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TALK OF THE DAY.

BY MAZEPPA.

*** October the 2nd is the general entryday for the Alexandra meeting. The programme contains seven events of a diversified character, from the mile and a-half handicap of 30sovs down to the Pony Race for a fiver. Mr J. Young's handicaps for the ohief events appear in another column, having been kindly forwarded by Mr W. F. Forrest, secretary. Looking at these weights, I should f anoy that Windsor ought to have a say in the Alexandra Handicap. *** We have to face a very considerable falling off in the nominations for the four chief handicaps at the Dunedin Jockey Club's Spring meeting as compared with those for the corresponding races at last year's fixture. Of course that was a speoial meeting in the widest sense, and a comparison is therefore hardly fair, but this season a new departure is also made in regard to the programme, much more money being given than on former ordinary occasions, and it is disappointing to find that we now have fewer than half last year's number, Tbe exaot figures for this season's events and the corresponding ones of last season are as follow :— 1889. 1890. Otego Oup ... ... 59 21 Federal Handicap... ... 49 31 President's Handicap ... 64 24 St. Andrew's Handicap ... 72 33 244 109 In making this comparison, however, it is neoessary to notice that we are now taking tbe nominations six weeks later than they were taken last year, thereby excluding all horses that may have gone amiss in the course of the last month or so, and also those proved by their performances to be unequal to raoing in good company and therefore those horses that are entered are, without exception so far aa I know, racers that may come to the post, whereas last year there was a lot of rubbish in the list. The falling off, then, is more apparent then real, and there is not the least risk of a poor meeting if the handicapping is up to the mark. A glance at the lists will show that Canterbury and Napier purpose to be well represented. %* Salvator's great performance in lowering tbe mile and a-quarter reoord to 2min sseo has not been permitted to stand much longer than it took to dry the ink with which it was written. At Monmouth Park, New Jersey, an the 17th July, a second and a quarter was clipped off that record by Mr W. L. Scott's three-year-old gelding Banquet, by Rayon dOr out of Ella T., who, carrying 7.10, ran the distance in the Stockton Stakes in 2min 3£aeo. There were four starters : Tournament (8.6), Sir John (7.l3)— these being two sons of Sir Modred — Devotee (7. 13), and Banquet. The betting was 10 to 9on Tournament and sto 2 against Banquet. A New York paper thus describes the race : — " The race was run over the straightaway course, and the start was virtually out of sight. As soon as they oame into full view it was plain that the contest lay between Tournament and Banquet, the others being lengths behind The two leaders raced together down the homestretch, and not until the last furlong was there any change. Then Banquet gradually drew away and beat Tournament by half a length. Sir John finished third, eight lengths behind, and about the same in front of Devotee. Considering the weight, Tournament ran a remarkable race."

%* And the_ American papers further chronicle the beating of Racine's recently- made record at a mile. Ten Broeck's lmin 39|seo successfully withstood assault for 13 years, until, iv fact, it had come to be a sort of tradition that it never would be beaten ; but within a month of Racine cutting this down to lmin 39Jieo he is himself put down a peg by T. Pur yea? and Co.'s three-year old colt R*weloc, by Joe Hooker out of Illusion. This youngster won tbe Newark Stakes at Monmouth Park, on July 31, in tbo wonderful time of lmin 39Jatc He carried 7.9, met six opponents, ami beat tho beat of them by a length. *** English papers are now to hand giving results of the Goodwood meeting whioh began on July 29. The Ham Stakes, a well-known event over the T. Y.C. course, was supposed to be a good thing for either the Duke of Westminster's Orion or Mr Barclay's Simon de Montfort, who went out about equal favourites ; and it was so, Orion being firßt and the other fellow Beoond, with the Prince of Wales' Dere-

