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TALK OF THE DAY.

J BY MAZEPPA. * + * The proposals of' the; Canterbury Jockey Club in the'ttireotibn'of limiting the'tise of the* 7 totalisa'tor have- doubtless been framed with 'the idea^of preventing Parliament from interfering with' the- Gaming and Lotteries' Act.' Tho. metropolitan clubs are asked, to take such action that wliw tho question comes, before jthe Hbusosomeono speaking on behalf of the leading olubs may pay, "iYtv. have fixed up the affair, and you noed not bother your heads ( abou.t ? &" And on paper the scheme . looks' reasonable enough at first sight. Proposition ' No.', 7 'allows ,sbe minor climbs to carry on without any further, restriction' than exists at' present— that is, that the stakes shall bear a . certain relation to the money, put, through the totalizator at the corresponding meeting of the previous' year, and that 'only a certain percentage shall, be charged to "Owners by way of fees— so that thefce little cjubsj ,aj; any' rate, cannot sing out that they are! 'hSirsbly treated. But will a majority of the second-rate dabs be equally satisfied ? It is from these that the complaints w ill, % I think, be heard. They arV Wready irritated about the , necessity of submitting their programmes for approval, and now ie is proposed that they shall, if require <% f fit ni-h >. properly - audited balance sheets, and Batisfy tbu metropolitan clubs that ,the revenue lVas .ba*n properly expended ; and, besides^ this, they are to bo compelled to, conform to,arulc3 in respect to' the amountgiven injstakes. I'expect that >the>e. multiplied restrictions will produce something very' much in the nature of a revolt;^ The question asked, pfjJUoses' by the "contentious Hebrew," Who made tbee'a prince and',a" -judge -over its?" comes naturally to the" lips when dno js ordered "about; by a self-elected ( authority^.; especially when the motives of the dominant- party nre hot-free from the.sbspicion Of stjhlKhn"ess,;'aud;'l fully .expectrfthat *jn this ;casefthe metropolitan': clubs will be told pretty plainly- thaj; '-if they;ar,e sOjanxious, to limit the use of the |i6talisator ,t)iey should commence with theniselveH,, and ? set.aa'example by reducing th^ number.of^their, dwifface meetings. , "- ' -*„,*; Andit jnust,b'e;cpfifessied that there is fiometbing i^ .the -argument.' metro'politah^tilub that i "does not'eome'uptothestandard averagS is Greymouth ;| with .this exception none of the metropbl'tan-«luHs rfre palled On to .make ahyjacrifice'/';.The J Wellington Racing* Cjab was behindhand to the tune of £390 in the season, of 1886-87,' but has overcome,; the difficulty by the simple 'expedient 'of ''divorcing' the Ste'eplrchase ' meeting arid" handing qyeu the s cQntrol-^f that 'gjitherin^itjO r ft olu.b, forpaed f for .the^o'ccaslon/ jphe;f6Uowtpg tables, will, JBhow ; how the : several i tioiae now made. Aq the, present season has" not'

■hfr+'wftßan

~%89tF

I 'quite closed I Eave*n > s|a;tKe*figni esTtf^Jf<tßß<JiCf I- 87; se|^on. s $aUe^fNoT4| r deal|\«it^|^Vo^iß^ < which j though 'holding more thW one 'me~et> D^ I comphedjwith.the terms of the suggestions maple/ 'by the CXc; . ■ *' '.% . . \:, r r - 7- " ' .'

* # * My next table gives a list of tfie blubs* l> 28 in number, which during the 1886-87 ' season held more meetings than they would have -been* entitled to hold if the suggestions now before* us had been in operation :— . ' !, ■ , • .m,

