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TALK OF THE DAY.

BY MAZEPFA.

%♦ The Cromwell Club has ace ptedMrE. Murrell's tender for working the totalisator at the annual meeting. The privileges of the meeting realised £83 12s when put up to auction. The handicaps appear in this issue, and from a glance down tha lists I should say that Seoretary ought to win the Hurdle Bace if sent up to the meeting. Ixion may perhaps be good enough to account for the Grand Stand Handicap, though ho will have to be very well to beat Windsor, and it would not surprise me to see Pennant annex the Flying Handicap on this the first time of carrying her new owners' colours.

♦*♦ Signorina is a remarkably smart and promising two-year-old, one of .the best seen in England for many, a day. That appears to be the universal verdict of the scribes, one of whom, no less than the great " Pendragon," says that the fact of her not being nominated for the Epsom Derby of 1890 must be regarded as a let off for the Australian colts who are to try and run away with it. Whatever the result of their efforts may be, continues the writer referred to, it is something for those who have them in charge to know they will not have to meet such a sample of quality as is happily possessed by the.Onevaher Ginistrelli. Taking the Derby as still the representati l^ race of England, though it has for long lost the position of being the richest, the lottery of luok it offers to the adventurous owner, no matter whether he be English, foreign, or colonial, is remarkable, The same lottery occurs, of course, in all other evenweighted races ; the Derby's long history and the way in which it used to be coveted by all kinds and conditions of owners make the peculiarity in its case very muoh more pointed and prominent. Must readers will remember how the American-bred Iroquois won both the Derby and the Leger, and won them with ease ; this was because he happened on a year when there was not a three-year-old who was within a stone of the best form of the year preceding. Compare this with tha fate of a man who owns an almost unknown colt good enough to run Lord Lyon or Cremorne to a head ; that is, good enough to have won easily in an ordinary year, but as it was only good enough to get second. Probably there never was more luck than has been shown in connection with Donovan— a good horse in a wretchedly bad year ; a good horse there can be no doubt, but not to my thinking in any way a wonder. It is hardly probable that in our time at all events any horse will win as much money as Donovan has won; likely enough he will be held up to future generations as the great type of success on the turf, and will therefore in due course coma to be regarded aa absolutely the best racer on record. Yet if I had to arrange a list of the best performers of say, the last 20 years, Donovan, who couldn't be kept out of it after all the money he has won, would figure not very far from the bottom.

*#* The Hon. G. M'Lean's working team ha 3 been reinforced by the addition of ths two-year-old chestnut filly by Gorton out of Malice — a rather nice ycungster that to all appearances should at least be as speedy as the majority of the Gortons undoubtedly are. St. James is looking very well, and so is Emmason, who will probably race again before long, perhaps at the Christcburch Summer meeting ; but Don Pedro has been blistered and may be reserved for autumn engagements. Dormeur U doing well. Mr Turnbull's own horses, Wo'venne and the Kamnant two-year- old colt, are not likely to do much yet awhile. The last-mentioned member is blistered and will, I understand, not be seen in publio till the spring of next season, by which time, if looks go for anything, he Bbonld have developed into a slashing three-year-old. *** Speaking of St. James, I fancy that his performances at the Exhibition meeting have caused some backers to somewhat overrate him. The horse certainly shaped very well in the Cup, but bis gaining second place was not a wonderful feat, for of tboso that finished behind him in that event none were able to win a race at the meeting bar Scot? Grey, and he only scored in a six- furlong race; and as^.to the President's Handicap, I agree with thosef who assert that io a true-run race Ojcidenl!" would have done pretty well what he liked with St. James at the finish. That there was such a close tussle at tho last pinch was owing to the accidental blocking in of Occident three furlongs from home. Hie rush was thus delayed, and hence the opportunity for a clever finish on White's part, in which bis success was by his own admission due to the fact that he was able to creep up on the inside, St, James ran well in both these

events, but if he bad won either it would have been by a stroke of luck. Then on the third day, when raced without plates, he finished absolutely last. This must be considered. I don't attach much, importance to his defeat in the Consolation, for in that event he was doubly handicapped in drawing outside position at the start— a serious matter to a slow beginner as he is. But Ido think that considering all things : that be was as well as he oould possibly be made, that be was carrying light weights, that ha met a lot of horses many of whom for some reason or other were not showing their form, and that he ran through the meeting without scoring a winin view of these facts, I say, tnose who grabbed all the 100 to 14 money about him for the Dunedin Cup did an unwise thing, unless they were confident that the Northern horses were going out. On the other hand, St. James is a stayer, and the extra distance of our Cup will aerve him if he starts.

