Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image

LADIES' GOSSIP.

— The Prince and Princess of Wales and the Princesses Victoriaand Maud were to pro,ceed to Denmark about September 19, in the royal yacht Osborne, embarking at Aberdeen, and they will be the guests of the King and Queen at the Castle of Fredensborg, where the Emperor and Empress of Russia and the Duchess of Cumberland are also expected.

— The marriage of Lieutenant Herbert Northey Hopkins aad the Hon. Eleanor Yarde Buller, fourth daughter of the late Lord Cbuiston, and sister to the present peer, took place in Sepi ember last at St. Augustine's Church, Queen's Gate The bride was given away by her brother, and accompanied to the altar by her nephew, Master Victor Malone, who was attired in a Buit of brown silk, after the style of Lord Fauntleroy. In the afternoon the "happy pair " left London for Eastbourne. — A.n interesting story 1h told of a Turkish girl who was abandoned as a baby by her parents at the time of the Russo-Turkish war, and upon whom a regiment of Russian Boldiers took pity. When the regiment returned to Warsaw the officers resolved to do their best for the girl, whose name was Aish.

They imposed upon themselves an income tax of lper cent., and resolved to pay to " the Aish fund " 10 copecks for each game of cards played at the regimental club, &c. As she grew up she was christened Maria Kexholtnskaia, after the name of the regiment, Kexholm, and was placed at the Maria College for young girls at Warsaw. Twelve years have passed, and Maria Kexholm shaia has become a pretty girl, and has just finished her college studies. The regiment lately gave a fete in her honour ; then a State dinner, during which the oldest non-com-missioned officers of the regiment, in the name of all the privates, presented a sacred image, and in the evening there was a ball. As a sign of her gratitude, Maria Kexholmskaia presented the regiment with a large velvet cushion, on which she had embroidered in gold the monogram of the regiment and exact copies of all the decorations and medals the regiment has received for its gallantry. In one of the corners she had embroidered "Masha (or Maria) Kexholmskaia, 24th January 1878— 19 th June 1890." The Emperor of Austria is the honorary colonel of the regiment, and it is supposed that he will do something to show his interest in the daughter of his regiment, who is now staying with General Panjoutin, commander of the 11th Division, the officer who commanded the Kexholm Regiment when little Aish was found.

— The disposition of that sentimental pledge, the engagement ring, has at last been carried before the French courts ; and now we know to whom, when its significance is broken, the token shall revert. In the Nimes Court, in Fiance, a recent divorce case came up, in which the wife claimed as hers certain articles of jewellery presented to her before their marriage. Prominert among these was the engagement ring. The judges decided that not only was a woman entitled, before the law, to all those articles of value which a lover had seen fit to present to her before marriage, but also that the " ring offered^or the purpose of recalling the engagement of two persons constituted the most personal and most irrevocable of all souvenirs given in view of marriage." This is as it should be.

— Coloured note paper is now made in all the colours of the rainbow and more. Mauve is the newest shade. R6s6da (mignonette, a grey-green tint) is also new. " Some of the paper has a dim floral pattern all over it, and looks rather like chintz. Pink, red, yellow, and blue papers are to be had, a paper strewn with heather, and one adorned with flights of swallows. Envelopes of these fancy papers are in all sorts of odd shapes. The newest way of folding a sheet of note paper is to double it lengthwise. A very long narrow envelope is provided for the sheet thus disposed of. Berlin is the birthplace of all this outri stationery. The Parisians content themselves with a simple artistic device in one comer — a spray of flowers or a flight of birds.

— False modesty frequently deters women from doing their share of love-making. From fear of being considered over-bold they are apt to be over-shy, and thus discourage attentions which they secretly desire. Women are as well entitled as men to express their love, only each sex has its own way — man with words, woman with manners. The one is quite as expressive as the other ; and in either case the more delicately expressed the better. A woman who does not express her attachment by her manner cannot expect to be loved. It is altogether foolish, because it is a hypocritical practice, that of pretending to be indifferent to those whom she really and legitimately love 3. Preference is a legitimate feeling which may be always modestly manifested by any woman.

