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SPORTING NOTES FROM AUSTRALIA.

(By Our Australian sporting Corbespokdent " Warrior.")

Melbouhne, August 22. THE VICTORIA AMATEUR TURF CLUB WINTER STEEPLECHASE MEETING

Upwards of 30,000 people assembled on the lovely ccur&e at Cauineld on Saturday afternoon to witness iho four-mile Grand National Steeplechase. Secretary liond carried out his portion of the programme iv a satisfactory manner, which is more than I can say for the railway authorities. The journey to the favourrite racing ground was bad enough, but the return home was a disgrace to a one-horse railway syndicate. After remaining on the plat* form in the freezing cold for a considerable timp, first- class passenger?, among them a large number of the fair sex, were bundled into second-class carriages filled to the brim by men and " 6heoak." Respectable passengers had not only to put up with smoking and spitting, but a chorus of oaths and the vulgar slang of Billingsgate. Neither the indefatigable secretary nor the officials of the Victoria Amateur Turf Club had anything to do with the running of the trains. Even in Tasmania they carry their passengers to and from the course in a superior manner to that of the " Great I Am" at the head of the Victorian railways, so far as Caulfield is concerned. Judging by the number in the press box every newspaper in Victoria must have been represented. The Australian Jockey Club only permit to the press box gentlemen connected with the metropolitan press— Argus, Age, Herald, Telegraph— and the representatives of Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand, and I hope Mr Bond will see his way clear to pack half these press deadheads to tbe public stand. Previous to the starting of the first race his Excellency and suite arrived on the- ground. The course and surroundings were in beautiful condition, and numbers of ladies graced tbe lawn with their presence. There being no counter attractions, the attendance outnumbered any previous gathering at'Caulfield.' Mr Miles, of the V.R.C., and his assistants carried out the arrangements afc the scales, -&c, in a satisfactory manner. Mr- Skinner, the centen*

nial caterer, did a good business in "shilling pies " and " longsleevers." The telegraph officials attended assiduously to their business, and with the exception of the railway traffic everything passed off satisfactorily. Notwithstanding there was a number of falls in the steeple, no bones were broken. The opening event of the day introduced to the public a select number of candidates for the champion two-year-old event of the year — the Maribyrnong Plater- from which should come the winner— namely, Montalto (by Neckersgat — Romula), Prince Consort (by Richmond — Queen Consort), Epi (by Epigram — Nellie), Somnolence (by Somnus — Debris), Seamstress (by Julian Avenel — Needle), The Flower (by Richmond — Camelia), and Lancashire Lad (by The Englishman — Lancashire Lass). After disposing of the Sapling Stakes (for two-year-olds), won by Montalto, and the luncheon business, the bell announced the saddling for the Handicap Hurdle Race, which resulted in a win for the consistent Leroy. The favourite, Recall, jumping like a bullock, took his numerous friends "down a peg." Quicklight (11.4) performed very indifferently when compared with his running in the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdle Race. Another horse who surprised the public was Boolka. He was never dangerous at any portion of the race. With the exception of four ouc of the 10 starters not one of them could clear comfortably a circus hurdle. Leroy (11.11), who is a six-year-old son of Sussex — Matilda, finished home half a length in front of Incident (1,0.6), who beat Bonnie Chester (10.8) by a head for second place ; Quilt fourth, Recall sixth, the Hobart Cup winner (Ballarat) and Boolka last. The race, which was worth 300sovs, and two miles distance, occupied 4min 3^3ec. Master John, alias Peter Burns, having run a dead heat with the 5 to 2 on favourite Whisperer, the owners agreed to run it off. The public planked their dollars on Whisperer, and lost their tin. Another win for the unfortunate "three-ball man." The race of the day now came on for consideration. Crowds of people surrounded the game little mare Ruby, and accepted all the three's to one available in the market. Eaglet, who had performed a wonderful trial over the sticks on the previous Thursday, had a select following, being backed from 100 to 8 down to 100 to 20. His stable companion, Mernder, had a large following, the majority of whom turned out to be " mugs," the stable and " knowing birds " basked the winner, Eaglet. Royal Oak, Promotion, Ellersiie, and Beadsman II had a host of friends at 7 and 8 to 1. The race throughout waß a chapter of accidents, but nobody was seriously hurt. Everybody regretted Scobie being unseated from his saddle. Had the mare come down, in all probability we would have seen the last of the champion hurdle and steeplechase rider. Ruby was the first to make a mishap, nearly coming to grief opposite the lawn and grand stand on the first time round. The next mistake was made by Royal Oak coming down a cropper, bringing Ellerslie with him. As Eaglet, Curiosity, Beadsman 11, and Promotion ascended the, hill and prepared to leap the obstacle, Curiosity kissed mother earth, and by a splendid piece of jockeyship Corrigan, at the risk of coming down himself, jumped Promotion sideways, thus saving the life of Gardiner, Curiosity's jock, who must have been killed. This fact was gathered from an eyewitness who stood alongside the fence at the time of the fall. Promotion lost so much ground through the result of this that Corrigan refused to continue in the hunt any further. By the time that three miles and a-half had been negotiated but three horses were left in it. Eaglet, Mernder, and Beadsman II were the only horses together as they took the sod wall oa their homeward journey. At this point Masters appears to have lost his head, for he did no more than allow the Tasmanian to have his head, and overhauling Mernder he rushed at the last fence of the four miles like a racehorse, with the unmistakable result that he came down and lost all chance of the race. Had Beadsman got over the last obstacle he would most undoubtedly have won, for when he came to grief he was full of running, and must have worn down both Mernder and Eaglet, who displayed symptoms of distress as they returned to scales. Mr C. Krushka, the owner of Beadsman, entered a protest against the winner on the ground that he crossed his horse at the last fence, but the stewards dismissed the same.