hot third. Orion, a son of Bend Or and Shotover—there is running blood for you -is engaged in next Derby. For tho Stewards' Cup there was a good field of 22, beiug four in excess of last year's total, and the eamo number as when Trappist triumphed as fat back as '75 The Australian mare Lady Betty started at 40 to 1 and was never dangerous. Marvel, the winner, is by Marden out of Applauße 11, by Balfe out of Storm, by Oambusoan. Hie time for the six furlongs was lmin 14 1-5860, the fastest yet recorded for the race. Loup walked over for the Gratwicke Stakes, and the two-year-old Richmond Stakes was won easily by Mr Baud's Siphonia (by St. Simon—Palmflower) from her only opponent Ordinance. *** On the second day of this meeting the Duke of Portland's St. Serf started at 5 to 2 on in a field of eight for the Sussex Stakes, and won in a canter, doing the mile in lmin 503e0. This, the ohief three-year-old event of the meeting, was followed by the Goodwood Stakes, 14 going out to contest this long-dis-tance evont— aslarge a field as has started for it since Uhlan beat 18 others in 1873 Papyrus, the winner, is by Pet6r out of Nitooris, by King Tom from Datura, by Newminster. He is a fair performer. His time for the two and a-half miles was 4min 56sec, the fastest for 11 years with the exception of Stockholm's4mins23 sseo in 1884. Flodden Field beat the penalised Exeter Stakes winner, Haute Saone, in the Halnaker Stakes, and that consistent gee-gee Dog Rose captured the Arundel Cup On the third day the course being sloppy, Siphonia and Orion started at level weightß for the Prince of Wales' Stakes, and the colt, against whom odds of 3to 1 were betted, won easily, There were only two Btarterß. There were but five starters for the Cup. This was, however, up to the average of late, the largest field for the past 21 years having been eight in 1870, when Siderolite won. Philomel's time was smin 16 4-ssec. Lord Bradford's Outtlestone. by Retreat — Posthuma, winner of tho Rous Memorial, is a two-year-old that is supposed to have a great future before him.

