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LOCAL & GENERAL.

In the way of amusements (writes our Auckland correspondent on the 18th) there is little to record since the advent of Miss Lydia yon Finkelstein, whose lectures combined instruction with amusement. This gifted lady opened a successful season on Monday lasfc, her initiatory costume and tableau lecture being on " The Homes and Haunts of Jesus," and illustrative of Biblical lore and Oriental customs and manners. It may be questioned whether such a representative audience (so far as the clergy is concerned) has even been gathered within the walls of the Opera House. Bishop Luck, as the representative of Infallibility) being flanked by clerical claimants to the Apostolical succession, while in the rear were douce Presbyterian divines, hardshell baptists, and spiritual Bashi-bazouks from the Salvation Army. Miss Finkelstein expects to reach Dunedin early in November, a nd will lecture for a week there. As she is possessed of considerable oratorical and histrionic ability, and breaks up ground in the lecturing field which is somewhat new to the general public, there is every reason to believe that her lecturing tour throughout the colony will be satisfactory alike to herself and to her audiences.

Afc the R.M. Court; on Monday Peter lieitch sued the Mutual Agency Company for £4 14s 4d, balance for oat» sold on commission by the defendant company. Mr Calvert appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr Sinclair for the defendants, who paid £2 Is 7d into courfc. Mr Calverfc in opening the case said plaintiff, a farmer at Kuri Bush, in June last sent 90 bags of oats to the company for sale on commission. A week or so later he received a letter from the manager of the company stating that the 90 bags had been sold afc Is 8d a bushel, bub on asking a settlement he was told that the weights were not yet in, bufc got a cash advance of £16. He subsequently got account sales showing that 59 bags had been sold at Is 8d as s fc a ted, but that the other 31 bags being inferior had only realised Is 3d. There were also minor charges disputed, and plaintiff sued for a settlement on the basis of a sale at Is 8d all round. Evidence was giveu by the plaintiff and S. J. Loring, railway goods, manager.— For the defence Mr Sinclair said a sale was made by the company a!; Is 8d per bushel, bufc when the bags came to be handled ifc was fouud that some of the oats were of a very inferior quality and could not be delivered. The company agreed to purchase these themselves at Is 3d. Subsequently, however, they managed to sell them at Is 6d and decided to give plaintiff the full benefit of this sale, which was done.— Evidence for the defence was given by Alexander Matheson, manager of the defendant company, H. M, Driver, and Francis Carr.— His Worship said Mr Calvert ha I made out a strong pvima facie caso, but it had been explained away to a large extent Plaintiff was clearly not entitled to get more than the oits sold for, and as th^y were not withdrawn from gale, he thought on the whole the company were justified in selling as thi-y did. Judgment would be for the amount paid into court; each side to pay its own costs, and defendant to pay the costs of that day's heariug.

The Government have received a telegram the Ageut-geueral to the effect that he has agava been in communication with several railway experts in connection with the chief commissionership of New Zealand railways, but that he has not yet been able to make any selection, although he hopes he may ore long b« in a position to make the dtsired recommendation. A vague rumour was current on Saturvlay that should it not prove practicable to obtain a chief commissioner from England, the board would be constituted as follows:— Mr Ed ward Richarvl^on, M.H.R., chief commihsionrr (salary, £1200 or £1000), Mr J. Maxwell (present general Manager), and Mr C. Y. O'Conor (secretary Public Works), assistant commissioners (salaries £1000 each) ; but nothing authentic is, of course, obtained as yet. It; was further rumoured that Mr Maxwell was willing to serve under an English chief commissioner of repute, but not under anybody appointed in the colony. This, however, is probably as little to be relied on as any of the other reports which have so long been current on the subject.

It is understood that the appointment of Inspector of Material for the colony at Home is to be offered to Mr Blackett, engineer-in-chief. As that gentleman is entitled to retire on a pension, it is thought he may decline the position, io which ca?e it is believed Mr W. N. Blair will be appointed.

Information has been received Iv Blenheim that a dastardly attempt was made to burn the Hou. W. Clifford's house. The incendiary was Beeu by a jockey, who attempted a seizure, but was stunned by the man, who made off. It is believed that the man is the same as the person who caused the late fire at Blenheim.

The Lyttelton Times states that Messrs Herbert Henry and Co., merchants, of Melbourne, were so pleased with the ostrich feathers shown by Mr Matsou at the Centennial Exhibition that they have offered to give full London values for all the feathers that he can send them.

The" Shouting " Emperor (says the Pall Mall Gazette) keeps up the habit of speaking at the top of his voice. Here, for instance, is the latest Btriug of superlatives which have fallen from the Imperial lips :— " It is the pride ot the Hotenzollerns to reign at once over the noblest, the most intellectual, and most cultured of nations." This love of hyperbolical and extravagant exaggeration has not hitherto been the characteristic of the rulers of the " noblest, the most intellectual, and most cultured of nations." Of all things bombastic, fustian is the aiost distasteful to culture, and the constant conscious straining aftereffect is a novelty which the Emperor will find it difficult to make popular ainr>ng the sober citizens of the Fatherland.

Captain Wilson, of the Salvation Army at ynnstchurcb, has been sent to gaol for eight %s for neglecting to pay a fine of 10s and costs-alfcogether between £2 and £3— for obstructing a narrow street by holding service tuere on Sunday morning and of annoying certain residents thereby.

