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TALK OF THE DAY.

BY MAZEPFA.

%* With this week we commence a new raoing season— the horses are all a year older, and we start a fresh account aa it were. I had hoped to be able to print in this issue the statistics of the past season, but a somewhat lengthy indisposition from wbioh I have not long reoovered caused my posting-up to fall into arrear, and I shall have to ask for a oouple of weeks' grace. %• On Monday of this week Mr Dowses counsel (Sir Robert Stout) scut to Mr Stead a formal letter asking that he send down a formal withdrawal of the statements deemed libellous, or else that a solioitor be named who would accept service of the writ on Mr Stead's behalf. Up to Wednesday afternoon no reply had been received. Of course there had been no time to answer by post. *** I hardly expected that any one of the oluba interested would have backed up the Southland Racing Club's claim or request— l do not know wbioh form the aspiration assumes —to rank as a metropolitan olub with a jurisdiotion cut off from that of the Dunedin Jockey Olub, It seems to me unreasonable on the faoe of it that a club which has been in existence for only a dog watch as compared with some others in the district— Winton for example — and which gave laat season only £425 in stakes at its two meetings, Bhould seek to assume responsibilities such a 9 are vested in the large city oluba. But we do not all think alike on this subject;. Winton, the very olub I thought of as most likely to object, proclaims assent to the proposal, and pledges itself to give it every support. That is a fair set- off to Gore's negative reply. I suppose the pros and cons will be sent on to the conference, and that that body will come to a decision on the matter. We have not, by the way, heard what reasons are to be adduced for the proposed change. If there are any, and it may be supposed there are, else are the Winton people aoting in the dark, it would perhaps be as well to make them publio. I for one count as an opponent of the proposal so far, but olaim to be open to conviotior, and, whether convinced or not, shall be happy, if desired to do so, to publish the particulars of the scheme. Since writing the above I bear tbat the Waimea Plains Club also dissents,

%* It is not easy to say what horses will pay up for the New Zealand Cup on Saturday — not easy, that is, to make a complete list, but I can speak for a certainty as to the Ounedin horses, Those tbat will drop out are Forbury, Gipsy Prince, and Don Pedro— three horses that are at present in the ranks of the unemployed, and the seven tbat will be paid up for are Messrs Stepbenson and Hazlett's Ocoidentand Mariner, Mr 0. Turnbull's Wolverine and Wayland, and the Hon. G. M'Lean's Pique, Emmason, and St. James. The last-named, winner of the Dunedin Oup, has been brought in from the farm, and will be put into strong work as soon as convenient. Besides these, we know that Jet d'Eau will accept, for he has been backed, in all probability for the stable, to win as much as the bookmakers oare to lay to as short a price as 5 to 1, a move which makes him a strong first favourite. Then we are told that Reprisal's acceptance was posted a week or more ago. Further, I have reason to look on Dudu as a certain acceptor, and maybe she will be heavily baoked Before the day of the raoe ; and it is highly probable, if not a foregone conclusion, that Tirailleur, Merrie England, Medallion, St. Andrew, Rose Argent, Thackeray, Oraokshot, Freedom, Ohatfield, and Richlake will be found in the revised list. Beyond these I see nothing but uncertainties, and Bball therefore refrain from attempting to prophesy in the matter. I oan, however, indulge in an opinion on another question about this race, and that is that it is ! not the best of business of backers to take 5 to 1 I about Jet d'Eau, I would not take that price three months before a raoe about anything leas than Carbine let in at 9.0, and with bim the price would simply be the odds about his keeping alive. *** Two or three weeks ago the pony : Trixie was taken aoross from Ohristchurch to ' Melbourne on the strength of a rather superior trial which was reckoned quite good enough for Melbourne or anywhere else if she ran up to it. I see by the papers now to hand that she went down at the Moonee Valley meeting. It was in the 13.2 Distance Handicap of two miles. She started at 200 yds behind, and, though muoh faster than the winner, kept breaking, and was beaten by 10yds. The winner was Mr Fiaku's Kitty, 160 yds behind, who started first favourite. At the same meeting Mr A, J. Keith's Tommy 111, a New Zealand exportation, won two events. The first of these was the National Trot, of 150sovs, three miles, in which he started 100 yds behind and beat 14 others, including Long Roper and Wait- a- while ; and the second was the Two-mile Trot, in wbioh Tommy 111 had 50yds penalty! and started at 2 to 1 on in a field of a dozen. The most important event, the Free-for-all Trot, two miles, was reckoned a good thing for the Sydney oraok Huon, but as a matter of fact he was beaten out of place, the prize going to the Amerioan-bred mare Lucretia, who led all the way, and won very easily. Violetfca, jun., being seoond, and our New Zealand Daisy third. In the mile Free-for-all Lucretia went out at evens and was beaten by Matilda ; Daisy being third and Huon unplaced. Lucretia's time for the twomile race was smin 2753 ec, and Matilda's for the one mile 2min iljsec. %• The Grand Steeplechase de Paris, I which is the most valuable raoe of its olass in France, being this year worth £4718, was raced for at Auteuil on the 7th June and was contested by 11 horseß, of whom six represented L* Perfide Albion or her Bister island. The Frenoh horses were M, Ephrusßi's Fetiche 11.6, M, Farines' Papillon IV 9.12, M. Edouard's Leo 11.6, M. Fould's Bandmaster 11.6, and M, Tirard's Boule Bog 9.12; while those that crossed the channel were Lord Dudley's Royal Meath 11.6, who was made favourite at 6 to 4 against, Mr Oorbally's Bay Leaf .9.12, Mr Atkinson's Strong Tea 11.6, Mr Arthur's Innisfail 11.1, Duke