*„,* El Rio Bey, the orack two-year-old of the season in America) is dead. This colt, though so great a performer, was not quite full pedigreed,- his breeding being traceable back to Potomac, a grand racehorse, winner of the fastest two miles (3min 43sec) run up to his day, but not a thoroughbred. Students of pedigree lore may be interested in noting that this Potomac, so celebrated as a racer, waß not many removes from very common Btock. His pedigree as given in the " American Stud Book," vol. I, page 410, and, literally quoted, is as below: "Potomao, bay colt, foaled 1805, by imported Diomed, dam Fairy, by Pegasus ; second dam Nancy M'Cullock, by Young Yorick (a cold-blooded horse); third dam by a half-blooded horse called Silver Eye, fourth dam by a common waggon horse, fifth dam a common plough mare called Estray Mare." Turf, Field, and Farm remarks that while Potomac's great merit as a racehorse is admitted, "be got very few racehorses and injured the breed of racehorses in an eminent degree." But El Rio Boy's more immediate ancestors, descendants of Potomao, were all good racers, and the plebeian taint is apparently bred out.

%* It will be consoling news to those who love good and gallant racehorses to learn that Dante and launder have followed Ossory and Prince Io to the celebrated stables of Davy Jones, Esq., commonly known as "the Locker," presumably because it is in a part of the sea where there is no quay. Two more thoroughbreds have been done to death on the terrible voyage to Buenos Ayres. No wonder that Englishmen tremble for the fate of the mighty Ormonde, and that all true sportsmen are biting in their comments on the conduct of the millionaire duke in letting the unbeaten hero of the turf run such terrible risks and endure such untold agony as this voyage will entail. Surely such a horße, if worthless for stud purposes, might have been poisoned or otherwise killed, if his owner couldn't afford to keep him in idleness. Had he belonged to a real, oven though poor, sportsman he would never have been parted with. After bis treatment of Ormonde the duke doesn't deserve ever to have another good horse, This is how "Dagonet" speaks his mind, in doing which he is but echoing the voice of the people, who to a man reproach Westminster for bartering away his great racer.

