Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LOCAL & GENERAL

A few days ago a somewhat startling story was reported to the police at South Dunedin, a newsboy declaring that he had been assaulted, robbed, and stripped naked by two men. The matter was inquired into, and as a result of Constable Dale's investigations the boy yesterday admitted thai the story he had told the police and his mother was false. He now declares that as he was going over the sandhills at the Ocean Beach, not far from St. Clair, he dropped some of the newspapers he was carrying into a big pool of water. He became frightened and tore up two other papers, took off his clothes, buried his trousers and shirt in the sand, tied a stocking round his mouth, and ran into Mr Taggart'a house, telling the inmates that he had been stripped of his clothing by two men, and that one of the men had assaulted him the morning before. We understand that the man sent up to Palmerston last week to search the house of the- bankrupt Picworth found the sum of £8 in a drawer in the house. This sum has been handed to the acting-official assignee, and, with the £6 10s taken from the person of the bankrupt at the meeting of creditors, makes a total of £14 10s recovered by means of the search warrant. At the meeting on Wednesday the bankrupt admitted having received the sum of £28 10s a week or two before his bankruptcy, but produced an account showing that he had spent this sum, the greater portion of it in paying the expenses of filing. It would thus appear, if his own statement be correct, that the bankrupt had in his possession immediately before his bankruptcy the sum of £43, while his debts only amounted to £38. The Invercargill Garrison Band and a number of citizens proceeded to the Bluff on the evenisgof the 11th by special train andserenaded the Hon. J. G. Ward, in honour of his becoming Colonial Treasurer. The Southland Times states that after Mrs Ward had dispensed substantial hospitality Mr Ward returned thanks to Lieutenant Siddall, the bandmaster, the mayor and citizens of Invercargill present, and to the Bluff residents. He handed to Lieutanant Siddall a telegram he had that day received from Colonel Hume, intimating that a long service medal would be forwarded to that officer as soon as the engraving of his name on it was completed. He then referred in jocular terms to the days when he, like many present there that evening, believed, and tried to make others believe, that the Bluff was New Zealand, contrasting his present position and views with those of a few years back, and finished by referring to the happy relationships which had always existed from his boyhood between himself and the residents of Awarua. He hoped the same good feeling would continue when his new and important duties removed him from their midst to Wellington, and said that when the time came for him to seek re-election to Parliament he should look to no other place than Awarua for a seat. The entire proceedings were marked by great enthusiasm and cordiality. As only one tender was received for the manufacture of the clock at the Invercargill Post Office tower, the Minister for Works has resolved to invite fresh tenders. One of the coaditions is that the clock shall be made in the colony, and the contract time h to be extended beyond the six months previously specified, as the department is advised that that pericd is insufficient for the purpose. Sir Robert Stout will address the electors of Inangahua before the election if he can arrange to do so. The following telegram from the Hon. Mr Seddon is published in the West Coast papers : — " At the unanimous request of the Ministry, Sir R. Stout has consented to stand in thte Liberal interest. I trust every friend of the party will support him. In my opinion it would be in the interest of the West Coast, as well as of the colony, to see him again in public life." Mr Marchant, commissioner of Crown lands, informs the Lyttelton Times that on the Cheviot estate the survey of the line of railway, under Messrs Ussher and Gavin, of the Public Works department, is progressing, and the route has practically been laid out ; while the triangulation is completed, a staff of five surveyors having been engaged upon that work, j The subdivision of the estate into blocks of suitable size for settlement will b9 proceeded with as soon as the survey of the railway is completed, and it is expected that 37,000 acres, comprising the Waiau Downs, Port Hills, the Huruuui Flats, and a portion of the homestead block, will be ready 'to offer to the public by September, so that they will be available for settlement as soon as the grazing lease 3 expire in October. ' There has been a remarkable growth of grass lately, quite a second spring having set in, and the stock is, Mr Marchant says, looking well. He has completed arrangements with the occupants of the various houses on the estate tb retain them, Mr C. R. Campbell having leased the homestead for a term, and the other houses are occupied by the various persons who had used them while in the service of the trustees, they having in most instances secured some interest in the grazing leases, or being in one way or another engaged about the estate. Those liable to pay income tax should remember that returns must be made to the Commifcsioner of Taxes on or before the 31st of May. The following Crown lands have been disposed oH at the local office during the week :— Portion of section 5, block