Riferring to the coal miners' strike, the oyauey Morning Herald of the 11th inst. says ; , In the midst of sanguine expectations affairs f co "nection with the coal strike have taken a turn for the worse ; and ther« seems to be no wtter prospect of a settlement now than there was a month ago. The Mediation Committee j«s been at work all along and the last step was . * s * the masters to reopen communication «»n i the miners. This action has failed. The wasters contend that the miners are the aggresOrs > an( J that proposals for a settlement should wmo from them. They therefore decline to ™ake any proposals, but at the same time state jueir willingness that a sub-committee of the wasters should meet the miners if the latter express a desire to confer, provided (and this is •significant condition) that new labour has not Wen obtained in the meantime. The miners, so ♦«■, have shown no disposition to make advances,

and the situation amounts to a deadlock." In addition to the coal miners, there is a strike of carters and fillers in connection with the construction of a reservoir near Sydney, the men engaged numbering 250. This, with the carpenters' and joiners' strike, must leave a large number of workmen dependent en strike pay in New South Wales. The accommodation house, owned and occupied by Mr Steele, at Spylaw, Moa Flat, was completely destroyed by fire on the 17th insfc., nothing whatever being saved. The Tuapeka Times says :—" The people sleeping in the house at the time were Mr and Mrs Steele and girl, and two boarders, named Smith and M'Leod. They escaped with some difficulty. Smith had his hand badly cut in breaking the window to escape, and came out with nothing on but his shirfc. M'Leod lost a valuable watch and chain. The fire is thought to have originated in the kitchen, but in what way is not 1 known. Mrs Steele says she lost between £50 and £60 in cash, which was in the house at the time, and one of the boarders (Mailler) says he , lost £100 in cash, which he had in his room. There were no insurances, so that the loss falls entirely on Mr and Mrs Steele, with whom great sympathy is felt. The house was built about four years ago, and with the furniture was valued at about £700." A serious and quite unprecedented misfortune has (The Times says) happened to the sloop Nymphe, which is completing for commission at Portsmouth. The vessel, which was laid down in July last year, was only floated out of dock a few months ago. Afc the time the water was admitted the after and upper portions of the j hull, as well as the rudder, were coppered the ends of the propeller shaft, to which the twin screws are fitted, being covered with paint to prevent their rusting. When the water was pumped out of No. 1 dock, whither the sloop had been taken to be prepared for her steam trials by the Greenock Foundry Company, an alarming state of things was discovered. While she was in the shiD basin the water seems to have percolated through the composition, and set up a powerful galvanic battery between the copper and the steel. As a result, the exposed parts of the propeller shafting are seriously damaged, ruts an iach broad having been eaten out of the steel in some places as though gouged with a chisel. The key pieces are bitten away at the sides, while deep holes are everywhere visible. The propeller shafts are 45ft long, each manufactured out of a single ingot, and the injury is so great that new ouea will probably have to be fitted. Where the nuts screwed into the ends the threads are in a state of perfect preservation, and had the usual precaution of covering the exposed surfaces with zinc caps been followed, no harm would have beea sustained.

The terms of the munificent offer made by Mr G. W. Taylor at the jubilee meeting in connection with the Congregational Union held in Melbourne were incorrectly stated in our cablegrams. Mr Taylor undertook to contribute £10,000 a year for three years, making in all £30,000, if the congregation found another £30,000, which would suffice for the establishment of an affiliated college in the university. A grammar school for boy 3 and a high school for girls could be established for £20,000 apiece. If these were looked upon favourably, he would be willing to contribute £10,000 a year for five yoara provided the congregation found £50,000. Tee offer was heartily accepted. Mr Henry Lee offered £1000 and Mr Mirams £1000 a year for five years, Mr W. Higgina £500 a year for five years, and Mr R. O'Donnell £100 a year for the same period ; and other donations were given.

We understand that Captain Stronach, of the Otago Hussar? , intends to resign his commission in consequence of the finding of the commission recently appointed to inquire into the matter in depute" between his troop and the Port Chalmers Naval Artillery, As Captain Sfcronach is an able and a very popular officer his loss will be greatly felt.

The following new patents have been applied for .-—Alexander Simpson, Southland, a goldsaving machine; Thomas Cossens and Alexander Black, Dunedin, automatic folding straw elevators; A. Willows, Auckland, an improved hunk for fixing sails to ships' rigging ; W. Tarrant, Syduey, improvements in apparatus for the amalgamation and concentration of mfitalliferous material; T. Emerson, Oamaru, for a sfilf-acting fire alarm ; J. Todd, Otahuhu, improvement of candlesticks; J. F. Roberts, Auckland, for tilting keroseue tins, oil drums, and other vessels; J. T. Johns, Auckland, improving and reducing the cost of jam and other preserve tins; J. C. Butler, Wellington, an attachment for affixing to meeting-rails of window sashes and other purposes requiring a perfect fitting* joint, and for an improved fastener for securing windows, doors, &c. ; J. M. Baird and E. H. Taylor, Sydney, improvements in erection? to be used in the sport called Tobogganing, and in appliances in connection therewith ; L. C. Parke and B. T. Lacy, San Francisco, improvements in rock breaking machines and in crushing and pulverising machines; J. S. Mac Arthur (Renfrew), R. W. Forrest, M.D., and W. Forrest, M.B. (Glasgow), improvements in extracting gold and silver from ores or other compounds; H. Edmunds, London, an improved system and means to be used in the supply or distribution and control of electricity for lighting or oMier purposes; T. Dobbie, M. Levinsohn, and A. N. Jonsen, all of Sydnej, for improved amnluiinjating and gem and pyrites saving machine

In speaking to the toast of " The Parliament of New Zealand " at Mr Larnach's dinner on Saturday evening Dr Fitohett said that he was really disposed to think that it would be a good thing for the colony if they could put the Government in commission to carry on without Parliament for a few years. — (A Voice : " Hear, hear ; that's the best thing you could do.") It seemed to him that what the people wanted was to be let alone. They did not want laws, because laws begat other laws. But things being as they were, he thought Parliament did reasonably well. It did not pass any very pernicious legislation, and when wrong legislation was passed the House was always willing to rescind it as far as possible.

Mr J. W. Jago and Dr Stenhouse will contest the vacancy on the Education Board caused by the resignation of Dr Brown.

Eighteen patients wore admitted into the hospital during the past week and 10 wore discharged. One death occurred in the institution, the patient's name being Mary Fahey. Thera are 91 patients afc present in the institution, or seven more ihan at the beginning of last week.

Sir Robert and Lady Stout were pan?engers by the Te Auau, which arrived afc Dunedin on Tuesday. Thu vessel brought back from Melbourne 52 steerage passengers.

