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IN A NUTSHELL.

— J. Laughlin has bought Cymaro.

—Carbine has never yet won a handicap. — Tokomairiro privileges realised £42 Is. —The Spy is said to have gone lame behind. — The Manawatu meeting resulted in a loss of £90.

— Lady Florin broke down in the Wanganui Cup. — An offer for Le Loup has come from Hawera.

'—Nominations for the New Zealand Cup on Saturday first. —St. Malo is now being ridden by a shepherd in one of the up-country districts. —A prominent defaulter was ordered off the Forbury course at the Cup meeting. —Mason and Roberts passed £827 through the totalisator at the Waikouaiti meeting.

— Philippe, who paid the big dividend at Waikouaiti, is one of King Philip's get. — Meters Hobbs and Goodwin passed £1002 through the machine at Lancaster Park. — The first of Fryingpan's get won the Sale (Victoria) Junior Stakes on the 26th ult. A five-year-old trotter named Miss Majolica has been sold by Mr Bonner for 15,000d01. —Donovan is backed afc 3 to 1 for the Derby, Chitabob at 6 to 1, and Laureate at 7 to 1.

—After 1890 the Grand Prix will follow, instead of precede, ths Ascot meeting in England. —O. H. Todd, the American Derby winner of 1887, is being used as a buggy horse at Sacramento.

—Jockey Tierney was thrown while riding at Orange (N.S.W.) last Friday, and killed instantly. —Alec. Sutherland has turned boniface, having taken possession of TattersalFs Hotel, Grafton.

— There are, it is said, fewer race meetings now in Great Britain than there were 17 or 18 years ago. —Fishwife, winner of the Farewell Handicap at Flemington, is half-sister to the Southland mare Anonyma. — SeouruSf the five-year-old half-brother to Hermitage, won the Waiau Oup and the Hamner Stakes.

— They say that the stable backed Lochiel for £30,000 in the double of Newmarket Handicap and Australian Oup. — The Referee's correspondent says that Richmond (by Apremont— Peggy) has been sold to Mr Tatham, of Napier. — A Northern paper says that Camomile's owner backed the mare to win him £500 in the Wanganui Cup at 100 to 2. — "Senex" says it is not improbable that Sultan may be heard of on the Australian turf before many months elapse. The Yankee crack- mare Firenzi, who got a place in every race she started for last season, is scarcely over 15 hands high. — The action of Wood versus Lord Durham was to come on in January, but the Chetwynd arbitration is practically in abeyance. —Will Camomile's owner kindly tell us how the mare is bred ? One authority tells us The Painter is her sire ! another, Don Juan.

— -Viotor, the trotter that made the threemile record last season, has been disqualified for two years by the Lancaster Park executive. — Mr J. Perry bought Annie Laurie at Tapanui for £15. Next day she was sold to Mr F. R. White for £15 10s. She was dirt cheap.

— A note for sporting printers— if there are any such: At the Pakuranga meeting a Mr Caslon ran a pony n*med Pica ; and Pica won. — The Paris Municipal Council had only a majority of nine for voting the annual subvention of £2000 towards making up the Grand Prix.

— The Leicester executive have tried to economise by reducing the value of their mile race from £1000 to £500, the result being that it has not filled.

— Mr W. Percival has been appointed to represent the Auckland Racing Club at a conference of delegates from metropolitan clubs to be held at Napier. —Mr D. O'Brien has purchased 1 a yearling colt by St. Albans from Curlew, by The Marquis, for 480g8. What price this fellow for the N.Z. Cup of 1890? — Walter Buddicombe, one of the best of our light-weight jockeys, has left Mr Goodman's service and is now employed at the Hon. George M'Lean's stable. —It is said that Lord Dunraven and Lord Randolph Ohunhill have formed a racing partnership, and that the horses will run in the name of the latter.

—During the two days of the Nelson meeting over £3000 went through the machines, being £700 more than last year. The Derby took £507 of this amount. — The Wanganui Herald says that after the •up was run, but before the Derby, Bob Ray jffered £800 for Recluse, but the owners refused to trade under £1000.

—A writer in a Clarence river exchange says :— " Priam, who is now 21 years of age, is to ue put into work again. The inhuman owner does not deserve success." x

— Up to date Carbine has started in 13 races, of which he has won 10, while he has two seconds and a third to his credit. He was

Dought as a yearling for 640gs. — The yearling by St. Albans from Zillah is so muoh like her brother Tasman that Dan O'Brien picked her from the crowd when they were running in the paddock.— v Angur." — One of the regrettable occurrences of the V.R.C. meeting was the collapse of The Australian Peer, who went amiss while on the way to the Sydney railway station. — Potatau, one of the horses engaged in the D.J.O. trots, won at Lancaster Park, taking 9min 20sec to do the three miles. Better than that fc wanted to score at the Forbury.

—The report of the V.R.C. meeting^ was one of the best compilations of results ever cabled from Australia. It contained just the news we wanted, and was about the right length.

— The Danevirke race meeting, held on the 6th, passed off successfully. Penguin won the Danevirke Handicap. Brown, a rider in the Hack Hurdles, had his shoulder dislocated.