The Balaclava Stakes, of lOOsovs, and 3sovs each, onf> mile, brought the seventh annual meeting to a close. There were 17 starters, and again the " three-ball man " played the most prominent part in the little game of " 5 to 1 bar one." The Murray "cod" and Hobson's Bay "flatheads" did bite at the "last bait" of the afternoon, 3 to 1 being freely taken in scores that Strife would put down the field, which he and the other favourite (Straight Shot) failed to do. Teuton, a four-year-old by Neckersgat — Etta, defeated Strife (who lost in consequence of his saddle girths breaking) and Sumatra, ridden by Hales.

Montalto was ridden to victory in the Sapling Stakes by Bowes. This filly was bred by Sir Thomas Elder, of South Australia, and bought by Mr R. Donovan (the owner of last year's Melbourne Cup winner) at the Morphetville yearling sale last March for 305ge. Mr S. Miller, for his first and second in the Grand National Steeplechase, takes the lion's share of the prize money distributed at the V.A.T.C. yesterday morning, his cheque amounting to £900. Mr Miller was followed by Mr J. B. Gill, £305 ; Mr W. Bailey, £131 ; Mr R. Donovan, £100; Mr R. Phillips, £100; Mr S. Russell, £100 ; Mr C. Wilson, £50 ; Messrs Leek and Thompson, £20. Total, £1706.

The following jocks proved successful at the meeting : — Messrs Power, Bowas (two wins), Allen, and Martin Burke. Among the firstclass flat race riders who took part I noticed Hales, M. O'Brien, Moore, Trahan, Fiddes, and Redfearn.

Appended are the particulars of the event of the afternoon : — THE CAULFIELD GRAfID NATIONAL STEEPLECHASE, Of lOOOsovs; second, 200sovs ; third, lOOsovs. About four miles. Mr S Miller's b g Eaglet, by Wild Eagle— dam by South Australian, aged, 9.10 ... (Burke) 1 Mr S Miller's b g Mernder, aged, 12.2 (W*tson) 2 Mr G Russell's b g Kestrel, aged, 9.7 (Carey) 3 Mr W V Bryant's br m Ruby, aged, 12.13 (Scobie) 0 Hen W Pearson's b g Royal Oak, aged, 12.3 (Oupitt) 0 Mr R Phillips' b g Ellerslie, aged, 12.0 (Keating) 0 Mr W E Power's or g Promotion, aged, 11.7 (Corrigan) 0 Mr O Krushka's b g Beadsman 11, aged, 11.2 (Masters) 0 Mr W|A Menzies' ro g Curiosity, aged, 10.3 (Gardiner) 0 Betting: 3 to 1 agst Ruby, 5 to 1 Ellerslie and Eaglet, 7 to 1 Mernder, Royal Oak, and Promotion, 8 to 1 Beadsman 11, 10 to 1 Kestrel, and 12 to 1 Curiosity. Kestrel was first to more, and was followed by Promotion, Royal Oak, Ellerslie, and Mernder, Curiosity, and the favourite lying lass. Kestrel was the leader into the straight, and showed the way over the first of the treble, attended by Promotion, Beadsman 11, Ellerslie, and Mernder, Ruby bringing* up the rear; Mernder and Curiosity were the leaders over the palings and logs, at the latter of which obstacle the favourite blundered and fell, and

