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TALK OF THE DAY.

BY MAZEPPA.

*#* Bishop has nine horses in training at Messrs Stephenson and Hazlett's stables. Occident's lengthy spell has caused him to assume a very round, beefy appearance, and he will not be at his best till the coming racing season is a bit advanced— say about February, but he is apparently sound and healthy. Hippomenes has evidently been kept jogging along quietly, and there is no reason why he should not be prepared for the New Zealand Gup meeting. Huguenot is looking remarkably well, and so is Tempest. The last-named seems to me to be iraproving with age. lioth mares are likely to race pretty early in the season. Old Derby's appearance is that ot one of the most muscular hort.es 1 have seen for a long while, and as he keeps quite hearty wo may guess that he will not remain idle when the new season begins. ■ Lustre is growing fairly well, but he. has a lot ol" work in front of him hi fore he will be, ready for a Cup contest. (Jlva seems to be ripening into- a fairish kind of mare. The unnamed yearling, son of Vanguard and Tilania has been previously referred to as a good-looking 'youngster and the more J see of him the more I like him. He should makeja useful, perhaps a brilliant two-year-old, The other yearling colt,

by Sir Garnet out of the St. Albans mare lona, is a perfect little nugget, and may prove to be a pretty fair handicap horse.

*** Reference is made elsewhere to a statement published in Australia on the authority of someone who recently visited our colony to the effect that racing is going to the dogs in Maori.land, and that this is attributable to the totalisator, which trusts chiefly to the 'patronage of women and children of tender years. Now Zealanders will merely smile at the audacious perversion of truth embodied in the latter clause of this statement, but it may be as well to assure Witness readers in the other colonies that the accusation thus brought against the machine is utterly baseless. I have seen as much of the working of the totalisator as a good many folk, and so far I have never noticed one woman go to the machine at any meeting, nor aro the clerks given to trading with children of tender years. I have seen women putting together half-crowns and sending for tickets on their respective fancies after the horses were paraded, but the amount thus subscribed is, I am convinced, very small at even the biggest meetings. They can in this way amuse themselves without exposure to insult or blackguardism, and really I do not know that there is anything objectionable in this form of amusement. At any rate, even the more particular of the husbands do not seem to mind it — they rather encourage it by going for tickets and giving advico which, alas ! too often proves unsound — and I am sure that they will when they read it resent the exaggeration of this critic, who, to be consistent, should forbid his wife and daughters to attend the races. What I should like to see would be a larger attendance [of ladies, and if they choose to invest a shilling or a half crown I am sure that no right-minded man will think the less of them for doing" so.

*v* The assertion that racing is going to the dogs in New Zealand is one that we occasionally hear from other sources also, but a moment's consideration will show that it is no more reliable than the statomeht which is briefly noticed above. There are men who for want of information would have us believe that in other respects the world is turning backwards — that everything was better 50 years ago than now. But the bulk of those who think and who observe for themselves are satisfied to humour those old fogies, and treat them with consideration as being just a little out of date. So with the pessimists of the turf. The facts are against them. The very best horses New Zealand ever bred were produced in the days of the totalisator. When in all the period before the machine was known could be found the equal of Maxim and the great Carbine ? And it is now only five months ago since the record for the longest flat race in the colony was reduced. Further, our fields are as large as ever, and the quality as high, taken on the average ; and there is a great deal moro money to be run for ; and, while we retain enough horses to keep our own fields large, we supply Australia with a not insignificant contingent periodically. If this exportation is relied on as evidence of racing going to the dogs because of the totalisator, how was it that beforo the advent of the machine we sent away the pick of our cattle in Manuka and LeLoupand Mataand Lurline and Calumny and others of lesser note ? I must own that I tor one sometimes begrudge Australia her acquisitions from these shores, but this sort of tbing has been going on for a long time, aud it will continue to go on, totalisator or no totalisator. Australia is the big country, and we are the small one — that is the explanation, and in the bigger placo there is naturally the greater scope for the best horses. We ought to be thankful that there is a good market so handy. Never fear that the prosperity of our turf will be thus endangered. Australia has in turn sent us hundreds of her horse«, and no one over there ever got a fright that the turf would "go bung "as the result. New Zealand can breed more horses than she wants, and Australia takes the pick. That is the worst way of putting the facts, but even on that footing, racing here is so far from going to the dogs that it is maintaining its quality and at the same time growing — growing too fast to please some people.