*** There have recently been great doings in the trotting line in America, and from all that can be gathered from the United States papers it will yet be many a day ere we see galloping completely eolipße the Bport in which the land of the Stars and Stripes takes the lead. Axtell's sensational performance of 2min 12seo for a mile constitutes the stallion record, and has brought this hoise into such demand in the Eastern States that his everyday doings are "reported as freely as though he belonged to a Royal Family. He is to make a season at the stud next spring, being limited to 35 mares at lOOOdol each.; and after that he is to go into training with a view of lowering his own record. But Axtell's 2min 12aeo is not only the stallion record ; it is the three year-old record — or rather was until the first week in November, when tbis portion of his honours was rested from him by Sunol, who last season lowered the two-year-old record. * # * The day on which Sunol put down Axtell was the last day of the fall meeting of the Trotting Horse-breeders' Association, and the track was the well-known one of the Bay district, at Golden Gate Park, San Francisco. So man] of our readers are interested in trotting that it will not be a waste of space to reproduce from the Bulletin a notice of the day's events. The first race on the programme was the trial of the filly Sunol to beat the three-year-old record held by Axtell. Hickok drove a running horse alongside as a teaser, and it was only by looking at the runner that one was able to tell how fast the filly was travelling. On the first attempt Marvin nodded for the word, with the runner nearly a furlong behind. The quarter Sunol trotted in 32sec, and went to the half in Imin ssec, and then it was certain that, barring a break, the Eastern colt's record would be broken badly. Sunol reached the three quarter in Imin 37|sec. The filly trotted like a machine, but now the runner caught up, and down the stretch the filly came like the wind, under the whip, making the mile in 2min lO^seo, beating the record by l£seo, and making the fastest mile for a California-bred trotter. The accomplishment of the feat was greeted with wild cheers from all the audience, while more than one lady on the club house balcony split her glove in her applause of the crack trotter of California. Marvin, on bis return to tho stand, was met with a regular ovation, everybody' on the track being anxious to grasp the hand that drove the filly. Palo Alto trotted to beat the stallion record of 2miu 12sec. At the drawgate he went off his feet momentarily, but caught . quickly and finished the mile in 2min 12|aeo, beating his own record l£sec Faustino, the yearling colt by Sydney, came out to beat the yearling stallion record (2min 38sec), held by Yon Wilkea. On the fourth attempt he was sent off, accompanied by a running teaser, and the quarter was made in 41seo, the half in Imin 20sec, and the three quarters in Imin 57f aec, and the mile in 2min 35580, thus breaking the second record for the day. Regal Wilkes, bay stallion by Guy Wilkea, was then sent to beat the two-year-old stallion record of Axtell of 2min 233 ec, accompanied by a running teaser. The colt went to the quarter in 36sec, the half in Imin lOiseo, the three-quarters in Imin 45£3e0, and the mile (without a skip or break) in 2min 20|aeo, breaking the third record for tha day. Bow Bells, the twoyear-old oolt, was sent for the two-year-old stake. The colt is a full brother to Hinda Rose, Bell Boy, and Palo Alto Belle, all of which have records under 2mm 30seo. The colt broke just as tha bell tapped, and Marvin jogged him round the track for the stake, then he started for a record. On the first turn he broke and again at the quarter. He was eff his feet on the turn. Passing fche half he again broke, but from there out he trotted on his courage, making the mile, ia 2cnin 32f ?e c. The judges were Messrs Grim,' and White, and the timers were Meesra Spreckels, Carroll, and Smith. Stamboul, the 50,000d0l boree, then start ci to win A. 3 . Rose's bet of lO.OOOdoI and beat the stallion record. The stallion was driven by Hickok and the

I

running teaser by Marvin. On the second attempt Hickok nodded for the word. The quarter was made in 33£seo, the half in lmin 6£gec, the three-quarters in lmin 40aeo'. Coming up the stretch the stallion broke at the drawgate, making the mile in 2min 13f3e0, beating his record by lsec and equalling the atallion reoord at the time the bet was made.