was thus early out of it. Mernder and Curiosity rounded the turn and ascended the hill at the head of their horses, Beadsman II lying next, the last two to leave the straight being Promotion and Royal Oak. Going into the dip Curiosity was attended by Mernder, Eaglet, Ellerslie, and Beadsman 11, Promotion now being some lengths in the rear of the main body. As they commenced the run along the back of the course, Mernder headed Curiosity, close up to them lying Eaglet and Beadsman 11, and then came Ellerslie, Kestrel, Royal Oak, and Promotion. Curiosity and Mernder negotiated the mud wall on even terms, followed by Beadsman 11, Eaglet, Ellerslie, Kestrel, and Royal Oak, Promotion not having as yet improved his position. The order was much the same over the next jump, and then Mernder and Curiosity entered the straight, racing up to the rails, followed by Beadsman II and Eaglet, the latter of whom was going very strong and jumping well. There was no change of importance over th,e palings and logs, the latter, however, nearly stopping Ellerslie. Mernder and Curiosity left the straight together and took the jump on the hill side by side, Kestrel and Promotion being last, Ellerslie here blundering again, and dropping to the extreme rear. Along the back of the course Curiosity and 'Mernder were still at the head of affairs, close up to them being Beadsman II aud Eaglet, with Royal Oak , at the head of the others. At the far turn Kestrel had fallen away last, and Curiosity and Mernder raced together to the mud wall, pursued by Beadsman 11, Eaglet, Royal Oak, and Promotion, half a dozen lengths behind the last-named being Ellerslie and Kestrel. The next obstacle stopped the progress of Royal Oak, and Ellerslie being next to him also came to grief. Rounding the turn into the straight Beadsman II had joined Mernder and Curiosity, Eaglet coming next with Promotoin and Keßtrel close up. They raced in this order over the treble in the straight ; but going up the hill, Curiosity came down, the field now being reduced to small dimensions, at which point Eaglet joined his stable companion, Mernder, and they descended the dip in front of Beadsman 11, half a dozen lengths behind whom was Promotion, who hit the next jump so badly that he dropped out of the race. Along the far side Eaglet was in front of Mernder, Beadsman II and Kestrel coming next, and they ran in this order to the mud wall, which the Tasmanian horse blundered at, likewise making a worse mistake at the last jump of all, inasmuch as it brought him down. The race was now over, for Eaglet, still full of running, came along in advance of Mernder, headed for home, and cantered in three lengths in front, Kestrel taking third place about 50yds off, with Promotion following at a long interval. Time, Bmin 47fsec. A protest lodged against the winner for interfering with Beadsman II was dismissed. WINNERS OP THE CAULFIELD GRAND NATIONAL STEEPLECHASE. v Horae. m ■£ £ {H £ M B st. lb. m. s. 1882 Left Bower 11 12 14 545 1883 Euchre 10 12 5 5 57£ 1881 Marquis of Waterford ... 10 8 13 655 1885 Granville 10 0 9 556 1886 Game 12 12 8 538 *1887 Blue Mountain ... 11 11 12 9 1* 1888 Eaglet 910 9 8 47f * Distance altered from 2£ miles to 4 miles. REVIEW OF THE MELBOURNE CUP WEIGHTS. [ No. IV. Having dealt in my last article with Monte Christo, I now propose placing before my readers the past performances of Lord Allen, Frisco, Pakeha, Yellow Jacket, and Touchstone. Lord Alien, 4yrs, 7.6, the property of Mr P. T. Heyvrood (Mick O'Brien), is by the same sire as Silvermine and Mozart, out of Talkative (dam of Aspen, who won the Newmarket Handicap twice in succession). Started six times as a two-year-old, only gaining a place onee — second to Boz in the V.R.C. Hopeful Stakes. Last season the son of Napoleon ran second on three different occasions— namely, Toorak Handicap, one mile, 7.1 ; V.R.C. Newmarket Handicap, three-quarters of a mile, 7.4, won by Cranbrook; Maiden Stakes, one mile and aquarter, 8.0, won by the Maitland horse, The Queen. Frisco, a five-year-old black gelding, by Grand Flaneur — Verbena, the property of Mr T. Sampson, has ran and won some of the most important events decided in New South Wales. As a three-year-old he showed his best form by running second to Stanley in the Hawkesbury Handicap, and romping home in the Sydney Cup. Mr Barnard allotted him 7.5 in the Melbourne Cup, but I fail to place him or