of Hamilton's Weatherwitch 11.1. and Lord Annaly's Lady Sarah 9.12. Innisfail and Strong Tea came to i?rief during the race, which resulted in a very easy win for Royal Meath, who had been sold before the raoe to Lord Dudley for £5000 and half the stake in case he won. This year the stake was for the first time a weight-for-age race. *„,* The Grand International Hurdle Race at Auteuil was run on the 11th June. It also is a weight-forage race, with penalties. The only one of the six starters that had a penalty was Royal Meath, who was called on to put up 141b extra, and this caused the Duke of Beaufort's Benburb to be made favourite at 6 to 4. This member, however, oame down at the first hurdle ; Royal Meath was unabb to do anything under his 12stj and the finish was fought out by Saint Claude and Saida, of whom the first-named won by half a length. The winner's starting price was 5 to 2, and hecovered the three miles one furlong in 6min 34 2-saec. The stakes amounted to £1930, and according to the conditions of the race, M. Aumont, the well-known breeder, was awarded 20030vs from the mutuels. %♦ Still another French race, the importance of which justifies passing reference. I speak of the Prix dv Jookey Olub, commonly known as the Frenoh Derby, Fcr it there were 10 starters, all Continental bred and owned but one, and that one the winner. This was Baron de Rothsohild's Heaume, who started at 6 to 4, waited on bis field till the distance, and then oame away easily, winning with something to spare in the fast time of 2min 41sec— a record that may be put on the books, seeing that the distance is not ** about," but exactly one mile and a-half. The performance seems the better when we consider that Heaume suffered an injury to his hook at tho Spring meeting, as previously remarked, and had in consequence undergone a somewhat intermittent course of training. He walked away quite lame after winning the Derby, so that his old hurt must have affected him more or less all through. %* It turns out that Melody's success in the Woodcote Stakes at the Epsom Summer meeting was quite a famous performance. She started at the nice price of 100 to 8, and, jumping away with the lead, waa uncaught from beginning to end, winning easily by three \ lengths from the favourite, Simonian, who shaped so indifferently as compared with | Melody that it is considered doubtful whether he could have got home even without his penalty. He mußt, however, have kept up the pace pretty well, as Melody ran the six furlongs in lmin 13 l-sseo, thus scoring, in her win for an Australian owner, a better record for the distance than the colonials have ever put up in their own country. Melody was bred in Ireland, and was purchased last Ootober I for £1000 by Mr D. Cooper. It was her first appearance in public In 1875 Folkestone started for this race also at 100 to 8, and in 1867 Le Sarrazin waa a 20 to 1 chance. Bar these Melody is the greatest outsider that has ever won, %* The critics seem to be agreed that Surefoot was not beaten on his merits in the Derby, or, rather, that he would have shaped better but for a mistake in the way he was ridden, and we also read tbat he showed I temper in the race. One writer says : "I do not remember a case besides Surefoot's in wbioh a horse absolutely lost the Derby tbrongb bis own upwillingneaß to gallop. Some people have hastily blamed Liddi&rd for not taking him to the front, as be did in the Two Thoq-

sand. This ia all very well, bat if Surefoot would not extend himself and take the lead, but preferred to remain in the rear and try to savage his opponents, what was his rider to do ? This reminds one of the tale of a wellknown lady owner who soundly rated a jockey who had lost, for not coming away at the turn, as she had told him. The horseman replied, 1 1 could not come away without the horse, could I?' Liddiard can only be blamed for using his whip, which he was told expressly not to do. There was not so much harm in this, as, after he had tried to make Surefoot gallop by coaxing and ordinary riding, the only course open was to try the whalebone. This he did coming down the straight, and for a few strides the favourite put in some telling strokes. To me be appeared then to be catching the leaders rapidly, but be again ran rather sluggishly at the last. That his form waß all wrong iB certain. I say now, as I have eald all along, that Surefoot ought to have won the Derby by many a length, and when he one day tries to gallop he will quickly demonstrate it. The horses wore all too olose together for Surefoot to have shown his proper form." And another of the soribes says regarding Surefoot : •• He was . too much coddled— was treated too carefully and, perhaps it is as well to add, too cleverly. It is likely enough if he had gone into the paddook, and then paraded and cantered, he would never have tried to savage his horses in the race— he was brought too suddenly to them. This pampering of horses, and, as it were, wrapping them in cottonwool for fear of woaring them out too soon, is not without its drawbacks. The unduly preserved animals are utterly taken aback at the suddenness of the task tbat lies before them. Get Surefoot in a good mood, and there was only one in Wednesday's raoe would have a chance of beating him, and that one wouldn't be the winner. We shall presently see that temper had much more to do with Surefoot's defeat than inability. Read by the light of 1890's Derby, about which there was to be no interest whatever, raoing seems more than ever a lottery," %* The Duke of Portland did not make a declaration in the Oaks. The reason of this, remarks the Referee man, was that it was pointed out to him that if a close raoe with Signorina and his fillies ensued and the wrong one won, the Epsom crowd, unlike that of Newmarket, might not understand it, and the jookey might be ill-treated, whilst it might bring the owner himself into disfavour. I never saw a classic event run at such a pace, It was murder to Semolina to race hor away so fast, but the reason was doubtless to try and make Signorina's lack of condition tell its tale, as they thought the