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BY MAZEPPA.

* # * Will wonders never cease ? There is a proposition to establish a Derby on the West Coast. The Ahaura Club have taken the matter in hand, and announce that if more of the other Coast clubs will take up the suggestion there will be an effort made to get up a Derby in Ahaura for 1890. Plucky little Ahaura ! Ido admire real grit, and if the other clubs don't take the hint I hope that your endeavour to rescue the West Coast from the stigma of doing nothing to encourage breeding will meet \rith unbounded success. If a start is made it must of course be on a moderate scale, for thero are not many breeders in those parts, but those will doubtless not object to a liberal sweepstake, and if the idea is judiciously worked out an affirmative answer will once more be returned to the query, Can thero any good thing come out of Nazareth ?

%* Once more we are threatened with a racing association to carry on business at Christchuch in defiauce of the metropolitan clubs. With all rebellions the question that should determine the attitude of the public is whether the rebels' cause is just. The popular verdict in such cases has not always been a fair one — the world of the past has condemned as rebels men that the world of to-day would applaud as patriots ; but in the matter now before us no complex considerations are involved, the issue being, as I understand it, simply personal interest and pique on the one side as against the welfare (if not the existence) of the national sport on the other. Who, then, can be in doubt as to which side he will enlist on ? I sincerely hope that this foolishness will not be further proceeded with.

%* The Derby for which the Hon. James White's colts are to race will be more valuable than that recently appropriated by Ayrshire. The Epsom authorities have seen the necessity oE increasing the monetary value of the Derby and Oaks, and otherwise modifying the old conditions of their classic races. For the winner of the Derby of 1899*5000sovs is now guaranteed* together with 500sovs for the nominator of the winner. The owner of the second horse is to receive 3000sovs as heretofore, while the owner of the third is to receive 200sovs instead of 150sovs. The half-forfeit of 25sovs mustbe declared by the first Tuesday in January 1890, and there is a second forfeit of lOsovs only if declared by the first Tuesday in January 1889, any surplus to be paid to the winner. The Oaks conditions are similar, but 4000sovs only is guaranteed to the winner, while the nominator of the winner receives 4Gosovs.

*** The Yankees have the record in many thiogs. The latest addition to the world's championships is in respect to the largest price paid for a yearling thoroughbred. Prior to June that distinction was attached to the transaction in which Maximilan was sold for 4100g3 ;

but we now learn that at the sale of Mr Haggin's stock in New York Messrs Appleby and Johnson paid 38,000d0l for King Thomas, a bay colt by King Ban oub of Maud Hampton. Next day the colb was resold to Senator Hearst of California, for 40,000J01, or roughly speaking, £8000.

*** To us New Zealanders, however, a much more pleasing item of news in connection with Mr Haggin's sale is that eight of Sir Modred's get realised 17,100d01, giving the excellent average of 2137id01, or say £427. We all regretted the expatriation of the Canterbury Cup winner, but it is better that he should be where he is, earning fame and advertising our country, than rernainiog here, where he would not have been fully appreciated. Though we knew Sir Modred to be a good one, his stock would not havo fetched so large a price in New Zealand. '• A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country."

*** Mr Benzon's notoriety as a plunger is on the wane. It is said that he lost £7000 over the Northumberland Plate, in whi'ih race his luck was dead out. He bought the favourite for £1000, got fined £5 for not taking out a license for servants, and dropped another sovereign by way of penalty for not running the horse in his registered colours; and after all this the nag not only was beaten, but failed to get a place. This is a good all-round performance.

*#* The new plunger, whose fame is eclipsing Mr Benzon's, is a Mr Santonia, a Spaniard, 23 years of age, and said to be worth £160,000 a year.

* # * A general meeting of the members of the Tapauui Club will be held this (Friday) evening. The special business is to consider Mr Simmonds' motion to wind up the club as at present constituted. The question of fixing dates of future race meetings will also be considered.