%♦ I hear that Jimmy Cotton is about to enter into possession of the stables lately occupied by Mr Henshall, who went to Melbourne fast week with Alanna, Violet, and ' Emily. Jimmy is pagering away with Wardrobe, his old favourite Trapper, and others, but has parted with Erebus, who has been sent back to his owner. Among the " others " in hand at this establishment is the well-bred Anonyma, a filly of whioh I expect to be able to record a decent performance some day before the season is out,, for she is undoubtedly fast and mußt be treated leniently by the handicapped until she does something worthy of her lineage and good looks. %* American papers record the death of the well-known brood mare Maggie B. 8., dam of the only American colt which ever won the English Derby. She was a ohoßtnut in colour, foaled in Kentucky in 1867, and therefore 22 years old. She was bred by Messrs J. B. and J. M. Clay, and on the turf distinguished herself, among her victories being the Sequel Stakes at Saratoga, while she also ran second to Eaquirer for the Jersey St. Leger. She was named in honour of one of the belles of the Blue Grass region, a daughter of Senator Beck. Prior to her death Maggie B. B. had for some time luxuriated in unrestrained freedom in the paddocks of her owners, who considered that " the old mare " bad earned a rest for the good Bhe had done. * # * " Pendragon " on handicapping: The Oesarewitch of this year was formed on a 5,12 minimum, so Primrose Day had only 31b over and above the absolutely lowest weight it was possible to give her. This result will probably bring up again the often-talked-over proposition tbat no four-year old horse or mare shall carry less than a stone above bottom weight. If I had my way we should have nothing less than 7 0 in any handicap, and then only for three-year-olds, notlessthanß.oforany four-year-olds, and not less than 3.7 between top and bottom weight. This idea, being an innovation, and a radical one, will doubtless make many admirers and believers in that which is, simply because it is, more than a little bit angry ; still, it would stop a good deal of the sort of thing that now often makes the turf odious in the eyes of good and true sportsmen, and which the Jockey Olub, fret and fume as it may, is absolutely powerless to prevent j also it would bring about such a change in our riding arrangements aa would do more good in one week than all the Jockey Olub expulsions and suspensions will do in a lifetime, %* Ths proposal to form a New Zealand Jockey Olub is one that will command support from all quarters if the promoters take pains to establish it on an equitable and wellconsidered basiß. Mr Clifford will, it may be presumed, have ready for the conference a schema for the constitution of the club whioh he proposes shall be formed ; and it is to be hoped that in the drafting of this, and in the consideration of it, pains will be taken to do the thing properly. If an attempt is made to rush the business through in a given time, it will be a bit of luck if the project escapes shipwreck ; or perhaps I should say it will be lucky if it is wrecked at the outset, as an alternative preferable to causing further trouble between tho clubs. Among the serious questions that require consideration before anything is done, the chief, perhaps, is that of fixing the method of representation. The country clubs are " faint, yet pursuing," an d they will not readily give up their olaim to have a voice in the making of the laws by which they are to be governed. If Mr Clifford and those acting with him can bring about a settlement of this much vexed question they will deserve well of the racing world even should no other good result. The country clubs, it must be remembered, have a grievance, and one that explains if it does not justify the intemperate language they occasionally employ in the way of protestation. The immediate grievance in Otago in in reference to the stake limit, but the real cause of the trouble is that the racing laws are made by bodies on whioh the country clubs have no representation. This is doubtloss felt in other places besides our own provincial district. So far I havo not been able to support thß agitation of the country clubs, and for not doing so I have been called all sorts of ugly names. But now tbat there is aprospeofc of an amended form of government one begins to see a leasonabje chance of overcoming the difficulty in a constitutional and orderly way, and I deaive to enroll myself among those who would urge that the proposed New Zealand Jockey Club should fairly represent both, town and country. A little study of the question would surely suffice to arrive at a reasonable basis of this representation, If this is done the country '■ übsoan have no further ground for opposition, and there will be a prospect of ending these worrying disputes. * # * The Forbury-trained horses entered for the galloping handicaps at the Southland Club's meeting on Boxing Day are Waitangi, Wardrobe, Milord, Apres Moi, Don Caesar, and Anonyma. The weights are in this issue, and Poole is so dissatisfied with the treatment of Apreß Moi tbat he will not take her down. In this decision he iB wise, for the mare has not a 100 to 1 show of winning at the weights. I fanoy that Waitangi in bis present excellent form will just about beat Wardrobe in the Hurdle Race j for the Racing Club Handicap I sao nothing better than Don Caesar, unless Billy should -prove a better horse than I think he is; ■ Maxwellton is such a solid weightcarrier that I feel inclined to take him to win the Welter Handicap, in whioh, however, Milord l^sa show; I like Vaultress for the Flying Handicap ; and it would not astonish me to see Billy win the Inaugural Stakes. I may take occasion to alter my opinion after the acceptances appear. *** Mr R. Hamilton's handicaps for the Oamaru meeting appear in this issue. I feel somewhat diffident about expressing an opinion as to the correctness or otherwise of this gentleman's calculations, for he has bad a very hard lot to work upon, and a poor lot too, if Carina is nearly two stone better than the next beat over a mile and a- quarter oourae. Vagrant ia a member that I do not think can be relied on, and of the other two in the Boxing Day Handicap I know nothing. If either of these— Maidie and Mentor— ia any good, it ought to win. Carina has a better show in the Flying, and may perhaps win right out from Mizpah. Ia the Novel I should say that; Bard ought to have a show ; of the Hurdle Race candidates Miss Meggs is perhaps as good an investment aa anything else ; and it would not be astonishing to find Bondville close up in the Trot. But they are a weak lot, aren't they ? *** Better by far are the horses engaged at Waikouaiti, and it is not easy to pick the winners. It oaoms to me that Garibaldi and Oinuabar, the latter for choice, are a likely pair in the Cup ; I would as soon stand Pirate as anything else in the Trot ; the District Handicap oupht to be won by Vortex, unless Seorecy Bhould flop up ; and either Cinnabar or Vortex nny account for the Hawkebury Handicap.