One Thousand winner had plenty of stamina. Semolina led quite three clear lengths at the mile post, where ono-third of the journey had been accomplished, aud the rate the race was run at can be imagined when it is mentioned that the time is given at 2min 40 4-sseo, lam not a great believer in the correctness of these so-called official times, as the watch is struok when the flag falls, and not when they pass the exact starting place. Thus on one occasion the horseß run a longer distance than on another. Still, the fastest time that the Oaks has over been run in is Seabreeze's 2min 42 4 sseo. The Derby has ■never been run quicker than 2min 43seo, a feat which has been accomplished by Kettledrum, Blair Athol, Merry Hampton, and Ayrshire. Memoir's time on Friday, therefore, is so much superior to the others that it must have been run at a great pace, and she has set a record that will tike some beating. Considering all things, Signorina ran wonderfully well, and, had she been her old self, would have won. She is a beautiful filly, but she laoks muscle, and appeared rather BOft. ♦#• There is a good deal of interesting matter in the American papers to hand by the laat mail. In the first place, I notice that Amazon's nine furlongs in the Gazelle Stakes at Brooklyn on the 21st May were covered not in lmin 44<sec, as cabled to England, but in lmin 58£aeo, so that it was by no means a wonderful performance. It is easy to see how the compiler of the cablegram fell into bis mistake. In the races previous to the Gazelle Stakes Adamant ran a mile in lmin 44sec, and as the races are not dearly divided in the Yankee prints the time has been read into the wrong report. Next I observe tbat the Messrs Morris' colt Russell made his performance of lmin 2seo for five furlongs, also referred to last week, in the Great American Stakes, run for at Gravesend, at the Brooklyn Club's meeting on the 27th May. This is a two year-old event with 20,000d0l guaranteed, There were 13 starters— none by Darebin or Sir Modred. Russell, a bay colt byJEolus out of Tillie Russell, started favourite at 7 to 5, and ran home a winner by six lengths. This was the last of five races Russell had run during 10 days, one of these being a Bix-furlong event won by him by five lengths in lmin 1445e0. He is said to have a wonderful stride and to be the pick of tfce two-year-olds seen out this Beason. *** This same Russell ran four furlongs on the Westchester course on the 30fcb May in 4C|sec, winning by five longtha, so that if proßeed he could probably have equalled the even 46seo made by Geraldine on the same track last year. The traok, be it noted, is a little down bill. At tbe same meeting on the following day a four-year-old filly named Fidea, by 111- Used out of Filletto, carried 8.4 and ran the six furlongs of the Toboggan Slide Handicap in the ■ wonderful time of lmin lO^sec, thus breaking the world's record of lmin llboc, previously held jointly by El Rio Rey and Tipstaff, by three quarters of a second. There wore 20 starters, Strideaway being favourite at sto 2. Fides set the pace, closely attended by Madstone, Tormentor, Blue Rock, and FitzJames, with Geraldine running well up but away by herself along tbe inner rail. When well in sight the race settled down to a fight between Fides and Geraldine. Two hundred yards from home Geraldine had the best of it, and M'Carthy rode as if confident of winning, but in the final brush Fides outlasted tbe Oalifornian mare and won by a scant length. Blue Rock was an open length behind Geraldine, and then came FitzJames, Worth, and Tormentor well up, the others straggling in at intervals, pulled up. * # * On the 14th June Russell was beaten on equal terms as to weight by Sallie M'Clelland, a daughter of Hindoo, who started at 15 to lin a field of six. It was an awful boilover, Russell's price being 4 to 1 on straight out and barred for a place. The track was very heavy, and there was a terrifio race all the w&y between these two, who were nose and nose until the last 200 yds, when the filly got an advantage of a head, which she maintained to tho finish, winning by that measure in lmin 148eo. An exchange says that Rusbqll had not been out for some time, atid it is just probable that he had been indulged. If so, it was a costly mistake, for the Btake was worth 24,135d0l net to the winner. That the filly, or any other filly or colt which we have Been, iB his superior we do not believe, and we do not underestimate Sallie M'Clelland at that \* Salvator's success in the Suburban Handicap at Sheepshead Bay on tbe 17th June has been mentioned, but my readers will doubtless be interested in tbe details. Well,

there were nine starters : Raceland (syrs, 9.2) { Salvator (4yrs, 9.1), Tenny (4yrs, 9.0), Firenzi syrs, 9 0), Prince.Royal (syrs,B 11), Longstreet 4yrs, 8,1), Strideaway (6yrs, 8.4), Oassiua 4yrs, 7.9), and Montague (syrs, 7.6). In the betting Tenny was rather a better favourite than Salvator, at about 2to 1 each. Cassius made the running until the last hundred yards, when Tenny was done with and Salvator went up to Oasßiue. This pair ran looked together until nearing home, when Salvator made a final effort and won by a neok. The fractional lime of the race was as follows : Quarter 25 2 sseo; half, SOJseo; six furlongs, lmin 15 2-saec ; mile, lmin 40 4-53e0 ; mile and a furlong, lmin 55 4-53 ec; mile and a-quarter, 2min 6 4-sseo. The best Suburban record is the 2min 7£seo of Elkwood in 1888 with 8.7, and the best for the distance is Kingston's 2min 6&ieo at Brooklyn, with 8,10 %* The third annual sale of Mr J.B. Haggin's thoroughbred yearlings from the Ranabo del Pasco Stud, Sacramento, California, was held at New York on June 16. From a local paper I leatn that 100 head were catalogued, and of these 95 wore sold for a total of 115,850d01, an average of 1219d01. In 1888 he disposed of 64 yearlings for 112,775d01, an average of 1762d01. Last year 96 were sold for 113.750dc1, the average falling to 1185dol. In 1888 the top price, 88,000dol, was paid for the colt by King Ban, out of Maud Hampton, Laßt year the colt by St. Blaise out of the same mare realised