%* By the rules of the C.J.C. they are supposed to appoint a starter previous to each race meeting, and I ("Senex") call attention to this fact, because many people erroneously suppose that Mr P. Campbell has been appointed to that position for the whole of the next racing season. Personally, I should be sorry if Mr Campbell's services were not retained as long as he will undertake the duties of the office. Unthinking people sneer at him as "an amateur." Bosh ! he has had more practice than any of your so called professionals in New Zealand, he knows the game of racing, he has been up in many a race, is not likely to lose his head, and does not allow jockeys to take liberties with him. For one better starter we should get 20 worse ; but a certain section of owuers and the public have never done with carping criticism at his best efforts. He has distinctly bound himself not to bet on races when he is wielding the starter's flag, and it would simply be disgraceful to doubt' his word on the point. That he may be in good form at the Metropolitan meeting I sincerely hope, and then perhaps his detractors will take a rest.

*** The rule above referred to must have been framed in anticipation of a state of affairs something like that which at present exists. There is, of course, a provision iv the Rules of Racing empowering the stewards to remove the starter or other officers during a race meeting and appoint a deputy ; but this is not an exact equivalent of the C. J.C.s rule, and of the two I prefer the latter. Stewards would be scarcely likely to exercise their prerogative and remove a starter duriDg a meeting unlesshewere bowled out in some flagrant and unpardonable swiudle ;> they would hesitate about taking action unless the evidence of mala fides was complete and of such a character as to preclude the possibility of a mistake ; and where it was simply a case of incompetence the chances are that the evil would be borne as long as possible in the hope that the starting would improve — in short, nothing less than the revealing of such facts as would damn a man's character offhand would suffice to move stewards to act under the authority of the Rules of Racing, and in the majority of cases, even when a starter had forfeited the confidence of the entire racing community, he would, unless shamed into resigning, remain an incubus on the club and a source of irritation to owners and all others vitally interested. I shall be very much surprised if a case ever arises which will be dealt with by this rule. It is practically a dead letter. There is no harm in retaining it as one of the rules of racing, for the same reason that the Book of Common Prayer still tells us that a man may not marry his grandmother — such curious circumstances as may bring it into operation may be experienced once iv a thousand years — but all clubs should at the same time be equipped after the fashion of the C J.C.

\* Knowing that his appointment was but for a limited term, a starter would naturally mind his p's and q's, being well aware that should he forfeit conßdeace he would be simply luft out in the cold Avhen the appointment was made for the next meeting. Ie may be said, on the other hand, that the existence of this C. J.C. rule may open the door to favouritism and the persecution of a starter who has not made friends of the leading members of his club ; but this is hardly likely to happen, for a starter who had done nothing to merit being shelved would be backed up by the public, and club 3 know their business too well to depose a man who has given general satisfaction. The risk here spokeu of is a mere bagatelle to that of which it is the alternative.

*** Though prompted to these remarks by the case of Mr Campbell, I have purposely made no personal reference to that gentleman, for the reason that I fully agree with other writers in the belief that we may without suspicion accept his assurance that he will not bet on races in which ho is to act as starter. Mr Campbell has been directly and pointedly challenged on the subject; he has answered without equivocation ; and thero is an end of the matter — indeed we may hope that the C J.C.s troubles about the starting are now altogether overcome, for Mr Campbell has bad a lot of experience* and of a kind that should well qualify him for the office. Would that we could say the same in respect to all other clubs. The day must come, sooner or later, when the leading clubs will combine and make it worth the while of one good man to do duty all round by turns — that is, as far as it would be possible to do so ; at any rate one man could do all the work in each island. Owners and the public are really very little concerned with the internal management of clubs — they care not a dump who is president, or treasurer, or clerk of the course— but they are within their rights in claiming the privilege of approving or condemning the appointments to the responsible offices of starter and handicapper. Without this pressure brought to bear by outside ci'itics, however, the leading spirits ia our racing clubs know that they must secure the best men for the?e positions, and if any born genius in this line should come to the front it is long odds that he would soon be provided with enough work to ke?p hinr going "pending a general appointment. Tbe question is, Where is such a man to come from ?