Pakeha in the first four. The last-named colt, no doubt, is on the improving side, and considering the game way in which he ran in last Cup, I may make a mistake in thus discarding the son of The Englishman — True Blue, who is now four years old, and has been handicapped at 74. Ran once as a two-year-old, and innumerable times last season, running second to Carlyon in Caulfield Guineas, and Whakawai in V.R.C. Maiden Stakes ; won South Yarra Handicap ; dead heat in Altona (Williamstown) Handicap ; third in Birthday Handicap, and second in Corinthian Flat Race. The next on the list is

Yellow Jacket, a bay horse, syrs, by The Drummer out of Baroness. He has up to the present been very unfortunate on the turf, and although he won the first race he ever started for, has not run up to expectation. With 7.4 Yellow Jacket should, if he was up to anything good, gain' a respectable position in the next Cup, but I very much doubt if he will run within lengths of

Touchstone, should Mr William Gannon think fit to start him. This brown colt, who has just turned four years old, is beautifully bred, being by Vespasian out of Grey Esperance. Most of Touchstone's past performances have taken place in Queensland, where he won the Cup. He appears to be in excellent condition, and the stable fancy they have a good thing in him for the Melbourne Cup with 7.3 up. In my next I will complete the Melbourne Cup handicap, after which I will do my best to place the performances of 20 of the best horses remaining in the Caulfield Cup. RACING IN NEW ZEALAND. NORTH CANTERBURY STEEPLECHASES. (Press.) These races took place on Thursday, the 23rd inst., and the attendance was exceedingly satisfactory. The weather was perfect. The following are the events : — GREAT NORTHERN STEEPLECHASE HANDICAP, Of £68, added to a sweepstake of 3sova each for acceptors ; second horse to receive £10 out of the stake. Three mil' s. 31— Mr W O Rutherford's b g Presto, by Presto, aged, 10.7... ... ... (Sheenan) 1 73-Mr A L Barker's b g Daddy Longlegs. aged, 11.9 ... ... ... {Mr Cox) 2