the highest figure, 22,000d01, and this year Maud Hampton's son again headed the list, but at a very much reduced figure, Mr Marcus Daly paying only 7Coodol for him. This gentleman, who ia interested with Mr Haggin in mining enterprises, bought altogether 12 head for 31 SOOdoI, Mr Pierre Lotillard purchased nine head for 16,800dol ; Mr L J. Rose, of California, the same number for 11,375d01 ; Messrs J. A. and A H. Morriß four for 1050dol ; Mr Walter Rollinß six for 4800dol ; Mr John Hunter four for 2800dol j Mr G. Walbaum, four for 3200a01, and the Excelsior stable four for 2400d01. One colt by Sfc. Blaise brought 7000dol, one filly ay Falsetto, 3500d01, 15 colts and. nine fillies by Sir Modred averaged 1919d01, and eight oolts and se7on fillies by Darebin, 1533du1. Hidalgo's single representative brought 950d01, and those by other sires averaged as follows : — Tyrant, four head, 838dol ; Warwick, nine head, 761dol ; Kyrle Daly, eight head, 753d01 ; Joe Daniels, eight head, 703dol ; Longfield, two head, 6C0dol ; flyder AH, 11 head, 568dol; John Happy, eight head, 563d01 ; Talisman, two head, 550dol ; Milner, one boad, 450d01. The colonies have in this result something to be proud of. A St. Blaise brought top price, certainly, but the 6000dol paid for what was presumed to be the best of the Darebin's was only lOOOdol behind, and a Sir Modrod colt waa third on the list, and close up, with 5800dol. %* Ahua's defeat in the Grand National run at Riccarton last week was regarded by many down here as next to an impossibility, and a large share of the money invested on him in the totalisators was sent up from Dunedin. Backers, in fact, would stand nothing else, and deemed it good enough to lay about 20 to 15 on the top weight. One fielder a'ono, so far as I have heard, had the temerity to stand the run on the one horse, and he did a good day's work. Well, I was one who thought Ahua a really good thing, and even now I do not regret having tipped him, for he lasted until the second fence from home, and would have walked in if belhadnot blundered at a simple ditoh-and-bank jump. Of course he was tiring under the weight, but all the others were tiring too ; and so far as we oan judge, if the race were to be run again Ahua would go out favourite. At the same time, Daddy -Longlegs' performance was a meritorious one, and I am not at all sorry tbat he at last met with success, for Mr Cox baa a great job to bring hioa to the post in condition for such a contest, and Daddy has twice previously been placed. Perhaps now that Ahua has twice failed it may be bia turn to win next year. Those of us who have always said tbat Daddy was exceptionally slow will be surprised to learn tbat be was of choice pulled to the rear at the start, and went on last for half the distance. He did not jump so well as usual, while, on the' other haud, Darnley, who was deemed likely to stick up at the first fence, proved himself particularly clever at the obstacles, The following table shows the

The certainty oame off in the Hurdle Race, Ixion winning easily from the outsider ■Romulus, with the Otago representative Trimolite third. That was about what I expected of him ; but before the day was over he paid the expenses of his trip by winning the Final Handicap and paying the best dividend of the day. %* On the following Saturday the Christchurch Hunt Club meeting wag held. Our Trimolite led off with a meritorious win in the Hunters' Hurdio Racej in which ha carried 12.0 and was capitally ridden by Mr O'Rourke, There wag, however, nothing much to get beside the stake, as Trimolite waa backed down to 20 to 15 on. The Hunt Club Oup waa a series of adventures. Enterprise was tho first to fall ; then Trooper came down ; and Picton blundered, unseating his rider,; who, however, was quickly in the saddle again. Picton baulked at another fence, and by the time ho was over the leader s were a quarter of a mile ahead, Of these, Why Not stumbled and lost his ridor, and the other two fought out a good finish, Morok beating Encore by two lengths. It was, however, seen that these two horses bad missed the last couple of jumps, and they had to go back. This gave Pioton a chance, and while the other pair were going back be came on and won easily. In the Open Steeplechase Ahua met Daddy Longlega on 71b better terms than in the National, and won with something to spare. Ixion ought to have won the Hurdle Race, and would too but for being interfered with in tbo last few strides. Trimolito fell while in the lead and gave Jimmy Allan a very nasty shaking, but no was soon about again. %* The second day's racing at tha V.R.O. meeting began with the Second Hurdle Rjace, in which Pingara (10.3) was made favourita at 2to 1 among 18 starters. Jack Rao's Donald (10 6) was next in demand at 3to 1, Ellerslie, handicapped at 12.3 on account of his Grand National win, was supported at 8 and 10 to 1. All the horses seem to have fenced without a mistake. Vanish (10.0), a horße belonging to the Western district, made nearly all the running, and won easily by three lengths from Donald, Africans, EUerslie, and King Billy

were the next in order, with Pingara tenth. The 28 starters for the Lawn Handicap, six furlongs, included both Blizzard (8.7) and La Rose (8.7), Tommy Buddicombe was up on Mr Goodman's horse,land Jack Laughlan rode tbe mare. Neither was mentioned i in the betting nor yet in tbe race, Little Bob led tbe field to the distance, where Bendigo, who had been in the centre of the field a little distance behind the leaders, shot out, and was soon on terms with Little Bob, and at the same time Collich Rouoh, on the inside rails, also oame out, and with Bendigo was clearly in front at the half-distance. Bendigo had everything beaten as they passed the post, where be was a length and a-balf in front of Collioh Rouoh, Little Bob, only a head behind, beingthird, with JohnS. fourth, Midas fifth, Prattler and Erneßt next. Time, lmin 19|seo. \* Waitangi seems to have been completely out of it in the Grand National Steeplechase. He is hardly mentioned in tbe report of the race appearing in another column, and finished no nearer than