XII, Naseby, comprising 382 acres, to James Lory, lease in perpetuity, price 20s per acre ; section 89, block IX. Otepopo, comprising 176 acres, to J. J, Spence, lease in perpetuity, price 10s per acre. The committee of the Dunedin Horticultural Society, in their annual report presented at the meeting on Thursday last, "regret that they are compelled to repeat the statement made last year that? the interest taken in horticultural matters, both by exhibitors and the public at large, continues to decrease. A tabulated statement was presented last year showing that during the preceding quinquennium the number of members, exhibitors, and prizetakers had year by year gradually diminished, and it is with extreme regret that the committee report that this retrograde movement still continues. Comparing last year's figures with those of the year just ended, the number of members has decreased from 252 to 249; exhibitors, from 219 to 159; prizetikers, from 160 to 147; prize money, from £137 5s to £117 12a. The number of those who take an active interest in this society hos become so small that it can scarcely be expected that they should give their time and Bervices unless they meet with more cordial support. The committee therefore appeals to the present members not only to continue their connection with the society, but to use their influence in endeavouring to secure additions to the membership. The treasurer's balance sheet bears out to a considerable extent the remarks made above as to tbo retrograde movement in the financial position of the society. The subscriptions have fallen off materially, which has compelled the

committee to reduce the amount of prize money, and at the same time rendered it extremely difficult to meet current expenses. Dr Jeff coat lectured on "Nursing" to a number of certificated members of the St. John Ambulance Association in the Town Hall on Friday evening, treating on the selection, preparation, &c. of the sick room. Miss Violet Campbell has_been appointed class secretary. At a meeting of directors of the Caledonian Society, held on Friday, it was stated that the bank overdraft stood at £83 6s Bd. The rents and accounts owing to the society amounted to £194 2s 6d, whilst the accounts owing by the society were nil. The sum of £10 has been voted as a donation to the Technical Classes Association. It was decided that the Games and Ground Committee be called together at an early date to take into consideration the next annual programme, with a view to bring it up to present requirements. A pound for pound subsidy to the extent of £45 was granted tothe Caledonian Bowling Club to assist in alterations to the bowling green. The bicycle track is to be widened and the corners banked. The members of the Mutual Life Association have every reason to be well pleased with the annual report, which has jast been issued, and I their confidence in the association during the past year has been clearly shown by the fact that only £9300 has been drawn in cash of over £140,000 declared bonuses at the beginning of last year. Mr Henry, the Otago district agent, will be pleased to supply the annual report to any who may not have received copies through the post. The Lower Owake settlers are agitating for pushing on the Catlins line into the flat without delay, and urge the Government to give settlers in the neighbourhood of the railway works an opportunity of obtaining employment thereon without having to seek the assistance of the Labour Bureau at Dunedin. The R.M.S. Kaikoura brings word of the arrival at Cape Town on the 13th March of H.M.S. Raleigh, with Rear-admiral Bedford on board, after a trip to various ports on the west coast. During the cruise, when near Fernandez Po, a frightful tornado was experienced. It was something which all on board will long remember. The lightning was intensely vivid, and the thunder claps were described as terrific. For a time there was almost a continuous blaze of light overhead, and the rain came down in' perfect sheets of water. A sad accident happened on board during the storm. It appears that a first-class boy, named William Brunton, while aloft, missed his footing in the rigging, and falling to the deck was almost instantaneously killed. About 10 o'clock in the morning a renewal of the thunderstorm took place, and while the chaplain, the Rev. Wilson Highmoor, was conducting service the ship was struck by lightning. The effect is reported to have been almost indescribable, and everyone on board received a severe shock. The peal of thunder was instantaneous, and the alarming condition of the elements rudely caused the service to be closed. It was discovered afterwards that the lightning flash had affected the ship's compasses so seriously as to alter the deviation to as much as lOdeg. In the afternoon the remains of Brunton were buried at sea with naval honours, and as the thunderstorm was still raging the feelings of the deceased's comrades as the body was received by the angry sea may well be imagined. A correspondent informs the Christchurch Press that recently a gentleman and his wife had a lengthy argument on the question of bleaching by the aid of electricity. The gentleman, being an amateur electrician, had connected the week's wash as it hung out to dry and bleach on a thorn fence with a couple of copper wires, and before going to bed had laid on the current from the battery. Somewhere about 2 a.m. the whole of his neighbourhood, which is infested with