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TALK OF THE DAY.

BY MAZEPPA.

%* James Cotton tells me that it was partly understood that he should leave for Mel-' bourne this week with Trapper, but the arrangement fell through somehow, and he waß not sure when -I saw him when he would get away to the other side. He intends to settle there, I understand ; and a wise resolve it iB, for Jimmy will have a larger field of operations in Australia, and should be able to make a good living by riding without bothering totrain at all. He is one of the, oldest and at the same' time one of the boldest of our cross - country- jockeys, and a resolute finisher, having frequently got home by sheer , determination and physical endnranoe, '* as for example when he lifted in Seoretary a winner of the Otago Hunt Olnb's Steeplechase in 1888. beating Daddy lionglegs by t a nose. Another great performance ef his was when he rode Oarrigeen to ■victory in the Forbury Steeplechase, beating the mighty Clarence. These are only two samples out of many that could be given. Cotton's doings in the pigskin form a very long and a very honourable record, and if he does go to Melbourne the Victorians will gain a really good rider, and an honest man.

', •«* There is plenty of food for thought in the handicap' for the Melbourne Cvp — more than oan be digested in a hurry — and it is not surprising that not a blow was struok at the betting roams when the weights appeared, excepting, indeed, a little investing on Oat bine at 100 to 8, to whioh move, however, I attach no significance, Bince between .bis bona fide admirers, who are simply infatuated, and the who are buying for the sake of after--wards retailing at shorter odds, there will always be baokers for the old horse go long as be is not scratched. It is a thumping weight that Mr Barnard has given Oarbine, but the anticipations of those, who ventured to guess it ranged from" 10 9 to 10.13, and on due consideration I don't .think it would have been wery safe to have given the Musket demon much less than that which he is now sentenced to carry. At the same time I .do not see how Oarbine oan be- expeoted to win with such an impost. It is all the quoted odds, at any rate, that the beßt and luckiest of his opponents will Sut him down, as was the case in Bravo's year, o far as I oan see the handicap !b a pretty fair ■one. Perhaps the^Auatralian scribes, with their more intimate acquaintance with *• form," - n>ay discover grave defects, but I cannot. .The New Zealanders — those, I mean, belonging t3 our country — are for the most part taken care of, however. As a matter ■of opinion I should say that Tirailleur ought not to be asked to concede an ounce to the champion winner Melos, but on the other hand the Goldsbrough horse haa been often beaten while Tirailleur went through his three-year-old season undefeated, and has not since done Anything to. take weight off, bo that the relative imposts maybe justified. Merrie England .and Cuirassier, again, were both bound to be ■well up, and so was Freedom,' though this list- . mentioned horse has hardly deserved 8,12 seeing that be was badly beaten in the Autumn Handicap, a mile and a-half with 9.0. 1 regard Freedom as the worst used of all the Maorilandera. Tiraillerie and Sternohaser, on the other hand, are deoidedly well in, for the 'first-named was one of the beßt two-year-olds -we had in New Zealand this season, and she receives no less than 121b from Lord Hopetoun and Stromboli; while Sternchaser, a nonperformer, has only 31b more than the minimum. Flinders' weight has not been sent across. Taking the list as a whole, it seems to me, with my imperfect knowledge, that "Whakawai with 7.11 is about as nioely 'weighted as anything in the raoe, but I prefer -to allow the men on the spot to lead the way in making selections, and therefore I say nothing further for the present. ♦ # *- Reference is made elsewhere to the total sum passed through the machines at the Dunedin meetings for the season now closing. It is the largest amount ever handled by the •slab in a season, with the exception of that for

1889-90, which was swelled abnormally by the Exhibition meeting. The past seven seasons' totals are as follow : —

