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IN A NUTSHELL,

— Clogs is for sale in Sydney. -— Singapore's penalty for the Melbourne Cup is 51b.

r-The Hon. J. White's colts reached Suez in safety. — Le Clair ran unplaced in the Sydney Hunt Club Steeplechase. — The Wanganui Club has made a net profit of £438 for the year. — No conclusion yet arrived at in regard to the Forbury totab'sators. — Whakawai will train at Brighton, with Chicago and Don Giovan. — Lowburn Club will give not less than £100 in stakes at its Spring meeting. — The Dunedin Jockey Club has passed the Kurow and Lake County programmes. — The New Zealand Artist was last in tbe A.J.C. Steeplechase won by Peter Osbeck. — A Sydney telegram states that Clogs has been scratched for the Metropolitan Stakes. — The Wanganui-bred Artist sold in Sydney for £200, and Kangaroo (by Gladiator) for 49gs. —The Wairarapa horse Cupid has been sent to Sydney, having been purchased by Mr Oxeaham. r-Charley Rudrags' gelding Best Man won the July Handicap at Moonee Valley, ridden by Myere.

—The Hon. W. Pearson won the Bairnsdale Winter Handicap with Firelock, brother to Matchlock. — Bravo looks wonderfully well, bright, .and muscular, and just as fit as he should be at this tinaQ of year. — An Australian dreamer has, in his vision, seen Meteor win the Caulfield and Gasburner the Melbourne Cup. ~A Sydney telegram states that Home Rule and Merlin have been scratched for the Hawkesbury Grand Handicap. — By being run into by El Dorado in the Derby, Tom Cannon (rider of Gay Hampton) lost one of his stirrups. — An actual surplus of £311 odd is reported to have been made during the year by the South Canterbury Jockey Club. —The Hon. W. Robinson's eh o by St. George from Charity has been struck out of the A.J.C\ Second Foal Stakes of 1889. — The death is announcad of the Tasmanian brood mare First Fruit, by Broomielaw from Cherry Tree, by Flying Dutchman. — The Duke of Portland requested to be excused from parading Donovan before the Derby, on the ground that the colt is fidgetty. — In the Newmarket Stakes the Jockey Club had to give only £12001 the remainder of the £7500 came out of the pockets of the owners. — Nothing of importance to report in the betting on the New Zealand Cup. Everybody 5s waiting to see which horses are going to Australia. —Owners of jumping horses are positively afraid to use the schooling fences at Flemington on account of the dangerous state of the ground on the take-off.

— Escapade won the Point Nepean Handicap (7.10) and the Woodlands Handioap (8 5) at the Epsom meeting on the 10th, starting first favourite in both events.

— Officers elected by Lowburn club : Mr H. Partridge, president; Mr W. Colclough, vicepresident ; Mr Heavey, treasurer ; Mr Perriaia, secretary; Mr M'lllclck, judge. — Twelve thousand pounds approximately represent the amount won as a result of Redleap's Grand National win. Most of this goes to " the stable " and its connections.-

— Mr R. Reeves haa moved in the House in the direction of repealing the Gaming and Lotteries Act, which means, I suppose, that he desires the abolition of the tofcalisator.

— Tranter having completed his course of swimming, has returned to Caulfield. It is hardly likely that Tranter will ever stand the strong work essential to a Cup preparation. — Hyacinth, who won the Newmarket Handicap in 1882, is dead. He was bred in New South Wales by the Coxes of Fernhill, and was by Lord of Linne out of Grey Esperance. —The hurdle-racer Friction and his owner (Browne) have been disqualified during the pleasure of the A.J.C, and the jockey Lee for 12 months. It .was for suspicious running at Randwick.

— Mr J. Cowan was elected president of the Cromwell Club ; Mr D. A. Jolly, vice-president ; Mr J. Ferguson, hon. treasurer; and Mr J. Marshall, secretary, the latter at a remuneration of £21 per annum. — Wilson, who rode Lord Harry in the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdle Race, sustained concussion of the brain by his fall, but at l«t advices was recovering. His brother was killed in a steeplechase a ierr years ago. — Mr, H. Haines has lost bis gelding by St. Leger from Raupo. The half-brother to Mata had only a short time previously been added to the list, and, being turned out on a cold day, inflammation set in, and he died. — The result of the Derby in England was known in New York at Bmin 32sec past 3 o'clock (English time), or within a very few minutes of Donovan passing the post. This feat is held to be the greatest ever performed in telegraphy. — This year was T. Loates' first Derby ride, so he won his " blue " at the first attempt. He was lucky in getting the mount, as F. Barrett, who usually rides Donovan, was claimed by his first master, Mr L. de Rothschild, for Morglay. — Betting is at a complete standstill with regard to the spring handicaps in Sydney. Tradition and Carbine are nominal favourites for the Melbourne Cup, but nothing has been done, and the A.J.C. Metropolitan Stakes is so far a dead letter. — The racing pony Zora, winner of the Grand Handicap at Elsternwick recently, was sold by Messrs Campbell and Sons to Mr E. Weeks for 102|g8. Zora is the daughter of Le Loup and St. Kilda Maid that Mr H. Gourley, jun., took from Dunedin

— The Tapanui Racing Clnb have approved of the action of the Cromwell Club in protesting against the action of metropolitan clubs regarding the passing of programmes. The Gore, Lawrence, Milton, and Queeustown Clubs are to be communicated with on the subject.

