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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Marvel is said to be amiss. — Mr W. Lyons has been seriously ill in Sydney. — Whakawai is lame again on the Melbourne tracks. . ■ — Maxim arrived at San Francisco on the 22nd — Matthew Dawson recently celebrated his 72nd birthday. — It is reported that Benzon has come in for a lot more money. — A two-year-old brother to Sunol was recently sold for 14,500d01. " — The Christchurch Hunt Club has a credit balance of nearly L2OO. — Queen of Trumps and Freelance should have a show in the Napier Cup. — The EgmontClub announces a new departure : a Sires' Hack Produce Stakes. — Several northern writers tells us that Kulnine is bound for Australia. — Messrs Mason and Roberts passed L 520 through the totalisator at Wairio. — Whimbrel has been sold for 400gs and will probably go to Western Australia. — The recent purchaser of the Yankee trotter Arion was Mr J. Malcolm Forbes. — Mr Gollan, now in Victoria, has bought the Newminster— Beryl yearling for lOOOgs. — The New Zealand trotting sire Crowhurst Spot has been sold in Melbourne for DOgs. — Gatling has been runningbadlyagain, and the Australasian refers to him as an arch deceiver. — The first prize in the big sweep on the Newmarket Handicap went to a pressman at Graf ton (N.S.W.). — " Sir Modred," who is on the spot, says that he cannot find out who the Invercargill buyer of Pyramus is. — There are to be only seven events on the Duntroon programme this April. The two-mile trot is cut out.

— They had a place totalisator at work at the Tasmanian Racing Club's meeting, and it was well patronised. — The Chief for the Domain Handicap and Glencairn for the President's may be a decent double at Ettrick.

— The total amount passed through the totalisator during the recent Tasmanian Racing Club's meeting was L 9138. — The Randwick trainer Tom Lamond, has been elected mayor of . Waterloo, one -of the suburbs of Sydney. — Twenty-five thousand dollars a year is the price a New Jersey jockey club pays Starter Caldwell for his services.

— Don Pedro, bought for 125gs at the Hon. G. M'Lean's sale, could have been sold a couple of days afterwards at 200gs. — The Wellington Racing Club has voted LlO to the fund for 'defraying the expenses of sending an athletic team to England. — Our Mr Fodor has executed black-and-white Eictures of Malvolio and Maxim which are ighly spoken of in Melbourne. — The testimonial to the veteran jockey, John Osborne, had reached close on L 3500 at the time the last mail to hand left England. — A Tasmanian writer says that at Elwick recently, Papapa (by Musk Rose) bolted a number of times and then cleared a hedge. & — A bill has been introduced in the Senate at Albany, N.Y., by_ Mr Van Gerder, to punish men who enter " ringing " horses in races. — Messrs Yuille and Nathan, of Wellington, and Mr May, of Auckland, were warned off at Wanganui for betting at totalisator odds. — The Leader gravely announces that Day Dream, winner of the Champagne Stakes at " Auckland," was bred by " Captain JBrice." —Mr H. Gourley, our popular clerk of the course and chairman of the D.J.C. Works Committee, has recovered from his recent illness. — Out of 57 horses left in this year's Derby, the sires of 15 are Blue Riband heroes. There are four Ormondes, four Galopins, and five Bend Ors. — In January, odds of 110 to 100 were betted on Porter's lot for the Derby. The party now consists of Orme, Orville, Polyglot, Goldfinch, and La Fleche. — Colonel North is going to support the illegitimate business. A couple of his horses, Royal Star and Old Coin, are to be taught to, jump hurdles. — It is reported that the great horse Foxhall is likely to return to the land of his birth, as there is a movement on foot to purchase him for American buyers. — While running in the Bathurst Cup, the well- ! known- mare Ultimate, by Martini-Henry from Ultima, fell and broke one of her legs and had to be destroyed. —Mr W. R. Wilson was dissatisfied at the manner in which Cusden rode Strathmore in the Australian Cup, and a new jockey was put up in the Champion. / — Wildrake (by Argus Scandal — Ouida) has been returned to his owner, Mr G. Coombes,'of Milton. I doubt whether this well-bred horse will ever race again. — ,The old custom of hanging up the money for each race in a silk purse on the wire drawn across the track is in vogue at New Orleans. The money is paid after each race. — At the Peninsula (Canterbury) meeting on Monday a mare called Loo — not the daughter of Trump Card — won two events and Lady Grey took the Cup of 20sovs. — At the Mahikapawa meeting on the 25th ult., Mr Pilbrow's Jack won the Hurdles, and the same owner's Flywheel the Cup. The sum of L 502 went through the machine. —Mr Dowse has issued the Central Taieri Handicaps. All in, I should take Galtee to win the chief event, and Tempest the Flying-, but the acceptances aretiot yet declared. — A year ago but one trotter had a record better than 2.10. Now there are five. They are Sunol, 2.8h Maud S., 2.8?; Palo Alto. 2.S} ; Nancy Hanks, 2.9 : and Allcrton, 2.S>i. — Billy White had the -mount on Florrie in the Newmarket Handicap, Golding was up on Reprisal, and Thomas, who rode Wolverine to victory in the Now Zealand Cup, was up on Proh Pudor. — "Sir Launcelot" records the death of Mr Redwood's brood mare Amohia, by Towton from Anticipation. She was fancied for Punga's Dunedin Cup. At the stud her best product was Tigridia. — The following are the principal net winning payments at the Wanganui race meeting : — W. C. Marsh, L 448 10s ; Hon. J. D. Ormond, L 294 103 ; George Hunter, L 175 15s ; F. Martin, Ll7l ; j Captain Russell, L 137. — A few days before the Newmarket Mr Sayer was offered L2OOO for Wild Rose, but he refused, stating that he would not care to take that sum to .have to inform Ike Foulsham, the trainer of the mare, that he had sold her. — Mr jjlundell Maptej of England, the racing 1 man, owner of the sensational horse Common, and Tottenham Court road. London, furniture dealer, has presented a hospital and a recreation ground to the people of St. Albans. — A report is current to the effect that when Ormonde shall have completed such services in England as he is already booked for, he will be sent to America. It is said that a Chicago syndicate has offered a high price for him. — The late Duke of Clarence, during his brief career as an. owner, won two regimental races with Paddy and was twice second with Scraptoft. Last year the Duke was elected a member of the Jockey Club, to which body the Prince of Wales has belonged since 1864. — From June 2 to December 31, 1891, the 2 per cent, which the French Government, according to law, reserves for charitable objects from the Paris mutual system of betting, amounted to 400,000d01, thus showing the sum invested during that period reached the total of 20,000,000d01.