*#* Sir Charles Russell made a smart speech in opening the defence in the celebrated libel case. Defining "pulling," the learned -counsel said that they now knew that ifc meant any form of action, negative or positive, by which a horse was not fairly ridden, so as to make hfrn win a race' Whip and spar might be

used with a flourish, but their being applied as a punishment to a- horse was another' thing.' If Wood had not intended the horse to win' was it likely he would have allowed it to gain a prominent position when he might have interfered with it in the earlier part of the race, or particularly when going round the bend. It' was I astonishing how such a great lumbering thing of a horse could have been able to put one leg before the other when running a race — he with his nasty cuvby hooks, hardly fit to draw a butcher's cart ; but yet Wood said that looking to his running at Lewes he thought he might win. What an extraordinary animal he must have been. At Sandown he could not go up a hill, at Lewes he could not got down one, and at Alexandra Park he could not go with any speed round a corner. Did not all this suggest that he had but a limited turn of speed, and 'could not stay, and j yet it was the same Success that subsequently j altered his form in the most glaring fashion, ! and won a race easily over a coursoof a greater length than any of the preceding ones. ' ' *** The action for libel brought by Mr Cooper-Smith against the proprietor of "Baily'a Magazine" was settled by the defendant apologising and consenting to a verdict against him for £500. The circumstances of the case, which are of importance to [the whole sporting world, were set out by counsel when the matter came , before tho High Court of Justice. The action (said Mr Bankes) is one for libel which is brought by Mr Cooper-Smith, an eminent veterinary surgeon, of Hollist Stud Farm, Midhurst, Sussex, to vindicate bis character from the aspersions which are made in certain articles which were published in " Baily's Monthly Magazine " for October last. Ido not j wish to go into the articles at length, but your lord&hip will eeo there that tho articles refer to a certificate which Mr Smith gave shortly prior to the St. Leger of last year, with reference to the condition of the horse, Merry Hampton, who was first favourite for the race. My lord, tin articles are founded upon an entire misapprehension. Apparently the writers of these articles thought that Merry Hampton was not sufforing from a sprain of the suspensory ligament of the near fore leg. I understand that since the action has been commenced the defendants have sxamined the horse and have found that Mr Smith was perfectly right, originally, and is perfectly right* still, that the , horse was suffering from an injury, and is suffering from it still. The articles go on further, because they did convey the suggestion that Mr • Smith had made an obvious ■ mistake, and that he had made it intentionally. Under those circumstances Mr Smith had no option but to bring an action to vindicate his character. He has no personal ill-feeling against these gentlemen, and no desire to make a profit out of the transaction. As long as the defendants would meet him fairly and apologise openly in court, and agree to give him such a substantial verdict as would justify him in the eyes of the public as a professional man, and one who was thoroughly competent, he is 'content. The defendants have now come forward, and have offered to apologise in court to Mr Smith, and have consented to give him a verdict for £500 and costs. I have assented to that, and under those circumstances I ask your lordship to allow a verdict to be entered against the defendants for £500 on the terms agreed upon, and I ask your lordship to give judgment for that amount.

%* When the June mail left England Seabreeze was first favourite for the St. Leger at 3' to 1 (off ered)— though 1000 to 300 would have, been taken — while 4 to 1 was forthcoming in the case of Crowberry, and 500 to 100 taken and asked for again about Ayrshire. Of Porter's' lot, there were offers to lay 100 to 12 against Orbit, while Friar's Balsam acrain receded to 1000 to 30 "offered " after 500 w to 15 had been booked. Merry Andrew appeared on the scene at 25 to I—taken1 — taken to win only a few hundreds. Speaking of this race an English writer says : — "A circumstance that causeo a good many people to put on their considering caps is the support given to Orbit. To the astonishment of those who hau made up their minds that Ossory must be the sole hope of Kingsclere, a desire to back Orbit is shown at a time when he is doing very little exercise. This is rather startling,' but upon the Ascot failure of Orbit I never laid the slightest stress, having reason to think that it was altogether wrong. Moreover, it is quite possible that the horse was third best iv the Derby, so with Ayrshire under a cloud, sufficient reason exists for placing Orbit amongst the little .lot that have a good chance for the St. Leger. So far as appearance goes it is difficult to write in his favour, and soundness is the chief point that can be claimed for the colt. He is neither good to follow nor to look at side ways, and a much more improving horse so far as looks go is his companion Ossory, whose performances &t Ascot can, however, readily be overrated. Ayrshire continues to take matters easily, and I doubt his winning the St. Leger even if he be sent to Doncaster, which may not be the case should a hot summer make hard ground. A little money has gone on his comrade, Johnny Morgan, who has not his superior in good looks amongst oar three-year-olds. He showed such symptoms of faint courage, however, after earning a certain reputation that it would be unsafe to place trust in him until some proof has been giveu that the "white feather" no longer exists. The admirers of Crowberry, and they are not few, have been made rather uneasy by noticing that Mr Vyner's colt has been missing from exercise, bub I do not attach much importance to this. Seabreeze's chance depends, in my opinion, to a great extent on the policy pursued with her in the meantime. If kept in reserve for September 12 her prospect of success will be a splendid one. But the filly is not one o? the cut-and-come-again sort, and may easily be upset by repeated calls being made on her. Friar's Balsam is not altogether unnoticed, and a few persons have backed him on what must be a very off chance if what I hear is true." At last advices Seabreeze and Ayrshire were equal favourites at 7 to 2 each.