cats, was disturbed by a dismal howling, which increased to fearful shrieks, and in order to quell the row our hero went forth in his pyjamas and slippers, armed with a shotgun. He was sure that cats were in the fence where the clothes were, or very near it, but fortunately there was a little meon, and, before firing, he saw that a woman was writhing in pain with the comer of a wet sheet in one hand and the skirt of another garment in the other. Her first exclamation was, " For goodness sake, if you'll let me off this time I'll give it up." He had to go indoors to disconnect wires, and on returning he found that the thief was gone, together with the sheet and the other garment. There were signs that she had had a terrible struggle, which suggested that she would not visit that back garden again. At a meeting of subscribers to the telephone bureau at Balclutha to consider the action of the department in increasing the charge for connections outside the borough from 6d to Is, a resolution was passed to the effect that the chaDge was a breach of faith. The Leader states that Messrs Wilson and Fleming, -who were deputed to bring the matter before the Postmaßter-general, did so and have received a reply that the resolution will receive careful consideration. A valuable suggestion has been made by Mr J. S. Rutherford, of The Island, Whangarei, in the following letter to the New Zealand Institute :—": — " I believe that preserving a record of the Maori race, their language, and old New Zealand, is within the wide field of labour of your institution. I shall therefore respectfully suggest that one of the most important aids in this direction would be a purely Maori map of the colony showing native names only. This would be of the greatest historical value, and, in fast, is almost the only way we can ever hope to retain the Native names and hand them on with any degree of purity. Every year past makes the task more difficult, as, at all events in the southern portion of New Zealand, the names are being fast forgotten, corrupted, cr entirely lost, there being now only a remnant of the race living to whom an appeal can be made. When it ia considered how carefully and minutely each bay and headland is named by the Natives, iv many cases far more appropriately than by the Europeans, who have fallen back on a clumsy repetition of names where there is no similarity of position or surroundings, and whm it is remembered how often the Native name is taken from some distinctive feature in the place, I think the value of such a document will be readily admitted." The news that the committee of the Children's Hospital at Glebe Point, Sydney, which is composed almost entirely of ladies, has refused the nomination of a duly qualified lady graduate in medicine as resident medical officer, will be a surprise and a perplexity to most people. The nomination (says the Daily Telegraph) was made on the responsibility of Professor Anderson Stuart, whose competence to appraise her qualifications no one will question. It is to be concluded, therefore, that her rejection by the committee did not turn upon any question of capacity; and as the hospital is subsidised by tho Government out of the national exchequer, tho public will be interested to know— they have certainly an undoubted right to ask— on what grounds her nomination has been refused. At present the matter is surrounded with

mystery. The highest authority in our medical schools has testified to the special qualifications of the woman doctor who has been rejected by the committee, and the public have a right to know if her nomination has been declined solely because she is a woman. In a letter to the Indian Daily News of March 2, Mr A. H. Fawcett, who left Dunedin as advance agent for the Denseni Company, makes a suggestion to the Indian Government to the effect that they should take advantage of the depression in Australia to secure recruits for service in India. He writes: — "At the present moment in Melbourne and Sydney there would be no difficulty whatever in raising more than one battalion for Indian service. These latter remarks, however, do not apply in any sense to New Zealand — a country the most prosperous, most enterprising, and, above all, developed on a sound and healthy commercial and financial basis, under what is regarded as a most enlightened form of Liberal Government. I am asked so frequently what sort of a chance there really is in Australia for employment, that I feel tempted to say : 'On no account dream of going to Australia to look for work in any shape or form.' Believe me, Sir, hundreds of youug men would be glad to be learning their drill on the parade grounds of India." Mr B. Pyke, for many years in the Dunedin branch of the Bank of New Zealand, has been promoted to a position iv the Melbourne office. Dr Carter, Bishop of Zululand, finds himself unable to supply even the modest needs of South African episcopal life on his salary of £400 a year. An attempt is consequently being made to ensure him a fixed £450, wherewith he will endeavour to sustain the dignity of his office in comparative splendour. Dr Carter has an exceedingly good " record" as Eton Missioner at Hackney, and has acquitted himself with great credit during the time in which he has occupied his present arduous and responsible post. The Sydney Savings Bank frauds, in connection with which we were informed by cable on Saturday that a man named Leonard had been committed for trial, were