These figures Bhow periodic progress, and, bar one drop down, that progress has been steady. It will be taken for granted, I think, by all reasonable men, that the progress indicated is one proof of prosperity — proof that the olub is going forward. Other facts leading to the Bame conclusion could be quoted if necessary — such as the increase of stakes, the improvements to the course, and the enhanced value of the racing plant as an asset— but Ido not propose to dwell on these particulars, It is established beyond question that the D. J.O. is on a firm footing, and I take this opportunity at the end of the raoing season of congratulating the officers and members on the indisputable facts of the past and the promise of a healthy balance sheet when the veteran secretary Mr Sydney James comes to make up his accounts at the end of the year — that is unless the Government lop a big junk off the profits. .The reasons of the club's ' prosperity are not far to seek. Popular management, in the first place ; and, as important adjuncts, programmes that owners like and handioappipg in which they have confidence: for, notwithstanding an occasion growl, I feel sure that no one questions George Dowses integrity or ability. If when he was appointed his 'salary had been fixed at a percentage on the totaliaator returns— paying by results, as it were— he would have a nice income now. The following statement shows the stakes and gross takings of the totalisator for the past three

These figures are, I may mention, obtained from offioial r Hources» being courteously supplied from the books kept it* the secretary's office. %* The Green Island Trotting Olab is, I bear, fairly afloat. . It has not been my privilege so far to meet any- of the promoters, but it is* said on what may be taken as good' authority that they hare secured a suitable mile track close to the township, andthat the .first raoe meeting will be held on August 29, when six events will be contested. A wise, step has been taken in appointing Mr Dowse as'bandicapper. There is very little doubt, if any, that the club will be a success if it is managed well and run on popular lines. One thing that should not be forgotten is the making of such arrangements as will enable the Dunedin public to get out and in at as low a coßt as possible, and to be fully assured against waiting a long time for a train to bring them back. . I regard this as a moat important matter, and hope that the management will accept the hint, for I am sure that proper attention paid Ito- this matter would bring ' a large and immediate reward.

*«,* I take this the earliest opportunity of correcting an error whioh appeared in these columns last week, as to the amount of undivided money which remained after paying oat the dividends at,t he Danedin Jockey Olab'a May meeting. By a miscalculation thi B amount was stated at £840 lls, whereas as a matter of f aot it was only a trifle over £32. Mr Sydney James, who called my attention to the mistake, kindly permitted ;ne for my own satisfaction to inspect the detailed statement of totals in bis poaaeasion, It may relieve Borne who got a scare to know that the charge of 10 per cent, is not greatly exceeded, after all, when the dividends are made up to the bucpenoe.

*t* On looking over the history of the past 30 Melbourne Oops, aaya the Bulletin, we find that over 1000 boraea have sported silk for that great event. The V.R.O. has given away in Gup money alone £65,000. Oat of 30 winners three have been aged ; five 6yrs, nine syrs, six 4yra, seven 3yrs. In colour they have been -17 bay, nine brown, two black, one grey, and one chestnnt. Four were geldings, presumably ending their days as oab horses. A mare, and only one, ever got her nose in front at the post, and she was a clinker. Victoria lays claim to 15 Cups, New South Wales 13, South Australia one, Tasmania one. Aa yet none of the New Z9a)and gentlemen have bad the good luck to annex a Onp, but it will happen some day. Tbe yellow and black and all black have eaob scored four in honour of New South Wales. The largest field to face the flag was in Sheet Anchor'a year— 3s, against Boven in Banker's. Oarbine left his field behind him with a crusher of 10 5 j Bmkor did the same with the feather 59. Tbe double winner, Aroher, took 3tnin 52seo to get home; last year's great gun travelled the distance in 3min 28£aeo, but in Archer's day the turf was not velvet as it is now. The lamb has backed the favourite cix times and got home ;24 times he has lost his wool. Cutts, Pigott, and O'Brien have had the good fortune to Bteer the winner twice eaoh. The lowest amount run for was in 1863, when the race was worth a little over £500$ the highest— £lo,ooo, for last year's Bpin. The best horse to past tbe post, without doubt, was Oarbine ; tbe worat, that miserable three-legged brute Zulu - —•and yet he was a near relation of theonoa mighty Barb.