* X * Owners made a tolerably satisfactory response to the invitation of the D.J.C. to nominate for tbe Otago Hunt Club handicaps. It was not to be expected that we should have the Maxims, Carbines, and Gipsy Kings shot at vs — the select company will follow later on, as at a military funeral ; but we have a very fair lot of second-raters, even if one or two real clippers arejsot disclosed, and we must be thankful that the promise of good racing is as good as it is. The figures as compared with last year are as follows : — 1887. 1883. Kensington Handicap ... 11 12 Tally-ho Handicap ... ... 14 10 Shorts ... ... ... 13 12 Hurdle Handicap ... ... 11 14 Hunt Club Oup ... ... 12 t 11 Welter Handicap ... ... 14 9 Telegraph Handicap ... 15 13 90 81 So on the seven races wo are thi3 year only nine to the bad. Mr Dowses handicaps wer6 awaited with more than usual inquisifeiveness, for there were some puzzles in front of him before he could bring all these horses together. The handicaps appear in this issue, bub they were not available in time to carefully peruse them. This will be my task next week. Meanwhile I note that acceptances for the Handicaps and entries for the Maiden Steeplechase are due on tbe Bth September-

%* The Irish Derby, one mile and a-half, was run for at the Curragh of Kildare, on?' June 27, and resulted in a victory for Captain L. H. Jones' Theodolite, by Arbitrator from Miss Theo, who defeated Hospodar by three parts of a length, with Rosebud in the other place. There were half a dozen starters for the event.

*#* Ifc is said that Mr .David Dudley Withers is one of the racing lights of America. He never bets a penny, and runs his horses for the sport alone. Hi 3 colour is all black ; and he has" pronounced ideas in connection with the breaking-in of his youngsters, upon which he never allows a whip or spur to be used. The consequence is that his horses are noted for their bad tempers and fraotiousness at the post. He also makes it a rule never to name a colt or a filly until it has won a race. Consequently many go to the grave unnamed.

V At the annual meeting of the Tasrnanian Turf Club the balance sheet" submitted showed an expenditure 0f.^1993 13s 6d, fixed deposit £250, overdraft £29 9a lOd. A rule was adopted concerning objections and protests requiriug a deposit of £5 with the stewards, such being liable to forfeiture if the complaint made be deemed frivolous.

%# The notion of engrafting the trotter on to the thoroughbred has passed beyond the experimental stage . ra America, though some of the old-time breeders in the States still adhere to the prejudice that trotting stock cannot be improved by this means. ' It is, however, something new to find a cross of this nature in New Zealand. I am led to speak|of this from seeing a particularly fine yearling colb, the offspring of Pinole Patchen and a thoroughbred mare called Baroness Burdebt, by Top King. Mr W. J. Taggarb— the owner of this colt— says that he will keep ib for use as a stallion. The youngster's name is Pinole Junior.

