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IN A NUTSHELL.

— La Fleche stands 15hds 3Jin. — Mr F. Meenan is off for atrip to Melbourne. — Tommy Tittlemouse ran 129 races, of which he won 37. — There are two covered half-mile tracks in .Oregon State. , — Lochiel is appreciated in Australia. His 1892 list is full.

— Mr Carncross forwards the Taieri programme for 9th November. — Mr D. O'Brien has sold Survivor, by Robinson Crusoe— Rustic Lass. — New Zealand Cup weights may be looked at the end of this week. — Norbert, a Melbourne Cup candidate, is being schooled over sticks. — Leeson has gone to Melbourne with Stratford, to ride Ilium and Tom Field. — Scots Grey is reported to have been sold to Mr P. M'Carthy, of Slorpeth, for 300gs. — Merganser, by Nordenfeldt — Albatross, is beingnibbled at for the New Zealand Cup. — Everybody says that Mr H. Redwood, father of the New Zealand turf, is about to marry. — Bungebah has broken a blood-vessel in the head. That is why he is thrown out of work.- — Medjidie, in Martin's team at Caulfield, has been thrown out of work as the result of lameness. — Bonavista is bred from the same cross that has produced Ormonde, Orvieto, Martagon, and others. — A set of racing harness, trimmed with aluminum, is being made for Axtell. The whole set will weigh but 51b. — Strathmore was the first pick in Dunedin after the Melbourne Cup weights appeared, and 100 to 7 was taken. — The Queensland horse Realm, who is nominated for the Melbourne Cup, changed hands the other day for 750gs. — At the Hawke's Bay Steeplechase meeting all the jockeys wore crape bands in memory of the late Walter Clifford.

— The Tinwald Club has LIOO in the bank. Mr D. Thomas has resigned his office as starter and his membership of the club. — Darriwell, the hero of the Melbourne Cup of 1879 was recently sold in Queensland to go to the Gulf of Carpentaria for L 4 10s. — Through ill-health Fred Barrett is getting little riding. He has been wasting too hard, and it has quite upset his constitution. — Colonel North, was recently asked if he would sell Simonian. "Yes," said the Nitrate King, " if you will give me LIO.OOO for him." — It is reported that in one of her three heats at Belmont course the first week in July Nancy Hanks will try to beat Sunol's record of 2.08}. — Bishop gave his yearlings a short spin, about a furlong, on Saturday, and the lona colt by Sir Garnet showed a bit of pace over that 'distance. — Rev. E. W. Spence, of Napier, says that since the totalisator was introduced the evil of gambling has increased tenfold. I challenge proof of this statement. — Goldsmith Maid trotted her first race in 1865, when she got a record of 2.26. She was 17 years old when she made her record of 2.14 at Mystic Park in 1874. — At a recent meeting in America the most important race was a seven furlong handicap, which was the longest distance race of the day with a card of six races. — Conqueror, the horse that trotted 100 miles in the year 1853 in Bhvs 55min 53sec. was sired by a son of imp. Bellfounder, and out of a mare by the same horse. — "Spectator" regrets to learn that Melinite, by Nordenfeldt— Pearl Ash, has slipped twin foals to Maxim, thus preventing what looked a likely experiment in breeding. — In the five seasons from 1885 to 1889 inclusive 126 English yearlings were sold for lOOOgsormore. Sixty-seven of these, which cost 106,000ga, have not yet earned a shilling. — While hearing a Supreme Court case recently, Judge Conolly remarked that the Courts were very much averse to interfering with the action of stewards of racing clubs. — The stock at the Hon. G. M'Lean's stud farm are, I hear, looking very well. Malice, Dione, and Lady Florence show uo sign yet, but all the other mares are undoubtedly in foal. — Assumed names are quite the rage in Australia. Nine of the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdle horses and 13 of the Steeplechase candidates are entered with the " ns." — The well-known trotting race rider, A. J. Keith, appeared in a new role at the Mordialloc

races- He steered Maribyroong In the -Selling Hurdle Race, but without success. — Sultan, by Apremont— Miss Kate, who was nominated for the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdlo Race, was scratched before the handicaps were published owing to one of his legs giving way. — Calm, who was supposed to have been stolen out of one of Mr S. Miller's paddocks at Bacchus Marsh, was found a few days afterwards, the daughter of Newminster having only strayed away. — It has been definitely decided to bring off tho long-talked of trotting match between Valentine ana Yum Yum at the Sydney Driving Park's meeting on July 20. The match is for LIOO a-side.