*** The special commissioner of the Sportsman tells us something about Common, winner of the Darby. He was writing immediately after that oolt won the Two Thousand Guineas. That race, he says, has introduced to the public a champion, not only of high order himself, but one, now that his sire and grandaire, Isonomy and Sterling, have gone to the unknown land, who has come opportunely to hand to head a tribe the nearest akin to Birdoatoher in father to son descent. He seemingly won everywhere and anyhow in style which for the moment seemed worthy an Ormonde, until reflection told that no Minting was in the field. After ' walking for a time alongside Gouverneur before he was saddled, I met George Porter in charge of the dark Kingsclere crack. When the big brown walked parallel with the new paddook none too favourable comments came from the out side stable-helps, past or present, and others forming a nondescript crowd encountered no-

where else than at Newmarket. Nor did his appearance complete approval within, many an experienced horseman deorying the son of Isonomy and Thistle as on the leg and split up, whioh in a measure the colt deserves. Still, though open to the charge of being influenced by what he did in the Guineas, I cannot but desoribe Common as the best-look-ing three-year-old, of the raking, somewhat undeveloped stamp, I can remember having seen saddled in spring. Standing 16hds l&m high, it would be hyperoritioal to point out a fleoking bo faint that it hardly can be traced on his brow as prohibiting a whole-coloured brown of the bay rather than the dull hue. Looking upwards, one first is struck by the shapeliest of open and rather large feet which paddock critic could admire, whilst hardier limbs there oould not be ; nor ia often suoh reaoh of forehand seen, his high-set withers lending beauty to very grand shoulders. For suoh a rattling, overgrown colt, Common was wonderfully forward, and though generally unfurnished there was not wanting a tough, sinewy appearanoe, and when let down a bit in barrel, with muscle coaxed on to his loins and quarters, Isonomy's son assuredly Bhould become one of the grandest raoenorsea of this century's declining years. To his blood on the dam's Bide most particular attention has been called, and in my opinion he stands out immeasurably the best of .his year bo far, whilst, as the publio two-year-olds of last campaign must have been all of a heap, it would seem highly improbable that Kingsolere can produce his superior.

* # * T. Cotton, who has not been overwhelmed with the favours of Fortune of late, has struck out in a new line, or rather in an old line in a new place, and I think he will make ado of it. He has left the Forbury and entered into the occupation of the stables at the Taieri that until the last week or so were in the possession of Mr Melrose. 'The place is situated directly opposite the gate of the new racecourse, and as Tommy will have a very fair track to work on, one, moreover, that is more private than most of our racecourses, he should do very well. He will at anyrate have no very formidable opposition there for some time to come, though it may be expeoted that in the future other professionals will also take the same step. Tommy is not lacking in experiences, and I wish him luok. He commences in his new quarters with Jaoky Tar (the son of Trefoil that I have already spoken about); a trotter of the Pinole Patchen breed, and a filly by Sis Garnet out of the St, Albans mare lona.

%♦ Those extremists who in their ignoranoe denounce horse raoing and all its Burroundings as neither more nor less than a snare for perdition will be shocked if they happen upon an item of news from Australia, which I herewith refer to. The Presbytery of Toowoomba forwarded to the Queensland Minister of Education a resolution expressing "its' profound Indignation that the State schools should have a holiday on the day of the Warwick races, whereby inducement is, deliberately given the youth in "our sohools to attend the races, and as well the implication is oast upon the teachers that they are accustomed to attend and take, part in the practices i ÜBual in suoh plaoes of resort." The reply is worth reading. The Minister first points out that the presbytery has not mentioned the' reason why the resolution is sent to him. The department does not grant holidays to schools on ; raoe days in any district. The holiday is proolaimed at the request of some person' repre- ' senting the residents. It would appear, then,] that if the presbytery's indignation is well' founded, it should be addressed to the residents and the parents of the Bohool children with whom rests the gravamen of the matter iof complaint. In a free community it is im1 possible for a Minister of Education to compel! the attendance of children at school on any particular day against the wishes of their parents. It- does not appear unreasonable to the Minister that the children should share in the festivities and sports of their parents and break the monotony of their lives by an oooasional fete ; and he is unable to supply the steps of the- reasoning by whioh the presbytery oonneots the existence of a general holiday, in whioh the school children" Bhare, when horses are run, with a dishonouring reflection on- the 1 character of the teaohers, or a deliberate intention on the part of some oae to corrupt the children.