sarried out very cleverly. A man named Arthur Hume, on the 18th ult., paid a sum of £1 in to his credit at the Stockton branch of the Post Office Savings Bank. Subsequently a sum of £3 was paid into the same account, and a day or two later, a man representing himself as Arthur Hume produced his pass book at the William street branch of the bank, and intimated a desire to draw out £310. As the amount was initialled in the usual way apparently by an official, and the proper notice had been given, the money was paid over the counter to him and Hume departed with the cash. On the following morning the officials of the bank discovered that they had been defrauded, and a warrant was immediately issued for the arrest of Hume. The fraud assumed larger dimensions than was at first supposed, as it was found that Hume had given notice to withdraw a sum of £303 from the Harrison street branch of the same bank, and it is believed that a similar fraud had been attempted on other branches of the bank. The accused was taken by the detective in a cab to the water police station, and while on the way thither he was observed to push a book under the cushions of the seat. This was obtained, and was found to be the book which was presented at the William street branch. The initials of the officer of the bank are apparently forged, but how the stamp (an official one) was obtained has not been explained. Lord Rosebery recently had some curiosity about the use of haschisch, or as it is more generally written "hasheesh." In a Parliamentary paper just issued (says the Daily Chronicle) it is ehown to be a preparation of the flowers, the stems, or the husks of Indian hemp, and in the "East it is smoked with tobacco or consumed with syrup. It acts directly on the brain, and thence disturbs digestion, circulation, and the muscular system. It conduces to violent and homicidal or suicidal mania, and the majority of the lunatics in Bengal and Egypt are driven to the asylums by the abuse of haschisch, the sale of which is now prohibited in Egypt and Turkey. But in Egypt it is largely smuggled, mostly from Greece, where the sale of it is allowed as merchandise, but its use forbidden. In Turkey the cultivation is prohibited, but it is grown nevertheless. As it is of no great special use in modern medicine, the Powers might well unite to stop its growth and sale altogether. Mr Horßburgh has sent us a copy of the " Statesman's Year Book " for 1893. This is the thirtieth annual publication of Messrs Macmillan and Co.'s well-known and extremely useful work. It is a wonderful storehouse of information of all kinds concerning the British Empire, foreign countries, and indeed the entire world. It bristles with statistical tables of the world's commerce, finance, population, products, &c; gives concise sketches of the constitution and mode of government of the various countries ; has maps of the Pamirs and Africa south of the equator, the latter showing the existing boundary treaties ; and furnishes, indeed, in its 1100 pages an amount of information that statesmen and others interested in public affairs are not likely to obtain within the covers of any other book of the sort, except Mulhall. The information is well up to date, and no pains appear to have been spared to make the " Year Book" worthy of the reputation of its publishers. The Kaitangata correspondent of the Free Press writes:— "Mr James M'Lelland, jun., a young man of 24 years of age and a resident of Kaitangata for over 16 years, has shown to the young men of this town what can be done during their leisure hours towards improving their position in life. By persevering and adhering to a course of training he has qualified himself for admission to a theological training college, and having decided to abide by the Church of Christ, he left on Monday en route for the Kentucky University, America, with the view of qualifying himself as an evangelist oE that church. Mr M'Lelland was a coal miner, and was employed at the Kaitangata Company's mine. The Auckland correspondent of the Tablet writes : — " Dr Posuett, one of the professors in the local university, but at the present time in Dublin, has bearded the lion in his den. He recently attended a meeting of the Dublin University Senate, at which the Home Rule Bill was denounced in all the moods and tenses. Upon rising the doctor was loudly cheered, but, to the great astonishment of them all, he uttered rank treason, and wa3, in f aci"-, an out-and-out Homo Ruler. Amidst tbo utuioßt uproar the doctor ceased speaking. When order was restored, he said •. ' I have come from a distant land, whore I found uncultured miners and gumdiggers, and though you might differ from them upon questions affecting their bread and butter, yet they would listen to you respectfully if you wished to address them ; but I have come to the cultured senate of Dublin to be thus insulted because I differ from you, my countrymen, around me' This struck them mute. He proceeded with his speech, which he wound up by stating that 1 although his ancestor, Mr Oauley, had repre-

