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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Chemist is in work again at Flemine'ton. — Humphrey Oxenham saw the Derby run. — Lochiel's fee in Australia has been fixed at °— Mr Gollan's luck is awful. Kimberley has gone lame. „ ... . — The owners of Outpost recently declined an offer for the colt. . . — Outpost is in prime health, having got rid of his teething troubles. — Pauline is entered for tbe Caulneld Cup a3 by Buudoora—Wave. — Mr S. Miller has purchased the Jiagot Ilauclicap winner, Hopotoun. , — Alf Keith, a trotting rider and trainer, Lr>s settled in Christchurch. — Maritoto, by Muskot, won the telling Steeplechase at Cranbourne I Vie). — The sum of £1704 10s was passed through thß tobe at Lancaster Park on Saturday. — Cowboy, the Duuediu representative, did not start at the Lancaster Park meeting. , — Ormonde will be restricted this season to umo m&roi, the property of bis owner, Mr Macdonash. — Occident will shortly be in work again, and if lie stands he may be racing .again in the early "* J_ jttr' Gollan's colt The Possiblo recently got away from his lad at Oaulfiold, and, coming dowu, cut his kuecs. , , „ m. — Ln,to entries coming to hand for the Champion Stakes bring ths total to (50, or four more than last year. — It; was understood that Wakawatea and Heather Bell would leave for Sydney yesterday by the Wakatipu. —In Christchurch the failure of the!rotting Association to demand balance bheets of all the clubs is publicly commented on. — The use of whiting for marking starting lines has been abandoned at Flemington. Sand and loam are to be used instead. — Captain Webb hurt his leg while exercuang a few days before the last mail left Melbourne, but the injury was not regarded as serious. — Florrie got blocked in the straight when running well in the Winter Stakes for which she was favourite, at Sydney Tattersatt's meeting. — The Field says that the 14 9 awarded Redleap in the last V.R.C. Autumn Steeplechase is the record steeplechase handicap of the worid. — Despised was Koss Ileaton's first winning mount in the Auckland Winter Steeplechase, a race in which no rider has succeeded twice. — Cape Pigeon, tho son of Albatioss that won at Sydney Tattorsall's ou the 3rd, was making his first appearance over the Itaudvvick hurdles. — Philainmon's daughter Convent had a walk over for the Ascot Gold Vase, the two-mile race for Her Majesty's trophy run on the 13th iust. T. Loale3, on Isinglass, rode his first Two Thousand winner thi3 year, and his win on Siflleuso ■was also his first success in tho One Thousand. — Gouvcrnour, by Energy oiifc of Gladia, has been sold for lO.OOOsovs, by M. E. Blanc to Baion