tenth, or just about last of those that kept on their legs. Tbe horse was evidently, out classed, and yet I cannot help thinking that ho was not quite himself, otherwise he Burely would have made a somewhat better.' show. Tbe Argus tells us that there were numerous incidents in the race, Nooroo baulking, and .afterwards falling ia front of the grand stand. Nooroo came down with a crash, and rolled over Keeting at the first of the four fences in the straight, and though the jookey was badly bruised and shaken he escaped more serious injury. Buaaoo blundered and fell over the third fence, and than, having been remounted, he fell again when in the straight, he being some distance behind the field at the time owing to his previous mistake. Mr Godfrey Watson, wbo was riding him, gotbaok into the saddle and got over the next fence, but the horse fell at tbe stone wall and shot Mr Watson out of the saddle heavily. The rider was oarried off the field, but he soon reoovered himself and went after his horse, getting into the saddle and returning with tbe others to the weighing enclosure after the race waa over. Harris Auhl ran well in the race until he fell, and Shanks, Lawler, and Dunlop each came down a1;a 1 ; different times. %* The Final Handicap attracted 19 runners, Precedence (7.9) and Mercy Merrick (7,7) being equal favourites at 3 to 1 eaob, while - G'Naroo (7.12), Blizzard (8.6), and Oorythus (8.4) were at Bto 1 each. Ruwley (8.12) and Escutcheon (7.10) were among the starters. Precedence made the running to the home turn, where G'Naroo got through. Once in a fair line for home Blizzard was prominent, but he could not live with G'Naroo, wbo held bia position all along the straight, and won easily by a ocuple of lengths. Blizzard .was fourth. Tune, lmin 44£seo. Saxon was made favourite at 5 to 2 for tbe Open Steepleohase, and Renmark was next in demand at 4 to 1. Jaok Rae rode hia own horse Orangeman, who Btarted at Bto 1. Ariel (10.7) was also a starter, and made the running for about half tbe distance, but could not withstand the reBpeotive rushes of tbe placed horses, and at the finish Renmark won by a length and a-half from Orangeman, with Saxon third and Ariel fourth. %* " Pendragon " writes words or wisdom on the minimum weight question. By and bye, he says, the lowest raoing weight will be 6.7 ; in due course it will be 7.0 ; and then the best sort of raoing men, who may or may not be owners, will wonder how it was it could ever have been aa little as we have known it. When that time comes, all of na majr not be here to Bee, but whoever thinks he ia likely to be left may aB well note now, in case he requires the fact for future use, that no races will then be run (except for two-year-olds) at a less distance than seven furlongs. In all probability a mile will be the shortest permissible distance, If, as I expect they will do by then, they limit the length of, two year-old races to half a mile, why, bo much the better. A range of no more than 3 7 in handicaps— say from 70 to 10 7— would make an immense amount of difference in the quality of our horses, though at first it might throw half of them out of training. As for the difference in the jookey s caused by the lift in the weights, why it would at once abolish much of the trouble that exists now ; and all the fat-headed admiration that Bhows suoh extremes of folly about present day pigmies simply because they can sit on horßes while they are galloping would be abolished with it. What a lot of really fioe riders there must be who are kept out of the saddle simply because they cannot get down to the weights required by the existent wretchedly absurd Bystem ! When everybody was able to ride races "with some degree of nous and ability, what would become of the vanity glorious mannikins who are now so puffed up with pride, not because they can do what they have to do extremely well, but because they can do it better than the wretched .brats and weaklings who as a rule have'fco oppose them. A friend of mine who travels the. meetings, and whose lucubrations are read and enjoyed by thousands, was telling me about a nasty- faced abortion of a " fashionable middleweight " the other day, and, says he, "I really do believe the brute has gone stark staring mad over the fulsome praise some writers are always giving him: my opinion is that he'B a d— '• — d bad rider." V Ontario, the property of Mr S. S. Howland, of Mount Morria, New Yoik, at the recent Boston horße Bbow was entered to jump 7ft for a 500dol cup at Washington on May 17. The night he tried to accomplish the feat the Society for tbe Prevention of Orualty to Animals interfered and stopped hia efforts. Mr Rowland, anxious to prove that his horse could accomplish tbe task, invited about 150 friends to the Washington-Riding Academy ip boo the effort tnado. Ontario was ridden by his usual rider, James Freyling, weighing, with saddle and bridle, 1591b, who rode him in Chicago, where he made 6ft lOfin, and at Boston. The jumping commenced at 4ft 6in, and the bar was raised 4in at a time uutil 7ft was reached. Ontario up to this height never made a mistake, clearing tbe respective heights without difficulty on the first effort. When the bar was raised to 7ft a oommittee consisting of Judge John Davis, of the Court of Claims j Colonel Carpenter, U.S.A., commander at Fott Myera ; Count Sala, of the French Legation ; Sevelon Brown, chief clerk of the State Department : and Neilson Brown, of Philadelphia, were called in to measure tbe jump, and pronounced it full 7ft. At the first effort Ontario got over, but pulled off tbe top bar ; at the second, with a superb jump, he cleared the whole, and landed safely on the other Bide. The excitement waa intense, for a jump had been made ne\or equalled by any horse in the world. Iff A NUTSHELL. —St. James is in work again. —Major George saw the Derby run. —Lady Florin is in foal to Le Loup. —Tommy Cotton is training Miss Ann. — Steelbone is sold to a Taßmanian buyer. —The Prince of Wales has paid £2000 for The email loss resulted over the Winton May m-Mrm -Mr B Sherwin's:Kahu, who raced at our May meeting) ia dead.