*#* At the Monmouth Park (U.S.) races, on July 12, the chief event was the Monmouth Cup, of lOOdol each, with 2000dol added, one mile and three-quarters. There were only three starters — viz., Haggin's Firenzi (4yrs, V 8.1), Gratz's Elkwood (syrs, 8 9), aud Cassatt'd Eurus (syrs, 8.9). The betting was 13 to 10 against Eurus, 2 to 1 the others. Eurus took command at once and showed Elkwood the way for about a mile with a lead of two length?, Firenzi three behind Elkwood. On the back stretch the second time Elkwood closed, was a 'neck in front at the half, and leading by an open length on the far turn, Eurus and Firenzi together. Eutering the stretch Eurus gave it up and Firenzi closed on Elkwood. Garrison waited with the filly to the last furlong, when he took command and Firenzi finally won easily by a scant length, Elkwood a dozen in front of Eurus.

V The rich Lorillard Stakes (late the Jersey Derby), at the same meeting, produced a field of eight, and was won by the first favourite, Dwyer Bros.' Sir Dixon, by Billet— Jaconet, who started at evens. The field got off to a good start, but in the first hundred yards Bella B. took command, and with a lead of two lengths showed the way into aud up the stretch, followed by Los Angeles and Defense. At the stand Bella B. was lapped by Defense, Los Angeles a length behind and half a length in front of Sir Dixon, Prince Royal and Marauder lapped. On the turn and along the back stretch Bella B. again ran out clear, but nearing the half Los Angeles overhauled and passed her, and led by a scant length passing the half, Defense, Sir Dixon, and Prince Royal together. On the turn Sir Dixon took second place to Los Angeles and the two drew away from the others, the two making a good run to the last furlong, where both were tired and were driving. M'Laughlin outrode Armstrong, however, and ia the last sixteenth drew away with Sir Dixon and won by three lengths, Los Angeles six in front of Prince Royal, the others badly strung out. The value of the stake to the winner was 18,750d01.

%* The principal winning jockeys on the fiat in England from March 19 to July 13 were aa follows :— J. Watts, 233 mounts, 55 wins ; F. Barrett, 269, 54 ; S. Loates, 191, 41 ; W. Robinson, 225, 41 ; F. Rickaby, 234, 34 ; T. Weldon, 117, 32; J. Woodburn, 218, 31; F. Webb, 133, 30; J. Osborne, 121, 25 ; T. Loates, 140, 24; T. Cannon, 88, 22 ; W. Warne, 113, 21 ; J. Fagan, 81, 17.

* # * The notice of appeal in the libel case of Wood v. Cox was giveu on two grounds — (1) That the Lord Chief Justice admitted evidence which was irrelevant to the case, and should nob have been admitted ; and (2) the second ground expresses in legal phraseology the dissatisfaction of the plaintiff with the result of the trial. Subsequent to the hearing of this actiou, the Lord Chief Justice, in deciding a case of no public interest, in which the plaintiff obtained a farthing damages, referred to the turf libel case, again giving his reasons for depriving the plaintiff of his costs. His lordship said that in tbe case of Wood v. Cox he has exercised his discretion simply on the understanding that a quasi-pledge had been given that the matter should go to the House of Lords. Of course if that tribupal decided that the Court of Appeal had jurisdiction in regard to the discretion of a judge, he would willingly bow to it, but until that decision was arrived at he should refuse to exercise his discretion.

*** The three-year-old chestnut filly Apres Moi has changed her quarters, having been leased by Mr C. Turnbull from Mr J. Baxter. The filly is now located at St. Clair. She is not looking very well at present.

*** There are 238 nominations for the Epsom Derby of 1890, as against 167 for 1889, and 171 for the Oak.=, as against 111 in 1889. The most liberal subscribers to the Derby, apart from tho professional breeders, are Mr Manton, Lord Bradford, Sir R. Jardiuc, and Mr Leopold Rothschild, two out of whose batch were bred in America, while all the prominent owners find representatives. M. Lefevre has taken five nominations, all bred in France ; nor are other French subscribers wanting, whilst Mr Hovaisky has entered Luterbor, a ttusaianbred colfc, by Va.dim— Berezina. With Mr J. White's pair engage?], the race has quite au international character.