—It seems after all that St. Glair's feet are not so bad as was at first supposed, and it is quite possible (says thfe Canterbury Times) the little horse may be prepared for the Great Autumn Handicap.

— Mr H. Lunn informs the Canterbury Times that it is still very doubtful if Tres Sec will ever race again. No attempt will be made to train the big gelding until he has enjoyed two or three years' spelL —The bookmaker Bolger, who was charged with perjury, in having sworn that he was not standing upon a box when requested by a V.R.O. official to desist from betting on the hill, was found guilty of that offence. —Ponies are good property nowadays, but if it is correct, as stated in the Press, that Mr Broughton has refused £300 for Kariri, he may be supposed to believe that the mare is indeed something out of the common, — Believers in coincidences will eschew the name of Eusign when christening colts. The Waikouaiti member of that name was the second finsign that has come to grief this season wbile racing, and each broke a leg. — TJie first forfeit of lOsova has been deolared for a of horses entered in the Derby and Oaks of 1890. This is in accordance with the altered conditions, which guarantee 5000sovs to the winner of the Derby and 4000 to the winner of the Oaks.

— The Australian Jockey Club have decided to have nothing whatever to do with pony, galloway, and trotting race meetings. ' They have not only refused to register them, but have taken away the registration from the Sydney Driving Park Club. The New Zealand-bred Whitworth, by Musket— Leila, won the Campbell Plate at Sale (Victoria) on the 27th ult., and also annexed the Latrobe Handicap ; while Firelock, a full brother to Matchlock, ran a dead heat with Dexter in the Sale Handicap. —The Sydney Gold Cup winner, Frisco, now being spelled at Windsor, is suffering from an abscess under the frontal bone, and Mr F. W. Day, who is attending him, considers that it will be necessary to resort to trephining before a cure can be effected.

— The amounts won during the past season by the eight principal owners in England, France, Austria, and Germany respectively are as follow: England, £122,787; France, £100,590; Austria, £38,373 ; Germany, £30,064. These figures apply to flat races only. —•At a meeting of the Coursing Committee of the Dunedin Jockey Club it was resolved that the first meeting be held on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th May, the programme to consist of Forbury All-aged Stakes, St. Leger Stakes, and Consolation Stakes. — Oberon, the Lincolnshire Handicap winner, was to have taken part in the Viceroy's Cup, run at Calcutta on the 26th December, but unfortunately went amiss. The winner was Lord Wm. Beresford's Myall King, who started at 9 to 1. Moorhouse was favourite at sto 4 on. —During the year 1889 £21,270 will be given away as added money at the races in Hoppegarten, Germany, exclusive of the sums offered for military races. The Government contributes £6100, the Union, or German Jookey Club, £12,520 nnrl ihr Graditz Stud £2650. —A Me Dunham has inquired as to the colour of stallions owned by the French Government during the past 40 years, and found that of nearly 3000 entire horses, 2200 were bay or brown of some shade, 500 were chestnut, and 200 were black, with a few greys, mostly Arabs. —Mr T. Barnett has left Dunedin and means to make his home in Melbourne. Prior to sailing in the Mararoa he was presented with a memento of friendship, which was ungrudgingly subscribed for by his old acquaintances. I hope he will meet with success in the colonial metropolis. The following statistics of the horse traffic at Newmarket will be of interest :— ln 1886 the number of horses carried in and out of Newmarket was 10,058 ; in 1887 this number was increased to 10,331, and laßt year there was a still further increase of 353 horses, or a total of no less than 10,684. —Mr Stead, having armed himself with a list of Sedition's performances, had an idea of cabling over and asking the V.R.C. stewards to hold an inquiry into the previous running of Sedition. However, after winning the Australian Cup with Lochiel, he decided to take no further action.— Referee. — Crowberry, who has not started since he ran second (such second as it was) to Stuart in the Grand Prix, has been sent back to Newmarket in the hope that he will stand a preparation, but he seems desperately groggy, and it will tax even Matthew Dawson's cleverness to get him to the post in racing condition. . —The Westport Club took the precaution of placing two stewards at each hurdle wbile the jumping races were being run at the recent n&eeting. So says the local paper, but it omits to tell us what the stewards were supposed to do. I suppose their duty was to "shoo" on any horses that tried to run round. —Mr H. Redwood had a bit of bad luck with Masthead, the filly going wrong just on the eve of the Wanganui meeting. The Press' correspondent says that she did a two-mile trial in 3min 34sec, and that her owner had taken a sporting wager about her winning the treble of the Marlborougb, Nelson, and Wanganui Cups. —An Auckland telegram states that a communication from Mr G. G. Stead, recommending that the date of the A.R.C. Spring meeting be altered to early in October to prevent clashing with the C. J.C. November fixture was considered by the Auckland Racing Club, whea it was decided that it would not be advisable to agree to the suggestions. —A match for £20 a-side, between Forester and Armourer, took place on the Manawatu racecourse on the 2nd inst. The distance was one mile and a-half, and the weights the same as carried by the horses in the Ladies' Bracelet — 11.3 each. Forester^ was ridden by Gravestock and Armourer by his owner, Mr J. George. Forester led all the way and won eaaily at the finish.