—Blizzard was backed by bis owner for the Lawn Handicap. — Jaß Kean is fast recovering from bia attack of paralysis. I — L\me has been strewn on the Forbury course as a fertiliser. —The Epsom Derby next year will beheld on Wednesday, May 27. — The Australasian Bayß that Apropos ib to be schooled over hnrdleß. —Satan, a New Zealander, has been bought for 160gs by Mr A. Miller. —Mr W. Hateley iB the newly appointed handicapper to the Wanganui Club. —The Hawke'a Bay Club proposes to give £8794 in stakes during the coming season. —Sir James Miller; owner of Sainfoin, is a lieutenant in the 14th Hussars and 26 years of age. —Watte received a present of £500 from Sir Jamea Miller for winning the Derby on Sainfoin. —At the Auteuil i meeting in June nearly £80,000 was taken at the mutuel.bootha in one day. —Mr D, O'Brien baa sold Helmsman and Town Moor to Mr E. Weeks, the Indian trader, —The public did not piok the winner of either of the free-for-all trots at Moonee Valley. — It ia rumoured that Mr Benson, the Jubilee J., has come in for another large fortune. —Sir John Willoughby's yearling book oame out right after all, as Sainfoin was a " skinner" for him. —The field for this year's Derby was the smallest since 1804, when there was also eight starters. . — 1 understand that Gipsy Prince and his half brother the yearling by Sir Garnet are in the market. —Fred Barrett has been lucky enough to ride the winner of the Prenoh Derby two years in succession. —Johnny Wattß* win on Sainfoin was his second Derby eucoese, He bad the mount on Merry Hampton, —The total amount colleoted in .Australia for Mr W. Filgate amountß to £680. Dan O'Brien sent a fiver. —It is understood that Hales is founding a eeleot breeding stud and that he purchased Lochiel as a beginning. — New stables are beincr, built close to the Forbury course gates. I believe that Hankina, is to be the first tenant. ;. — The D.J.O. committee meet this evening, when all programmes for the season will be brought up for adoption. —Soudan, vy Musket— Maid of AthoL waa recently Bold Jta Melbourne for. 27£gs, Mr S. Griffiths being the buyer. —Mr Richard Oonkling, the American sportsman, died in the grand stand at Brooklyn races in May from syncope. —Even money is betted on Sainfoin, Surefoot, and Memoir for the St. Legqr. Sainfoin's prioe at latest dates was 4 to 1, — Donovan has broken down badly in his near fore-leg, and it is very doubtful whether he will again stand another preparation. — Winton Club has appointed Mr O. D. Moore president, Mr R. Wilaqn vioe^prasident, and Mr J. Wilson secretary (re-elected). — Mr P. Campbell, late starter to the O. J. 0., has married the late " Hon. W. Robinson's daughter and sailed for a trip to England. —"Augur" gives a tabulated statement of the Hon. J. White's winnings. He h&B altogether had 66 winners of 252 races worth £121 738 — Last week I remarked that Telephone, the trotter, was one of Pinole Patohen's get. , This ia not correot. The horse is, I am told, by Bucephalus. . —Complaint is made that while race cards m England contain formidable lists of, names of stewards, only a few put in an appearance to, do the work. —The Winton Olub has resolved to substitute a Guineas race for the Derby, which means, I suppose, that the course is to be out down to a mile. —The Duke of Portland and Lord Oadogan went partners in the Derby sweep at ,the Turf Club. Portland drew Surefoot, and Cadogan pulled out Sainfoin. —There were 149 horses entered for the Melbourne Cup and 140 for the Caulfield Cup. It was, therefore, possible to lay the double 20,860 different ways. — Gitana is in foal to La Loup. A colt, I suppose. The mare has thrown nothing but oolta bo far. Her mate, the St. Albanß mare lona, is also heavy in foal. —The late Hon. James White was a native of N.S.W., and waß born &t Stroud,,near Port Stephens, on July 19, 1828, He leaves a widow, but had no family. — Jet d'Eau has been backed for' the New Zealand Cup for all the money in the market down to 100 to 20. The commission was well executed in Ohristohurob. —Mr M. Loughlin, the Australian owner now in England, has bought three .valuable pictures for presentation to the art gallery recently opened at Ballarat. — M. Oonatana, Frenoh Minister ~of the] Interior, has signed an order prohibiting the parimutuela outside racecourses, as well aa all intermediary betting agenoies. — Mr Goodman does not expect to return to Dunedin for two or three months. It is possible that he may race his horses at the New South Wales spring meetings. —Good judges gay that this season's two-year-olds in England are not bo good as last season's. Another reason for regret at ( the bursting- up of the Kirkham stable's projeot. —Sir James Miller is reported to have won £14,000 over the Derby, so that, including hie share of the stakes, he ia nearly £9000 to the good after allowing for the price of Sainfoin, —Lord Falmoutb's breeding paddocks at Newmarket were purchased on behalf of John Watts, the jockey. The rider of Sainfoin intends to