— Messrs Hobbs have taken Palliser, Lady Zetland, Captain Abram, and Little Arthur to Melbourne. , Frank Cochrane and Bob Allen went over as riders, Tom Buddicombe declining the offer. — Some English news is held over. Meanwhile I may remark, that Euclid (7.4), who won the Kempton Park Jubilee Stakes, started at 20 to 1, and got home a length and a-half from Martagnon. — A letter from Melbourne tells me that my weakness, The Admiral, would be fancied a good deal if at all well treated in the Cup handicap. I don't know whether they consider 9.1 good treatment. — Please credit me with the honour of picking the winning double at Hawke's Bay. If a man had placed LSOOO on each of my selections he would have won perhaps I had better not say how much.

— Euclid was the great bargain of the English yearling sales of 1890, as all he cost was 70gs. Mr Kilsyth won L 20,000 on the horse last year, and his slice of the Kempton Park Jubilee Stakes this year was L 15.000.

— Judge Morrow, winner of , the Brooklyn Handicap (U.S.) is by Vagabond out of Moonlight. His time was ljsec slower than Exile's in 1889, and l}sec slower than Dry Monopole's in 1887, the year the race was initiated.

— At the Lumsden Club's meeting the balancesheet showed that the year's transactions had been most advantageous to the club, having resulted in a profit of L 63 Is 7d. It was resolved to still further improve the racecourse. —At Ipswich (England) steeplechases three horses out of nine running in the opening event fell through getting their feet in a hole, and in every case smashed their fetlocks so badly that they had to be destroyed on the spot. — The Sporting, Times ,says :— It has now been established, beyond all, possibility of doi\bt, that Deeming poisoned Orme. "A strong acid, in a gelatine Tcapsule, was despatched direct to the horse's box from Melbourne, per submarine cable."