* # * M f Henry's handicaps for tho New Zealand Grand National meeting were accidentally omitted last week, but appear in this issue. They have been very well received, and I expect a fair acceptance list to-morrow evening. Whalebone will be paid up for in the Steeplechase, and there are signs already that his party are rather sweet on his chance, notwithstanding his weight. Some think that Air Lunn will accept with both Ahua and Norton, both of whom are doing well at Riccartons C'ouranto is pretty certain to remain in, but Shillelagh, Somnambulist, and Commotion are equally likely to be numbered with the slain, and I hear disquieting reports about Sir Garnet and Lyndoora, though I think they are by no means dead to the world as yet, Kangaroo is sure to pay up, and Fliutstone and Morok may be expected to keep in after their success at Wellington on Saturday ; while Worth is being specially trained for this race, and so is Torch, who is described as a dangerous member among the light weights. As to the Hurdle Race candidates, the knowing ones have already pitched upon Kulnine as a good thing, and Couranto and Cajolery are also reckoned to have a say. The last-named, though somewhat wayward, not to say unmanageable, as a flat racer, is making a name for himself over the schooling fences at Riccarton. Bar these three nothing has been so far backed for much, but there will be a lot of betting in doubles before the day, and when the rush comes you will see that Captain Webb will not be neglected. I fancy him before all the ethers, and am gradually working up a stronger regard for Flintstone for the Steeplechase. It is, liowever, too early yet awhile to venture on a tip. I had almost forgotten, by the way, that Derby was scratched for the Hurdles on Friday evening. The horse is very well, but his owners were, I understand, dissatisfied with the weight given him.

*** Last week I uttered a mild complaint as to the unsatisfactory report of the Wellington Conference proceedings which was sent to Dunedin. So far as one can see, the Wellington papers fared no better. They have only about 40 lines of the whole thing. Evidently tho proceedings were conducted in secret. This must have been done of a purpose. New Z: aland newspapers are always ready to send a reporter to an important meeting, and, as there is no report beyond a few skeletonised minutes, w« mii't take it that the delegates elected to keep everything d<\rk. This is nut, I think, the best way of obtaining respect for a body elaim'iiig legislative power. The country clubs, who have no voice; oi\ tho conference, and ycfc are virtually concerned in most of the questions r.tised, h:ivo a ri/;ht to know exactly what is done and how it wat> done, and to keep thum in Mm (Kirk is to directly encourage discontent. As it happens, however, there was nothing particular done at the recent meeting, so far as