tion gradually subsided, and the upshot of various fluctuations was that the colt started at 5 to 4- on. How the son of Isonomy and Deadlock justified his position is now a matter of history. Before half the distance had been travelled tho favourite occupied a good position in advance, had the issue safely in hand at the Bushes, and silenced all the fielding opposition by winniug easily by threequarters of a length from the improved Ravensbury. In addition to endorsing his two-year-old form by a ckver if not an easy victory, Isinglass won in the fastest time in the history of the race. He occupied lmin 42? sec in covering the Rowley mile, the previous record (lmin 43sec) in connection with the Guineas bting credited to Diophantus, the winner in 1861. On the following day Marcion proved himself a colt of good class by the way he won the March Stakes. Mr Vyner made a very judi> cious purchase when he bought Emmeline Marcia, Marciou's dam, for 260gs, from Mr Simons Harrison at Doncaster three years ago, as the mare was heavy in foal to Royal Hampton at the time. Sir J. Blundell Maple made no declaration in favour of either of his One Thousand candidates, Damo President and Sifflsu^e, who therefore ran on their merits, the jockeys agreeing to "give and take a suit of clothes" in the event of either winning. The owner, however, as well as followers of the stable, fancied " the Dame," Sir Blundell having a bob of £700 to £200 about tha daughter of Barcaidine and Geheimniss, who indeed appeared to hold the issue at her mercy till half way up the i hill, when she began to falter, and was just beaten by her stable companion, to the no small joy of the bookmakers, the winner's name having never been written by them. * # * " Freelance," in the Sportsman, is out with his first impressions as to the V.R.C. Grand National handicaps. As to the Hurdles, he remarks that in bringing Merrigal within 121b of Redleap over hurdles Mr Dakiu has paid a very high compliment to the up-country horse, whom we have seen perform very ingloriously on more than one occasion. This son of Robert the Devil has, however, won on the flat, which Redleap up to date has failed to do, and this fact has probably influenced the handicapper in his apportionment of the weights. Pygmalion, although a maiden over hurdles, cannot be considered badly treated. If he jumps up to stable expectations, he should very nearly win. Busaco carried 61b more in front of his field in the Caulfield Grand National Steeplechase, and has since thown that he is equally at home over hurdles. I rather fancy the chance of this son of Wellington. Knight of the Garter once started nearly first favourite for a Melbourne Cup, bub I doubt his ability to stay and fight out a fast run three-mile race. Tim Swivelier has a few pounds more than his stable anticipated, but on last season's form he cannot be considered altogether crushed. Stamboul, a good old plodder, is hardly brilliant enough for this company. Captain Webb has for months past been a strong Grand National tip. Of late he has been reported to have been under a bit of a cloud, but at the weights there are few more likely horses engaged' than the son of Natator, whom I take to be the pick of the handicap. Of the more lightly-weighted division Titanic, Polonius, and Omaha strike me as being best treated. At present I am content to pin my faith to one of the foregoing, but if just now, a month ahead of the race, I had to name one of three as the probable winner I would taks Captain Webb, Polonius, or Merrigal. As to the Steeplechase, Redleap ia for some reason or other already regarded a* an unlikely starter, but as the owners can hardly have had time to digest the weights I cannot quite follow the reasoning of those who reckon that Redleap is out-handicapped, and for that reason unlikely to face the starter. Confidence has, I fear, too much weight. Tyrp is coming back to his best form, and is just the sort of animal to out-jump and out-stay all his opponents and win a Grand National. Hunters have won Nationals more than once, and I rather fancy that old Blackthorn, either as a hunter or steeplechaser, was slightly inferior to Tyro. Shjlock has a lot of weight, and so has Wellington. Of the two I prefer Wellington. Password cannot complain on the score of weight, neither can Raven.

de Giraewald, and is to stand at the Harzburg stud.

— The will of the late Mr Baird was sworn at between £900,000 and £1,000,000, probate amounting to about £30,000 having been paid by the executors.