"V He thinks it* natural that boys should desire to witness the running of the hdrses, and believes that if the teachers as well as the parents were present, the children would be less liable to moral injury from any bad association. The same end would probably be Btill better Beoured if the members of the presbytery were also on the spot to guide and admonish the young and the old who are their spiritual oharge. The Minister does not doubt that betting and gambling take place in connection with horse racing ; but he cannot sup pose that the presbytery are ignorant of the fact that the Bame evils exist apart from that amusement, and would exist if it were abolished. There is no institution to whioh evil does not attach itself as a parasite. It may not be out of place to remind the Presbytery of Toowoomba that St. Paul, albeit he was reared in the narrowest school of Hebrew thought had, by the fortunate incident of his birth in a foreign town, a great disadvantage over the majority of his race in a youthful association with Greek thought and life, and so i'o came about that the racecourse, whioh probably was no purer in Tarsus than it is in Warwick, furnished him with some of his happiest illustrations and allusions.

"V One of the White Star liners sailing from New York for Liverpool in April carried a novel item of freight in the shape ef 10 thoroughbred fillies, two years old, consigned by Mr" William Easton for sale by auotion at Newmarket. Snob an experiment has never befote been" tried. Americans have imported thoroughbreds from England from the earliest colonial days, and the results from a breeder's standpoint have been very happy. Americans have sent a oomparatively small number of racehorses to Europe, and they have been wonderfully successful, the ..list including suoh notable winners as Starke, Prioress, Brown Prince, Iroquois, Foxhall. Parole, Wallenatein, and Papoose ; but to Bend youngsters for sale ia an experiment pure and simple. The exchange from which these facts are gleaned says that Mr Easton's theory in making the shipment is that since Americans know by the experienoe of many years that well-bred English horses almost invariably "nick" successfully with the best American steok, and that the climatio change is of evident value, it should follow that the results of each breeding ought to be of extreme value to the stud ia England. Following this idea he purchased over a year ago nearly 53 of the best bred and most promising yearlings he could find in Amerioa, and from the lot he has picked out 10 that in their development as two-year-olds he considers the best. The lot includes Miserrima, chestnut filly, by Miser out of Algeria; Red Heather, bay filly, by imp. Glengarry out of Azalea ; Maid Marian, chestnut filly, by Forester out of Elaine; Blozaaway, brown filly, by Blazes out of Emma H. ; Turkish Delight, ohestnut filly, by Hyder Ali out of Jollity ; Spanish Dancer, black filly, by Farandole out of Lady Hampton ; Twi- '