%♦ The nominations for the .Canterbury Summer meeting are not up to the mark, and I am sorry to see that the events are likely to be confined for the most rart to local horses, with a small contingent from Dunedin. So much the more need for good handicaps, Let the committee succeed in bringing the majority of the nominated horses to the post and we may yet hope for an interesting meeting. *„,* Some of the cracks have gone out of the Auckland Cup at . the first pop, ' the . malcontents including such gqod ones as Tirailleur, Dudu, Recluse,' Scots Grey, Corunna, Cyniaoa, Alaace, and British Lion, all of whom would have carried money in the totalisator if they had come to the post. On the other hand, Raglan, the badly- used horse, is left in, and I am rather .surprised to see Cuirassier pay up. My present fanoy for the Cup, to name it in' one, ia LeobLva. As for the Derby, it takes no picking ; Tirailleur in a walk if he goes for it, whioh is no oertainty, seeing that Ranata, may be tha stable representative. What about Shillelagh for the Steeplechase ? He has a- chance, I think. , * # * The threat' of certain Northern owners that they would scratch their horses for the Danedin Cup unless Mr Dowse were superseded as bandicapper has been carried into execution. Most of us had hoped that on cool reflection the malcontents, would repent and take no steps to 'fulfil' a' menace conceived in a moment when petulance had temporarily gained the upper hand of oommon sense and sportsmanlike spirit. But, in grief , I have to record that the hope was in vain. Mr Stead and those acting with him are' bent upon sulking, and have done what they can to be revenged on account of their imaginary grievance. lam sorry for it— sorry that our autumn races will not be contested by the best horses in the colony ; and more sorry still that these sudden scratohers should make themselves ridiculous in the eyea of all .onlookers: That they have made themselves ridiculous there is ample evidence, in the expressions of opinion, public and private, heard and read on all sides, from racing men as well as from those who take but a passing interest in matters .pertaining to the turf. The Adullainites have no doubt read what the sporting journals say on the subject ; and as to the opinions of ordinary newspapers I will just quote the first examples I have come aoross :— ) i

Dunetan Times: Messrs Stead and Clifford's threat is puerile and childish, and the reply given by the Dunedin Club will be supported by all honest men.

Taieri Advocate t The Canterbury men have had a long run offeood luck, and now, forsooth, because for once they are beaten they commence to cry like a lot of greedy boys who, can't, get enough , pudding. They ought to get a 'good spanking and be made to feel thoroughly well ashamed of themselves. Napier Telegraph: i,The committee, must support their official in this affair, no matter what threat may be made, otherwise they will have loßtall sense of their own responsibility and respect. Oamaru Mail : Messri Stead and Clifford's letter not only presupposes the right of the writers and those of whom they are the mouthpiece to exercise a most improper influence over their own turf destinies, but it also implies that the Dunedin committee were acting improperly in retaining Mr Dowse, and endeavours to force them, under a threat;,' ty> adopt a certain course, whether it might to them seem just or not. By their dictatorial attitude they.compelled the committee to refuse to act on their suggestion ; for had they complied with the .request they would have laid themselves open to the accusation that they had fallen victims to improper influences.