we guess. We were informed last week that a resolution was passed to the effect that it is not desirable to have trotting and pony races on ordinary programmes, and that tho question of forming a New Zealand Jockey Club be deferred till November. Those wore the raaiu subjects on the order paper. *** Among the rest of tho business one of the most important "items was tho carrying of a resolution, on the motion of Captain Russell, authorising an addition to the rule as to changiug the name of a horse. The amendment makes an owner responsible for the production, on demand of the stewards or the secretary of the meeting at which the horse is to run, of the acknowledgment that tho namehns been legally changed, and if such acknowledgment is not forthcoming on. demand, tho stewards shall not allow the horse to start. The proposal of tho Tarauaki Club that tho conference should tako Rule 131 into consideration, with a view to enlarging the jurisdiction of metropolitan clubs, was withdrawn. A letter was read from Messrs Yuille and Nathan, asking the conference to urge the Wanganui Jockey Club to remove the disqualification passed by that club some months ago ; but the conference decided that the matter was withiu the exclusive jurisdiction of the Wanganui Club. Captain Russell moved, and it was carried — "Thafc various instances having occurred during the past year of the rules of racing being infringed, this conference desires to .draw the attention of all officials of racing clubs to the absolute necessity of uniformity of action, which can only be obtained by the literal interpretation of the Rules of Racing." Dr Earle, of Wanganui, gave notice of his intention to move- as follows at the next conference : — "That the totalisator shall not be used by any club that has a race of less Tfclue than 25sovs on its programme. Thafc the added money to be given by any club holding one meeting shall not be less than L 15 0; two meetings, LSOO ; three meetings, L 50 0; more than three meetings, L 600.'! The doctor of course means that these are to be tho amounts of added money per day. The existing rule is LIOO per day for one meeting, L2OO for two meetings, L4OO for three meetings, and LSOO for more than three meetings. Tho object, evidently, is to get the racing authorities to comply with that development of public opinion which says that there is too much racing* Whether this is or is not a desirable move, and whether Dr Earlo's motion is tho best ono that could be framed to meet tho case if there is need to do something, is a subject which I propose to discuss later on. There is plenty of time. *** A fair idea can already be obtained ns to the chance some of the New Zealand Cup candidates have of seeing the post. Cruchfield was a "gone coon" last week, and Occident went out on Friday. That is tsvo the less to puzzle one's brain about. Ido not think that the owners were nettled at Occident being put at the top of the handicap, the reason for his withdrawal being rather — at least, that is my guess— that the son of Tho West could hardly be got quite fit so early as tho beginning of November. He is more likely to bo ready in the early autumn. Prime Warden's' followers seem to think that ho will continue his engagement and be a bad ono to beat at the finish. The Workman, ou the other hand, is not likely to como down. Occident's withdrawal will cause some attention to bo bestowed on Hippomenes, but ho is not a good ono to back just yet. Ido not think the stable know what he can do at tho distance. British Lion, last year's winner, is in work again, and seems to be all serene. Tho Napier lolk appear to fancy Whisper in preference to Cynisca. They should know moro than mo, but I do not feel inclined to forego my own opinion on the point, and that is that Cyuisca has a good show. There is a growing tendency to bring Presttgo forward in the market, aud it is believed that this is the race for which this half brother to Dudu has been latterly reserved. Some say that he is likely to go into Dick Mason's hands. Thame is regarded as having ended her career as a racer. Don Pedro has been genuinely backed by the stable tor a few hundreds, and his owner makes no secret of. his belief that this horse will shape well in the race. Vogengang's weight does not seem to have frightened his party, and Merganser is being steadily nibbled at. I hear great accounts of the improvement in North Atlautic, and rumour says that the stable have already backed him for LIOOO at 100 to 7. The puzzle is that many who should be in the know swear by Freelance who is in the same ownership. Evidently the Hon. Mr Ormond holds a strong hand. St. Hippo is also fancied on the strength of his forward and promising condition, and Dilemma is not overlooked, while there are promising reports concerning the unnamed gelding by The Mute from Christina — the only nameless member in the race. Dunedin quotations yesterday were as follow :—: — New Zealand Cup. 100 to 8 agst North Atlantic (tk) -v 100 — 8 Prime Warden (tic) 100 — 7 Vogenganj? (tk) 100 — 7 Merganser (off) 100 — (i Don Pedro (tk) 100 — 6 Stepniak (tk) 100 — (5 Dilemma (off) 100 — 6 Memo England (oil) 100 — 6 Prestige (off) 100 — 5 Hippomenes (off) 100 — 4 Robefeldt (tk) 100 — 4 Coalscuttle (tk) 100 — 4 Freelance (tk). *** "Pentagraph" is out early with his trotting statistics for the season of 1891-92. They appear in last week's Weekly Press. There were 33 clubs that gave LSO or upwards in stakes to this branch of the game, the Auckland Trotting Club heading tho list with four days' racing and L 1705 for 30 races. The Canterbury Trotting Club comes second with four days and L 995 in stakes; Lower Heathcote third with LB9O for five days ; Lancaster Park fourth with LB9O for four days ; Pluiupton Park fifth with L 672 10s for four days; and the Dunedin Jockey Club sixth with L 635 distributed over seven days. Of the other Otago meetings the defunct Carisbrook Club gave L 535 for three days, Green Island L 295 for two days, North Otago L2lO for four days, Tahuna Park L2OO for one day, Maniototo Ll6O for three days, Taieri L 145 for two days, Central Taieri Ll3sfortwo days, Winton LIOO for three days, Palmerston L 95 for two days, Southland L 75 for two days, Vincent L7O for two days, Clutha L 55 for one day, Cromwell Jockey Club LSO for two days, Wanaka LSO for two days, and Cromwell Tradesmen's LSO for one day. Of the 33 clubs that gave LSO or over in stakes to trotting races, it will thus be seen that 16 are Otago clubs. The lemarkable thing about this particular table, however, is the position taken by the Auckland clubs. As thf statician observes : "Two seasons ago the disbursements in stakes for trotting in Ih" Auckland district did not reach L9.oo,\vh'lfL 9 .oo,\vh'lf this season well on for L3OOO was yiven " There, were 49 clubs in different parts of tho culonv th.ifc gave less than LISO iv stakes, «nd in all the .r.e.ount of stake mone.y for tho season amounted to L10.2G2 10s for bGS trots and gallow.ty r.iee-s. With regard to tho totalizator investment-, the Auckland T. C. heads the list among the 33 clubs above