Dairy Farming.— Many small farmers cannot spare the ready money to pui-chaee a strong Spring Cart and Set of Colonial-made Harness at the same time. To those we can confidently recommend the Tim* Payment System adopted by Mr Mathieson of the Amkmoak Oakquqk Factory, Intercargiu., as by his method of a small sum per month any struggling farmer can procure a first-olass vehicle and set of strong harness that will last a life time. Write at once (or particulars.

a In connection with the Sutherland waterfall, f and the globing description which Mr T. - M'Kenzie, M.H.R., supplied to us, the Weli i liogton Post states that the authorities of the - T Union Steam Ship Company have very liberally 3 promised the Government that they will place a i substantial boat upon Lake Ada to convey tourists across its waters to the point where the track to the falls will resume its course. It is estimated that the distance from the further 3 shore of Lake Ada to the Sutherland Falls is between 10 and 12 miles. Arrangements have 1 been made with Mr Sutherland to form a track 1 suitable for ordinary light traffic for that dis- ! tance, and also to erect a hut in the vicinity of the falls for the convenience of any travel- [ lers who may desire to or be obliged to pass the I night there. The work is now in progress, and ' is to be completed as early as possible, so that little time may be lost in opening up the dis- ', trict. Mr Adams will endeavour to ascertain ' whether there is a pass from the Arthur river to Lake Te Anau which could be made available for traffic, so as to open an overland route to the falls through Central Otago, as an alter native to the sea voyage amongst the West Coast Sounds. Before quitting the neighbourhood Mr Adams will also determine the actual height of the falls by trigonometrical calculation. Two young members of the Auckland City Guards on Saturday afternoon set up a kerosene tin on Surrey Hills estate and began firing afc ifc with rifles afc a distance of 500 yds. A bullet whistled past a gentleman and little girl walking in Crummer road, and then penetrated the wall of a house, smashing some things in the kitchen. The police were informed, and put a stop to this extraordinary rifle practice in a thickly populated district; and the souths, named Henry Casey and Joseph Fair weather, will be charged with a breach of the Police Offences Act. A similar thing is reported from Christchurch. On Saturday afternoon, it is stated, a bullet from a rifle, discharged between the Domain and Smith street, at Kaiapoi, nearly struck a man named Miller, in Davie sbreefc. Mr Miller picked the bullet out of the sand and handed it to the police, who intend to prosecute the offender. Saturday, September 1, saw the last— for the present at all events— of the railway race to Edinburgh. From that day the extra expresses were withdrawn by the Great Northern as well as the London and North Western, and the journey will in future be performed in eight hours and a-half, or at what, after the experience of the last few weeks, may be called the moderate and reasonable speed of 47 miles an hour, lunch and all other stoppages included. But in return for these two other accelerations are promised. 'For the present, then, ifc appears that the East Coast have accspted their rivals as their equate to Edinburgh. A Paris telegram in the London Daily Telegraph states that a terrible tragedy took place at sea on board the French ship Tarapaca, which has just entered the port of Dunkirk The Tarapaca is a four-master, owned by a Bordeaux firm, and was coming home from Chili with a cargo of nitrate of soda. The vessel was manned by a large crew, some of whom were South Americans, or foreign castaways and deserters, who were shipped at Iquique. When in mid-Atlantic some of the men became mutinous, and the captain, assisted by the first mate, the boatswain, and a few of the sailors, had to defend the quarter-deck, which was besieged by the mutineers from the forecastle. Bloodthirsty encounters were fought with firearms, cutlasses, and marlinspikes, and twp sailors were battered to death. After their bodies had been thrown overboard comparative tranquility was restored on the vessel. Several seamen have reached port in a precarious condition, and the captain and first mate have been suspended while full investigation is being made by the maritime authorities into all the circumstances of this new tragedy on the high seas. Does a term of imprisonment purge a man of his evil propensities ? This is a question which is very often asked. The following incident (says the Wellington Press), which is vouched for by a gentleman holding a high social position, goes to prove that in all cases, afc all events, ifc does not. By the steamer Rofcorua from the South last week three prisoners were l.rought to Wellington from one of the gaols down South. They were accommodated in the steerage, and ifc appears had free liberty to any part of that department. The gentleman mentioned above was also a steerage passenger by the Rotorui, and in consequence of having a considerable amount of money about him he did not relish the idea of these three misguided u?en being too well acquainted with him. On retiring for the night he put his roll of notes into the inside pocket of his overcoat, which he then rolled up and put under his pillow. On waking in the morning he, to satisfy himself as to the safety of the money, put his hnnd into his pocket, and lo ! the money was gone. He at once reported the occurrence to the first officer he saw, no doubt through entertaining a suspicion or two of his own. The three delinquents were arrainged and searched, and the roll of notes complete was extracted from the jumper of one of them. Some controversy took place recently regarding clergymen's sons turning out well. The Chicago News has the following to the point :— 11 This is a great year for clergymen's sons, notwithstanding the old theory that they and deacons' daughters never turn out well. Grover Cleveland, Democratic candidate for the Presidency, is the son of a Presbyterian clergyman. Allen G. Thurman, ditto for the Vice-presi-dency, is the son of a Methodist chirgyman. Benjamin Harrison, Republican candidate for the Presidency, is the son-in-law of a Presbyterian clergyman. Levi P. Morton, ditto for the Vicepresidency, is the son of a Congregational clergyman. Calvin S. Brice, chairman of the Democratic Executive Committee in charge of the campaign, is the son of a Presbyterian clergyman. Matthew Stanley Quay, chairman of the Republican National Committee, is also the son of a Presbyterian clergyman. That remarkable specimen of the vegetable world, the " weather plant," continues, says a Vienna correspondent, to excite considerable interest here. Men of science who on its first discovery were unwilling to express an opinion on its prognosticating virtues, now agree, after extensive experiments, that the shrub is _in truth prophetic. Thirty- two thousand trials made during the last three years tend to prove its infallibility. The plant itself is a legume, commonly called the "Paternoster pea," but known in botany as the Abrus Pereginus. It is a native of Corsica and Tunis. Its leaf and twig strongly resemble those of the acacia. The more delicate leaves of its upper branches foretell the state of the weather 48 hours in advance, while its lower and hardier leaves indicate all atmospheric changes three days beforehand. The indications consist _in a change in the position of the leaves and in the rise and fall of the twigs and brancblets. A Home paper states that a mysterious occurrence took place in Asylum road, Birmingham, on a recent Saturday night. Mrs Ada Fereday, wife of a working man, went out marketing about 6 o'clock in the evening, leaving her iufaut, six months old, lying in a bassinette