—•A Napier telegram states that Recluse is a warm favourite for the Hawke's Bay Cup, the best offer being level money. Betting is confined to doubles on the Cup and Railway Stakes, for which 100 to 16 has been accepted about the two Recluses ; 100 to 12 has been taken about Lady Norab and Recluse, with 100 to 14 wanted ; Silence and Recluse 100 to 10, and Salisbury and Recluse 100 to 4.

— The following amusing paragraph is from a Madras paper :— " The death of three horses in the Jaintpore stable made the owners so nervous that Dr Symons was sent up post haste from Calcutta to see if he could put a name to the disease which had so suddenly killed the unfortunate victims, but the natives having eaten the defunct gee-gees, there was not much reliable evidence to work a report on."

—A correspondent, writing under date December 28, from Johannisburg, Tranßvaal Republic, the centre of the gold iriniog district,

states that "during the last week they have had nothing but races to divert their attention, and that two sweepstakes were got up of the value of £20,000 and £10,000 respectively. Among a community of 10,000 to 15,000 this beats the record of the Old Country. " — Racing in the Argentine Republic is in a most flourishing condition. About 60 meetings take place in the year, and the two important societies are the Jockey Club and the Hipodroma Naciqnal, which latter pays attention to the financial part of the bu&iness, the shareholders having built stands, &c, at a cost of over £40,000. Frenoh-bred horses appear to acclimatise themselves much better than those which are bought in England. —A Queensland exchange states that Greywing bas met with another mishap which will not tend to improve his chances of recovery. Just as he was commencing to pick up a little, the sling upon which he was resting one night broke recently and let him fall heavily on the injured side, and in his struggles to get up he bruised and scratched himself all over. He haft now a pair of swelled knees and is covered with bruises. There are still, however, hopes that he will eventually recover. —I am not sure that even 9.0 will stop Windsor in the Tokomairiro Handicap. He is in great form now. St. James is the only one that has a chance of " doing " the son of Mabel, and it is not a certainty that the Hon. Q-. M'Lean's horse will go to the meeting. Tenakoe can win the Novel Race; I like Taiaroa for the Trot; Miss Ann may be good enough to take the St. Patrick's Handicap; and Louis Philippa may win the District Handicap. lam writing before the acceptances appear. —Here is a hopeful little item from so eminent an authority as the London Sportsman : — "That the turf is now in a more flourishing state than at any previous period in its history is a statement which few wiil attempt to deny. Twelve months ago, when certain scandals were the topic of conversation in racing circles, some may have tried to argue that the moral tone of the national pastime was not so good as iv years gone by ; but evils then existed, we venture to assert, to a far greater extent, although they were not so frequently brought to light." —The purchase by a Oalifornian of Electric Bells, the yearling, for 25,000d01J seems to have been but the signal for a series or gigantic transfers of trotting stock. Mr A. J. Alexander, of Kentucky, was in New York recently, and when he returned took with him the trotting stallion King Wilkes, by George Wilkes, dam Massie, which he purchased from Mr R. B. Conklin for 15,000d01. J. I. Case, the owner of Jay-Eye-See, sold one of the best of his string (James G., record 2min 20sec) to A. J. Feck, of Syracuse, tor 6000dol. The animal was purchased for parties residing at Frankfort, Germany. —Joe Thompson tells "Vigilant" that his biggest win was on Zulu's Cup. He had had a bad Derby day, lost £8000 over Segenhoe and Darebin, Maribyrnong Plate and Derby, but got it all back over Zulu, and £21,000 besides I He didn't win much over Don Juan. He certainly backed the Don to win £20,000, but laid itall off, and only won a couple of thousand on the race. The horse went wrong in his last gallop on Tuesday (the Cup was run on Thursday then), and Redfearn, who worked like a nigger, together with young Jemmy Wilson, were fomenting the horse for four-and-twenty hours. — Le Destrier, the sire of Stuart and several other smart horses, seems to be the coming horse in France, and the stock of Zut have been doing exceedingly well. Silvio, who was at the head of the Frenoh list of winning sires in 1886, was fourth in 1887, and seventh last year, but if Maypole trains on he may be again first in 1889. So far, however, the two-year-olds by Silvio have not usually improved with age. M. Lefevre made a terrible blunder when he sold Chamant and Verneuil to the Prussian Government, as their stock won upwards ■'of £20,000 last year, and they are evidently a serious loss to the sbud in France.— Truth ' —A mare called Rosebud, entered for some of the Westport races, was suspected to be identical with a disqualified member known originally as Jenny. The stewards gave the owner an opportunity of clearing up the doubts that existed, but the local paper understands that his evidence was not quite satisfactory, and the question was adjourned. I observe that the mare did not run at the meeting. This is a more sensible way of dealing with a doubtful case than to allow the suspected animal to run and take the chance of a row in the event of its winning. I should like to see more of these beforehand inquiries.

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IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 1947, 14 March 1889

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IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 1947, 14 March 1889

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