* # * Some writers specially disclaim any intention of arguing that Mr Dowses handicapping was all that it ought to have been ; but it is evidently the general opinion that that consideration was beside the question, the real issue being whether Messrs Stead and Co, were or were not to "boss" the Dunedin Jockey Olub. If they had a wrong, there was a constitutional remedy for it ; but instead of adopting this they put themselves out of court by assuming functions that do not belong to them ; and hence, as I have said, they have made themselves look foolish. They aspired to personate Jove and fling thunderbolts about ; and have ended by being compared with the shirty Bohoolboy who " won't play any more" because he oan't have everything his own way. Their action is ridiculous,'moreover, in that they are manifestly biting off their nose to be revenged on their face, Owners nowadays want all they can get in the way of stakes and machine money,- and every big meeting they miss represents a chance gone. %* As to the grounds the grumblers had for objecting to Mr Dowses handicapping, I am tempted to reprint the material passages of a capital letter by "Old Turfite" in the Weekly Press. The writer says :. "Of course it is very easy to play the after game, and it's equally easy to pick holes in any handicap after the race. An ideal handicap is one whioh results in a dead heat between all the horses, and any handicap, not so resulting is more or less bad, A newspaper is popularly supposed to represent public opinion, but in connection with racing we have a" much more faithful reflector than o any paper can possibly be. I allude to the totalizator, each pound in which represents a man's opinion, I am of course aware that a few men put on a fiver, but the number of those who do is more than counterbalanced by those who put in five or ten shillings. Now what did the public think of Mr Dowses handicaps. In the Cup 1239 thought Scots Grey could .win against 814 who, backed Ocoident, besides those who backed others of the field in such numbers as to make Occident pay a dividend of £4 in a field of bine. In the Carnival the numbers' were: i Francotte 169, Aloinous 410, Ruby 453, Lady Florin 202, Aptea Moi 175. Dividend over j £10. In the President's, Occident did start i favourite, and won. He also started first j favourite in the St. Andrew's, and was nojyhere. In the Criterion Stakes, Tempest at 343, Pymalion at 715, and a dividend of £3 17s represented publio opinion about the handicap. In four days' racing, four firßt favourites got home— in thß President's, the Consolation, and two stick races. Altogether Mr Dowse managed to conceal the winners as well as most men oould. Of course your contemporary knows now that Francotte can put down Forester at weight for age, but if he knew it before the race, as he apparently contends Mr Dowse ought to, why didn't he tip him to win the Carnival ? As for Tempest, as Mr Stead let her go at 105gs, Mr Dowse may be excused for taking a moderate view of her capabilities. But apart from all ihis sort of thing I think any such comments is these are to be deprecated as tedding to Foment interprovinoial enmities." When Mr Stead had his year we heard nothing of ,th,is sort from Dunedin. Congratulations reached - Mr Stead from every quarter on his 'good luck at last,' and that is the spirit in which every sportsman should regard Mr Stephenson's success. We have had Dan O'Brien's yaar, Mr Stead's year, Major George's ypar, Patsy Butler's year, Mr PilbroVs year;'and Mason's year, and now that Mr Stephenson ventures to have a year, he is greeted not with congratulations but with attempts to deprive I him of as much as possible of the pleasure Attaching to his success, attempts, I venture to say, whioh are not looked upon with favour by the majsrity of Canterbury sportsmen." ' *** If seems to me, all things considered; tbat the ostensible reason for Messrs Stead,