72— Mr F J Bradley's b g Isaac, 6yrs, 12.7 (Lyford) 3 49— Mr H Lunn'e b h Icenian, aged, 10.12 (Klngan) 0 Icenian, pulling hard, was front to the first fence, which he refused, but was got over at a second attempt. He then rushed again to the fore, but baulking at the next obstacle put his backers out of their misery. Presto then went on with the running at a slow pace, followed by Daddy Longlegs, with Isaac lying off. In this order they ran round the course, when Daddy Longlegs drew closer to the leader, and Isaac attempted to get up to the pair. When coming at the last fence but one Daddy was nearly on terms with Presto, but the latter drew away after a reminder, and won all the way home by three lengths ; Isaac close up third. Time, 7min 55|sec. Dividend, £6 10s 6d. HUNTERS' PLATE, Of 25sovs, consisting of a Cup, value £10, and 15aovs ; second horse to receive £5 out of the stake. Distance, two miles. 44— Mr R J Parsons' b m Kathleen, by Killaraey, aged, 12.3 (Mr G Murray-Aynsley) 1 25— Mr A Barker's r g Bolero, aged, 12.3 (Mr A Cox) 2 10-Mr G B Starkey's eh m Hornpipe. syrs, 11.8 (M'Donald) 3 16— Mr J Ingram's eh g Harlington, syrs, 11.8 (Neill) 0 44— Mr C Boyce's blk g Defiance, aged, 12.3 (Murfitt) 0 15— Mr M Lake's b g Tomboy, 6yrs, 12.3 (Shearsby) 0 12— Mr F Courage's eh m The Nun, aged, 12.3 (Owner) 0 Defiance made running, attended by Bolero and Tomboy. At the stand hurdles Harlington pecked and got rid of his rider, who, however, was no sooner down than dp again and in the saddle — a clever recovery. Defiance, Tomboy, and Bolero were most prominent along the low ground, where The Nun was lying handy, Hornpipe and Kathleen well up. The latter ran up to the leaders at the last fence but two, where the whole lot — five — refused. Kathleen was first over,|f ollowed by Bolero, but Mr G. MurrayAynsley hurried his mount up and never lost the advantage he had gained, winning by four lengths, Hornpipe the same distance off from the second. Time, 6min 20sec. Dividend, £3 7s 6d. SEADOWN STEEPLECHASE HANDICAP, j Of £30 ; second horse to receive £5 from the stake. Distance, two miles. 45- Mr T H Lance's br g Premier, by Anteros, aged, 11.4- ... ... '" ... (Sheenan) 1 39— Mr H T Pitts' g m Squib, 6yrs, 9.12 [car. 10.0] ... ... ... (Owner) 2 36— Mr A G Holmes' g g Mexico, aged, 11.10 j., , (O'Connor) 3 66— Mr P Bradley's b g Isaac, 6yrs. 12.7 (Lyford) 0 14— Mr W O Rutherford's eh m Mainboom, syrs, 10.10 ... ... ... (Rudings) 0 10— Mr J Thomas' eh m Myra Bell, aged, 9.12 (T Stewart) 0 20-Mr W Butler's b g Sawdust, aged, 9.7 (D Mitchell) 0 From a good start Mexico, on the outside, took the lead, followed by Squib, but Mainboom rushed to the front towards the stand hurdles, over which she was followed by Squib, Mexico, and Isaac, the others in a cluster some lengths off. At the fence past the stand Mexico again went to the fore, and for the next half-mile he and M»inbroom were alternately in front. In the paddock opposite the stand on the far side Premier and Sawdust began to put in their claims, and Mainboom fell back beaten. At the rise of the hill Premier had got the measure of all his antagonists bar Squib, who followed him closely over the trap fence, but was beaten in the run home after a good race by three lengths ; Mexico an indifferent third, and Mainboom fourth. The others finished in straggling order. Time, 4min 52sec. Dividend, £4 10s. TALLY-HO PLATE, Of £25 ; second horse to receive £5 from the stake. Weight for age. Two miles. 36— Mr R J Parsons' b m Kathleen, aged, 12.3 (Mr G Murray-Aynsley) 1 105— Mr D Rutherford's b g Landsborough, 6yrs, 12.0 ... ... ... (Rudings)2 20— Mr G B Starky's b g Fireworks, syrs, 11.8 (Mr Beaumont) 0 Landsborough made the running, the other two following pretty closely until the fence towards Amberley, where Fireworks stopped. The other two ran in close order for the rest of the journey, the mare getting the best of it over the last fence, and winning by three-quarters of a length after a thoroughly ridden out finish. I Time, smin ssec. Dividend, £4 0s 6d. [ FARMERS' STEEPLECHASE HANDICAP, Of £40, added to a sweepstakes of £2 each ; winners extra. Distance, two miles. 76— Mr T H Lance's br g Premier, aged, 12.2 (Sheenan) 1 88— Mr H G Pitts' gr m Squib, aged, 10.11 (Stewart) 2 24 — Mr A G Holmes' g g Mexico, aged, 12.7 (O'Connor) 3 31— Mr D Macfarlane's eh g Sailor, aged, 10.11 (Murfitt) 0 13— Mr Homer's eh a Industry, 10.2 (M'Guiness) 0 11— Mr W Pox's g g Nana, syrs, 10.2 (D Mitchell) 0 Sailor, Squib, and Mexico were the first to show in front after the .flag had fallen, and in that order they cleared the first fence, at which Industry got rid of her pilot. Sailor led over the stand hurdles, with Squib following, Mexico third, and Premier fourth. This order was maintained over the drop fence and along the far obstacle, at which Sailor refused and took no further part in the race. Premier raced up to Squib in the low paddock, and the pair were followed by Mexico, who, however, was not in it with the leading pair, to whom the struggle was confined. The brown horse got the better of the mare coming up the hill, and won comfortably by three lengths ; Mexico a bad third. Time, smin 50sec. Dividend, £2 17s 6d. CONSOLATION RACE, Of 15sova ; second horse ssovs from the stake. Distance, one mile and a-half. 49— Mr Barker's b g Daddy Longlegs, aged, 12.0 (Mr A Cox) 1 36— Mr Lunn's bh Icenian, aged, 11.3 (Kingan) 2 52— Mr Bradley's b g Isaac, aged, 12.7 (Stewart) 0 5 -Mr Starky's b g Fireworks, aged, 10.5 * (M'Donald) 0 12— Mr M'Farlane's eh g Sailor, aged, 9.12 ... 0 6— Mr Homer's b g Industry, aged (D Mitchell) 0 2— Mr Thomas' eh m Myra Bell, oyrs, 9st 71b ... 0 Won easily at the finish by half a dozen lengths. Time 3min 40sec. Dividend, £2 19s. RACING IN ENGLAND. SANDOWN PARK. Friday, June 29. ELECTRIC STAKES, A plate of 2000SOV8, for three-year-olds— colts 9.0, fillies 8.10 ; penalties and allowances. The second horse to receive lOOsovs and the third 25sovs out of the stakes. Five furlongs, quite straight. Mr R Peck's b c Bullion, by The Miser— Stella, by Mogador, 8.10 ... ... (FWebb) 1 Lord Londonderry's eh c Hazlehatch, by Hermit — Hazledean, 9.7 ... ... (P Barrett) 2 Mr Abington'B eh c Juggler, by Tou-het—En-chantress, 9.7 ... ... (J Watts) 3 General Owen Williams' b c Senanus, 9.7 (SLoates) 0 Mr Douglas Baird's br f Briar-root, 9.3 (T Cannon) 0 Mr A Benholm's b c Bartizau, 9.0 ... (Rickaby) 0 Mr D Heuty's eh c Whitelegs, 8,9 (T Cannon, jun) 0' Betting: 13 to 8 agst Hazlehatch, 5 to 2 Senanus, 6 to I Bartizan, 10 to 1 Juggler, Briarroot, and Bullion, and 100 to 3 Whitelegs.