*** Thoroughbreds of the first class are fetching high prices in England. All our good breeders of blood stock will say, I am sure (says one writer), that the yearling sales have been glorious. There have been no bad sales, and when a gentleman valued two mares and their foals belonging to himself at 300.30v5, and they realised 1800gs, it can well be said that we are getting into extraordinary times. The honours of gaining the high prices have been carried off by the Yardley, as that establishment has sold a colt by Sterling out of Hypatia for 2300g5, the purchase being for Mr Douglas Baird, and 2600gs~was given by Captain Machell for the colt by Sterling out of Cherry Duchess, and so an own brother to Energy. The two cases quoted were not entirely exceptional in the four-figured line, as the sister to Paradox made 1150. The sensation must be very pleasing to get four figures for a yearling, and it was enjoyed this week by the Earl of Rosslyn, who got 1700 for a very beautiful colt by Master Kildareout of Miss Middlewiek, by Scottish Chief, and, therefore, the colt in question is own brother iv blood to Melton. Mr John Lawrence had the pleasure of getting 1350 for a son of Robert the Devil and Bide-a-Wee. The purchaser here was Lord Dudley also, and on

the same evening one of the best yearlings, got by Hampton out of that stout mare Mistress of the Robes, was sold to Mr Percy Peck for 680ga. I Mr Phillips, of the Leybourue Grange Stud, sold a colt by Sweetbread out of Mattie-a-Sfcray for 1200, Captain Machell being the purchaser, and Mr Beddington sold a colt by Galliard oat of Lotus (Riversdale's dam) for 1300gj», and as he bought the colfc at Sir Robert Jardine's sale last September for 500, it was business a good deal better than losing money on a foreign loan or gold mine operation. Mr Hume- Webster joined the four-figure rank when he sold his colt by Beaudesert out of Hedgerose for a cool thousand, and prices of 600 and 700 were nearly as plentiful as blackberries. Our old friend Mr Smith, of Whimple, could not sing to the tune of four figures, but he got what the farmers .would call a level average with two in out of seven that ran up to over 600. • . '%*.The agent of the American Humane Society recently stopped a race on aecbuut of the terrific heat. ' It was at Plainvill^, on" a sandy plain, and the heat must at least have been lOOdeg to l2odeg in the sun. P. P. Barrow's Jim and Thomas Russell's Hampton were to trot a 10-mile race for 200dol a-side, and their ownere would have started them,' but Mr Thrall, iii view of the intense heat, put^his veto oh the race. He would only allow the horses to trot around the track once or twice for exhibition purposes but not for speed. A 10-mile race in such heat would have been a brutal affair. **♦ On June 15 a bolt of lightning passed through the window of Cuyler'a stall, at Parkville Farm (U.S.), going entirely over Cuyler, and struck a steel hook in Paneoast's stall so near his head as fco burn his ears and knock him entirely senseless, setting fire to the stall, wiiich was quickly put out by his groom and nightwatchman. Michael Coyne, his groom, about 10 minutes before this happened left the stall for the brood-mare barn for water. Had he been in the stall at the time the probabilities are that the horses and building would have been burned. At first it was reported that Panooast was fatally injured, but this is untrue. The highest price ever paid for a stallion at auction in America was the 28,000d0l paid for Pancoast. %* " Martindale" has been looking at the Hon. J. White's Derby colts, and says that Kirkham will be hardly as tall a horse as his brother Cranbrook. He is, however, a better built colt. His colour is chestnut, with a white blaze. He is possessed of splendid shoulders, and good barrel and quarters. The neck is short, not too much so, with a large though intelligent head, welLset in, with good deep gullet. His legs are the best that sould be seen, with splendid joints, good pasterns, and feet which do not give one the idea of being troublesome. He is possessed of an excellent temper, allowing one to go up to him in the paddock. A scamper about the field bold me that he will assuredly be a splendid mover. The full brother to Acme (111 ear that his name will be Acorn) is also a chestnut with a white star and snip. He is not such a lengthy horso as his stable companion, bat is well put together, possessing splendid quarters and shoulders, with well sprung fibs. These colts are now 19 months old. They are out in the fields all day and stabled at night time, and reflect the greatest credit on all concerned