sented this university in the old Irish Parliament, he hoped that university representation would be swept away, as it was an anomaly. Upon leaving the building Dr Posnett was loudly hooted and hissed." ■ Mr Ashcroft returned from Sydney via Auckland and Wellington on Saturday. We learn from him that he leaves finally for Wellington onthe24thinst. Mr Graham receives six weeks' leave of absence to visit Australia before taking up his duties as official assignee iv Dunedin. Mr Paul will be acting assignee during the interval. We are pleased to be able to state that Dr Stuart passed a good night on Saturday, and that his health showed great improvement since. The Hon. John M'Kenzie, Minister for Lands, will address his constituents about the end of this week or the beginning of next week, when he will enter on a full defence and exposition of his land policy. The hospital returns for the past week are : Remaining from previous week, 92 ; admitted during the week, 19 ; discharged, 13 ; deaths (Annie Daly, Ernest Hughes, and Angus Campbell), 3 ;— total remaining in the institution, 95. Mr E. H. Carew, R.M., presided at the Magistrate's Court, Port Chalmers, on Saturday. In the case of David Morkane v. Robert M'Dougall (Lake Wanaka), claim £22 10s, for wages, &c, Mr Platts appeared for the plaintiff. Defendant had served a notice of application to have evidence taken at Pembroke, and the case was adjourned until June 10. A series of evangelistic services were commenced on Sunday by Mr Corrie Johnston in the Garrison Hall. The first service was held in the afternoon, and was largely attended. Mr Corrie Johnston took as his subject the beginning of the Gospel of Mark. In the evening there were two services. At the first he spoke for over an hour with great vigour and clearness, giving a Gospel address on the words ••Escape for thy life," and repeating a graphic illustration used by him many years ago when addressing an audience in this city. As Mr Johnston's voice was failing somewhat the principal address at the second meeting was delivered by Mr Briggs, the subject being " Tne parable of the rich man." Mr Johnston made a brief, earnest appeal to the unconverted and the proceedings were closed with praise and prayer. The evangelistic services will probably be continued during the week, and of their continuance notice will be given in the press. A correspondent gives "Bohemian" of the I Christchurch Press some amusing particulars of the unveiling of commercial "shoddy" when the Ruahine's cargo was discharged at the Cape, after the fire. Part of it consisted of pianos — and they looked terribly dissipated and "tore up" when they were unpacked. The "real" walnut and mahogany of their cases had shed its veneer under the heat, as an actress's face sheds the paint under vaseline, and there exposed to the pitiless daylight stood the rough, unplaned, unmistakable deal. The "ivory" of the keys looked like cocoanut ice gone wrong in the fryingpan— a white, pulpy, shapeless mass of unmistakable celluloid. Inside the cases of the pianos were rammed full with mandolins, flutes, fiddles, and instruments enough for a whole orchestra— in defiance of Customs regulations. A " Bophometic baptism of fire," as Carlyle would say. Alas for this age of wooden nutmegs, when skim milk passes for cream ! A contemporary states that the following, taken from a Belfast paper, will cause a great deal of surprise, seeing that all Orangemen are reported as being the deadly enemies of Home Rule:— "At a meeting of Orangemen held in Sandyrow Orange Hall, Mr Wagner (Grand Master of No. 7 Lodge) said that for some time back things had been drifting slowly, but surely, towards Home Rule, and that it was time for them to speak out and say, ' Give us Home Rule.' The Orangemen of Belfast need not be ; a bit afraid to take Home Rule, and make their own terms afterwards, for they had the fighting men and industry and intelligence of the people. The time had come when they should be no longer shouting 'No surrender,' but take up instead the' cries of ♦ Onward, upward— Excelsior.' — (Cheers.)" A proposal is made to erect a memorial church on the site of the Gate Pa, as a suitable monument to the memory of the men who fell there. Over £100 has been subscribed by Gate Pa residents, most of whom are old soldiers. At the Blenheim Borough Council meeting on Friday (says the Express) a nice surprise was sprung on the council. The Bank of New Zealand has stopped its credit, and last month's wages cheques are still unpaid. It seems that the overdraft is nearly £2500, but there are credits to the extent of £700, which the bank refuses to deduct from the total. A deputation has been appointed to wait on the banker and see if the wages cheques cannot be paid. The Hon. W. P. Reeves, Minister for Education, will arrive in Dunedin on Friday evening. He has intimated that he is prepared to address a public meeting on Monday evening, but as it is doubtful if a hall can be secured, it is probable the speech will be given on Tuesday evening. A telegram has been received in Dunedin stating that leave of absence to Mr Justice Williams has been extended to the 20th June. We understand that his Honor's health is gradually improving. Mr Justice Ward will in all probability take the next sittings of the court at Invercargill and Dunedin. A Masonic correspondent informs us that the W. Bro. Francis Arkwright, P.M. Ruapehu Lodge, No. 2137, E.G., Overton, Rangitikei. has been recommended by the District Grand Lodge of Wellington to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, M.W.G.M. of England, for appointment as D.G.M. of Wellington in succession to the late Sir Harry Atkinson. The Arthur street and Kensington Schools re-opened on Monday, but as the attendance was very poor, owing to the prevalence of measles, it was decided to close them again, and the pupils who