The seven moved away. to a flying start, Senanus, m the centre, holding a slight advantage of Bartisan and Hazlehatch on the rails, while close up on the outside lay Whitelegs, heading Juggler, and Briar-root bronght up the rear. So they ran for a furlong, where Senanus was holding a slight lead of Hazlehatoh, who, heading Bartizan, took second place, while Juggler took feurth place, and Bullion became whipper-in. After going half the journey the pace told its tale on Senanus, who began to drop back, and Hazlehatch drew out, attended by Bartizan, the pair racing away clear of Senanus,' with Juggler drawing np on the outside, in front of Briar-root and Bullion, Whitelegs being- now in trouble. Two furlongs from home Juggler, passing the beaten Senanus, joined Bartizan, whom he headed a few strides further on, and at the distance challenged Hazlehatch, but as the pair were fighting out the issue they were swooped down upon by Bullion/who came with ■ a wet sail, and taking up the running 100 yds from the chair, won easily by two lengths from Hazlehatch, who defeated Juggler by a neck for second place.

Saturday, June 30. BRITISH DOMINION TWO-YEAE-QLD STAKES,

Of 15sovs each, Bsovs ft with 600sova added (500sovs for the owner, and lOOsovs for the breeder of the winner) ; for two-year-olds bred and trained in the British dominions. Five furlongs. Mr Douglas Baird's b or br o El Dorado, by Ster-ling-Palmfiower, 8.7 ... ... (T Cannon) 1 Mr T Jennin^o', jun, eh c Royal Star, by George Frederick— North Star, 9.6 ... (IVatts) 2 Mr J Pritchard's br filly by Bruce— Mrs Jones, 8.4 (E Martin) 3 Mr A W Merry's colt by The Miser-Lady Hester, 9-3 ... ... ... (Liddiard) 0 General Owen Williams' L'Avare, 8.8 (S Loates) 0 Mr B Leigh's Whitehall, 8.8 ... (Kobinson) 0 Mr R Peck's Rokeby, 8.5 ... (Calder) 0 Mr Renfrew's Dover, 8.5.,. ... (T Loates) 0 Mr Whitley's Mrs Sterling, 8.4 ... (P Barrett) 0 Mr J Joicey's Golden Fleece, 8.4 ... (Rickaby) 0 Mr G Maßterman's Grewelthorpe, 8.3 (J Woodburn) 0 Betting: 5 to 4 agst El Dorado, 300 to 30 Mrs Jones filly, 9 to 2 L'Avare, and 10 to 1 Royal Star. The Mrs Jones filly, in the centre, held a slight lead of Rokeby and Grewelthorpe on the left, with El Dorado, Mrs Sterling, and Reyal Star on the right, clear of L'Avare and Golden Fleece, while last of all came the Lady Hester colt. After going a furlong Mrs Jones filly , took a clear lead of Grewelthorpe, Rokeby, Royal Star, and Whitehall, with El Dorado heading the others, and so they ran for half the journey. Here Grewelthorpe and Rokeby dropped back, and Mrs Jones filly was holding a slight lead of Royal Star and El Dorado, with Mrs Sterling and Whitehall lying next, but before reasbing the distance, Mrs Sterling and Whitehall dropped back, Mrs Jones filly was collared by Royal Star and El Dorado, who headed her 100 yds from the chair, and the favourite, running on, got the best of an exciting finish, and won by three - quarters 'of a length from Royal Star, who defeated the Mrs Jones filly by a neck for second place.

NEWMARKET JULY.