— Chatfield, who as a two-year-old nearly beat Richlake for the C.J.C. Autumn Nursery — we on the press stand thought he had, and one of us had a ticket on him— won his maiden at Waiau on the 26th ult. The Cup and Hanmer Stakes fell to Brummagem, by Albany— Trinket. •■ — Baron de Hirsch's flying filly La Fleche slipped up at Kingsclere in January and knocked the skin off both her knees. It was at first feared that she was cooked as a racer, but it is now found that -the only harm done is that she will be marked for life in the same way as Occident is.

— Dilemma's spell seems to be working wonders with him. He is frisking about in the home paddock and growing fast for a three-year-old, and there does not seem to be anything the matter with him, but it is hardly likely that he will be trained for anything earlier than' next spring. — Certain English riders having been warned off in Austria, the remaining ones demand more pay. It is proposed t6 get over the ditnculty by adopting higher weights in some of the principal races, so as to give a show to the Austrian riders, and take the riding out of the hands of a monopoly of light-weights. — The Argus sjays that it is considered that if pony handicaps are to be successfully adjusted a proper record of, the performances of ponies is necessary. • The, advisability of appointing a gentleman to keep such a record has been suggested to the suburban clubs, and is likely to receive their serious consideration. . 3 — A subscription raised in England for the benefit of Percy -Bradbury, the unfortunate young jockey wholost "his right leg as the resnltof an accident he met with at Windsor races in June last, and whose promising career in the pigskin has thus been lamentably and prematurely ended, amounted to considerably over L2OOO. — 'JL'horc were it appears, two persons concerned in the attempt to work a fraud on Joe Thompson, in London, by trying to get him to cash a cheque purporting to be signed by the Earl of Shaf tesbury. One of these persons, named Blackwell, was sentenced to seven'years' penal servitude, and the other, Acland,, to (lß months' hard labour. — The South Australian-bred Itichlake, now a four-year-old, won the Cup and Culverden Plate at the Amuri meeting last week. In the Cup he carried 11.7 and ran the two miles in 3.49. In the Culverden Plate he also had 11.7. and his old opponent Chatfield 10.11 was third. Sultan's brother Catamount won the District Race.