attended were dismissed. The High street School also re-opened, but although the attendance was below the average it was decided to keep open. The Forbury School has been closed for a i'oriuight. The Post Office department have decided to adopt a suggestion mado to them by Mcssrd W. Guthrie and Co., that circulars posted at one time in considerable numbers might be received without Btaraps, the party postiug to pay the cost of stamps in ca"-h over the couuter. Tbe department has fixed the minimum to bo posted at 2000 documents at one time. If the Post-master-general could ccc his way to reduce the minimum to 500 the concession that has been mado would benefit a considerably larger number of people. By the change the department saves the stamps and the public the labour of affixing them. The circulars will be stamped at the post office with the word "Paid." The Southland Times adds :— " ' There is nothing new under the sun ' : this concession was in force for single letters at>er Rowland Hill's penny post cinio into bring. Wn fiivw a lettor

the other day, written in 1849, and on the envelope of it the word "Paid" appears in place of a stamp." We might point out that the Victorian post office authorities appear to be in advance of New Zealand, as they allow two, three, or four newspapers to be posted and paid for without requiring them to be stamped. Our Auckland correspondent writes: — "Owing to the prevalence of measles, the City Schools Committee have extended the closing of one school for a week. The attendance has fallen off at the others nearly 50 pet cent;., and the committee have asked the head masters to furnish returns of the numbers absent in each standard, with a view of determining what is best to be done. I understand the attendance in the primer and junior classes is most affected." A special meeting of the St. Leonards School Committee was held on Monday evening to consider the matter of the prevailing epidemic, when it was decided to close the school for a fortnight. The Post understands that tho attention of Ministers has been directed to some rather extraordinary proceedings in the Resident Magistrate's Court at Invercargill lately, and an inquiry will probably be instituted. The Timaru Herald states that a business man in Timaru has received a letter from his brother in Melbourne, a Victorian civil servant, who writes dolefully on the state of things over there. After referring to the reductions in salaries, he writes :—": — " Financial affairs are in a very bad state, and every day the papers seem to have worse news than the bad news of the day before — the banks going bung, the unemployed starving, labour strikes, reductions of wages, retrenchment of Government expenses, talk of the closing of public charities, wholesale dismissals from office, bankruptcies, burglaries, highway robberies in broad daylight, swindling and thieving of all descriptions. I don't know when poor Victoria was so hard beset. The, fact is we have been borrowing millions, and so long as the money was coming in we lived as happy as kings, but now that no money is coming in, and the interest of our borrowing is going out, we don't feel quite so jovial as we used to do." An extraordinary case is attracting attention at Broken Hill. A labourer named John King shot himself in the head with a revolver, the bullet entering the forehead and going, into the brain. King, who lived at South Broken Hill, said nothing to anyone about the mishap, but coolly walked to Broken Hill and asked a doctor, two hours after the accident occurred, to extract the lead from his head. The request was first treated as a joke, but investigation proved that the bullet was really in the man's brain. He walked to the hospital, where the lead was extracted. On the road to the institution King got in and out of a cab himself, sat upright in it, and even went into an hotel and had a glass of beer. His condition after the operation became serious, and he is not expected to live. The bullet, when extracted, was found to be flattened by contact with the skull. The question which puzzles the doctors is why the man did not die instantly, instead of being able to walk about all right for two hours. In Adelaide the Government havo got over the Chinese difficulty so far as their acquiring political influence, by refusing to naturalise Chinamen. It was discovered that they were getting naturalised, paying the requisite fees, with a view of getting placed on the electoral rolls. They are now taking tho Afghan and Assyrian hawkers in hand. The Municipal I Association recently took the matter up, and wrote to the Commissioner of Crown Lands, through whose department all their correspondence goes, asking that legislation should be enacted to prevent the issue of hawkers' licenses to Afghans and Assyrians. The Attorney-general having looked into the matter told the Commissioner of Crown Lands that legislation was really unnecessary in the matter, as if the various local authorities who issued licenses and the Treasurer, who also issued licenses, chose to agree amongst themselves not to issue licenses they could gain the end aimed at. The commissioner thereupon placed himself in communication with the Treasurer, and will instruct his officers to refrain from issuing licenses to Afghans and Assyrians, while the various corporations and district councils of tho colony will he invited to take similar action. With the object of popularising the telephonic communication