— The Alexandra Plate, run on the 18 th inst., was wou by Mr Houldsworth's Bushey Park (by Hampton— Sunshine), the only other starter being Insurance. „ . j — Lord William Beresford, who recently had a severe fall when riding in the Grand Military Paperchase at Calcutta, is progressing satisfactorily towards recovery. — It is reckoned pos3ible that the recent action of the N.S.W. Government in suppressing consultations will lead to Brisbane being made the headquarters of this game. — Ayrshire's Derby time was 2mm42j3ec. Next to that, there is nothing in the history of the race to beat the 2min 43seo which Isinglass scored thia year, tieing Kettledrum and others. . —Mr M'Calmont has bought from Captain Machell, for delivery after the present season, his Ormonde mare Kilkenny, who is covered by Satiety. The price is said to be under 2000gs. — "Phaeton" reports that Heaton, rider of Despised in the Auckland Steeplechase, was laid £50 to nothing by a backer who had taken £200 to £1 about the double of Mutiny and Despised. — Don Rodrigo's Festucca has won the Italian Derby. The value of it is 24,000 lire (nearly £1000), which, is given by King Humbert. Festucca is au English marc, by Prestonpans out of Gratitude. — Wagering on the Melbourne Cup has already commenced in Australia— Megaphone, Vakeel, Cremorne, Camoola, Zalinski, btrathmore, Malvolio, and Ronda being backed at long odds for small amounts. ,„ v « -o • —In the race for the Ascot Gold Cup Ragixmrade led into the straight, -but then shut up, and the three-year-old Marcion cantered m eight lengths ahead of Buccaneer. The result was probably a surprise. — A rumour is current that Charles Wood, the ex- jockey, whose license was withdrawn by the stewards of the Jockey Club, ia shortly to be favoured with permission to train horses, though he will not be allowed to ride. . — Of the two most successful English sires this season up to the end of April one is dead and the other is an exile. Barcaldine heads the list, whilst Peter, who is now in France, is second. Up to now St. Simon only stands sixth. . — The Duke of Portland, represented in the Two Thousand Guineas by Raeburn and Kumarnock, declared to win with the first-named, who finished third. Kilmarnock broke a blood-vessel in the early part of the race, and was beaten off. — The valuable Prince of Wales Stakes, a mile aud five furloDgs, for three-year-olds, run at Ascot on Tuesday week, was Avon by air K . Jardme s Red Ensign, by Paradox— Red Rag. Treasure was second and the high-priced Chudwick third. — The Oaks winner, Miss Middlewick (daughtei of Scottish Chief), the dam of the Duke's last Oaks winner, is a full sister to Violet Melrose, the dam of Melton, who won the Derby and Legcr in 1885, and was afterwards sold for £10,000 to go to — I hesr that the Lady Evelyn yearling filly purchased by the Hon. J. D. Ormond at the Warrington sale has been successfully heated by a newly arrived vet. and has now lost that strange fulness of face which gave her such a peculiar appearance. . — The stewards were so dissatisfied with the running of Sir John at Mentone (Vie.) that they disqualified the horse for 12 months, and Gordon Trainor, the jockey, for three months. The V.R.O. committee, however, refused to endorse the disqualifications. ' . — The English stallion Tertius (by Marquis of Carabas— Little Jane) died in May. Among his winners may be mentioned Friday, Quartus, Star Trap, Quintus, Undecimus, Facetious, Lord Lieutenant, Master Munden, Grove Beauty, and Golden Drop. — Mr W. Rouse has determined to send the well-performed (N.S.W.) mare Vespasia to the stud. The daughter of Vespasian and Persephone is nine years old, and during her turf career has won 22 races, finished second on 38 occasions, and 18 times third. — Without a doubt the best hurdle racer in any of the colonies at the present time, for his age, remarks " Cranbrook," is Simulator, a three-year-old son of Sir Edmund and Hortense, who is owned by Mr S. Ferry, the well-known South Australian sport. — As an example of how lightly Colonel North's horses are estimated in America, it may be mentioned that the top-weights in the Oakwood Handicap are Tammany and Lamplighter 9.11. High Commissioner has only 8.0 to carry, while Iddesleigh has 7.12. — "Terlinga " says that Hales does not contemplate absolutely retiring from the saddle yet a while, although he has no intention of riding as regularly as he did. Hales has some half a dozen yearlings of his own, and these he wants to ride whon the weight permits. — Despised had a faulty hock as a three-year-old, and he lost his eye through an illness. So I learn from the correspondence of Sporting Review, and the writer further says that Despised's dam is the Mavis that was the dam of Castoff (sire of Tongariro, Ruapehu, and Aorere). — Mr C. F. Fraser, in his capacity of inspector of racecourses, rode round the Moonee Valley track at last meeting before the racing commenced to determine whether the course was in a safe state to race on after the recent rains, and decided that it was so. So says " Asmodeus." — The Winton Club has a credit balance of £175. The Southland Times's correspondent adds : I hear that a majority of those who favoured a two days' meeting in November have changed their opinions, and it is likely there will be only one day's racing and that there will be races in May. — Considerable discussion in England has arisen over the name bestowed by Mr Vyner on his colt by Crowberry out of Fabiola— Cunctator. It can hardly be deemed apt for such a smart performer, remarks the Sportsman, the word signifying a loiterer. Fabius, a Roman general, from his habits of delay, was surnamed Cunctator. — Ofcago-bred Butcher Boy is being talked about in connection with the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdles. "Ajax" in Sydney Referee says :— This jumper was ostensibly purchased by Foulsham for a buggy horse, but during the autumn I of ton saw him shape well on the Caulfield tiack with Malolo and Wild Rose, and his jumping is all right, — Dare Devil has now copied the example of Pageant and Dalby by securing the Chester Cup in two successive years, and another dual \yinner maybe mentioned in Lyxnington, who won in 1857 aud 1859. For this year's race Red Eagle settled down with a decided market command, and, until he was exught and beaten in the last 50yds by Mr Perkins's horse, looked all over a winner. — Mr W. R. Wilson was at Newmarket to see Isinglass win the Two Thousand Guineas, says " Terlinga," and as an Australianhe was surprised to hear so much grumbling about tbe hard ground. Mr Wilson told some racing men that in Australia the ground is often much harder than it was in Jjlngund on the Two Thousand day, and "out there," &aid the owner of St. Albans, "we run them without shoes."