*** The South Canterbury Harrier and the Wai mate Harrier Clubs held a steeplechase meet* ing on the 16th inst. on the banks of thePareorg river. The prizes were trophies. Mr R. H. Rhodes' Ivanhoe beat The Mount, Stockings, and five others in the Welter Steeplechase, 13.0 up. In the Light-weight Steeplechase, 11.0 up, Mr Mitchell's Nero easily beat Juggler Stockman, and three others. The ' Farmers Steeplechase was practically a walk-otfer for Mi Pringle's Racket, his two opponents coming tc grief. Nero put up 13.4 and beat Juggler (13.0) by a couple of lengths in the Ladies' Bracelet for which there were nine starters; and the Consolation was taken by Mr Kaye's Stockman (12.7), beating Herald (12.7), Kate (12.0), and four others. The totalisator was not used at the meeting.

a three-year-old, won a race in heats at Salisbury in the year 1837. — Engagement will have a 3ay in the New Zealand Cup if she is well. But she is a delicate member to train, . — Alexandra programme opens with a Trial Stakes for three-year-olds bred in Lake, Maniototo, or Vincent Counties. — Lord Rosebery intends to resume his connection with the turf and will train with George D&wson at Heath House. — So great has been the opposition in America of late to steeplechasing that it will in all probability be shortly abolished. . — If he lives for six and a-half years longer Captain M'Calmont will be the happy possessor of upwards of £5,000,000 " ready." — At Ascot the gross amount won this year in stakes during the. four days was £28,808, half of which, or £14,400, was added money. — The Oaks estate at Epsom was recently put up to auction. The best bid was £23,500, and tho property was bought in at £25,000. — Mr Benzon is a melancholy harlequin, and few men have bought ridicule and contempt at so high a price. This is Truth's opinion. — Prince Henry of Battenburg, or Macbattenburg as some writers irreverently style him, figures as a breeder of thoroughbred stock. — G. Barrett, the jockey whose license to ride was refused at the same time as Wood's, has beea granted permission to resume his profession. — The North Island hor^e Waitangi is still in Canterbury, and I believe (writes " Rata") it is intended to send him to the Dunedin Hunt Club races. —The Greymouth Club is clear of debt and has a balance of £124 odd in hand. Mr Lahman succeeds the late Mr Payne as secretary and treasurer. —The Great Cambridgeshire Stakes will this year be run on the flat, instead of up the hill, which will be much to the advantage of spectators. — Andy Ferguson, who, after his accident in the Grand National Steeplechase, was removed to Dr Fitzgerald's private hospital, is progressing favourably. , — When Macaulay was at his zenith he was rejected as a Parliamentary eaudidate at Edinburgh because he refused to subscribe to Musselburgh races. — Agitated by the excitement of a desperate finish at Washington Park, Jockey M'Cartby fainted and fell from his horse before he could be weighed in. Mr David Heudersou, of Otepopo, has purchased from Mr John Grigg the thoroughbred entire horse Digby Grand, by Traducer (imp.), from Aglaia (imp.). — The Broker, who it was at onetime thought would succumb to injuries received on the training ground at Rand wick, has lived to gain honours in the show ring. A Rosehill trotter named Bandsman is said to be one of the most hideous beasts ever seen on a racecourse — all points, like some of the horses in American caricatures. — Sfc. Albans has never recovered the mysterious ailment which has affected him during the Ust 18 months, and is not likely to be of much further use as a stud horse. — Mr Houldsworth has requested the Jockey Club to institute anjinquiry into the matters affecting the jockey Warne disclosed in the evidence given ia the recent action of Wood v. Cox. — The Hungarian Government has made a grant of £11,000 to the Pesth Jockey Club for the purpose of buying English-bred racehorses, aid Counflvan Tzapay is the commissioner employed. — A Flemington bookmaker posted one of his customers on the morning of the V.R.C. Grand National, and thus saved a thousand, for the backer had taken 1000 to 20 about Malua and Ruby. — Chrifctchurch purposes to send only two fiat racers to the Hunt Club meeting, but takes a decided lead in regard to the jumping races, and if Dunedin wins one of these we shall be lucky. — It may be that Friar's Balsam may not run for the St. Leger, even if ho gets well, as he may be kept in reserve for a better and richer engagement in the big £11,000 stake at Manchester. — Minting goes to the stud next season, and will stand ac Fairfield, near York. He will be limited to 20 public mares at lOOgs, and a few of his owner's. The subscription list for the first season is already full. — The trotters Hawkdun aud Masher Maid were taken to Melbourne by Mr Lefevre in last week's steamer. I believe the owner's intention is not primarily to seek buyers for his horßes, but to race them. — The stewards of the Jockey Club have refused the Marquis of Aylesbury's application to be restored to his former position on the turf. They have also refused, so it is stated, to grant Wood a license to train at Newmarket. — For expressing ,a wish that " that starter was dead," a jockey named Williams had, at Lexington, America, his suspension for a meeting iucreased to six months. On tendering an abject apology, however,-the sentence was commuted. — The unfortunate jockey George Forbes, who was injured in tho Hurdle Race at Canterbury Park, has succumbed to his injuries. From the nature of the crushing he received— his head and body being dreadfully injured — no hope was . held out of his recovery. At St. Ives Horse Fair Mr Thomas Benton, of Earith, Huntingdonshire, sold a three-year-oli roadster stallion, by Reality, for £650, to Messrs J. H. Truman and Sons, Bushnell, Illinois, which is believed to be the highest price ever pail for a stallion of this class. At Fontainebleau recently there was a steeplec'iase for which there were three starters. Nougat was the only one that got over the cours , aud he was ridden part of the way by Neut y, then by M Deschatnps, then by a third pers n, and again by Neuby at the finish. — Th *. Ascot grand stand was first opened to thepublic in 1839, and the funds to erect it were raised by 100 shares of £100 each, of which £5 ware to be paid off every year ; so that at the end of 20 years the staud was free from debt, and appropriated solely to tho benefit of the : aoes. For many years the £20 shares of the Epsom Grand Stand Association were saleable at £80 apiece, and even.the decline iw the Derby from a stake worth more than £7000 to a stake worth less then £4000 has not reduced the above-named shares to a lower value than £50 apiece. —Jenny Howlet dropped her first foal in 1883, so that only four of her stock can have as yet run in public, and it is a most extraordinary cir-cu-nstance that three of them — viz.Hawkeye, Boile .Mahone, and Chitfcabob. should all have been winnprs at the Newcastle and Gosforth Park meeting. — During the five months ended May 31 there were exported from England 4006 horses, compared with 2873 in the same period of last year, and 2004 in 1886. the value having been £226,334, against £156,756 in 1887, and £115,707 in 1886. Of the hordes exported 752 were stallions valued at £81,902. —Lake County Press says that Mr A. Cowan, f Gibbston, has lost hi 3 race mare Juuo by a sgular accident. The mare was feeding at a