Tuesday, July 3. July stakes,

Of 508OV8 each, 30 ft, for two-j ear-olds— coltu 9 0, fillies 8.11 ; second received lOOsovs out of the stakes, and the third saved stake. New T.Y.C. Duke of Portland's b c Donovan, by Galopin— Mowerina, 9.0 ... ... (P Barrett) 1 Prince Soltykoff 's eh c Gold, by Sterling—Lucetta, 9.0 ... ... ... (.T Cannon) 2 Betting : 7te4 on Donovan. Donovan jumped off in front, and held a lead of about a length and a half of his opponent to the corner of the Plantation, where Gold joined the favourite, the pair racing down the hill into the dip, where Donovan was shaken up, and instantly responding, had Gold beaten; and won a little cleverly by half a length.

Thuesday, July 5. CHESTERFIELD STAKES,

Of33osovs each, 20 ft, for two-year-olds— colts 8.10, fillies 8.7; second received lOOsovs out of the stakes, and the third saved stake. Last five furlongs of B.M. Prince SoltykofP s eh o Gold, by Sterling- Lucetta, 9.3 ... ... ... (T Cannon) t Mr D Baird's b f Hamptonia, by Hampton— Feronia, 8.7 ... ... ... (Warne) t Lord Rosslyn's b f Ladybird, by Muster Kildare —Miss Middlewick, 8.7 (J Woodburn) 3 General Owen Williams' b c L'Avaro, by The Miser — Victress, by Lambton, 8.10 (S Loates ) 0 Betting : stol on Gold, 10 to 1 agst L'Avare, 100 to 8 Hatnptonia, and 20 to 1 Ladybird. Hamptonia, on the left centre, jumped off j in front and made play with a three lengths' lead of Gold on her right, with Ladybird next on the right, and L'Avare several lengths astern on the inside. At a good pace Hamptonia showed the way until they commenced to breast the hill, where Ladybird and L'Avare were beaten, and Gold began to close with Hamptonia, whose quarters he had reached halfway up the hill, but Douglas Baird's filly struggling on gamely, kept her advantage until 50yds from home, where Gold, with a supreme effort, got on level terms, an exciting finish resulting in a dead heat ; Ladybird was a bad third, and L'Avare last throughout. The stakes were divided.

A RACE FOE A FORTUNE.

Twenty-nine years ago, writes an American exchange, St. Joseph, Mo., was the Western terminus of the railway systems of the country. Beyond St. Joseph the stage coach, or ox team and kindred methods of transportation were resorted to for the purpose of maintaining communication with the Pacific Slope. This coast was by that timepretty well settled, and business men began to wish for a rapid overland mail ■ervice.

In the winter of 1860 Wall street was at work in Washington endeavouring to get a subsidy of 10,000,000 10l for carrying the mails overland one year between New York and San Francisco.

William H. Russell, backed up by Secretary of War Floyd, looked upon the scheme as a very extravagant proposition, and said that he could put on a mail line from San Francisco to St. Joseph that would cover the distance — 1950 miles — in 10 days. So confident was he that he professed himself willing to wager 200,000d0l on the proposition. The schemers for the big mail contract felt bound to meet the bluff, and took up the wager, the Bth day of April 1860 being fixed as the day for starting. A. B. Miller, Russell's partner, wds positive that a pony express could be established which would enable Russell to win his prodigious wager. There was no time to be lost, and Miller set about his task with energy. He purchased 300 of the fleetest horses he could procure, and secured the services of 125 men. Eighty of these men were selected for post riders, and, of course, were especially chosen for their light weight— the lighter the men tha better for the horse, as some parts of the route had to be covered at the rate of 25 miles an hour. In establishing the relays, the distance in each instance was determined by the character of the country. As a rule the horses were stationed from 10 to 20 miles apart, and each, rider had to make 60

miles. Two minutes were allowed for changing the animals and shifting the mails! ' If the stage, stations were not at proper intervals, A tent, was pat up suffioient to accommodate one wan and two horses. By the day Bet for the starting everything was in readiness, and before the smoke cleared avfay from the muzzle of the signal gun on the steamor Sacramento at the hour of noon, Bth April 1860, Billy Baker, mounted on Border Ruffian, Miller's' famous saddle horse, dashed away toward the Sierras, covering his 20 miles in 49min. Deep snow lay in the mountain passes, and to Salt Lake Valley slow time was made, so that from the valley on it was necessary to make extra fast speed to win the huge wager. All went well until the crossing at Julesberg was reached. To his dismay the courier found the Platte river high up in its banks and a strong current running. Fearlessly horse and rider plunged into the turbid stream, but only the man reached the opposite bank. His gallant steed mired in the quicksands and was drowned. The courier saved his precious mail pouch, and had to walk 10 miles to the next railway station. Johnny Fry was one of the famous men of his day on the border. Tough and wiry, he was as light as a cat, and as a rider he never knew an equal. To him fell the duty of riding the last 60 miles of the long race. He had six thorough*' bred horses to do it with. When the courier arrived at the 60-mile post out of St. Joseph, he was one hour behind time.' Johnny had to make up that lost hour or the wager was lost. Miller considered all this when. he selected Johnny Fry to make the final dash. As the hour drew near for Fry's arrival at St. Joseph thousands of people lined the river bank, gazing with feverish expectancy in the direction of the woods from which the horse and rider should emerge into the open country, one mile from the finish.