\* The opening item on the fourth day was tho Nassau Stakes, one mile, worth £760. Thiß was won very easily by the Duke of Tortland's Memoir in lmin 49 3 ssec, beating Star and Dearest. After this raco 1000 to 200 was taken about her for the Leger. Of the five starters for the Molecomb Stakes, run over the T.Y.O. course, Mr Lowther's Oleator, by Oharibert — Hematite, was the most fancied, and in spite of a 71b penalty he won by a neck from Patrician, The Chesterfield Cup produced'a sensation, there being a dead heat between the favourite, Father Confessor, and an outsider. It is said that JMr Abington's horse was much interfered with at the first attempt, and it was only owing to great gameuess that defeat was avoided, as Edgardo and Silver Spur hampered him ; in fact it was only on the post that the dead heat was made. Admirably ridden by Tom Gannonjthe decider was won by a head, after Edgardo, served by his light weight, had led to the distance. This, the most exciting contest of the week, was thoroughly appreciated by the onlookers, who cheered both T. Cannon and Father Confessor on their return to the paddock. *** The next meeting of importance in the Old Country was that at Brighton, commencing on the sth August. The Cup, a weight-for-age race, run over a mile course, brought out a field of five. Jodel and Lady Jacobite had no say in it, but in climbing the hill the other three gradually joined issue, and before The Rejected (9.12) could collar Philomel (10.0), Robinson drove ShUlelagh (9.12) between the pair. The finish between the three Irish-bred nags was then of the most exciting charaoter, and Tom Cannon having saved just a little for the finishing strokes, Philomel held her own by rather a short neck from Shillelagh, who in turn was a full head in advance of The Rejected. The result of the Lancashire Plate is reported by cable. *#* I had a message the other day from Mr Harry Goodman, now in Victoria. At the time of writing' he bad only had one turn of luck, and he was somewhat uncertain as to his movements in the immediate future, but the probabilities were that he would be back in New Zealand in time for the November raoes at Christchurch. Whether he brings with him Blizzard and Belvidere depends entirely on the value of the offers made for them. He is not anxious to bring the horses back if a fair price is forthcoming, but he will not sacrifice them for the sake of effecting a sale. From what I can make out there is little probability of Harry* making Australia his home. This was talked about some time ago, but I think ho prefers New Zealand ; and lam sure everyone will be glad to Bee him back. %* Home files record the death of Mr Brodrick Oloete'a stallion Paradox, the cause being a twisted intestine. Paradox was a noted racer. By Sterling out of Casuistry, he was bred at the Yardley Stud, and was purchased by Captain Bowling at the sale of the Messrs Graham's yearlings in 1883 for 700gs. He became the property of the Duke of Westminster just before the Middle Park Plate, and he ran in that race in his Grace's colours. Great things were expeoted of him, but in his maiden effort be could only finish a dead heat with Royal Hampton for third place behind Melton and Xaintrailles. Paradox next ran for the Dewhurat Platß, in the meantime having been disposed of to Mr BrodrickCloete, and this race he won in a canter from Cora, Xaintrailles, and seven other*, and his new owner then refused an offer of 10,000sovs for the son of Sterling. As a three-year-eld he won the Two Thousand Guineas by a head from Crafton and six others, bub in the Derby was beaten a similar distance by bis previous conqueror, Melton. The Grand Prize of Paris he won in a canter, and was also successful in the Sussex Stakes at Goodwood, the Champion St-keß at Newmarket Second October, and the Free Handicap Sweepstakes at the Houghton meeting. Paradox finished his turf career when a thiee-yeat old, and was sent to the stud. His subscription list was full for 1891 at a fee of lOOgs. %* Particulars of the second day's racing at Hawkesbury Jid not arrive in time for last week's issue. In the Members' Handicap there were a dozen starters. Pet Girl (9 0) was at first the favourite, but before the flag fell there was a great rush to get on to Hurrah, a four-year-old by Marvellous out of Queen Bee, carrying 7.0. This horse won very easily at the finish. Despite her 71b p&nalty, Prelude was looked on as such a certainty for the Produca Stakes that 5 and 6 to 1 on was demanded by tbo layers. Victor Hugo, Cobbam, and At».loitfy were the. othar 6tar'erg. Cobham made Hjo ptne for Fix fu-longp, and, with balf a mile further to go, Preiudo en-l Victor Hugo paHsod him, faii'i lod togi-iber to tho home turn, where Oobhr.m put in a renewed oiaim, but Prelude w»d Ihn first Lo laud in tbo straight, and wav nearly cicav at. the distance. A little further *>n Victor Hugo rands his final run, and Power wai compelled to draw his whip, but the pair liafl hardly sottied down to finish when Oobhain caino again with wonderful resolution, and a grand struggle ensued to the poet, Cobhani just getting up in the last stride, and winning a wonderfully good race by a head, after one of the most exciting contests ever seen on the course. The winner is a son of Grand Flaneur and Belle of Cobham

(imp.), by Restitution from May Queen, by Trumpeter from Maybell, by Hetman Platoff. Of the 15 sfarters for tha Hawkesbury Grand Handicap the best-conditioned seemed to be Eclipse, Olareraont, Little Bernie, Megaphone, and Simon. The last-named made the pace with Tridentine, and, to quote a local writer, when the pair had galloped themselves to a standstill, the favourite came through and won as he chose. He was very judioiously piloted by Ryan, and is by Newbold from Sound (dam of Rose of Drayton), by The Drummer from Beatrice, by Pitsford, and has an almost unbaatt n record. Eclipse, Federation, and Claremont greatly disapointed their respective stable?, but Little Bernie finished like a racehorse, and old Lancer chowed a deal of improvement The time was equal to the best ever done at the Hawkesbury, and Megaphone now stands on a par with Prince Imperial at 2 35£. [N.B — This is a point on which tho authorities differ. Miller's Pamphlet gives Prince Imperial's time as 2.85|, but both the Sydney weeklies record it as 2,35£, and bo does "Oentaur." Doubtlesß the last-named is correct I was misled last week by following the other authority.] The following table shows the WINNERS OF HAWKBSBURY HANDICAP.