— Miss Braddon (in private life Mrs Maxwell) is described as fair of skin, sandy of hair, and stout of figure. She works hard four days of the week, and plays three days. Among her recreations are riding, playgoing, and entertaining her friends. She is a collector of bric-a-brac, a lover of Dickens, a genial hostess, and an accomplished cook. She has published more than 50 novels, is married to her publisher, who is rich, and after all the " copy " she has produced she still writes a legible hand.

— Dr Razie Koatloiaroff-Hanum, a Mohammedan woman born in the Crimea, has passed a brilliant examination as physician and surgeon before the college authorities at Odessa, and is admitted to practice. Dr Koutloiaroff-Hanum is the first Mohammedan woman physician regularly graduated. Women, too, are now being employed for the first time by the Mohammedan Government as telegraphic clerks and ticket agents on the Trans-Caspian railroad.

— The marriage of Lady Helen Duncombe, daughter of Lord and Lady Feversham, and sister to the beautiful Duchess of Leinster, with Sir Edgar Vincent, K.0.M.G., governor of the State Ottoman Bank at Contstantinople, was to have taken place on the 24th September. Sir Edgar has only been granted a month's leave for all the purposes of marriage and the subsequent honeymoon, so he and his lovely bride are expected in Constantinople at the end of October. Lady Helen will most certainly prove a great addition to the society there, and it will be amusing to learn ihe Turkish ladies' opinions of one of the most distinguished English beauties of to-day.

— Sir Morell Mackenzie has ascertained that most of the actors in London are suffering from a relaxed condition of the upper part of the throat, while the actresses are very rarely affected that way. He has arrived at the conclusion that there is no reason for this difference — nothing that will account for it — except that so many of the gentlemen smoke and so few of the ladies.

— A marriage is arranged between Mr Leighton, eldest son of Sir Baldwyn and Lady Leighton, of Loton Park, Shropshire, and Miss Margaret Fletcher, second daughter of Mr Fletcher, of Saltoun. A marriage is also arranged between Captain H. E. Lacon, late 7th Highlanders, of Ackworth House, East Bergholt, and the Hon. Gretor Erskine, only daughter of Lord and Lady Erskine, of Rpratton Hall, Northampton. Vide New York Herald : — " From Chicago comes the announcement that Moreton Frewen, of England, is to be married to Mrs Grace January, widow of one of the richest men of the West." Me Moreton Frewen, "of England " — delicious description — is already married, and possesses a most attractive and charming wife, so I concede ibhe news "from

Chicago " — fancy going to Chicago for news 1 —is elaborately incorrect.

— And, by the way, that charming and singularly accomplished and talented sovereign, the Queen of Roumania, has arrived among us, and in the week she spent in town previous to continuing her journey to Llandudno, has devoted herself energetically to sight-seeing. Kew Gardens, Westminster Abbey, the Tower of London, and, indeed, all the usual places of interest have been duly visited, and many have been performed incognito. Her Majesty has experienced some singular adventures, which, however, she has throughout taken in good part. Should Llandudno prove less enjoyable than has been expected, "Carmen Sylva" will probably make a further move towards Penzance. The Queen is suffering from a malady strangely common with ladies in these high-pressure days — namely, the nerves.

— A French aristocrat has been trying to palm off his own notions on the world as the standard of taste. We scorn to do this ; our system is based upon the collective wisdom and experience of the ages.

1. Always take your hat off to your hairdresser.

2. Never offer your arm to a disaeoter until you are quite cold, 3 Always bow low before a lowly-drooping chandelier.

4. Butlera should always be treated with deference, but servility ia a mark of higher breeding. 5. Never precede your wife when there is an alarm of burglars. 6. Never eat peas with strychnine. 7. Avoid making a noise while swallowing something in the pantry. 8. In introducing the lady you are walking with to your wife be careful not to mention the latter's name.

9 If in doubt, do as others don't and don't as they do. 10 Avoid politeness. Politeness is the mark of a scoundrel.

11. Always give up your seat in 'bus or car to a lady if you have arrived at your destination and if there is a lady handy, 12 Above all, pay no attention to rules of etiquette. Fools follow rules. Wise men precede them.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18901113.2.103

Bibliographic details

Otago Witness, Otago Witness, Issue 1917, 13 November 1890

Word Count
1,617

LADIES' GOSSIP. Otago Witness, Issue 1917, 13 November 1890

Working