I, perambulator in front of the fire. She also left '. in the house two older children, her cousins, a - boy aged 12 and a girl aged 10. Mrs Fereday's a father was also lying drunk and asleep on the r sofa. On her return the boy had gone out. Ihe i little girl said, "Oh! look at the blood on the r floor." Mrs Fereday then found that the ) infant had been deeply cut near its ankle, t and that a table knife was lying in the • perambulator. The girl, Alice Forre3ter, stated i at first that she had done it, as a boy in the i street had told her that it would bring her good : luck. The mother took the baby to a surgery, • where an assistant sewed up the wound in the foot that was shown to him. Soon after, while nursing the infant, the mother found that the other foot was also bleediug, and, on examining it, found that it was nearly cut off. The infant | was then taken to the General Hospital, where ifc died about 10 minutes after admission from shock and loss of blood. The police at first suspected the mother and grandfather, but were afterwards satisfied that they were innocent, and that the fatal injuries were inflicted by one or both of the children, whom they have detained in custody. Mr G. T. Booth, the presnlent of the Christchurch Industrial Association, and a member of the firm of Booth and Macdonald, of the Carlyle Iron Works, has just returned from a visit to the Melbourne Exhibition. In an interview with a Christchurch Press representative he said that he had interviews with the president and seretary of the manufacturers' associations both in Melbourne and Sydney on the subject of intercolonial Freetrade. " I had doubts in my mind when I went over," he says, " as to whether the Australians were really in earnest, and whether the feeling was strong enough to afford a reasonable hope of the ultimate success of the movement. After the interviews I had, and the opportunities of ascertaining the state of feeling on the subject, I am very strongly impressed with the belief that intercolonial Freetrade will be an accomplished fact in the near future. In Victoria the manufacturing interest is very strong, and they are pressing ifc warmly on the attention of the Government. In Sydney they are not so keen as in Melbourne, as a feeling in favour of Protection is growing up fchere, which, however, has the effect of making Victoria more anxious for intercolonial Freefcrade. The Victorians seem determined to push the matter through, and certainly ifc is to the interest of New Zealand to back them up by all possible means. We have nothing to be afraid of, as it would mean the throwing open of the country to our produce. Although large numbers of our population have been attracted to Victoria, I think the time is not far distant when we may expect to see many back again who have gone over fchere. So far as climate and natural advantages are concerned, New Zealand is far ahead, and every New ,Zealander is looking forward to the time when he can getjback again. The great difference between New Zealand and Victoria that struck me was that the Victorians are intensely patriotic. They believe in themselves and their colony, and they make every one who goes there do the same. People who visit them are led by this to take them at their own estimate. This was the case with Mr Froude, whose book I believe has had a good deal to do with the influx into Victoria. Whilst; hero we have the unhappy koack of running down our country, and of course the people who visit us come to believe that we are in a desperate bad way." The Engineering News states that, from a careful analysis of the work to be done, it will require not less than from £90,000,000 to £100,000,000 sterling to complete the Panama Canal. Thi3 will increase the capital on which interest is to be paid to about £170,000,000. The interest on this will be £10,000,000 a year. The highest estimate of the reveuue from the tcaffic, made by M. de Lesseps himself, is £4,500,000 a year, or twice the revenue derived from the Suez Canal. It is more likely to be a half or a quarter, and from this has to be deducted the cost of administration and maintenance, say, £600,000, this being also Lesseps' estimate. The clear revenue available for paying interest is not likely to be more than £500,000, and there may be nothing afc all available for the purpose. The prospect of completing the canal is now more remote than ever. At a meeting of the creditors of William Robertson, Woodlands, storekeeper, held at Invercargill, the statement submitted showed :—: — Liabilities : Secured, £1675 ; unsecured, £1517 3s 9d ;— total, £3192 3s 9d. Assets : Secured, £1800 ; unsecured, stock-in-trade, plant, &c, £350; book debts (£686 19s 10d), valued afc £350; cash in hand, £12; furniture, £70;— total, £2582; deficiency, £610 3s 9d. The secured creditors are the Southland Building Society, £220; the Colonial Bank, £955; Wm. Young, Vunlaw, £500. Several Dunedin firms are among the unsecured creditors, the sums due, with one exception, being under £100. The Deputy-assignee stated that, having made an examination, he estimated the assets available to meet the claims of unsecured creditors at £731. The Bankrupt, having been examined as to a statement made to Dunedin creditors six months ago showing a surplus of over £1000, stated that the difference was occasioned chiefly by the different values placed on his sections. Ifc was resolved to realise the estate, and Messrs Fleming and Kingsland were appointed supervisors. We are given to understand that a difficulty has arisen between the Seamen's Union and the Union Steam Ship Company, in reference to the dispute existing between the Union and the Northern S.S. Company, Negotiations for a settlement have boon carried on for the last three weeks between the executive of the Seamen's Union and the Steamship Companies" Association, bufc unfortunately they are said to have fallen through. We learn on good authority that unless a settlement is arrived at the men iv the New Zealand shipping trade will go out on strike early in November, and that this roay probably be the means of leading to a general strike amongst the members of the Federated Seamen's Union and kindred societies. It is hoped, however, that wiser counsels will, prevail and an understanding be arrived afc without resort to such a serious step. The Railway department, in reply to a complaint made by Mr Samuel Orr, inform the Daily Times that "the weight of bags is invariably deducted before the excess over 2401b is charged at rate and aquarter, so that in a consignment of 60 bags, carried and charged for as six tons, they actually carry six tons, plus 3401b, made up as follows :—: — Sixty sacks grain equal to six tons, plus 1601b, difference between 22401b and 24001b per ton. Sixty sacks at 31b each equal to 1801b. " Good wtnb sheds ho bush," neither te ifc necessary to extol the virtues of Rowlands' Macassar ( iii, which for nearly 100 years has been considered the best and safest preparation for the hair of children sad adults, being perfectly free from any lead, poisonous or mineral ingredient. Ifc prevents and erresta baldness, and produces a luxuriant and glossy pi owth of hair. Sold also in a golden colour for falrbnlred children and adults. RowXANps 1 BUKONIA is a pure and delicate toilet powder in three tints— v hito, *ose, and cream. Ask Chemists and store 3 for ].o\tlakds' articles, of 20 Hat ton Garden, London, &ud avoid noxious Imitations,