in the suburbs, the Victorian Postmaster-general has decided that instead of the subscription increasing as at present according to the distance from the central exchange, it shall be the same in the suburbs as in the metropolis. There must, however, be sufficient subscribers to make the surburban exchanges a monetary success. We are requested to state, in connection with the particulars which we publish elsewhere concerning a wonderful surgical operation, that Dr Closs's name was used without his authority or knowledge. The following inquiries are taken from Lloyd's Weekly newspaper of March 26 :— John Allen left Rishton for Scotland, en route for New Zealand, in 1874-75, ,and sailed in the ship Jessie Ashburn under the name of A. Smith. He last wrote to his daughters Emma and Mary from Wellington about 11 years ago. Robert Anderson, of Coatbridge, Scotland, went to New Zealand about Dine years ago, and last wrote home from Mullocky Gully, near Mosgiel, six years since. Brother John inquires.— Thomas Baird sailed from the East India Docks on May 1, 1868, in the s.s. Ballarat, bound for Launceston. When he last wrote to his sister in 1872 he was mate on a mail boat running in the Kaipara waters, New Zealand. — Andrew Brookman was last heard from in 1881 ; address, Kaikoura Post Office, Marlborough, New Zealand. Sister Julia asks. — Henry, Henrietta, and Charlotte Waite are sought for by their sister Harriet, who says : " I last heard from them when they were on a visit to South Lincolnshire, England, in June 1885 ; now supposed to be at Mount Eden, Auckland, or Christchurch, New Zealand."— John E. W. White, late of Bridge House, Deptford, sailed in the s.s. Rimutaka, for Timaru, New Zealand, on January 13, 1888. His parents wish to know his whereabouts. The Hokonui Railway and Coal Co., Limited, have had an engine specially constructed for pumping operational their colliery, and it is a marvel in strength for the comparatively small space it occupied. Size is a point of considerable importance with machinery in a coal mine, and the engine in question, which is on the duplex principle, b/*s been designed specially to take up as little roj»x\ as possible, while at the same time capable oX doing the work required to be done. Its entire weight is but little over a ton, and yet it will force 6000 gal per hour against a vertical head cf 550 ft. It has been constructed at Johnston's Vulcan Foundry, and one of the principal f eabvir 1 c of the engine is a method-r-the joint produo ;o;i of Mr Johnston, jun., and Mr Hayes, the Cir.v.eny'B engineer— of procuring quick and (** ay. access to tho valves. This has been eff.-Ked by a strong bridge Of iron resting on two »!ates, eaoh of which* cover the entrance to a v«(ve chamber, i Tho removal of the bridge t*i d consequent

i

opening up of the two chambers is obtained by unscrewing two bolts only, whereas by any other method at least a duaen bolts would have to be displaced. By this arrangement any choking caused by the dirty water which is always met with at the bottom of a mine can be relieved, and work resumed in the short space of five minutes. There are two steam cylinders of lOin diameter, with a stroke of llin, and two water cylinders of 4£in diameter, with a similar stroke, the action being a positive one, without the possibility of the engines stopping on a dead centre. We (Southland Times)' saw the engine at work and were struck with the steadiness of the flow of water whether working at a slow or high rate of speed. The hearing of the criminal libel action brought by Dr Frederis Truby King against the printer and publisher of the Globe newspaper is fixed for Thursday afternoon at the Police Court. The measles appear to be still very prevalent in some parts of the city and suburbs. On Monday morning over 200 of ■ the children attending the Kaikorai School were absent, and it was deemed advisable to close the school for a fortnight. It was also decided to close the Forbury School till the 26th inst. ' | An improved fire indicator— the first of the ■ kind in the city— has just been fitted-up on the street wall of the Criterion Hotel in Princes street. The button in this, on being pressed in the usual way, rings a bell and 12 strokes, similar to that of a clock striking the hour of 12, are given, while the alarm is at the same time communicated to the fire brigade station. It is claimed that, inasmuch as the mechanical efcriking of the indicator will be a signal to passers-by that the indicator has been tampered with, this new contrivance will be a safeguard against false alarms. The Hon. Mr Seddon was reported to have indicated in his Greymouth speech the intention of the Government to keep in view the placing of all taxation on land. The Oamaru Mail states that the matter was brought under the Premier's notice by Mr Duncan, M.H.R., and elicited from She Premier the following telegram: — "It is absolutely a pure fabrication. I never said a word about putting all the taxes on the land. What I said was that I hoped the day was not far distant when all the improvements on the land would be exempt from taxation." The Wellington Press states that Sir George Grey intends to move for the appointment of a select committee to inquire into alleged trafficking by two members of the Government in Native lands, and that for some time past he has been getting together evidence on the subject. It also asserts that Mr Cadman's action against Mr Rees cannot come on for