referred to, having passed L 11.072 through the machine for 30 races, but the Dunedin Jockey Club has a higher average with L 6363 for 10 races. Nelsou is worst off in this respect, having put through only L 72 for four races to which L 77 was given in added money.

*** The Nelson representative, Rarus, tops the list of winning horses with L 248, and it will astonish many to learn that the ancient and somewhat despised Otago member, Maori Jack, thanks to honesty on his part and on the part of his owner, comes second with L 159. A Canterbury horse. Nilreb, is third with L 152, anil Venus, another belonging to the same district, is fourth with L 146, while Otago's big horse. Contractor, comes next with Ll3B. The others that have won ever LIOO are Little Ben L 137, Myrtle (Pater's) L 125, Sapphire L 123, Maud S. Lllß, Rover LIOB, and Our Pony LlO4. Looking further down the list I find that Ruby secured LBO, The Major L7l, Tut dOr L7O, Foremast L7O, Reefer L6B, Daffodil L 67, Colao L 63, Lady Jane 63, Colleen Dhas L 62, Eos L6l, Gaiety L6O, Young Pinole PatchenLs7, Grained L 54, Silver Bell L 53, little Parnell Lsl, and Young Rangi LSO. There are 15 owners who have captured over LIOO in stakes. Mr W. Kerr takes L 299, Messrs M. and J. Allan L 137, Miss Field L 129, and Mr Myers LllO. Of course, as the painstaking compiler suggests, there is some difficulty in determining the exact amounts won by owners, as horses are sometimes nominated by the owner and sometimes by the trainer. For the purposes of the return, the nominator has credit in every instance. That was the only workable system to adopt. Onthe other hand, the table of winningriders and drivers is one that can and does exhibit bedrock facts. I find on referring to this that W. Kerr has been placed first 18 times, and James Allan 17 times, but the latter's average is the better one, inasmuch as he was second 15 times and third seven times, while Kerr had only 11 goes altogether in which he was not first. Jas. Allan's score is 17 wins out of 39 tries, and Kerr's is 18 wins out of 29 goes. C. Kerr is third on the list with 16 wins, and J. Munro fourth with 12. Malcolm Allan had five wins. There were during the season 17 dividends of over L2O, the largest being Blackthorne's LlOl 2s at Vincent. The tables to which I have referred expose a great deal of precious hard work, and the sporting fraternity are under an obligation to " Pentagraph" for making such a gdod job of them.