— The Epsom Derby and Oaks to be run in June next, now appear to be cut down to very small proportions when their large original entries are borne in.mind. The second forfeit was declared in January,- and of 264 nominations received for the "blue riband" only 57 remain in, while the fillies' event shows a party of 45 out of 194. — " Castor."- says that there was an alleged case of "ringing in," at the recent trotting meeting at the Carisbrook ground. Rumour has it that a pale ' faced .animal, formerly well-known on Canterbury tracks, ran under a new name. As, however, the horse did not get the coveted honour of first place his identity was not questioned. — A serious accident occurred at Juuee (N.S.W.). During the race for the Prince of Wales' Stakes a cow strayed. on to the course. Star ran into the animal, bringing down Wjlina andO.D.A. Stir broke his neck, and Wilma fractured her near shoulder, while two jockeys, Macarthy and Tierney, were seriously injured. — I wonder who the backers .were who are referred to by "Bannerdale" in the New Zealand Mail as thinking that they had not a fair run for their money with Merrie England in the Dunecun Cup If there were such persons on the course they must be blind. No horse was ever more badly beaten in a fair 'go than the same son of Rupee. — The Lumsdan Club has upheld the protest lodged against Darby being adjudged winner of the Hack Race, run on the J llth l'ebruary, and have Messsrs Mason and Roberts to pay out on Dick. The dividend is L'3'ls. The horse Darby, .its nominator (Mr Erskine), and its rider (Boult) are disqualified during the pleasure — Says the Sydney Referee of 17th ult. :— " We often see a horse have a special liking for a particular race or conrse, but seldom so strongly marked as this : In J. 880: Meg Merrilies won the Geelong Sires' Produce Stakes ; in '86 h«r daughter, the bad-tempered Maddelina, followed her example, and, on Friday lc^st' The Shrew, a sister of Maddelina, repeated the trick — From " Sir, Modred's" notes I gather that Mr H. Tclford's team are doing easy work and they are all looking well except- Mi Mi, who has just been taken up and has not as yet done anything to warrant much interest being taken in her movements. Anonyma, Aparima, and a big chestnut who is, I believe, a son of Duntroon, are the other inmates of the" stable at present. — A billlias been introduced into the American Assembly by which it is proposed to impose a tax of 20 per cent! on the gross' receipts of racing' associations, in place of the 5 per cent, which is now demanded under the existing law. ' The amount collected for the past season aggregated 32,348d0l 18c, being 5 per cent, on the reported total gross receipts of 646,963d0l 55c. — The- yearling colt by Le Loup out of Tangi has been placed in M'Guinness' hands. I understand that " Mr -J.'Brett," who owned Wolverine when that horse Avon the New Zealand Cup, is theowner of this full brother to Wolverine. The yearling is hardly so high to the wither as his brother was at the same age, but he has as much substance,- and is altogether a very nice colt. He is a whole bay. — A fact which breeders of animals should never forget or-undervalue was stated by Agassiz when he said : 'VNo offspring is simply the offspring of its father and mother. It is at the same time the' offspring of the grandfather and grandmother on both sides; in tact this depend donee of offspring 'or liability to reproduce family characteristics .extends much further up the ancestral line."' - •"■ — The bookmakers' strike at Rosehill (says Sydney Referee) caused the racing to be somewhat tame. It, was curious to watch the way in which some of the horses were ridden, and it was quite evident .'-'.uo.money no go" was- the general order. The race down the straight in the Flying Handicap- would T -have made a man with the toothache look cheerful as he watched the dodging and cutting'-tp"keep out of the front rank. — The system, of having an official inspection of sires in France has resulted in .a great improvement in the- soundness. .The number of all kinds examined for use in 1891 was 6173, an increase of 245 on the previous year, and of these only 181 were rejected.'~"The percentage of rejections has fallen from 584 in- 1880 to 593 in 1891, a proof of the value of the restrictions which the authorities put on the use of unsound or unfit stallions. — The Mr -Hume Webster who committed suicide in London on January 23 was the celebrated breeder of Marden Park, owner at one time and another 'of such horses as Craig Millar, Prestonpans, George Frederick, Sir Bevys, Friar's Balsam, Hazelhateh, Saint Honomt, Bcaudes-crt, and others of equal calibre. Mr Webster's body was fuiind behind some bushes, lie having shot himself through the head. No cause is at present assigned for the act. — Sydney Bulletin says :— " The best proof that it is the children jockeys who cause the accidents is the absence of disaster in welter, weight-f or-age, Derby, Leger, and-;two-year-old races, not handicaps. An accident in one of these events is almost an unheard of Occurrence, simply because qualified men -have the mounts. A rule limiting the amount of dead-weight a horse shall be allowed to carry would have a good effect in at least modifying this crying eyil." — From " Cranbroqk's " notes : — The start for the Newmarket Handicap was, so say persons who were down at the post, a wretched one. Directly Mr George Watson left one side of the course to put some jockey on the opposite side in line those behind the wielder of the flag immediately got "out otbounds" ; so when the flag eventu ally dropped some seven' or eight horses got well away, whilst 'others were just as badly left, Stromboli ami -Whimbrel being about the last to get under war.'" - — H. S. Constable says that the broad fact about roaring is that, big, powerful horses, nearly 17 hands nigh,. with great bone, like Prince Charlie and Rayon dOr, ,are more likely to go wrong in the wind than little weak-legged horses. Ponies, as we kno,w, ,hurdlv ever roar. Thus what the majority otour'prpfessional instructors really tell us, in laying down that roaring in all its degrees is the sin of sins> is that we are to discontinue breeding useful horses, and are only to breed from little weak-legged ones — Hawera Star-tells the story of a fight between stallions, The" thoroughbred Volunteer broke into the paddock adjoining that in which the Clydesdale Prince Victor was running, and they began fighting- over the gate. Prince Victor seized Volunteer by the lower jaw, and finally succeeded in dragging Volunteer completely over the gate, and then tore his side open, exposing his entrails, besides otherwise knocking him about. Volunteer's jaw was completely smashed, the bones rattling when the head was lifted. — In an old chronicle of the "sport of kings " there is this description of racing in Italy, that may suggest a way of deciding the finishes that