light, oheßtnnt filly, by Onondaga out of Skylight ; La Duchesse Rouge, brown filly, by Duke of Montrose out of imp. Type of Beauty ; Lady Useful, bay filly, by Longfellow out of Useful ; and Duenna, ohestnut filly, by Milner out of Fedaimes. The results of Mr Easton's bold venture will be watched with much interest by raoing men. A later paper says that when Mr Easton's fillies were put up to auotion the eight lots submitted realised a total of 1745g5, or an average of 218gs. *S A protesting cry 'against the Govern-; ment proposal in regard to the|totalisator is being sent up from end to end {of the colony. The objeotion is, as.l understand it, not so much to there being a tax as to the heaviness of the one suggested; that is, many clubs would pay, Bay, .1 per cent, and kiok up no fuss .about it, but deem 2J per cent, unreasonably high.. That there is^aomething in this contention will be apparent when we come to consider that it means 25 per cent, of the commission charged by thejolnbs, and, to take another illustration, the Dunedin Jockey Olub's contribution at 2* per cent, on last season's turnover, £85,699, would have come to £2142 9a 6d, and that is without reckoning the extra day at the Spring meeting or taking in the Kakanui Fund race. The full amount passed through at the five meetings wbb £92,161. Farther, it ib pointed out that 2£ per cent, on the estimate for the year ending July 31 next, viz., £600,000, would bring in not £10,000, whioh the Treasurer has put down as the sum whioh he expects to realise, but £15,000, and that a smaller tax would suffice if £10,000 ;is all that is looked for ; and I daresay this view of the matter wilK be urged on the Government when 'the proposal comes to be debated. The answer to that objection will be, I suppose, that the Treasurer is not building on the expectation of the investments continuing to be so large as at present, and is making allowance for a reduction. If that view of the matter is considered, we may go a step farther, and say that the imposition of the tax will in all likelihood be ;the very means of lowering the present returns, for if the oharge falls on the dubs it must come out of stakes, andjf it comes out of stakes owners will not travel their horses about the colony so much as they do now,, and the large sums these men put on the machines will be materially reduced. V Besides this, some minor clubs 'that under present arrangements barely make both ends mset will find it necessary to consider whether they can carry on at all, and others will to a certainty be compelled to draw in their horns. A full consideration of all the circumstances must lead to the conclusion that 2& per cent, is a heavy charge, and it is to be hoped that Mr Ballance will see the reasonableness of the representations that are sure to be made on the subject and ask for no further contribution from raoing; than it can afford to pay. There would be no objection, I think, to a moderate tax ; indeed, it would in one way be a good thing if this were to come into, force, in that it would fend off the attacks of those' .members of the House who would like to nee the machine abolished. Already we hear that, Mr W. Hutchison had intended to ask the House tp pans an amending bill in that direction, but that ' he will not how move in the matter this , session. ' I may, here "mention the fact that the Canterbury Jockey, Olub has de- ! cided to withhold its programme for the season' excepting so far rb the Grand National iB concerned; until the result of the debate in the House is known; the, Timaru Trotting , Olub has resolved to give only £125 in stakes at the next meeting instead of. the £175 whioh some members were inolined to give; and at the annual meeting of the- South Canterbury Jockey Olub a resolution was passed asking the members for the district— Messrs Hall' Jones, Steward and Rhodes— to take action re the proposed tax on totalisators. The meeting was deoidedly against it going so far, and Bay that in time it would stop horse raoing. They thought, however, a small tax would not be objected to. *** That great horse Rosicruoian died on the 2nd May, and his history, condensed from the Sportsman's notice, will be read with interest. Rosiorudian, who was bred by Sir Joseph Hawley at his stud farm in 1865, was by the famous Beadsman out of Madame Eglentine; and in his prime- was noted for more quality than any other racehorse of his day. As a two-year-old in 1867 he ran four times, and thrioe proved successful, winning at his first attempt the Maiden at Ascot in a field of 22. In the Middlepark Plate Sir Joseph Hawley started both Rosioruoian "and Green Sleeve, when the ' latter, although the less fancied of the pair, beat him by a nead. He won the Criterion Stakes at the Newmarket October, meeting and also the Troy Stakes. His next appearanoe was in the memorable raoe for the Two Thousand Guineas of 1868, when Green Sleeve was a good favourite.- Neither of Sir J. Hawley's pair, however, finished in the first three places, Moslem and Formosa running a dead heat, the first-named subsequently walking over. Even more memorable was the Darby of that year. Sir Joseph Hawley had Roßicrucjan, Green Sleeve, and Blue Gown running in his colours, He declared to win with either of the first-named pair in preference to Blue Gown, but speculatora took a different view of the- situation. The Marquis of Hastings' Lady Elizabeth was a hot favourite, the field on that occasion numbering 18. Blue Gown was second favourite, while 25 to 1 was laid against Green Sleeve, and 80 to 1 against Rosicrnoian. Theraoe caused no end of commotion in the turf woild, as Blue Gown won by half a length from the outsider Kiqg Alfred. As a racehorse Rosicruoian did very little. subsequently.. In July 1873 Rosiorucian waa purchased by Mr Chaplin for 6200gs on behalf of himself and Lord Hartington. The latter subsequently sold his share to Lord Granville. Mr G. O. Carew Gibson later bouprbt the horse privately, giving, it was stated, close upon £12,000 for him. This turned out a good speculation', as Rosioruoian did the Sandgate stud good service for 11 seasons. At the break up of the stud in 1887 Rosicruoiac was too lame to be" brought into the ring, but he was shortly afterwards disposed of privately to Mr Freeman, of Bath. Rosioruoian has sired many- notable horses, among the more prominent of his sons and daughters being — Althotas, Beauolero, Brighton, Chevron, Ersilia, Eroildoune, Geheimnisß. (winner of the Oaks), Hedge Priest, Hauteur (winner of the One Thousand), Jacobite. Rosy 'Cross, Rosy Morn, Cruoible, Douranee, Illuminata, Preoiosa, and Three Pears. Halbran, who was purchased by Mr Freeman at the sale of M. Lupin's stud, will take the place vacant through Roaiorucian's death. *** Little Arthur was taken to Melbourne by laat week's steamer, and as he is not nominated for the Ghristohurch meeting it may be presumed that it is not intended to bring him back in a hurry, as is proposed with Mr DouglaB 1 horses. The people on the other sidewill 4jnd Little Arthur a useful rather than a brilliant horse— too good, perhaps, to be called' a plodder, since that term ia only fairly applicable to the slowest of the hunter class, but more likely to win a race by dogged pertinacity and fairly-good jumping than to electrify the onlookers with a fireworks finish. But a horse that may be called " useful " in that sense, is one of the beat that a man can own ; and if ,