t It is 6tated in London (writes our a. Home correspondent) that Lord Seafield is s coming to Scotland very shortly to take 3 1 possession of his Scotch estates, but that he has no intention of residing on them, and will return to New Zealand as soon as he has arranged all his business matters here. His family will not accompany him to Scotland, and during his absence a fine mansion will be built for him in Otago. Lord Seafield will thus follow the example of the eleventh Lord Fairfax, who, when he succeeded his brother in the title in 1869, refused to leave the United States, where he had been born and bred, and who is practising as a physician at Maryland. The Resident Magistrate's Court sat till the unusual hour of 7.35 on Friday evening, Mr Carew being occupied the whole day in hearing two actions for damages for breach of contract brought by Dunedin buyers against Messrs R. Allen and Co., of the Belford Mills, Timaru. The ground alleged was that quantities of flour and bran which were bought by the respective plaintiffs on a risiDg market were not delivered by the defendants. In the first case W. Wright, baker, of Dunedin, recovered £60, the amount of damages claimed; iv the second case, in which W. L. Lees, of Dunedin, claimed £75, judgment was reserved. Messrs A. Thomson and J. Morgan, J.P's, presided afc the Port Chalmers Police Court on Friday, when Robert Sutherland pleaded guilty to assaulting Margaret Robertson at Deborah Bay on the 18th inst. The complainant, who had cohabited with the defendant, stated that she had beeu subjected to severe ill-treatment at various times from him when in liquor. He neglected to provide for the children, and when she remonstrated with him on the day previous he not only abused her bufc dragged her into the house by her hair and got a razor to cut her throat, but was stopped by the interference of some of the neighbours. This was corroborated by two witnesses. The Bench stated that the evidence disclosed a very unhappy state of affairs, and a most cowardly and brutal assault had been committed. They therefore inflicted a fine of 30s, in default seven days' imprisonment, with hard labour. A letter from ihe Rev. Dr Stuart has been received by Mr W. D. Stewart, M.H.R., dated September 7, in which he states that he was about to visit the Rev. Mr Russell, of Port Glasgow, formerly of Caversham. Dr Stuart writes : — " I spent a week in my old Border parish in meeting the people, I both suffered and enjoyed much, for, as a rule, they were the children, in the main, of those with whom I was so happily associated in Christian work and worship for 10 happy years. Some claimed a part in me because I baptised them, some because I admitted them into a church, some because I married them, and some because they were my comrades in work. I lived in an old manse which sheltered us and gave me a delightful sanctuary for years. I left Tyneclale and its beautiful heather hills with the feeling I should never again gaze upon them. I have to see many families' in the west before I return to London, bufc I am beginning to get tired o£ knocking about' and boing exhibited. I will be glad to resume the thousand and one engagements at Dunedin, and will look upon them as easy work in comparison with the life I lead." Only one petition of insolvency was filed during the past week, the petitioning debtor being Robert Hogg, of Balclutha, watchmaker. Captain Hugh M'Lellan, of Lytfcelton, relates an incident of his first meeting with the veteran actor J. L. Hall, whose death has been reported. When he was chief officer, 'of the brig Mary Grant, sailing out of Sydney, on one voyage they made to Valparaiso in 1856, at which port they shipped an A.B. named John L. Hall, who had just left an American vessel called the Rover's Bride. This new A.B. was — to use the relator's expression — a " funny fellow." It did not matter what fche weather was he was always the same, full of merriment and jokes ; and during the six months he was on the vessel he earned for himself the esteem of his officers and the good fellowship of his shipmates. The next time that Captain M'Lellan saw the A.B. ifc was on the boards afc Newcastle as an exponent of; the histrionic art. The Brisbane Courier deals trenchantly with the Bank of New Zealand report. It says : — " The report is about as unsatisfactory and depressing as possibly could be issued. It will be one of the happily rare black pages in the recent; history of Australasian banking. Ifc discloses a style and method of management which ifc is to be hoped does not find a parallel in the Antipodes. It is almost sadly amusing to read that the report has given great satisfaction to the shareholders, bufc this, we suppose, is the usual whistling to keep their courage up. The reserve fund, which little over a year ago was £625,000, has vanished, and the shares, then worth £18, are now probably worfch par— i.e., £7. All that can be done is to endeavour to' start on a new career, to avoid the recklessness and folly of ' filming over the ulcerous places,' and saying there is no sore to be healed, no bad debts to be provided for. Ifc is all very well to lay the misfortunes at the door of excessive inflation and depression, and so forth,' but to all this the bank itself has largely contributed, and even if it had not, such a plea does not absolve directors from the lamentable consequences ot their injudicious management," If an enemy ever does, unfortunately, land up Taranaki way, be will be able to do so without danger, except lo the volunteers up there. A correspondent to fche Hawera and Normanby Star mentions that a volunteer fired nine rounds of ball cartridge at a calf the other day near Kakaramea, without; grazing a hair, bufc nearly shooting a man instead. It is an ugly inference, but ifc is possible that if he had aimed afc the man he might have shot the calf, which now mockingly frisks about the township. It is not surprising to learn that, under these circumstances, the volunteer modestly refrains from boasting about his ability as a marksman. Dr Brown on Thursday resigned his seat on the j Education Board, of which body he has been ! chairman for a considerable time past. He expressed himself unable to undertake the dutie3 any longer, having broken down twice during the winter in the attempt to do too much. The board accepted the resignation with regret, and acknowledged fcho valaable services Dr Brown had rendered during his tenure of office. Mr Thomas Brown, who for the last 10 years has been manager for Mrs Nimmo, of the Taieri, loaves by the s.B. Manapouri to-day for Melbourne, where, we understand, he has received an appointment from Mr D. Munro, contractor, to take charge of his estate at Somerfcon Park. Mr Brown has been connected with agricultural pursuits from boyhood, and has always taken a keen and special interest in stock breeding. He has through a long career earned for himself a high character for making his employer's business and interests hi 3 own. Quiet and unobtrusive in his manner, but plenty of firmness and determination when necessity required them— marked at the Bame time in a high degree with what is generally known as "keen foresight; and Scotch caution," coupled with thoroughly straightforward and honourable conduct— Mr Brown is one whose leaving is to be regretted*