*#* Booties was the public fancy for the Trial Steeplechase at the Wellington meeting on Saturday week, and he shaped so well up to the time he fell that he would have been hard to beat if he had stood up. That is the opinion of "Vigilant," who, referring to other events during the day, says r—"lnr — "In the Hurdle Handicap Waterbury ran a great horse, and if he could only be depended on he would be a nice one to have in a Grand National Hurdle' Race, with abo'it 10.7. Although he was giving most of his opponents over a stone and a-half, ho fairly smothered them. Matthews rode a very good raco, contenting himself with third or fourth plac3 until half a mile from home, when ho ■went up without effort and won easily. Waterbury would not have paid such a dividend as L 6 Is had he uot refused the hurdle in his preliminary. This disgusted several intending backers, find they stood off . The Wellington Steeplechase yas full of interesting variations. Canute made such good running for the first mile and three-quarters that, knowing what an honest horse he is, his friends were confident that he would stay it out. But he and Worth had had enough in the middle of the third round, where Ingorangi, who had always held a good position, took up the running, closely attended by Kaimanawa, with Whalebone coming up fast. The excitement now began. The backers of the favourite had their jubilation cut short by peeing their champion run off at the very same jump at which he ran off in the United Hunt Club Steeplechase last year. Then Ingorangi's admirers got a fright on seeing Kaimanawa going up to him after landing on the course for the finish. And no sooner did Kaimanawa's friends begin to shout out his "'name than he loses his chance by hitting the last hurdle and nearly coming on his nose. Now Ingorangi must win. But what do we hear ? * Look at Caloola! Caloolo wins,' goes up from the prowd in chorus. And there, just passing Kaimanawa and making a bold bid for victory, is the gallant grey which every one had lost sight of after his mishap at the ' double.' He has made up his ground wonderfully, and now the question is, will he have time to catch the leader. At the last turn he is about three lengths behind, but here he falters. Griffiths in vain urges him with whip and spur, but his bolt is shot, and Ingorangi plodding on, with Williams on his back sitting still, passes the post a winner, with a few lengths to spare. It was one of the best steeplechases wo have ever seen at the Hutt. Ingorangi's victory was a meritorious one, and Williams rode him with great coolness, skill, and judgment, but the general opinion is that the misfortunes of other competitors had more to do with his victory than his own merits. For my own part I have little doubt that nothing could have won but Whalebone had he kept on the course. Then there is the question, Where would Caloola have been had he not lost 200 yds by his mistake ? And another question that may be asked is, Did not Mr Donnelly throw away the Steeplechase by starting Kaimanawa in the Hurdles ?"

*** The race for the Woodcote Stakes this year resulted, it will be seen, in a dead heat, and the stakes were divided. The dead heaters ran the six furlongs in lmin 13sec. That is gomething like travelling. There was a second dead lieafc at Epsom on the same afternoon, Paddy and Mounteagle dividing in the Norbury Plate. Sir Hugo's win in the Derby has no appearance of being a fluke. He came away early, and La Fleche could not catch him. That is the story in short. His time was 2min 44sec, or one second slower than the record, at which (2min 43sec) Blair Athol, Kettledrum, Merry Hampton, and Ayrshire are a tie. Lord Bradford, by the success of Sir Hugo, received 5500sovs. Last year Sir F. Johnstone, the owner and nominator cf Common, won L 5510. In 1890 (when the new conditions obtained for the first time) Sir J. Miller's Sainfoin credited his owner with L 5930. The Duke of Portland's Donovan in 1889 won L 4550, and the previous year, when the same owner's Ayrshire was victorious, the value of the race wasJL3675; while in 1887, when it fell to Mr Abington's Merry Hampton, the stakes were worth L 4525. The richest Derby on record was that of Lord Lyon jn 1866, who then won for his owner L 7350. The Lover's time for the Epsom Grand Prize this year was 2min lOsec, the fastest record for this race, and the value of the stake was L 2381, or L2lßl less than when Scobell won the first time the race was run — in 1881.