they don't paok the weight too high on this son of Jangler and Lubra he will at leajt pay bis way. Little Arthur was bred up ABhburton way in 1883, and consequently comes eight years old this foaling. As a three-year-old he made his first appearance in the Geraldine 1 County Plate, whioh he won for Mr T. Logan, beating Bjzique, Zealot, and Derby', the baok hero of the last Forbury meeting. He is the only son of Jangler that has made a name. O. Hobbs went over in charge of the horse, and took at the' same time Lady Darling and Red Cross, the last-mentioned mare (winner of the 0.J.0. Stewards' Stakes among other events) having been purchased by Mr Allen. Dad Kingari has gone with them too.

*«* What a spletfdid array of entries the O. J.O. ha9 t reoaived for the ohief events of the New Zealand Grand National meeting. They count np to S3 for the Steeplechase and 41 for the Hurdle Race, as against 20 and 24 last season, or a gain on the two events of no fewer than 80 ! So much for numbers. The quality, too, leaves little ground for complaint. In the Steeplechase we miss the name of Daddy Longlegs, but we have a*strong representation of the veteran division in Ahua, Irish King. Mangaobane, Christmas, Waitangi. Chemist, Jenny, and Sentinel, and several promising beginners, while- the Hurdle Race includes Buoh oattle as Kulnine, Abua, Jet dEan, Regina, and Foxton, some of them reokoned at one time good enough to enter for the New Zealand Cap. Given good handicaps, the success of the meeting is already assured. *** A meeting of the stewards of the Taieri Amateur Turf Club was held last Thursday evening, a bare quorum being present, and the president, Mr O. Gore, occupying v the chair. The Advocate isayr that the meeting had been called for the purpose of considering plans of the proposed grand stand, and seeing the important nature of the matter under consideration it speaks very little for the interest which committeemen evince in the future welfare of the clnb that there was such a sparse attendance- Messrs Gore, Smith, O'Donnell, Hielop, and Low expressed their dissatisfaction at the meagre attendance and their unwillingness to accept the responsibility of ordering the work to be proceeded with, and after discussion decided to postpone further consideration of the matter for 12 months. Another meeting of stewards wjll shortly be held to decide as to building a temporary stand and saddling paddock, .and we hope that committeemen wUi. attend ■in goodly numbers.