dray with his draughts, and, one of these animals rushing at her, she, while trying to get out of the way, struck her temple against a~ projection on the body of the dray, and was killed almost instantaneously. — The amateur jockey is of older standing than the professional, for, when horse racing was mainly confined to matches, and, as often as not, formed part of the programme of what we should now call rural sports, it was by the owners that the competing horses were ridden, and racing clubs had their origin in the zeal with which amateurs entered into the spirit of race riding. —King Thomas, the 38,000d0l colt, is by King Ban (son of King Tom aud Atlantis, by Tbormanby), dam Maud Hampton, by Hunter's Lexington (son of Lexington and Sally Lewis, by Glencoe) ; second dam Mollie Fisher, by Knight of St. George, son of Irish Birdcatcher, and third dam Lizzie Morgan, by Glencoe. Pocahontas, the dam of King Tom, was also a daughter of Glencoe.

— The coloured jockey James Stone has been held by the grand jury to answer the charge of shooting and killing Henry Miller, a bartender, Coney Island (America). Stone, it is said, was in liquor, and quarrelled with Miller about change for a bill. He was an excellent rider and strong fiuisher, and was in the employ of Harris Cohen, for whom he has ridden Saxony in nearly all of his races.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18880824.2.62.1

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BY MAZEPPA., Otago Witness, Issue 1918, 24 August 1888

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BY MAZEPPA. Otago Witness, Issue 1918, 24 August 1888

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