— The English chaser Champion is rightly named. He has closed the season with a record of ten firsts,, two seconds, and three thirds to his name* During last season he negotiated 300 fences, without once putting a foot wrong, and he is as fresh and as clean on his legs as a two-year-old. — Up to the present time Orme has won no less than L 8174 in stakes for the Duke of Westminster. He has thus earned enough to pay himself for tho conviction of the " poisoner " if he is ever found. Orme's defeat by Signorina in the Lancashire Plate at Manchester made a difference of LII.OOO to his owner. — It is probable that trotting is more popular in Russia than in any othor country outside of America. Instead of a sulky, however, the Russian trainer sits on a four-wheelod trap called a droschky,, built very light and of the best material, weighing more than sulkies and costing fully twice as much. — " Sir Modred " says that Surefoot was recently offered at Invercargill and passed in. at Ll7, the would-be purchaser wanting clothing and gear into the bargain. Also that Mr Kennedy, of Drummond, has lost his filly foal,by Lorraine from May King's half sister May Morn. Also that Doubtful has been bought by a Fortroße sportsman . — The Sportsman's' ' English correspondent says :— " Mons Meg has as yet, failed to appreciate her change of condition, and appears inclined for a life of vestal quietude. It may be hoped that she will think better of it, for it would be a sad thing if the efforts to find her a suitable mate in Brag should be thus prevented from, fruition*" — Sir John, one of the best known of Sir Modred's sons in America, has been destroyed. He was thrown in his stall to be punctured for a spavin. In his exertions to regain his feet he hurt his loin in some way, and the day following was paralysed and unable to rise, although .he made strenuous efforts to do so. The outcome of the trouble was so serious that he had to be killed. , , ' — Here is the present list of trotters that have a record of 212 or better ;— Sunol, 1891, 2'oßi ; Maud S, 1885, 2-08| ; Palo Alto, 1891, 2-08} ; Nancy Hanks, 1891, 209; Allerton, 1891, 2-09J; Jay-eye-see, 1884, 210 ; Nelson, 1891, 210 • Arion, 1891, 210J ; Guy, 1889, 2101 ;, Stamboul, 1890, 211 ; St. Julien, 1880. 211 i; Delmarch, 1891,- 2'lli; Axtell, 1889, 212. The year is that in which the record was made. — Murtagh has Mr Fisk's Sir Garnet looking very well, says " Vigilant," but the old horße's work has to be restricted to gallops on the beach at Petone, and this is. only a poor preparation for a horse that is capable, when thoroughly fit, of winning a Grand National. Murtagh is doing his best under the circumstances, but the phances are that the horse will not be at his, best when he comes to the post. — Lord Rosebery has the honour of breeding Bonavista, the Two Thousand winner, and Mr Rose bought the horse as a yearling. His lordship is very unlucky, ia the fact that he can scarcely win a race himself. Bonavista, is the ,name of a cape, town, and bay on the east coast of Newfoundland. The cape is famous for its light-, house, with a revolving light. — The Australian-bred horse Martmdale, by Martini-Henry from Cranbn ok*s dam, ran second to Merry Scot in a maiden plate at' the Newmarket First Spring meeting. The winner started at 20 to 1, and 33 to 1 was on offer about Martindale. who was beaten by a length and a-half. Martindale, who is three years old, was purchased at the sale of the late Mr James "white's horses at Newmarket, by Mr Douglas Baird for 550gs. — At a meeting of the committee of the Ashburton Racing Club, it was decided to spend a considerable sum of money in making a proper training track inside the present course, to do more planting in the reserve, and to repair the present buildings. The committee decided not to proceed with the building of a new grand stand at present. The- Ashburton Stakes inaugurated at tho last Autumn meeting will be continued. — A Yankee rider named M'Canley was riding in a hurdle race in May when his horse fell over the fifth jump, but lie got up, and, helping his horse to rise, mounted him and started after the field. The horse was hardly in his stride again when he fell for the second time, throwing his rider a dozen yards over a hurdle. He again got on his back, however, and rode him in triumphantly- He was heartily cheered for his bravery. . „_„ . „ — A Tennessee paper on spring :— Now is the time of the year when the blue grass shoots up the tender spear of its juicy blades to meet the eager mouth of the frolicsome yearling or laugh with a wavy smile at the staggering locomotion of the new-born colt— with his awkward, angling, knockkneed gait— his thin- ribbed, cat-hammed, bowedup form, and the calloused, unsteady and uncertain instinct that has yet to decide whether it will trot or pace." — At the Anti-gainbling Conference at Auckland recently one speaker asserted that "there were 60 men in Auckland getting a living, by betting. Of these 32 were members of Tattersails, and 28 were blacklegs who failed to pay their losses." Concerning this statement, "Vigilant " says that the exact information on gambling and other evil doings which the good young men who spout morality on public platforms always appear to possess would be astonishing if their statements were not invariably incorrect. — Despite the near approach of the V.R.C. Grand National Steeplechase meeting, says the Sportsman, there has been but very little business done over the two jumps, 'lhe favourite selections for the Hurdle Race are Havilah, Norbert, Satyr, and The Pioneer, coupled with Medicine, Busaco, and Boulevard at 100 to 1. Along with the horses mentioned for the Hurdle Race, Jack's the Lad, Rob Roy, and Freeman have also been selected for the Steeplechase. No " stable " move has, however, yet been made. — " Early Bird," of the Australian Star, tells how a gentleman in business in Sydney dreamt a