go in largely for breeding blood stock, —Frederick Vanderbilt ib said to have been offered 25.000d0l for the offspring of Aldine and Early Rosa if both are filliea, SO.OOOdoI if there is one of either sex, and 85,000d0l if both are colts. — Lowburn Sporting Olub has a oredit balance of £68 18 a lOd. Mr H. Partridge waa appointed preaident, Mr Oololough vice-presi-dent, Mr J. Perriam secretary, and Mr Tillman treasurer. —Now that there is a suitable course in the district, saya the Advocate, membera of the Taieri Amateur Turf Club appear to be inclined to insist that looal horses shall be trained only in the district. ... ... — Cuirassier, who should now be in Australia, was backed for the Melbourne Cup for a large sum, from £15,000 to £20,000, at 100 to 3 and 100 to 4. Carbine continues to be in demand for occasional wagers at 100 to 5. —In the second race at Morns Park (New York) on June 11, Brother Ban, after running last throughout, dropped dead on the traok a furlong from home. Garrison was in the saddle but escaped without injury. — Twenty years ago Macgregor, who was owned by Mr J. Merry, father of the owner of Surefoot, won the Two Thousand bo easily that he was just suoh another Derby favourite as Surefoot, and he too went down, -Id 1852 Birdoatober had three of bis get,

Songstress, Bird on the Wing, and Gossamer, j placed^ in the Oaks, and these honours were I taken by Stockwell's three sons, Lord Lyon, I Savernake, and Rustio, in the Derby of 1866. —Mr Taggart has at his paddocks a handsome colt foal by Le Loup out of Gipsy Queen (daughter of Azucena). Apropos,' II am not quite Bure whether it has been mentioned that Azuoena died a little while ago, aged 29 years, —It has transpired that jG 11,000 was offered for the horses of the Stud Company at Sylvia Park, Auckland, but £13,000 was wanted. Negotiations have been broken off and the mortgagees have decided to submit the property to auction next January. —It is mentioned as satisfactory that the first of the series of three English handicaps to which an anonymous donor will add lOOOspys has closed with the large' number of 79 entries. Our entries here are not so bad by comparison after all, — A case of triple birth with a mare occurred at Marshall, Mo., U.S., in May last. A fine brood mare belonging to William Barnoß, of that oity, dropped three oolts. They were small, but at latest advices were alive and doing nicely. —Conflicting accounts reaoh us aa to what Sommeil is to do in Australia. On the one hand I hear that be is well 1 and likely to be trained for raoing ; while the Sportsman says he has been leased to Mr A, Smith, of Lindenow, for stud purposes. —By a railway accident on the Wabash (U.S.) line, on the 19 ch June, a train with racemen and racehorses collided with another. Eight raoing men and boya were killed, 22 injured or crippled, and 15 valuable horses destroyed. —The Cromwell Jockey Club's loss for the year was £122 8b 7d. The following officebearers were elected for the year ;— President, Mr J. Cowan ; vice-president, Mr D. A. Jolly j hon, treasurer, Mr J. Ferguson; seoretary, Mr J. Marshall, at a salary of £21. —The V.R.O. Winter Handicap won by Mr Goodman with Blizzard, was worth £525, less 5 per cent. Ellerslie's hurdle race brought him in £1495, and the Steeplechase first money was £1460, while Jaok Rae'B three seoonds gained him a cheque for £420. —The Bum. of £110 will be given by tbe; Cromwell Trotting Olub at its races on the, 10th October. The club has joined the; association;' Messrs W. G. Stronaoh, J, •Stronaqh, J. Cpwan, D. A. Jolly, and J. Fe^ gußqn are appointed honqrary stewards. —The grand stand on the' new Monmouthl Park (U.S.) Vace track ia 700 ft long, 110 ft wide: and 97ft high, with a elope of 10ft and has a can : tilever in front projecting 75ft, which should I ba a sure protection from either sun or rain. Its seating capacity is for 10,500 people. i —Mr W. R. Wilson, of St. Albans, has deoide'd to allow his five stallionn, Eiridspordj First King, Newminster, Robinson Crusce and, Trenton, to serve a limited number of mares iq addition to his' own. The fee for each ia 50gs, and mares, of course, have to be approved? j —Tybalt, the trained moose, owned by, Frances Dunlap, of Montpelier, Idaho, haa trotted a mile in 3.80. : Dunlap is eager to match the moose to trot a race of one mile and repeat against any horsa in America in thej 3.00. class, the stakes to be from £ipp to £20Q aside. ' ' .. —Tinder the new conditions governing the Derby this year.,there was a surplus of 430sova, which went to the owner of the winner, and, made the amount credited to Sir J. Milieu 543050v5. The nominator of Sainfoin, Mr J. 1 I Porter, received, SOMova, ' so tljattbe vajuepf the raoeWß £5980. v '„.