*** In the Oaks, as in the Derby, remarks the Sportsman, something under the average time was made by La Fleche in winning the Oaks this year, the clock 'making it 2min 43 4-ssec, against the 2min 54 3-ssec of Mimi last year, and the 2min 40 4-ssec of Memoir in 1890, which is the best on record in connection with, the race. In 1889 Lord Randolph

Churchill's L'Abbesse de Jouarre won" in 2min 453 ec, and in 1888 Lord Calthorpe's Seabreeze occupied 2min 42 4-ssec, which was record time up to that date. In 1887 the Duke of Beaufort's Reve dOr won in 2min 50 3-ssecr, and in 1886 the Duke of Hamilton's Miss Jummy covered the course in 2min 54 2-ssec. Lonely, in 1885, in Lord Cadogan's colours, was timed at 2min 43'2-ssec, and the following are the records ef a number of previous winners: — 1884 Mr Abington's Busybody, 2min 49sec ; 1883, Lord Rosebery's Bouuy Jean, 2min 53sec ; 1882, Lord Stamford's Geheimniss, 2tnin 59sec ; 1881, Mr W. S. Crawford's Thebais, 2min 46sec ; 1880, Mr Perkins' Jenny Howlet, 2min 49sec ; 1879, Lord Falmouth's Wheel of Fortune, 3min 2sec ; 1878, Lord Falmouth's Jannette, 2min 54sec ; 1877, Mr Pulteuey's Placida, 2min 54£ se c; 1876,1 the dead heaters, M. A. Lupin's Euguerrande and Count F. de Lagranges Camelia, 2min 50sec. When the conditions of the Derby were altered, those of the Oaks were changed on the same lines, but the amount guaranteed to the winner is not so large. The value of the race won by La Flecho was L 5320, while last year Mr N. Fenwick, whose Mimi was successfnl, won L 4405, the odd ssovs representing a fine imposed for the correction of an entry. In the previous season, when the Duke of Portland won with Memoir, the stakes amounted to L 4400, and the previous season Lord R. Churchill's L'Abbesse de Jouarre won L 2600. In 1888, when Lord Calthorpe's Seabreeze was successful, the stakes were L 2950, and in 1887 Reve dOr credited the Duke of Beaufort with L 3300, while in 1886, when Miss Jummy won in the Duke of Hamilton's colours, the stakes were worth L 325. *** Sir Modred's reputation in America is becoming more firmly established every year. News by this week's mail tells of more victories for his sons and daughters. To briefly mention a few. At the Brooklyn meeting in May his four-year-old son Dr Hasbrouck won at five and a-half furlongs in lmin 7^sec ; Courtship ran five furlongs m lmin 4sec ; Integrity did the same distance in lmin 4isec; and Masterlode ran a mile and three-sixteenths in 2min ssec. At the New York meeting which followed Dr Hasbrouck ra#flve furlongs in 59sec ; Masterlode did nine furlongs in lmin 55sec ; Fairplay went a mile and a sixteenth in lmin 49sec ; and Shellbark did a, mile in lmin 40£ sec. So much for what they can do on the track. What the get of the ex-patriated New Zealander are worth in the ring, as untried yearlings, may be gathered from the results of Mr Haggin's great sale. The results of two days' selling are to band, and it is seen that Sir Modred's stock brought the top prices. One sold for 2700d01, another for 1050dol, four fetched lOOOdol each, and other prices are 2700d01, 2500d01, and 1800dol. Thirteen of them realised 14,685d01. Darebiu's stock are also doing well in the States, and at this sale, and they are wanted by buyers. *** The starters for the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdle Race were Redleap 11.10, Fire King 10.9, Donald 10.4, Kimberley 12.1, Knight of the Garter 11.12, Satyr 11.12, Friction 11.7, Lyndhurst 11.0, Student 10.13, Ellerslie 10.12, Bolton 10.10, The Victim 10.9, Islander 10.8, Havilah 10.5, The Pioneer 10.4, Pilot 10.2, Porcius 10.0, Abergyle 9.12, Goldleaf 9.9, Tayforth 9.9, Butcher Boy 9.8, Indolenco 9.7, and Tim Swiveller 94. The race,* says the Sporting Standard, was one of the prettiest sights imaginable, for all the horses were closely bunchei for over two miles, when they began to straggle a bit, but it was not until the last hurdle had been crossed that it was seen that Redleap had the race in hand. The changes in position of the various horses during the early portion of the race were incessant, but Redleap was never further back than about fifth. After going past the stand Mr Cox took him to the front, a position he maintained, with the exception of a few strides, when Abergyle held pride of place/for the rest of the journey, and, going as strong as a lion, he shook off a run from Fire King, and won by a couple of lengths. The victory was a popular one, for the public always like to see a good horse successful, and there cannot be the least doubt but that Redleap is one of the very best hurdle racers ever seen here. The Messrs Miller threw in for a good stake over the horse's win, and few will grudge them the victory, for they race their horses in a manner which many other wealthy sportsmen here would do well to copy. There is never any of the wretched shunting bye-running business done by fit horses from their stable. They go to win, no matter whether the odds against them be short or long, and for that reason the public are glad to 'see the colours successful. Mr W. S. Cox handled the winner very nicely, and he is to be congratulated upon winning bis second Grand National Hurdle Race upon Redleap. He and Andy Fergusson are the only two jockeys who have twice succeeded in winning this event. When Redleap won the Grand National Hurdle Race in 1889 he was piloted by Mr W. S. Cox, and the amateur was again in the saddle when the son of Pandora gained his second victory in the same race this year. On the first occasion Redleap carried 9.8 and won the race in smin 54sec. This time he carried 11.10, and completed the journey in smin 58|sec. *** New Zealand was to the fore on the second day of the V.R.C. meeting, the reliable Kimberley making amends for his defeat on the previous Saturday by appropriating the Open Hurdle Race with the steadier of 11.11 ou his back, and beating a field of no fewer than 20 horses. Mr Gollan would have a decent win, and in such a crowd his horse would be sure to start at a nice price. But Mr Gollan's winnings, whatever they were, would be as a fleabite compared with the amouut which the Redleap stable would take from the Ring over the double. Mr H. A. Bellamy is Redleap's nominator, but it is understood that the sou of Dante and Pandora is owned or controlled by Mr Miller. The success of Redleap in the Steeplechase with those murderous fences proves him to be a slap-up horse, but at the same time it discounts the ability of those behind him, and I shall certainly think less of Freeman if it turns out that he was really well on the day. He appears to have been one of the rearmost division at the finish. For fuller particulars we must wait till the next mail comes in. *#* Turf, Field, and Farm records the death on May 17 of Rarus, whilom king of the trotting turf, holding that title from August 3, 1878, until October 25, 1879. He was a bay gelding, over 16 hands high, and as a trotter resembled Raceland as a racer, being equally entitled to the cognomen of " Old Bones." Rarus was bred by the late R. B. Conklin, of Greenport, L, 1., and was foaled in 1867. His sire was a horse called Conklin's Abdallah that was used as a truck horse in New York City by a cartman named Mead, from whom Mr Conklin bought him. The latter was a natural horseman, and recognised the intrinsic good qualities of the stallion, but his breeding has never been established. When Rarus became famous I spent many hours in looking up the history of his sire, and succeeded only in estab-