trial at Napier before June 20, and that the defendant intends to subpoena three Ministers and 14other members of Parliament. Mr F. H. Morice, who was for some time in the Police department at Dunedin, and has latterly occupied a position in the Public Trust Office in Wellington, has been appointed district agwit for the Public Trustee in Westland. He will be stationed in Greymouth, and the agents at Hokitika and Westport will be subordinate to him. The Waimate Times, referring to the vacant Wellington See, says :-— " Surely there are churchmen in New Zealand sufficiently wise and learned to fill the office of bishop. Candidly, we do not think the number is large. There are good men, preachers, pastors, in all denominations, but able men are at a discountstill they are surely to be found. Names 0 suitable candidates have been suggested here and there, and much may be said for the high haracte and accomplishments of those who have thus been named. But it is always the case that neither the church nor the world knows its greatest men. If the bishops desire an able coadjutor selected in the colony, we can direct them to a clergyman who, while making little stir, is one of high culture, a thinker and a scholar, an excellent preacher, and a man of broad views and large sympathies. Such a one is to be found in the person of the Rev. A. R. Fitchetc, of All Saints', Dunedin, whose brother is Australian editor of the 'Review "of Reviews.' Merit deserves recognition, and we are doing our part towards it in this instance." The Christchurch Evening Telegraph ceased publication on Saturday last, and has been succeeded by a Liberal evening journal named Truth, the first number of which appeared last evening. A Home paper states that the story by Mr Christie Murray, which is being advertised for publication in Lloyd's newspaper, is probably the last that will proceed from the hands of this popular author for some time to come. Mr Murray has been undergoing the hydropathic treatmemVJat Matlock in the hope of recovering from the effects of brain-fag. He can now eat and sleep, which, as he explains, is a vast improvement on his former condition ; but the doctor is far from satisfied, and Mr Murray has been ordered to take a sea- voyage, and to write nothing more for a period of six months. • He will proceed by the nest large sailing ship for Australia. M. Bloueb (Max O'Rell), who, it will be remembered, left in the White Star liner Australasian en route to England, via the Cape, was interviewed during his stay afc Cape Town. Speaking of the Australian colonies, he is reported to have said: — "What struck me most there waa the growing spirit of nationality, j which so far is provincialism. For instance, the pretensions of very small towns are very amusing. As an example : When H. : M. Stanley went to lecture in a little town of 2000 or 3000 inhabitants in Australi?, Mr Smythe was in advance of him as manager. Mr Smythe happened to meet a Baptist minister there, and asked him how he though}; Stanley would take. Tho little Baptist minister became very serious, and after considering, replied, ' Well, I don't know at all ; I have given several lectures in the town myself, and have never been able to got a good i house.' That is typical of Australia. I think there is a great future for that country. Its resources are immense, but they want a population, and of the right class. I was most pleased with New Zealand, where the scenery is squal to tho best to be seen in Norway or Sweden. There the people are more English and settled than in tjhe proper Australian colonies, and the climate is delightful." The Queensland Full Court gave an important decision recently concerning the granting of prohibition orders. On an ex parte application an order was granted against Captain John Strachan, direcbiug that 110 intoxicating drink 3 should be supplied to him. The Full Court, on application, grauted a rule absolute quashing the order. Mr Justice Harding laid down the law that the effect of the order was to interfere with the personal liberty of the subject, and, said his Honor : " Ifc is one of the strongest principles of British law, and one of the highest privileges Englishmen enjoy under it, that a man cannot be deprived of his liberty of person or reputation unle&a there is a judicial inquiry legal under the law." The remaining members 01 the court consented

to the quashing order, but the Chief Justice expressed some doubt as to whether the Legislature had nob " expressly or impliedly given authority to act without necessary authority" — that is, without the person against whom such an application is made being informed of the fact. The Government have appointed Mr J. Thompson, 8.E., resident engineer at Greymouth, and he will also lecture in the local schools of mines. Mr Thompson, besides having experience in Belfast and in the colony, has been a lecturer at the Otago University. An Auckland telegram states that the tour of Miss Maggie Moore and the Holloway Company promises to be a very successful one, judging by the opening performance in "Struck Oil" at the Opera House there. The audience was large, and the drama went off admirably, Miss Maggie Moore getting an enthusiastic reception. _^____________

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18930518.2.88

Bibliographic details

LOCAL & GENERAL, Otago Witness, Issue 2047, 18 May 1893

Word Count
7,570

LOCAL & GENERAL Otago Witness, Issue 2047, 18 May 1893

Working