«'' 1 —In Ebglatid t^ev have a mare cabled Oar-j natum.'whp has a beauty of a temper, aa bad as, one or two of our worst. In'a recent race nofj even the liberal nte of a dog-whip.atthepos^ would induce her to jump off with her horses^ and they . were ' inpre than halfway home; before flogging, kicking, and Bhoutuig combined, made her start on her jqurney. ' — The prospectus of the Southland Stud Co.has been issued. Its capital is £750 ; its pro : moterß>re Messrs G. M. Bell, James Gardner^ A. ft c Wallis, E. F. Crouch ; its intention is to purchase two upstanding sound tborought bred horses, one to travel in tbe Eastern disi trict, and one in the Western district j also a Cleveland bay entire to stand at 'headquarters □ear tnvercargill j j '—Melbourne Sportsman gives a likeness of our Jaok Rae, and also prints his • bistoryj Rae waa born in Lyttelton ; was apprenticed to Mr H. Redwood ; served with Mr Dela^ maine and Mr Webb : was partner with Roddy. M'lvor ; trained for Mr G. Stevenson and MiJ Lonnard ; then started on his own, hook. Hia first winning mount 'was in a haok race at Marlborough in 1873. ' , —Watta haa been the fortunate rider so far, in the big raoes. Thia year be haa won botf Derby and Oak*, the only one of hiacontem poraries who has performed the 'sime^feaii previously being Tom Cannon, who was 1 on th< backa of Shotdver and' Geheimniss in 1882 Iq 1867 Daley rode Herinjt and Hippia/and in 1885 Fred Archer steered Melton and Lonety in their respective raops. , —The Tapanui Club has elected as officers, for the ensuing year— Mr H. M'lntyre presij dent, Mr O. Grant vice-president, and Mr W; Quin bon. secretary and treasurer. In addij tion to the silver cup given by Mr A. Officer to be raced for by the progeny of hia horse Ike at the next meeting, a valuable trophy will be given oonjointly by Messrs W. Quin and James Collins for the beßt distriot hack. —"Augur" says that had Donald been handled differently he could not have lost th<? V.XC Hurdle Race. In such heavy ground it was hardly judicious to force the space at such a rate with the New Zealander. Had he remained about fourth until half a mile from home, I don't think be could have been beaten, but I suppose Henton rode to orders, in the 1 hope that with hia light weight he could cut all tho others down. -■ , ' —Another record lowered. At'MorriB r Par^ (New York), on June 11, A. Belmbnt'a cheßt; nut horse Prince Royal (s>rß), by Kinpfisher, dam imported Prinoesß, carrying 1161b, and, ridden by Hamilton, ran a mile and •a; sixteenth in lmin 46£aeo, beating the previous beßt record, lmin 47^860, shared by Wheeler T. (Syrs), 981b, and Eiyton (4vrs), 1061b, madej respectively at St. Louis and Washington Park, Chicago last year. ' —Says " Dagonet " : The old order of Btable lad ia dying out. The apprentices at a training stable are being recruited every day from a superior class. Among the boya serving, their; apprenticeship at Seven Barrows are the sons of solioiforfl, civil engineers, surveyors, merchants, and private gentlemen. I have not' the Bmalleßt doubt that' the jockey of the future will belong to the upper middle classperhaps even to the aiistooraoy, —When Mr J. Merry, father of Surefoot's owner, waa on the hustings at Falkirk Burghs, be remarked that apart from politics, he desired to do tbe eleotorH a good turn, and, aa bis horae Thormanby was Bure to win the Blue Riband, they must not omit to back it. Falkirk Burghs waa " on to a man " after this intimation, and when, after Thormanby's 6uccess, tbe wealthy ironmaster sent an intimation to the mayor of the town: "Thormanby has won," he received the characteristic reply : "Falkirk Burghs is drunk." —A meeting of the, Paimerston and Shag

Valley Jookey Olab was held at the Waverley Hotel on Wednesday, when it was decided to hold the Spring meetiog on Thursday, the 9oh October. The Programme Committee met afterwards, and drew up a draft programme to be submitted to the General Committee on the 29fch inst. It is suggested to give £180 in prize money, divided among eight events, the principal being the President's Handicap, 35sovs : Spring, District;, Novel, and Thre«-mile Trot, each of 25sovs ; Two-mile Trot, of 20aovs ; Consolation, and Hack Selling Race make up the other events. „ . —One of. the .English writers Bays that Kirkham i 8 about &b uninviting a Bample of equinity seen for a long time figuring in firstrate company. He doesn't even walk Bquarely, and he has as weak and as ugly a neok and aa poor a shoulder, an,d, iB.aB. ornary, a, customer all over as the bitterest enemy of Australia could desire. When set going he was even worse ; he would stride twice on a good-sized cabbage leaf ; and the hearts of any Now South Welshmen who happened to be present must have Bunk into their boots, as they could not help remarking the enormous difference in style —and in class also— between him and those against whom he had to try and advanoe Australia !

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TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Volume 31, Issue 1904, 31 July 1890

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8,238

TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Volume 31, Issue 1904, 31 July 1890

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