We have been requested to insert this as a tribute of respect; by one of his old employers, who says a large circle of friends in Ofcago wish him every success and happiness in all bh new engagements. Mr Horton, the newly-appointed electrician of the Keefton Electric Light Company, recommends the substitution of the Swan-Edison incandescent lamps for those of the ThomsonHouston manufacture at present iv use by the company. He says that the latter lamps are altogether uneuiteu to the dynamo. H« further recommends the use of overhead wires in place of underground cables, and, these changes effected, he assures the directors that there is not the slightest doubt of the complete success of the installation. He is well pleased with the design and condition of the plant otherwise, and expressed the opinion that the dynamo has a full capacity for 500 lamp I*.1 *. Last night the company sent to Melbourne for the required new plant, which will be shipped here as quickly as possible. Confidence is re-established in the venture. The Rev. Father Purton, 0.5.8., who has had charge of St. Patrick's Church, South Dunedin, since it was erected, hap, in consequence of a number of new priests being brought out from Ireland, been induced to resign his charge and leave Danedin. The news of the retirement of the rev. gentleman was, we are informed, a matter of great surprise to the whole of his congregation, scarcely any of whom were cognisant of what had taken place until Father Purton had left Dunedin. There is some talk of collecting subscriptions to make a presentation to the rev. gentleman, who by his gentto bearing and kindly manner had completely won the hearts of not only his own flock, but also every one with whom he had been brought into contact. Father Purton's new sphere of action is understood to be Auckland, the rev. gentleman belonging to the same order as Bishop Luck, under whose guidance it is understood he intends to place himself. The laat of the series of ambulance lectures to men was given on Wednesday night, iv the Council Chambers, by Dr Roberts, who described the methods of treating persons apparently drowned or otherwise suffocated ; also what to do with people who had been injured by scalds or burns; and how to carry the helpless. The lecture, which was attended by about 100 persons, appeared to be greatly appreciated, the remarks of the lecturer being frequently applauded. A Brisbane telegram in the Melbourne Age of the 12th inst. says:— "An extraordinary incident occurred in the Assembly Chamber Ust night. Mr Musters, munibtjr for FortUii'lp Valley, was uudblo to maintain an upright position when he attempted to cross tho Hcise. He fell headlong to the floor more than once. Members generally treated the matter jocularly. The member refused to go home, but sat calling "Aye, aye," iv a loud tone to all questions. After adjournment, and another heavy fall, he was led from the House by two members, and senfc home in a cab." A frightful tragedy is reported from the Philippines. In the village of Antique, near Iloilo (according to a Home paper), the only white men are a priest and a Spanish planter. One day, for no apparent cause, the native inhabitants attacked the priest's house with the intent of putting him to death. The planter hearing of this, armed himself with a rifle and 60 cartridges and went to his defence. Arriving at the priest's house, he loaded and began a deadly fire on the crowd. Whether on account of his coolness and skill, or because of the number of besiegers offering a mark that could not be missed, when he had fired off his 50 cartridges 50 persons lay on the ground dead or dying. Horror-stricken with this extraordinary slaughter, the people fled, leaving the priest much bruised, but not dangerously hurt. A denial, which emanates from a good source, is given to the statement that Mr Spurgeon intends to attach himself to any new religious denomination. It will be remembered that not long ago a rumour was current that the reverend gentleman contemplated joining the Presbyterian body. This is now contradicted, and it is said that Mr Spurgeon, notwithstanding that he has definitely severed himself and his chapel from the Baptist communion, will not identify himself with any other Nonconformist sect, but will retain hiß position of independence. The reverend gentleman is now engaged in tho preparation of a book, to be published under the title of "The Cheque Book of the Bank of Faith; being Precious Premises arranged for daily use, with brief experimental comments." This book will throw much light upon Mr Spurgeon's own inner experiences. Some figures, which are alleged to be authentic, have just been published with respect to the yearly expenditure of the Sultan of Turkey, and if their accuracy is to be relied upon they constitute in themselves a sufficient explanation of the desperate condition of the finances of his empire. It costs him £600,000 per annum for the renewal of his furniture, carpets, linen, and bedding, £2,000,000 per annum for the ladies of his harem, £2,600,000 for his various caprices, £400,000 for his wardrobe and personal adornment, £80f>,000 for presents and fees, £500,000 for vessels oE gold and silver, £92,000 for the maintenance of his 474 carriages and their hovses, and £1,000,000 for cookery and other household expenses. No less than 6000 persons have to be provided with three meals a day in his Majesty's palace of Dolma Bagtche, and ho lives altogether at the bountiful rate of something like £8,000,000 per annum. Homburg has been unusually lively this year with aristocratic company, iuvaluled and otherwise. Several fair American maids and matrons have as usual beeu conspicuous in the royal set which includes the Prince of Wales. A new sport has, it seems, been started at this fashionable Continental resort. It was started at a picnic. Cerfcaiu gentlemen backed themselves to race with wheelbarrows, each wheelbarrow to contain a lady. One of the most desperate contests was between Mr Munroe Ferguson, M P., and Lord Spencer. Mr Ferguson won, but only through an accident. Lord Spencer came to grief with his barrow and its fair passenger. She sustained some injuries, but they were not 6erious, and a diamond bangle will be one of the heirlooms of her family; it was presented by Lord Spencer as some solatium for her bruises, not to mention her vexation at tho ridiculous figure they must have cut in the presence of a fashionable, if " larky " assemblage. i The Sanitary Record has drawn attention to the danger of lead poisoning by wines made in the ordinary glazed earthenware pans, such glozo containing sometimes 50 or 60 per cent of red or white lead. In his last report on the Alcester rural sanitary district Dr Fosbroke, the medic&l officer of health, records some cases that came under his notice. Members of two families residing at Inkberrow were attacked by unmistakable symptoms of lead poisoning. Go. inquiry Dr Fosbroke ascertained that the persons affected had partaken of some borne made wine, though not by any means targe quantities. This wine, he learnt, was »B*de from Waok cur pants and plums,