the ardour for racing causes to bo made in denso fog or in the dark. "At Ancona they have a singular but very admirable method of determining the winner. Across the course, at the comingin post, a thread is stretched saturated in a red mixture, which the lirst horse breaking leaves ft mark upon his breast, which mark, whenever it is a near thing, is deemed decisive of victory." — "Augur" says that Mata's dam Raupo was - to nave been made a present to Mr Aldridge by Mr W. It. Wilson ; but, believing that the old mare had slipped her foal and would never breed again, she was sold at a weeding-out salo last year for the paltry sum of Bgs. A few months after, to the disgust of her , previous owner, it was announced that Raupo 'had thrown a fine colt foal to Nordenfcldt, and you might have knocked Mr Aldridge down with something lighter than a crowbar when he heard, this recently for the first' time. — From Western Horseman (U.S.):— "The oldest mare whose history -has come under our notice was Tansey, owned at Millersburg, O. She was foaled January 4, 1845, and died April 24, • 1891, and was therefore 4b* years 3 months arid 20 days old. At the age of 20 years sho«produced a foal, and at 32 gave birth to twins. At the age of 45 years she was again bred and appeared to be in foal."- If all these statements can be verified this is about the gvoatost record ever made by a brood mare in the line of fertility and longevity." — Mr It. Dicks last week sued tin- Lancaster Park Trotting Club for.the value of I lie btako in the Lancaster Park Handicap run on January 15. Plaintiff was owner of Fragment, whu was disqualified for crossing, and his plea was that the meeting of stewards at'which the disqualification was ordered was improperly constituted, as Mr Mace, the chairman, was not set down in the proframme as a steward, -Hvidence was given that he stewards present, before the meeting had appointed Mr Macens a- substitute, for one of the > stewards who was absent, and -plaintiff was nonsuited with costs.

— It is now 18 years sinco the French Govern- ' ment established .its studs for horse-breed ing, and they were begun with' 2soo sires 6f all breeds, 'which number has boon practically adhered to ever since, though at the .beginning of the year 1890 there were a dozen over the regulation figure. The last bulletin issued by .the French Ministry of Agriculture contains a report by M. deCormette, the director of the" stud,^ on its • administration during that year. The*' shes comprise 182 Eng- - lish breed, 102 Arab; 159 Anglo-Arab, 3742 halt- - breds, and 337 draught- horses. The purebred horses are practically r equal in number to thoso of last year, but there has been an increase in English Arabs and a_ decrease in, Arabs. — -The death is 'announced of J. B. Pryor, who was well known in England as trainer for, Mr Ten Broeck, the American owner of racehorses, who between 30 and 40 years' ago was a prominent v figure on the English turf. Among other notable successes achieved mention may be made of Prioress, who won the Cesarewitch in 1857 after a dead heat with El Hakim and Queen Bess, and the following year won the Grea* .Yorkshire Handicap. Pryor also trained Starke, winner of the Goodwood Stakes in 185'J and Brighton Stakes m 1861; Optimist, winner of the Ascot; Stakes in 1861 ; Lord of the Linne, the Lewes Handicap in 1863 ;- and Umpire, who won several good races, and ran ■ in the Derby woil by Thormnnby. "

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18920310.2.109

Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 1985, 10 March 1892

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3,443

IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 1985, 10 March 1892

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