Seven minutes more and the wager would be lost, when suddenly a bright eyed youngster caught sight of the anxiously looked for courier, and the yell that went up from the crowd reached the ears of the rider a mile away. Horse and rider fairly flew on the wings of the wind. Featherly flecks of foam streaked the panting flanks of the noble steed as she, with wide distended and blood red nostrils, bore the courier to his journey's end, covering the last mile in lmin 50sec. The little mare Sylph won the wager, aud there were five minutes and a fraction to spare.

A MULE RACE.

New Orleans society is nothing if notpfiouliar, as the following from a New York paper will go to show :— Colonel R. W. Simmons and Mr H. B. Foley both related lately several instances illustrative of this, how " Society " will turn out in thousands to see a mule race with gentlemen riders, while such horses as Bankrupt, Favour, Little Minch, Glenhall, Endurer, Birthday, &c, run to a few hundreds only. Just after the war here there was to be a mule race with gentlemen riders, at the old Metairie here, and the excitement ran high, the several riders backing themselves heavily. One slick young gentleman here resolved to make a " kitty »" He wrote up to Kentucky and Tennessee, giving his correspondents carte Uanche to buy him a " fast " mule, one that had thoroughbred blood if possible. In a few weeks one of his agents struck what he thought was the animal wanted, and on his representations the mule was' shipped here. On being tried,the mule, whose dam was a thorough" bred mare, actually showed a mile in lmin 56sec, and our young friend started in on his " killing." Going to his friends one by one he " gathered them in " until he stood to win an amount estimated at 25,000d0l on his mount. The day of the race came, and the society people, who do not appreciate a race between the best horses in the county, turned out by thousands to see the " battle of the mules." On the track the fun before the race was furious. One of the gentlemen " jocks " was rigged up in all the panoply of silk and gilt braid, and from the top of his patent leather top boots dangled heavy gold tassels, clinking as he strode proudly along irj front of the ladies' stand. One noted character of the day, I think his name was Graves, put up his glasses as this specimen of the guilt-edged aristocracy came along, the "observed of all observers," and said to his friend, " Jim, bet you a hundf ed that chap will fall off his mule " He of the tashels overheard the remark as he was passing, and stepping up to Graves, snapped out, "What did you say, sir?" Mr Graves quietlyobserved, " I wanted to bet lOOdol that you would fall off." The elegantly-attired youth stared at him and, cornered, said, "I'll take you* bet, sir," and he did. They went to the post, the mules bucking, kicking, and "humping" their backs in the endeavour to dislodge their riders "all this circus taking place in front of the stand and the assembled thousands, most of whom were already convulsed with laughter. Suddenly a roar from the massed crowd announced some thing unusual, and sure enough there was. The I starter catching them in motion, has started them and after going about 50yds, the mule on which he of the " tassels " was mounted, began to round his back viciously, and stop and buck. Suddenly, with a snort, a quick " hump " and jerk he shot rider, saddle, girth, and head-ge*. over his head, the rider being depositpri squarely on the track, sitting astride of his saddle, acconQ rrpments, &c, amid the yells and laughter oi 10.000 people.

Mr Graves, who had bet that he would go off made his way up to his friend and said " I knew it, Jim ; I knew it. He was too darned pretty to be a good jockey." Meanwhile the othei mules raced on, and the Kentucky thoroughbred importation won by 100 yds, doing the mile in 2min Isec.

A purgative medicine should poßseis tonic and ourative, as well as cathartic, properties. This combination of ingredients may be found in Aver's Pills. They strengthen and stimulate the bowels, causing natural action. .

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18880831.2.57

Bibliographic details

SPORTING NOTES FROM AUSTRALIA., Otago Witness, 31 August 1888

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6,236

SPORTING NOTES FROM AUSTRALIA. Otago Witness, 31 August 1888

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