which in the course of preparation were allowed to ferment in a glazed earthenware washing pan. This pan showed signs of corrosion, and. there seems no doubt that the lead which is used in the " glaze" had been taken up by the wine and imbibed by the sufferers. As the manufacture of home made wine is more common among the labouring classes than it used to be, it should be borne in mind that the fermentative process required for its manufacture should be carried out in wooden vessels, and the ordinary glazed earthenware pans be specially avoided. At a meeting of the Timaru Borough Council on Monday evening, a copy of a tender was received from Mr Ford, of the Arrow, agent for Parker Elwell, of Wolverhampton, to light the streets with incandescent lamps at £2 17s 6d each per annum, the council providing water for motive power. This tender was received two days late, but had been notified by telegraph, and the mayor directed it to be sent back as too late. Councillors, on obtaining the copy, were very angry at the chance of so great a reduction on the price being lost, the gas company's tender, which was accepted, being £5 5s per lamp. The mayor is now in Melbourne. It was resolved to invite Mr Ford to visit Timaru, and ask if he was willing to adhere to his offer. By the marriage of the Princess Letitia—only daughter of Prince Jerome Bonaparte and the Princess Clotilde of Savoy— with her uncle, the Duke of Aosta, the bride's family relations become somewhat complicated. She will be the sister-in-law of her own mother, the mother-in-law of her cousins, and tho aunt of her first cousin, the Prince of Naples. Her husband will be the son-in-law of his sister, and of his brother-in-law, and nephew of his brother and sister, and the brother-in-law of his nephews. The numbers at the Girls' High School are higher this year than they have been in the experience of the present rector. The numbers for the four quarters of this year have been j respectively 184, 187, 186, 181. The sixth form numbers 26 ; of these, no fewer than 22 are sixth standard pupils from the State schools. This is, we believe, about the only high or grammar school in the colony where there has not been a decrease, and the fact is gratifying in view of the adverse facts of the recent depression and the numerous departures. Sir James Hector cables from Melbourne to the acting executive commissioner here that the following awards have been made to New Zealand exhibitors of alimentary products:— oats.— J. nnl T. Meek, Oamaru, 1. : New Zealand Lfrdii and Mercantile Agoncy Company, 2. BARLEY.— Hew Zealniid and Australian Land Company, 1 and 2. s A. G. Fell Picton, 3. tares -J. Grigg, Longbeach, 2. P.YEUKASS seed.— P. Sufcton, Thornbury, 1. : New Zealand aud Australian Lund Company, 2. cocksfoot.— J4'Keever,'iKormimby, 1. potatoes. — Hon. Mai hew Holmes, 1. The team to represent Otago at the centennial shooting matches to be held in Melbourne under the auspices of the Victorian Rifle Association left by the Mararoa on Thursday The members of the team are Sergeant M'Carthy (City Guards), Sergeant Fredric (North Dunedin Rifles), Sergeant Kempshell (West Taieri Rifles), Private J. Dickson (Peninsula Rifles), and Private W. Hutchinson (North Dunedin Rifles). Several other well-known shots have also decided to visit the Victorian capital, and take part in the contests. Among these are Sergeant Sonntag (Wakari), Corporals Gebbie and Hutchinson (North Dunedin Rifles), Volunteer Richardson (City Guards), and M'Tainsh and P.O. Morrison, of the Navals. We understand that the difficulty between the Seamen's Union and the steamship owners is likely to be amicably settled' by a compromise. Cable communication is still interrupted between Port Darwin and Banjoewangie. A severe thunderstorm passed over Wyndbam on Saturday, followed by heavy rain. A house at Menzies Ferry was slightly touched by lightning, which ripped a weather board off and did some damage to the spouting at the back of the house. The death is announced this week of another of our early colonists, Mrs John Gillies having passed away peacefully on Wednesday morning, at the ripe age of 87. The deceased lady who was born in Glasgow in 1802, was the grand child of a French Huguenot who emigrated to Scotland during the period of the persecutions. She was married in 1826 to Mr John Gillies, of Rnthesay, and with her husband and most of their children arrived tin Dunedin in the ship Slam's Castle iv 1852. During her long residence here she gained the respect and esteem of all, and though after the death of her husband 17 years ago she lived a very retired life, her aid and assistance was often sought and freely given, and apart from her own family the news of her death will be sorely foit by many others. Of ] her family of nine the deceased lady is survived by four sods and three daughters. The sons are i Mr Justice Gillies (of Auckland), Mr John L. Gillies (secretary of tho Otago Harbour Board), the Rev. William Gillies (of Timaru), and Mr James GUUes (of New South Wales); the daughters are— Mrs M'lndoe (South Dunedin), Mrs Biirnside (Anderson's Bay), and Mrs Farquhar M'Rae (Auckland). The deceased lady is survived also by 52 grandchildren and by 10 greatgrandchildren. Our Tapanui correspondent writes :— " Kelso has just been visited with another large flood, and at the present time the water is running down the main street. Had it not been for the Railway department taking out the gravel at the top of the gorge it would have been the largest flood ever seen in Kelso." Our Lawrence correspondent writes :— " The Rev. Mr Powell, who has been in charge of the Congregational Church at Lawrence, has accepted a call to tho Congregational Church, Te Aro, Wellington. He left for that place yesterday." In concluding an article on the Bank of New Zealand tho Melbourne Age says ; — " What New Zealanders require to guard against is their colony being made the scene of rash experiment*, whether political, financial, or social. The colony seems to have a strange attraction for doctrinaires of all kinds, especially those who have fads about the formation of model communities. The latest of those which has been brought forward is the project of Mr W. L. Rees f->r transforming the poverty-stricken classes of England into prosperous colonists in New Zealand by means of a fund, interest on the capital of which will be guaranteed by the Imperial Government. No such guaraotee is likely to be given, and we may be sure 1 hat New Zealand herself will give the cold shoulder to any more impracticable schemes." A sharp shock of earthquake was felt in various centres from Napier to Timaru at a -quarter past 8 on Tuesday evening. The sensational speed recently attained by express trains between London and Edinburgh does not meet with the unanimous approval of the travelling public. It seems to be widely held that interesting as this form of rivalry between railway companies may be to the onlooker, its practical advantages are problematical. Independently of the inevitable, though perhaps unfounded, outcry as to increased danger, it is asserted that the few are being benefited at the expense of the many. For in-

stance, Mr Cecil F. Parr writes to The Times complaining of the consequent inconveniences to travellers between small towns. He goes so far as to say that in many cases it takes longer to go by rail between unimportant places than it took 10 years ago, "Passengers between smaller centres, even on main lines (the evils are 10 times worse if a cross country journey has to be made), are carted slowly from one station to another, and at short intervals are condemned to either a change or a wait, perhaps both, a 5 some roadside station or small junction. Here from the platform or a siding the tediousness of their journey is lightened or their trials increased — according to the individual temperament—by watching express after express, often nearly empty, fleet by one after another. And all for what ? Not that the public may be really benefited (how many third-class passengers does the London and North- Western railway expect will patrouise their new train, which only stops three times between London and Edinburgh ?), but that railway companies may keep up their prestige, regardless of the fact that they are buying gold or gilt too dear."