few nights back that a certain tmtfLbcr in Tattersall's sweep on the Winter' Stakes dreAV a prize, and making application for tho identical ticket, he obtained ifc and drew a L2O prize. On Friday night tlto same man says that he dreamt 37 was the number of the winning horse in the same race. This turned out to be Kookaburra, and he took L2OO to Ll2 and won. Ibis dreamer should be a success ass, turf agent. — The Columbia (U.S.) Herald says :- There is one thing to the eternal credit of most stock journals. As a rule they are freerfrom all debasIng, immoral and impure sentiments than any other class of papers or magazines. They are cleaner and better family reading than our big dailies and half our magazines. If the drivers, devotees, and race track admirers of the horse were as true to him and themselves as the avera"e horse journal, God's greatest animal gift to man would need no apology in any company. — The 18th Kentucky Derby was decided at Louisville on the 11th May. The field was the smallest in its history, only two owners being represented, vis., Mr Ed. Corrigan, with two starters, Huron and Phil Dwyer, and the Bashford Manor Stable with Azra. The former was supposed to h»ve the race at his mercy, ana ins entry sold at 2 to 1 over his solitary adversary, but through inefficient riding on the part of Britton, who rode Huron, Azra gained a nose victory over Corrigan's horse. Azra is by Keform out of Albia. . „ — At the Epsom (Vie.) meeting a rather serious accident happened to a lad named Eyre, the horse which he was riding, Stranger, rearing backwards and falling on him, and he was so severely injured that he was unable to ride in the race. It was a subject of unfavourable comment that though Eyre could be seen writhing in pain on the ground, it was a very considerable time before the ambulance came to his assistance. It is explained that the driver of the ambulance waggon had been called to assist in lowering the flags to half mast out of respect to the late Sir E. S. Chapman. — Colonists on tour who go a-racingm England must find the charges pretty stiff. London Referee tells us that a man who makes holiday on Two Thousand Guineas day has to part LI 10s tor Tattersall's ring and LI more fpr the paddock. There is not value for money m the 50s. Besides, this comes on. top of other serious incidentals. For Londoners there is about a soy. railwayfare ; then cabbing must be inordinately dear, because the Jockey Club charge about half-a-crown a head Heath tax for driving three-quarters of a mile to the booking office to pay your two and a half or one and a half of the best to go into the reserves. — Writing in a Tasmanian exchange of the IBtn inst., " Merlin " states :-" A few days ago it was found necessary to shoot Napoleon. The son ot Tim Whiffler had lost th.i use of his hmd-quartera. and Uiscase was so bad at the last that when belaid down he could not get up, and it was deemed a merciful action to put him out of his misery. Last year it was feared that the horse would have had to be destroyed, but he rallied. Napoleon was bred by his late owner, Mr W. Brown, and was by the imported Tim Whiffler from imported Parisienne, by The Nabob from Partlet, by Birdcatcher. He therefore had some good, blood °— °Tho Rev. J. W. Arney, pastor of a Methodist Church at Michigan, shocked his congregation recently by announcing his retirement from the pulpit). He will devote his entire attention to breeding and training his horses and will indulge in horse trots and matinees to his hearts content without fear of the Methodists Conference. Twice he has been on the carpet before the conference for his horsey inclinations. J.ne fact that he conducted successful revivals and that his collections were far above the average did not extenuate his offence, but he was told that it he persisted in cultivating horses he must retire... — Mr Fairie, whose horse Galeopsis ran so well in the Two Thousand, became a millionaire ma remarkable manner. For a time, says the bporting Times, he was in low water In Australia, when he came across a man to whom he had lent LiWV. The man could not pay him, but said that he had an original share in the Broken Hills which he would let him have for Ll5O. This was refused, and it was finally decided to ?lay five games of ecarte to decide whether the price should be L2OO or LIOO. Mr Fairie won, and out of this hundred pounds he cleared one jinillion sterling, and it would have been three millions if he had stuck to the whole of the share. — Says' the Sportsman :— " We are annually regaled with all kinds of conflicting reports at this season of the year relative to the whereabouts and condition of one or other of the Grand National candidates. This time 'tis Titokawaru who is, for some reason or other, being invested with mystery by some of the backers. Some of them say that the New Zealander is not in wonc at all, others are eagerly snapping up the Havdah and Titokawaru double event combination. One would imagine that the long-named horse would hardly have been nominated if he were not in work; unless, perhaps, his owner were anxious to ascertain what weight he would be likely to get in this and a longer distance steeplechase. — There are 442 American trotters, all told, that have or have had a record of better than 2.20 for a mile , and it would appear from the particvilars of the complete list as compiled by Turf, Field, and Farm that a trotter is at his best when seven years old, as animals of that age exceed m , numbers in the list those of any other age. The figures are as follows :— Two years, 3 ; three years, 17 : four years, 31 ; five years, 54 ; six years, 70 j seven years, 80; eight years, 56 ; nine years, 49; 10 years, 35 ; 11 years, 21 ; 12 years, 13 ; 13 years. 10 , 14 years, 2 ; 15 years, 1 ; 17 years, 1. It will be observed that the number of performers at the respective ages'increases steadily up to seven years, and after that as steadily decreases. The number below seven years, 175, is almost equal to the number above seven years, 188.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18920630.2.70

Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2001, 30 June 1892

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3,272

IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2001, 30 June 1892

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