— " Phaeton " would like to see Mr G. Donne appointed to handicap for the country meetings in the Auckland district. So should I. Mr Donne ranks with " Mr Horsford " and the Hon. G. M'Lean in being without reproach of contamination by the invertebrate patrons of the turf.

—Quite a host of presumably clever horsey Victorians (says a Melbourne writer) believe that horses of the Carbine and Lochiel calibre are hanging round " loobo like " in Maoriiand, yearning to be trained and emulate if not eclipse the doughty deeds of their illustrious countrymen.

— A story comes from India of a major in the army riding the finish of a hurdle race and taking the last jump without reins. When they broke he threw himself on the neck of the horse and hooked his forefinger on each Bide into the ring. Try it, some of you who think it was an easy feat. — " Asmodeus "is glad to hear that there is no truth in the rumour that old Commotion is in ill health. From Gippsland comes the gratifying intelligence that the veteran disports himself every day after the fashion of a two-year-old, and appears likely to be fit for good stud service for years to come. — In the weight-for-age scale adopted for the Madras meeting, Australian three-year-olds are called upon to give English horses 131b, Cape horses 251b, Indian-bred 4st, and Arabs sst ; bat when aged, the English and Australian horses carry equal weights, Cape horses being allowed Ist, country-bred 2st, and Arabs 3st. — Commentingonthe Durham-Chetwynd case " Augur " says : — " I dare say there are Chetwynds, Sherrards, and Woods on the Australian turf, which, just now, is in as unsatisfactory a state as it well can be. The fear of a farthing damages, and a thousand or two law cost*, will, however, stand in the way of anybody following I the example of Lord Durham."

— The Brooklyn Jockey Club Handicap of 10,000dol, 1J mile, run on May 15, was won by Mr W. Lakeland's Exile, by Mortimer from Second Hand, (8.4), after a great race with Prince Royal, (8 8), who had the benefit of Garrison iv the saddle. Prince Royal made the most of the pace to the turn forborne, where be was joined by Exile, who held him safe for the rest of the journey, and won by a couple of lengths in 2min 7|sec. — The Prixdu Jockey Club, or French Derby, was this year won by M. E. Blanc's Clover, a colt by the English-bred WelHngfconiaout of Princess Catherine, also bred in England, He, was

trained for the event at Newmarket by T. Jennings, jun., and was ridden in the race by F. Barrett. The race waa worth £4105, and Glover covered the distance (one mile and a-half ) in 2min 38sec. Clover afterwards broke down while running in the Epsom Derby. — The value of the Derby won by Donovan was £4050, the race last year, when the same owner's Ayrshire was successful, being^ £3675, while in 1887, when it Ml to Mr Abington's Merry Hampton, it was worth £4525. In 1886, when' Ormonde won for ~ the Duke of Westminster, the value was £4700, and the" previous season Melton credited Lord Hastings with £4525. The richest Derby on record was that of Lord Lyon in 1876, who then won for his owner £7350.

—At the Oakleigh Park races, near Melbourne. 1 on the 16th inst., a scandal occurred in connec- j tion with the last race, the result being that the New Zealand horse Escapade, his owner (Mr F. Panetti), and the jockey Stratford, were all disqualified for 12 months for running the horse in a suspicious manner in the Visitors' Handicap. Escapade was a warm favourite, and he was kept back at the start, and afterwards was ridden in a manner which caused the stewards to consider that an inquiry waa advisable. — A Tasmanian exchange writes : — " Mr John Field has had the bad luck to lose one of the most valuable yearling colts in his etud. The stud groom (Thompson) and his assistants were trying to catch the colts in the large yard near, the stables, to put them under cover for tbe night, when the bay colt by Proto-Martyr from Claudine attempted to jump the fence, and falling backwards broke bis neck. The colfc was full brother to Mr R. O'Connor's Claude, the best Tasmanian two-year-old of last season." — In the action recently brought against the Adelaide T&ttersalPs Committee by Mr Seth Ferry for £1000 damages for posting him as guilty of malpractice, and claiming to be reinstated, Mr Justice Boucaut, in reviewing the arguments used, said he was quite satisfied that the committee had acted in a high-handed and cruel manner, and that there had been no submission by Ferry, and no notice to him that a trial of his character by the committee would be made. He gave judgment for the plaintiff, and awarded £250 damages, with costs. — At Bairnsdale (Victoria) the Hon. W. Pearson was anxious to run his colts barefooted, excepting that ho desired to have a tip put on the injured foot of one of them. Consulting a blacksmith (says " Augur ") the son of Vulcan was quite prepared to do the job until he was informed that the colts were to race, when he declared that he would not have anything to do with horses that were going to run where bad characters assembled and intoxicating drink was indulged in. Nor did Mr Pearson fare any better on the racecourse, for there another blacksmith was offered £1 to remove the shoes, but he refused,and the irainer had to manage the business as best he could.

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IN A NUTSHELL,, Otago Witness, Issue 1966, 25 July 1889

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1,872

IN A NUTSHELL, Otago Witness, Issue 1966, 25 July 1889

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