*„* It turns oat as I expected, that Mr Stead did not have two horses representing him in the Jane Stakeß at the A.J.O. Whiter meeting on the 13th.- . His sole representative was Soots Grey B.IG, ridden by Con Boyle. There was a field of 16 starters, the favourite being the two-year-old Sunshine 7.4: Denman 7.0 led to the half-mile peat, attended by Kilmore 72, who then headed him and led* round the bend a' length olear from Repeater 6.12, with Denman, Welcome 6 2, and Helene 7.4 following, Repeater oat down Kilmore at the home tarn, and a little further on Helene singled out,' and outpacing her horses, won comfortably by three lengths. Time, lmin 178eo. Uranud with 11 0 was one of ,the starters in the Steeplechase, and stood up, bat was outpaced. At tbe second, last fence Reornit challenged the leaders, and bame^ through* the opening <with a trifling advantage of Caledonian and Uranus, while Melton was improving his position'at every stride 1 . Reoruit was the firet to land over the palings in the straight, but was very tired, and Melton coming on with >a desperate charge outpaced the. other finishers in the final run, and won a splendid race by three lengths. Time, 7min' 24aeo. The Winter .Stakes produced a ' very -'large field, including Greygowo 812 and Palliser 7.6. Tbe favourites were Jack 7.0 and. Dick 7.8. Rover, Hop Bitters, and Chorister wore in 'front until after passing the milo post, where Kilmore took ' up the running from Hop Bitters,' Denmari, and Retort, and just led Hop Bitters into the straight, where' tbe latfce'r out him down, and Denman dying; away, Retort, Sweetbit, and BUerstene were left* to fight out tbe finish. A great race ensued from the distance, and' Retort, galloping well, won by about a length' and ' a-half. Time, 2min 12jaee. • . --* V Epsom (Victoria) race 3 on the 13th inst. were highly successful./ The Argus says , that in the Hurdle Baoeari up-country horse in 1 Proletaire effected a clever win, add did the layers of odds a good turn, for he was very little baoked.-while a lot of money went on Mitchell and Plebeian, and Sketoher fell in the race and gave his rider'(Hughes) a bad shaking. The fine field oUQ runnetß contested the Trial Stakeß, and,. Mr S. G. Cook's representative, The Dootor, by the Musket horse Musk Rose, 'won.- Emerald, a New Zealand- bred mare/and Pollio'were well backed for tbe race, and Emerald euojeeded id gaining seoond place. The last rjace of the day was the Mordialloc Handicap, and several good horses made their app'earanoe' in it. Amongst them were Singapore, Escutcheon, Wycbmbe, Red Rose, Knight of the;GartSr, Mikado 11, Drilldoor, and Glenloth. Wycombe, Knight of the Garter, and Red,. Rosa were the three most backed, but Singapore, though supposed to be - something better than most of those he .had to meet, was to a great extent neglected. The brother to Mona Meg looked well, but rather big. His party did not farioy his chance much, but accepted some of the long prices which were on offer against him. The race resulted in a surprise,- for when Red Rosa looked very like a winner, and was getting very olose to the post, Mirnee came on the outside with such a darn of pace as his brother, the famous Malua, was celebrated for, and snatched the victory from the mare by a short head. Wycombe, who ran well, was third, with Dramatist and Singapore next.

*.* The Australian mail announces the death of three famous racehorses. Two of these, Wollomai and Sheet Anohor, both Mel' bourne Cup winners, were the property of Mr D. H. Hill, the well-known breeder, of the Lindenon estate (Victoria). They were found dead in the paddocks, but no further particulars are stated. Wollomai, ridden by Batty, won the Melbourne Cup in 1875, and Sheet Anchor was successful in the same race in 1885. Wollomai, who was a bright bay, , was by Ace of Clubs from Fleur de Lis, by Lugar, and was a perfcrmer of merit. . Sheet Anchor was bred by Mr John Field in Tasmania, and was by St. Albans from Queen Mary, by Castle Hill from Black Bess, by Pater Wilkins. The grand-dam of Sheet Anohor, who has not had a foal since 1886, is still alive.

%* The third obituary notioe relates., to a horse of muoh greater celebrity than either of the pair mentioned. I refer to old Strop, who has died-, in Tasmania in his 29th year. Strop was bred and owned by the late Mr W. Field, got by Panic out of a daughter of imported Little John out of Amelia, by Mozart — Pet, by imported Bolivar. Referring to his career, " Titan " says that the famous horse waß first Been out in 1866, and soon made a name for himself, not only in Tasmania, but in Victoria. His first publio appearanoe was as a four yearold in the Launoeston Champion Race in 1866, which he won, beating Ben Bolt, Rose of Denmark, and six others. Rose of Denmark represented Victoria, and Volunteer New