lishing the fact that his pedigree cannot be ascertained. He came from Tarrytown, N. V., and from his name has been thought to have been a son of Abdallah or Rysdyk's Hambleonian, but the name really indicates nothing, as it was given him simply because Abdallah stock was the fashion at the time. A morning paper says that ' ' it was generally conceded that he was a son of Rysdyk's Hambletonian,' but this is not the fact. The horse had some marked Hambletonian characteristics, and, as far as age and location were concerned, might have been by the Hero of Chester, but there is positively nothing beyond to indicate his paternity except that he got so good a horse as Rarus from Nancy Awful, by Telegraph, son of Smith Burr's Napoleon. Rarus first started as a four-year-old in a scrub race on Long Island, but did not come into prominence until 1874-, when he scored his first victory at Hornellsville, N.Y., and won four races that year, getting a record of 2 28£. In 1875 he went in for Grand Circuit honours, aud won at Cleveland, Rochester, Utica, and two races at Hartford, and altogether was first seven times that year, lowering his record to 2.20;}. The following year he won all down the line from Buffalo, and was first nine times, reducing his record to 2.20. That winter he went to California, and May 26, 1877, beat Goldsmith Maid in a match, trotting one heat in 2.19^. This gave him great fame, and he was the bright, particular star of the year, proving invincible in the free-for-all Grand Circuit events, lowering his record to 2.16, and winning, in 1877, 19 races. He was forced into the position of an exhibition horse in 1878, and trotted many fast heats, the best of which was 2.134:, at Buffalo, N.Y., August 3. This was the first time that 2.14 was beaten, and left Rarus king of the turf until St. Julien trotted in 2.12| 14 months later. In 1879 his best mile was 2.13£, at Rochester, N.Y., and at Hartford, Conn., ; that year he was purchased by Mr Robert Bonner, of this city, for 36,000d01, the highest price ever paid for a gelding. John Murphy drove him in 2.11£ over the three-quarter-mile track at Mr Bonner's farm. The horse died of old age, but his death was hastened by a cold. John Splan was the driver of Rarus at the zenith of his fame, and still considers him as fast a horse as was ever foaled.