— The mail brings news of Kendal, a young sire hitherto standing in Ireland, haviug been sold to a public breeder for 18,000g3. Kendal was bred by the Duke of Westminster in 1883, and 13 a haltbrother to Muncaster, beiDg by Bend Or from Wind'rmere. The ßruntwood Stud farm, Cheadle, Cheshire, is the new home of this stallion, who has been purchased by Mr James E. J'latt from Mr J. Gubbins, of the Bruree and Knobkany studs. — At the Paris spring meeting on April 30 the Poule d'ilssai dcs roulicb.es and the Poule d'Essai de 3 Poulains, commonly called the French One Thousand and I'wo Thousand Guineas, were ruD. Both races weie easily won, the former by M. 11. Hay's Tilly, a daughter of The Bard and Regine, bred by ber owner, whilst Baron de Rotlipchild's ho Kichara readily defeated M. Blanc's Marly, Vicount D'Harcourt's Mahonia, and four others in the other event. — " Asniodeus" observes that Mr D. G. Clark little dreamt of the bargain he was effecting when he purchased at auction Cremorne'.s dam, Nea, when in foal to Guesswork's brother, Perchance, for a fiver. Nea has since thrown a fine colt to the hor-.e named, and is now in foal to Mr Clark's American trotter, Honesty. Nea will in "11 probability next season visit her old love, Glorious, with a view of producing something akin to Cremorne.

— The recommendation of the V.R.C. committee that winners of handicaps of over £100 should be lehandicapped at the handicapper's discretion was, it will be remembered, opposed by certain owners, who moved for a continuance of the system of fixed penalties. The owners lost ou a show of hands, and demanded a ballot. The result of this is now to hand. There were 158 votes in favour of the committee's recommendation, and 71 against. — The smallest pony in Bridgeport, U.S.A., and the oldest, says Rider and Driver, is a diminutive Shetland owned and driven by Charlie Blitz. The little nag is over 40 years of age, and is smaller than the average Newfoundland dog. It was one of the first ponies owned by the late 1 . T. Barnum, and was used with its mate to driw the coach of Tom Thumb. Both the illustrious P. T and General Tom Thumb have passed on to the great majority, but their pony is jogging yet. — There was a meeting of 45 jockeys in Melbourne on the 12th inst. The new scale of fees to riders met with condemnation, it being contended that £1 for a losing mount on the flat for races under the value of £100 was an inadequate payment, more especially as a rider has frequently to spend money in obtaining Turkish bathsto reduce his weight, and has to pay his own train and cab fare to all meetings. It was considered that the V.R.C. authorities should provide for the collection of jockejs' fees at tcale. — The Sydney turf agent known as Yorkshireman " has sent me a card containing bis idea of what would be a fair handicap for the Melbourne Cup He gives the Admiral 99, Sfcrathinore 9.7, Cremorne 9.6, Malvolio 9.5, Zalinski 9.4, Camoola 9.3, Megaphone 9.2, Realm and Glenloth 9.1, PortBea and Paris 9.0. Of the New Zealanders he gives Sternchaser 8.12, Launceston 7.6, Loyalty 6.13, The Possible 6.12, and Ilium 6.8. To the steeplechaser Redleap he gives 7.0, at which weight he would surely be very well in. — During his preparation for the Two Thousand Isinglass seems to have been a source of great anxiety to his trainer. According to Mr John Corlett, he developedmo3teccentrichabits. Jewitt was frightened to tie him up in his box because of his propensity of getting his leg over the rack chain ; yet if left loose he would rear up to gaze through his window at the outside world, and on one occasion Avhen endeavouring to see beyond the confinement of his stable he struck his head against the roof and damaged himself considerably. — " Vigilant," of Wellington, remarks that the Australasian writer who records Welcome Jack's death "does not mention a sensational rumour that was circulated and gained a lot of credence, though I never believed it myself, that Sheet Anchor, who won the sensational Melbourne Cup of 1885, was not the well-known hurdle racer of that name, but Welcome Jack in disguise. The story is still thoroughly believed in by many sportsmen in Wellington, who have more than once told me that they have good reasons for their belief." — "Hotspur " tells us that Messw Hobbs Bros.' lease of Prime Warden, Lady Zetland, and Lord Zetland having expired they have been taken back to their home at Grove Farm, Tinwald. It is highly probable that Mr Gates will send Prime Warden and Lady Zetland to the stud next season, and that the smart little lady will visit St Leger. Ihe Maxim— Miss Kate colt is doing remarkably well, and already gives 'promise of developing into a very handsome horse. Mr Gates has decided to name him Marquis of Zetland. Taihunga, by The Wizard, out of Allabaculia, has also been taken back to Grove Farm.

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Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2052, 22 June 1893

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3,256

IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2052, 22 June 1893

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