The following story reaches the London Daily Telegraph from Montrichard, and is declared, although improbable, to be •' a true bill " :— A short time ago a fine sporting dog was found by some kind people wandering collarless, in search of its master. They gave the animal a home while they looked far and wide for its owner. The dog, however, was restless. It ran out at intervals during the first week, but on its return it was always well received. The next week, however, it absented itself for some days, and when it came back its host gave it a beating. It started off at once in the direction of the river, plunged into the water, and struck outuntil it was exhausted — deliberately drowning itself in the middle of the stream. This strange incident was witnessed by several spectators, who are unanimous in declaring that this was a decided case of felo de se. The poor animal is supposed to have been inconsolable at having lost its master, and the harshness with which it had been treated by its >ew friends settled the business.

The Paris Municipal Council is doing its best to repress "marchandage," the French equivalent for " sweating." A resolution was recently passed to the effect that " Workmen engaged for works for the town must be in the direct employment of the concessionaires or contractors, without any intermediary or middleman," on pain of the contract being cancelled and the infliction of a fine. The evil seems to be quite as pronounced in the French as in the English capital, but applies more especially to the building trades. It is not, however, confined to these. The natives from the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg have introduced the system into the tailoring trade, and are regarded by the Parisian journeymen as are the Polish Russian Jews by the English workers at the East Eud. Women's labour is paid for worse, if possible, than in London. Many seamstresses work all the week round for 4s, and at the task of fixing buttons on cards " 4|d per day is considered extraordinarily good pay." The system, which is an indirect cause of the present labour disturbances, has the effect of preventing many skilled French workmen from gaining employment. Owing to the manner the work is done, it is also injuring the reputation of national industries, such as electroplating work. It may be mentioned that so long ago as 1848 the Provisional Government issued a decree declaring that " U exploitation dcs travailleurs par le marchandage est interdit," but the validity of the decree has been generally disputed, and it has remained a dead letter. It is expected that the resolution of the Municipal Council will produce a mere practical effect.

The making of shadows is becoming a matter of high art in France, where the recent work of a young artist, Caxan d'Ache, has come to be distinctly known as "French Shadows." Historical military scenes are favourite representations of this artist at a Parisian theatre. Entire armies in their various movements pass across the screen, and in the curious processions the figures of celebrities are so accurately cut that hey can be recognised. Great combats and the capture of redoubts are shown. The figures are of sheet zinc, about 18in high, and are moved before a powerful lamp by several operators, causing the enlarged shadows to be projected on the screen. The flash of artillery is produced by a wad of gun-cotton, the roar of the cannonading by the big drum of the orchestra, the discharge of musketry by a large rattle, and the smoke by a cigarette. Many of the silhouettes, as in the drill where the guns move in unison, act through mechanism, and some are coloured in parts by having apertures covered with transparent paper.

The crash in the Panama Canal scheme is said to be approaching very rapidly. The final collapse has b>jen temporarily postponed by the authorisation of a lottery loan by the French Government, though without any guarantee or responsibility by the State. A vast cash investment of about £50,000,000, drawn mostly from the savings of the French poor and middle classes, will be utterly wiped out when the inevitable end cornea ; and a terrible blow will have been inflicted on the French nation. There is said to be no hope for the enterprise, unless one or more of the great power 3 outside France come to its relief, a thing which the United States Government might not approve of, inasmuch as all the plans are prepared for the Nicaraguan Canal scheme, which would be carried out under the direct sanction of the Washington Government.

A remarkable instance of memory has come to the notice of a correspondent of the New York Critic. Its possessor is a lady member of Dr Howard Crosby's church in New York. Without .having taken a single note, she will, when she * goes home, write out every word of her pastor's sermon, and, he tells me, she never makes a mistake of a " the " or an " and "—that every sentence not only embodies his idea, but gives it in his exact language. For 25 years this lady has been performing these feats of memory, and during that time she has written out some 2000 sermons. The manuscripts of some of them she has had bound and presented to Dr Crosby. They make 40 large volumes. But this is not all of her devoted labours ; she has written out, also from memory, all of his lectures, and she has classified his opinions on all the subjects upon which he has spoken during these years, and has made an elaborate series of indexes to them. Not a word is omitted. Even when the preacher drops into Greek, Latin, or Hebrew, she follows him, for she is proficient in each of these languages. Certainly a remarkable woman !

Work on the sea wail at Napier has been commenced. Wheu finished there will be a wide esplanade for a distance of two xnilea.

It lias been authoritatively laid down that " if f •vomaa ha« long hair it is a glory to her." Therefore, the more abundant the more glorious ; and. thanki to Mrs S. A. Aiten, every woman may now [,os»ees the iplendid adornment. Nor are the men forgotten; the same restorative is at their disposal, •s it not only causes the hair to grow but prevent* 1« falling off or turning gray; and when it ha> tamed gray will bring back the natural colour. Sole everywhere, o

RAND A. J. PARK, • SHABEBBOKERS, MINIWGTAGENTS. MINING ENGINEERS, and SURVEYORS, No. 1 BOND STREET, DUNEDIS". Bank, Insurance, Mining, and other Shares bought and sod on commission. Miniujyand other companies floated. Mines surveyed and reported on. Letters and telegrams promptly answered. 18my

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LOCAL & GENERAL., Otago Witness, Issue 1927, 26 October 1888

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LOCAL & GENERAL. Otago Witness, Issue 1927, 26 October 1888

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