*** There was a good muster of steeplechase horses at the Hutt meeting on Saturday last, and among them several that may develop into useful jumpers. Dangerous and Sawdust represented the veteran contingent. Neither of these scored. Of those that were successful I take Flintstone to be the most promising. He is described as a fast horse and a clever fencer, Morok also is fast, and not a bad one, but I do not take him to be a likely one to oreep up into the first flight. Things more unlikely have happened, though, than his winning the coming Grand National. Jimmy Allan, who rode him last time, says that he was going very strong when he fell on that occasion. He then had a very light weight, but the year's experience may be set against that and assist him to get home. He is not my pick, however. I prefSr Flintstone. Marangai, who ran second to Morok on Saturday, is an improving horse, they say, and I am told that Cyrus II will need watching next season. It will be observed from the summarised report appearing elsewhere that the favourite was beaten in every race. There were several spills during the day, bu,s no one was seriously injured.

*** In the second annual report of the Southland Stud Company the directors regret that, owing to litigation into which they were forced and which proved very disastrous, the prospects of the company have been seriously injured. The position taken up by the directors was purely iri the interests of shareholders, backed up by the best legal advioe available, after all possible means had been used to get an amicable settlement of the matter in dispute, in proof of which the company offered to do all the necessary works agreed upon, conditionally that Mr Waterston would make a refund of L2O from the first year's rental ; but, as no satisfaction could be got from Mr Waterston, and at the last moment, when mares and foals wf>re visiting the horses, the paddooks were rendered useless by opening up drains all over the place, thus necessitating the hiring of other pasturage, the directors hay ng np option but to quit. Judgment was given against the company in the Supreme Court, which was appealed against, resulting In a reduction of L4O from the original verdict. Last season the directors decided to raise the service fees to non-share-holders from L 3 to L 5 2s, with a view of getting more shares allotted. This has not had the desired effect, and the old scale, or a modified one, will have to be resorted to, the income having fallen to L 276 3s, as against L 352 16s the previous year. A 21 years' lease of a very convenient property at Waikiwi has been acquired, at a cost of Ll3O 10s, including 10 months' occupation, the annual rental being Ll3 15s. The balance sheet discloses a loss of L 530 10s 6d on the year's transactions, leaving a balance of L 126 9s 6d assets over liabilities, and L 73 oapital to call up. After disoussion it was resolved to carry on the company.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18920721.2.78

Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 2004, 21 July 1892

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 2004, 21 July 1892

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