Tom Corrigan having the mount. He led to' the abattoirs and then fell, leaving Royal Oak 10.7 with 'a substantial advantage, which he made the best use of; and' when Waterloo 10 7 full at the last fence Royal Oak had nothing to trouble him further, and he won by 20 lengths from the unlucky Waterloo, with Trumpeter third.

*** The starters for the Grand National Hurdle race were Tim Swiveller 11 0 (J. E. Brewer), The Pioneer 10.10 (A. Ferguson), Eapo 9 3 (Tomlin), 'Merrigal 12.3 (Cameron), Satyr 11.7 (Nolan), Fire King 11.4 (Gardner), Busaco 11.4 (Williams), Pro Consul 11.3 (Watson), Sfcamboul 10.12' (Corrigan), The Victim 10 7 (Underwood), Manon9.l2 (Carey), Wellington 9.10 (Tilley), and .Cuttlefish 9.5 (M'Gregor). The betting, after some fluctuations, stood at 4 to 1 Satyr, 5 to 1 Tim Swiveller. The Sportsman, describing the contest, says that the ' race for the greater portion of the distance was a slow one, the most noticeable feature being the way Merrigal waTpersistently kept in front. Even the aged Cuttlefish was nob thought insignificant, Cameron fighting ib oub- with him furlong after furlong. With the top weight up Cameron, on Merrigal, could nob haW'ridden a better race for Tim Swiveller and some of the others if he had tried. Ab one .time Tim Swiveller and Merrigal were a half score of lengths ahead of their field, then fell back a [ bit. Between the bridge and the abattoirs Merrigal went to the front again, and was* firsb into the muddy lakelet! ,' Ab the turn bat of the straight Merrigal was still' in front, bub at the back Wellington .took command, and ab the sheds stand Eapo looked like having 'a r " good * chance. Bub Tim and The Pioneer rapidly made up lost ground. There was a ory of . disappoinbmenb from Satyr's as he came down at the same, jump as that which ! proved fatal to him last year. Tim Swiveller and Kapo came over the last hurdle side by i side. Then Pioneer made a great rnsh; and tried hard to reach Tim, who, however, lasted long enough to win by over two lengths. .Tim Swiveller must be a bad horse for bhe books, as pretty well all the doubles were started with him. The stable is reported to have had a good win. The extra 81b incurred by , Pioneer's win at Caulfield, and by which his owner i> reported to have pocketed nothing, might have served him .in good Btoad, though when the serious accident he sustained in the' race, when running through a hurdle,. is taken into consideration, hi 3 second must.be voted a great performance. For the last event, of the day, the Winter Handicap of 400sovs, a mile and a-quarten, a baker's' dozen faced the starter, .Cooya. (4yrs, 8 3) being most' in demand at 3 to 1. The first to show in front was Pigeonboe (6jrs,-B.2)j'but Carringbon (6yrs, 7.0) was first into the straight, and the lastmentioned got home after a good race by half a length from the favourite, Quality (syrs, 8.2) beiDg third. Wild' Rose (syis, 97) was never dangerous. Carriugton's time is given as 2min 20it3ec. Hia starting price was 6to 1.

*#* We learn through the cable that the Grand National Steeplechase, run on Saturday lasb, was contested by a field of 15, of whom Shylock (6yrs 11 13) was favourite at 7to 2, Trojan (6yrs, 11.9) being nexb in demand ab 4 ' to 1. Mr Rayner's Albert (aged, 12 3) and Trojan led the field for the greater part of the journey, bub Albert fell ab the lasb fence and Trojan won easily by four lengths, having done the distance, aboub throe miles, in 7miu 4£sec. The winner was ridden by J. S. Edge. Shylock gained second place, and Busuco (a&ed, 12 10.) i»a.s third. Trojan's success was to some extent foreshadowed by his victory in. the Williamstown Steeplechase on the let inst. In that race he carried 12.7, wa3 ridden by Edge, and won by two lengths from .Liberty 10 6, the veteran New Zealander Chemisb 10.9 being third. In the betting on the Grand National Steeplechase on the night, before the race Shylock shortened to 4 to 1 offered, and 9 to 2 taken. Ouida occupied the position of second favourite ab 6 to 1. Other quotations were : 7to 1 Trojan, 8 to 1 Busaco and Sir Wilfred, 10 to 1 Kremlin and Albert, 12 to 1 Tyro, Sshoolboy, and Royal Oak. Heavy rain fell on the Thursday night.

* # *<The Sportsman of the 11th inst. reports that some straight out betting over the V.R.C. Derby was done the' previous night. Carnage " was supported for the Blue Riband at 6 to 1, Light Artillery was on, offer at 7 to 1, and Projectile and The Sailor Prince were befriended at 10 to 1. In doubles for the Derby and Melbourne Cup, Carnage .with Vakeel,- Malolo, Sbernchaser, - Sword bearer, Malvolio, Ronda, and Cullbden were laid jab' 200 to 1. Foe the Caulfleld and 'Melbourne Cap, 'Fulham and Malolo, Sainfoin and. Vakeel, Malolo and

Bternchaser, Sundial and Birinji, Sundial and Cremorne, Donizetti and Ronda, and Sundial and Realm have been supported at 1000 to 2. There has been hardly anything doing over the Caulfleld Cup straight out, but 1000's to 30 were wanted about Newman yesterday. Jeweller would be backed for 100 to 3 for both Cups.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18930720.2.131

Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2056, 20 July 1893

Word Count
5,766

TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2056, 20 July 1893

Working