In 1877 the distance was altered from two miles to | one mile and three-quarters. In 1879 the distance was altered to one mile and n-half. In 1878 Woodlands (8 10) finished first but was disqualified for not drawing the weight. The time in all cases is given to the nearest quarter of a second. %* The decease of Realisation is surely matter worthy of a Bbort paragraph, seeiug that to this mare we are indebted for the uni-versally-admired Maxim, the only horse New Zealand has ever bred that may be compared to Carbine.) Realisation was a bay mare bred in England by Mr Ellam in 1875, and imported to Victoria, I think, in 1877. In that colony she produced Result, a bay filly sired by Bethnal Green, that won several races, including the Goodwood Handicap at the South Australian J-O.'s meeting. In 1880 Realisation bore Wapiti to King Cole ; and four years later the mighty Maxim oame to show us a wonder. She had no produce in 1885 or the following year, .but in 1887 she had Liquidation to King Cole— a filly that has yet to earn her reputation as a racar. Realisation never raced herself. She was by Vespaßian out of Hopeful Duchess, by The Flying Dutchman out of Espoir, by Liverpool. \* I have heard it stated, and have seen the same opinion expressed in print, that the accidents which occurred in the jumping races at the Hunt Olub meeting were to some extent caused by the limited circuit on which the race was run r and to the faot that the fences were plaoed on the outside of the track. Possibly enough these reasons are sound — they; at the least deserve attention. I have in previous numbers spoken of the awkwardness of having the obstacles on the outside of the course, horses being thus perpetually running in and out—in to take short cuts and out to take the fenoes. It would not, however, be fair to charge all the aocideot3 to that arrangement, for at least two of the moßt serious of these misadventures happened on parts of the course where the ruuning is quite straight. Victor oame down right opposite the Btand, when going on a beeline, and Enterprise's fatal mishap occurred in front of the grand stand. The causes above assigned doubtless indioate a state of affairs that wants altering, but some of the spills seemed ■ to be due simply to bad luok which might have come in on any course. %* There was capital weather at the Sou oh Canterbury races last week, and some fairly good racing, which is pretty fully set forth in the report of the Lyttelton Times, somewhat abridged, appearing in another column. It iB pleasing to be able to say that the newly established Timaru Guineas provided an excellent contest. Moraine was made favourite, more on the strength of past form than by reason of his present condition, and the public paid the penalty for their want of judgment in seeing the colt unable to sustain bis struggle to the end of a stiff finish. Diadem, the winner, is said to have been the fittest of the lot, and she was handled nicely by Derrett, whose knowledge of pace enabled him to time his rush with capital judgment. This filly is by Bundoora from Ruby'B dam, Wave. Bay King ran rather disappointingly on both days ; and as for the rest of the racing, all that need be said is that in some respects it revealed different form to that shown atGeraldine, and that some of the performances did not seem to square with others at the same meeting. As I was not present, I cannot eutor into particulars. Ahua's defeat on the second day is put down to lack of condition. Messrs Mason and Roberts paaaed £3140 through the totalisator, or £344 less than last year.

*** The Tuapeka Times reports that a meeting was held in tho Good Templars' Hall, Waitahuna, on Thursday evening, for tho purpose of forming a racing club in the Wailahuna district. Mr Oowan, who was voted to the chair, called an Mr George Dick, the convener, to state the object of the meeting, Mr Dick said he bad been requested by several of the residents of tho district to call a meeting for the purpose of endeavouring to form a local racing club. He was of opinion that they coulJ hold a very successful race meeting in the district. There wore a unmber of young men li\iu# ;n; n the UQiKfcbtmrhuod who, ho was sure, would suppovt n, clob were it forroed. They LmJ a piece* of ground snUnblo ff-r a course down the fiat, about five rninuiea' walk from tho railway »tfttir-D, and be tborißbf; Ihcro soould be no diffijnlfcy in gotfeinß up a(. lo.nst o»n day's racing. After nome 'liscusnija, Mr L-^ffey moved and h&t G Dick seconded— ''Tiiat it ig doeu'.sble to fv rtn c. racing club in Wrd &huna, and that a committee, cimsisiibij of Messrs G. Dick, John Gran , H, Bar to;:, G. Oudaille, John Oallnnau, MarUa Ryan, jun., John Ward, and tho uoovor, with power to add to their number, be appointed to give effect thereto." A vote of thanks to the chair cloaed the meeting, The committee mot