Clifford, and Co.'a demonstration is clearly insufficient, and that it may be. as supposed by some, that the handicapping has been pitched upon as a convenient excuse for having f a/shy at the'olub by" way * oaf gettitfg even on acoount of other incidents in regard to whioh Mr Stead, who, rightly or wrongly, is believed to be the ruling spirit in the .movement, has -teken the huff. Whether thia ia or is hot the caae I cannot pretend to say, nor ifl,i,t a matter that we need be concerned about.' We may leave Mr Stead and Mr Clifford and the .othera ,who hang on a 6 the^tail j end '• of Hhe'-'bpposition party— not a very dignified position, by the j way — to console themselves and each other as they best can, -and^ turning 1 to the future, ask whether there is no hope of making a good race of the Dunedin j Cup. .after all. I think there is. The horses left in can be the easier brought together 'now^hV cracks are out of it, and I should not tie surprised to see a mode-rate-sized field after all, even though there are only 16 left to be han&ifcapp'ed. The death of Vandal brings it down to that number. Those left in are as follows : — British Lion .Sfconehenge Don Csesar ' '„ Peasblosßom St. James Tamora Don Pedro . Phantom Wolverine -Gipsy Prince Ixion Merrie England Lorraine , Wijdrake Occident Lisbon These 16 horses belong to 13 owners, and it must be anticipated 'that only about half the number can be expeoted to start, but if a field of this size does congregate, and all have a show and all are trying, the Cup may perhaps be as well worth seeing as when Vanguard left Trenton and others standing -still, or when Spade Guinea walked, away from a weak opposition, or when Gipsy.- King won , with ever so " much in hand. Further, is it not possible for the 12 owners engaged to come to an agreement by which the club-may be authorised to, call fcr fresh entries, and thus let in a lot more second-raters that were.not, nominated, simply because, under any weigh ta, they could have no show with the Canterbury cracks ? I think suqh a move, hyjuite on the cards, and would suggest that the attempt be made. Even if it fails, the club, ia not ruined should things stand as they are'at presertf. ' , ' " ' , ,%* In reference, to this question I have received a communication in which it is pointed out that in the tables appearing last week I have entered ..Occident's^ win in , the Forbury Handicap (£228)" in the Canterbury, column. I, thank my correspondent for calling' attention to a mistake whioh of course would mislead no body, but whioh at the. same' time should be corrected, by subtracting £228 from the) Canterbury total and adding it to the Otago total. The writer referred to also questions ■ the correctness of my orediting to Canterbury Mazurka's win ia 18S6 and Moss Rose's in ISBB. Others also may think . this an error, and I therefore take the opportunity of explaining that both these horses : were in Mr Butler's nomination when tHey won the races

alluded to, '

%* As to the Taierij trotting dispute, it has bean suggested as an -easy way out of the difficulty that the owners of and Milton's Daisy} should divide, first and second money, and that the totalisator money should '. be divided and paid out fco holders of Shepherdess and Milton's Daisy* tickets,' , There isno doubt that the' adoption of this course, which I understand -the owners referred "to would acquiesce in, would save the stewards a lot of time and trouble ; but I don't think it would be a proper thing to do, and the more satisfactory course is to proceed to the bitter end with the trial of the only point n'owromaining to be settled — viz. , as to whether Shepherdess is or is not put out of court by the error in her I nomination . paper. This question was formally sent on to the Canterbury Trotting Association, on Monday of this weak, and I hope to.be able to announce the answer in next i week's issue. As to what will happen should the result be to disqualify Shepherdess, so far as can at present be Been the stakes would go to Milton s Daisy, against whom no .protest has so far been received, though it was reported that she would, be protested against on 'the ground that she was nominated by a man who was not her owner. 1 I doubt very much whether such a protest will be sent in ; and if it is there would, I should say, oe a poorohanoe of its being upheld. V Mr S. J. Mercer, of the Forbury, is taking the preliminary steps in bringing an action against Christohurch TattersalPa Club on acoount of its notifying him as. a defaulter. I hear that Mr J. F. M. Eraser ia retained on behalf of the plaintiff. Mercer alleges that' Tattersall's have no jurisdiction over nonmembers, and that he 1 lias been prejudiced in his business, -■ I hear on the quiet that Mercer's case has already been discussed by the D. J.O.s committee. - ' * # * Very fair entries have been received for the Maori Bjiaik races, add from the appearance of thehahdicapaia this iaauo I should, say that the sport will at least be up to the average. I hope it will; for the meeting is generally well conducted and' deserves support, As to' the probable winners, I fancy Satan for the Hurdle Race, 3?orget-me Not for the Plate, and Crossbow for the District Handicap.

%* The Tokomairiro handicaps promise a good day's Rport, and this meeting is sure to be well attended. Those that appear to me to be likely winners are Mon Loup for the Bruce Handicap, Patrick for the Navel Eace, Miss Ann for the Milburn Handicap, and Mon Loup for the District Handicap.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18891219.2.84.4

Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 1974, 19 December 1889

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5,891

TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 1974, 19 December 1889

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