South Wales, and the mention of these names cads to the wish that oar leading events were now more intercolonial in character. Although the population then was small compared with now, the sum of 500aovs added money was given to the raoe mentioned. The son of Fanio, who unfortunately was added to the list, ran ceoond to Glencoe in the Melbourne Gap of 1868, and won the V.R.O. Free Handicap, Ballarat Handicap, Hobart Champion, and Hobart Prince of Waleß Handicap the same year. In 1869 he appropriated again the Launoeßton Champion as well as the V.R.C. Manners-Sutton Stakes, and other events. In 1870 be got home first io the V.R.O. Town Plate, and won the Launoeaton Oup in 1874, and the double— Hobart and Launceston— in 1876. Hia last appearance wbb at Oarrick on Boxing Day 1880, when he started in the Garrick Plate, won by West Coast, and also in the Welter Handicap, won by The Oaks, being third in that taoe. In describing the last-named raoes in these columns it was remarked : " Old Strop looked well, but the result of the raoe should teaoh his owner a lesson. The veteran, though his legs looked surprisingly well, bUows nnmistakeable signs of age, aud he was never able to pet out of the one pace. It was a sorrowful sight to see him afterwards contesting the Welter Handicap, and thus to witnwa the game old horse wbo commenced his oareer 14 years ago by winning a Champion Baoe with SOOaovs added ignominieußly beaten by a couple of platers." The majority of those good sports who gloried in Strop's early performances nave long since pasßed away, but there are yet many who have lively recollections of his deeds. Visitors to Enfield always had a look at the veteran. %• The Brooklyn Jockey Club Handicap, a 20,000d0l race at a mile and a quarter, run on the 15th May, drew a crowd of sports from all parts of the States. There were 21 starters, Rayon dOrs five-year-old son Tenny 9.2 being favourite at 5 to 2, A local report Bays that the raoe for nearly three-quarters of a mile was between Loantaka, Russell, Once Again, Santiago, and Nellie Bly. These made the pape hot for the first half mile, whioh was ran in 49|aeo, the first quarter in 24fjeo. For saoh a traok this was too good to last, and none of the leaders were in the final run, although both Bussell and Santiago hnng on very well to the Btretoh. In the early part of the raoe Judge Morrow was apparently out of the contest, but lie made a very fast run around the far turn, and near the laßt furlong his name was on every lip, but Covington had made the rush too soon and too fast, and he gave way to Princa Royal, Tea Tray, and Banquet. The Prince ontfooted the other two, and then his name was shouted by thousands as the prospective winner, but the enthusiasm of his adherents was shortlived, for when Barnes let out his wrap on Tenny, the favourite, who had been well nursed and placed, drew past first one and then another of tbe five or Bix in front of him, and won hy nearly three lengths. Nothing was able to withstand his powerful strides when once he straightened out for him. His time was 2min lOseo. At the same meeting Cheviot's son Osrio won the Expectation Stakes, a valuable two-year-old event, for Which there were 14 Btarters.

W8 5—5 — HUWT OiTTB MSBTINO. Season. Stakes. Tofcallaator, 1888-89 £ 530 £ 4,483 1889-90 665 6,785 1890-91 700 6,033 SPBitra Mbrtino. 1888-39* 1,325 11,500 188P-90 6,070 41.516 1890-91 3,610 28,930 * Only a two-dayt' meeting. Fkbbuxey Mkktinq. 1888-89, 3,260 30,298 1889-90 3,620 35,479 1890-91 3,740 35,847 ANNTVKRSA.BY MbBTWG. ' 1888-89 740 * 6,148 1889-90 810 8,551 1890-91 935 8,953 Mat Meeting. 1888-89 1,030 12,079 1889-90 „ 1,630 12,048 1890-91 1,625 12,398 ,

JtHUUU. [884-85... 1885-88... 1888-87... 1887-88... 1888-89... 1889-90... 1890-91... *5 ... 65,573 ... 66,173 ... 54,291 ... 57.318 ... 67,507 ... 104,379 ... 92,161

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Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 1948, 25 June 1891

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 1948, 25 June 1891

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