directly after the publio meeting to arrange preliminaries. *** By the cabled reports of the Australian Jockey Club's races it will be seen that Bungebah is credited with running the mile in the Epsom Handicap in 1 40, which is nominally equal to the best record south ef the Line, and may perhaps be accepted as the record, since doubt in some degree has always attached to the performances of Boolka and Kingfiah, whose time in each case was put down at the same made now by Bungebah. Carbine is also said to have cut a record at this meeting by doing the mile and a-quarter in 2.7, or half a second quicker than Abercorn's record. I shall not put these new records on the list until I hear what the Australian writers say about them, though there is no reason to suppose that any mistake has ooonrred in cabling, since the times stated are in each case behind the American records for the distance. Speaking of Carbine, he appears to have stepped aside in the Randwick Plate on the fourth day, and thus given Melos a chance. It Burely cannot be that he ran and was unplaced. That would be too bad to be true, and the message would have mentioned it as the most important item in connection with the meeting. Next week I hope to have all particulars of tbe meeting ready.

%* St. James, winner of the last Danedin Uup, was shipped to Wanganui this week, leaving Dunedin by the Te Anau. I underBtand that he is sold provisionally to a Northern breeder, but the particulars are not yet publio property. The deportation of this Bon of Pungawerewere leaves a vacancy at the St. Clair Btable, but by way of compensation there ia an increase of two at the farm, where Lady Emma has givon birth to a remarkably fine filly begotten by St. Olair (the first of thiß stallion's stock to see the light), and Legerdemain has thrown a filly to Gorton.

%* Being otherwise engaged on Monday afternoon I was unable to accept the kind invitation sent by Hanking to be present at tbe opening of the new stables, "Forbury Lodge," close to the entrance of tbe racecourse, but I shall take an early opportunity of looking round the premises and saying something about them. At the opening ceremony above referred to there was a representative gathering, and the chair was taken by Mr Arthur Smith, a veteran among our trainers, who, in the course of a few appropriate remarks, commended the Bpirit of enterprise displayed by Haukins in putting up so fine a stable, and expressed the hope that before long this trainer would have something better to work on than the horses now in hand. Those as embled received the toast with the heartiest good feeling, and a pleasant time was spent, the conviviality being helped on considerably Dy a couple of songs contributed by M'GuinD6HB, who has a capital voice.

Yr. Horse. Pedigree. at Wt. a> B EH otlb m. a. 1871 A.ruma „, Prlnoe WilliamGipsy Girl Yattendon— Nutcut Yatteudon— Nutcut fireworks— Sylvia ... Traducer— Gilaua ... Kelpio— Juanita Kelpie— Juauita Yattendon— The Nun Vat.tendon — G i pay Girl ... .;. Yattendon— J eaa i c Bell ... Conrad— Euphrosyne Grandmaster Queen Bee Gemma di Vergy - Lilian ... Wilber force— Oarlotta ... K'lpie -Qneen'i Head .., St. Albans — Deception Goldsbrongh — S i gnora ... The Drummer— Bl'ok Swan ... Goldabrough - Ethel Newbold- Sound ... 1872 1871 1874 1875 1876 1871 1878 1879 Dagworth ... Oagworth ... Goldabrough Calumny ... Sunlight ... Janitor The Dean ... Kinsman a 4 5 4 6 a 5 4 7 0 7 4 8 10 7 7 8 4 7 8 8 7 7 8 3.42 3.37 3 49J 3.40 3 35 3 34 3 14 3.8 1880 Hesperian ... 0 4 2.41 f 1881 1882 Trump Yobs... Sting 4 6 6 8 7 9 2.89 2.38 8 0 2.36J 1883 Flrat Demou 1884 Hastings ... 6 4 2.38J 1885 P r lnoe Imperial ... Meteor 7 11 2.36J 1886 6 12 2.35 i 1887 Cardigan ... 7 2 I 3 37| 1888 I The Queen ... 6 10 1 2.37| 18R9 1890 I Ellerdale ... i Megaphone ... 5 4 3 8 12 6 12 7 0 ! 3.36*. ! 2.37* I 2.351

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TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 1911, 25 September 1890

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 1911, 25 September 1890

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