It should be explained that in compiling the above tables I have omitted all the Jubilee meetings from' the calculations. They were 1 special meetings, and it) would have been unfair to include them.' Rotorua and Patea also come - under the ban/ and may be reckoned with (the second batch, but as I have not a complete j statement of the amounts these dubs, gave 'in, , stakes I have not filled in any figures t fur them* n Adding these two, ,we have, 30, clubs.in the black , , list. ; As to the fir^t. table, >■ the Qtago Hunt Club's . meeting ia included in the Dunedin Jockey, Club's return, and I may as well mention ' that at the Auckland Racing Clubj's meeting ' , £200 more was competed for than is "shbvrn, that' ; amount having been subscribed by the Stud Company for the Sylvia Park Staked.' It rwiUtbe observed tbat-HeathcotQ, heads < the, ljs^ of. ; .sinners, being £2005 short of the required ;total, offtakes; Lancaster ■* Park, comes next yfjth,, £1530; then Reefton and Westport ;, followed / by,Plumpton Park .with £1035.; . ", ; ..,'.,"'.' ; i , *<ff Looking, carefully, jfrom all sides at the propositions, I think that on' the whold they are ' reasonable, and as fair as orie could' expeci. Whether they will answer the'purpdse is Another ; t matter. Many of the clubs ; are s b6uhd to T jgTqwl ' —some will probably defy ' the' mfetropolitan clubs', while others' may Hake advantage of a ' palpable loophole and transfer, part of; their, meetings to clubs improvised for the-occaeiop; , ( so that it* is decidedly open to; question whether the desired end may be achieved. , Supposing ar club ido.es .snap its fingers at the metropolitan body! What.jhen? .It may punished by.dis*' qualifying, the horses that competed ; but that proc«sß pay'nbt "compel the club to return to : ifcjsallegiance^and if it does hot the use of the totalizator will not be materially restricted. To ' make the propositions complete 'they must hav«;the sanction of law: It would, I ■ should . imagine, be a' simple matter to add them to an amending act in the' form of a schedule, 06 that < the Colonial Secretary would have .roles laid down to guide him as, to granting permits. '/The . only alternative to these propositions that I, can , , thiuli of is to enact that .every club, great and small alike, should be allowed to use the machine until. a certain sum,. regulated by the amount of the stakes, had been put through, and that then the shutters should ' be . put up. ' This would be the simplest method of all for checking the use ' of the totalisator, arid ia conjunction with' & pro-' 1 viso that a stated percentage of the proceeds ■ "shbgld be apportioned to wcightifor-age 'racing,. ; it might be more beneficial to the interests of the; turf than the suggestions now before, us. But twe do not all look through the same spectacles, and though I have my doubta about the .efficacy of the, measures proposed, I hope that the clubs, .will give a prompt and loyal support tp'th'e ex* periment about to be tried. If it don't answer, try tny.'panacea or somebody else's. ' - ' ' ' *** The first thing fhat New Zealanders looked for on conning over the weights for the Melbourne Cup was to see how Mr Barnard had < treated Maxim and Gipsy King, and when it was., seen that 9-t 31b and Bst lljb had been setr.ed it :- was generally conceded that these Maor;landers had been well looked after, though I don't think thpy. can bn said to , be very harshly treated. Maxim has -31b more than his Weight for age, and Gipsy King 31b less — that is, the way f to get a . line as to. the merits .of the handicap ; and it, nfust be remembered that both are receiving weight from the Australian cracks of the same age, and also that it is a high' hiandicap all round; the minimum being 6st 71b. I don't know that' I should care to back Mr Stead's colts at theae, weights until we know what the owner thinks,, -for they are not* by any means chucke^ jn,.bnt with 51b less in each case they would have t been, rushed^ by New Zealand backers.; so that^on'conf \ sideling all the circumstances, I venture 'the. opinion; that Mr Barnard has hit oii soinethinfr ' like the correct thing. It will be db'servecl'that Volley j and Carbine head, the three-year-old division, with 7st 101b each. Such a long h'st of > oalcnlations requiraalot of thought before ven-^ turing on any pronounced opinion, arid backers J willactithe part ot the wise man in not making, up their, minds too hastily^ 1 Our ; Melbourne ; correspondent - will rin,' an -early > number throw Borne light on thequestiobii. ., .: < **!"'/]' \]-; t > *#* slns In England large, numbers, of backers., do not go to the courses . at all, andlhis occas- ' ejonally opens the door, to peculiar. movements in the market;'^," Robin Hpod/'.speakibg' of the Doveridge^^up,*wpii"by s 'l^bpn,'6ays';|^ > ' f Tprc^^ . light wasmade a etrong favourite at^the'.'ipost',' 1 "

Whilst Lisbon was comparatively neglected, but the latter was backed for a heap of money at fbtarting price' in all the leading turf clubs in and. the provinces. This was very cleverly done at the last moment, so that there should be no chance of the > starting-price layers in London wiring the money down to the ring. By this means the layers at the post, finding no money there for the animal, extended their offers from 6 to 1 (at which the horse opened) to 10 to 1, which price was on offer when the flag fell. Thus, with some, £lsoo on at 'starting price ' in different parts of the kingdom, a rare coup of £15,000 is landed, whereas had that money been put-on in the ring the price would, instead of drifting from 6 to 1 to 10 to 1, have ' certainly hardened to 5 to 2, or an average, say, of 4 bo 1, which means £6000, instead of the, ' £15,000 now annexed. This way of betting is, of course, becoming a very popular one with some owners and stables." > . %* The Ashburton Tradesmen's Racing Club made a profit of £43 odd on last season's operations': Mr Quill is reappointed handicapper. ' The report suggests that it be a recommendation to the new committee to take care that the claims of the' club as a provider of legitimate racing for the district are not overlooked. The stakes given by the club are retained in the district, and not competed for by email* fields of outside horses belonging to professional racing men. :*#**> Algerian is recovering from the mishap he met with in. the Birthday Cup at the Sydney Turf Club meeting. In that race Algerian'ran a nail into one of his feet, and, as a consequence, he had to be confined to his box. %* Thr?eof the leading racing clubs of, America — the American' Jockey Club, Coney Island, and Louisville — have determined to prohibit bookmaking, but will allow pool-selling. ~ %* -Chemist is a much better horse than I believed him to be. ,- He put up his 12st 61b, and was never in trouble in the\Hawke's Bay Steeplechase, winning in quite first-class style. Can it be that hi this son of the much-regretted Painter we have another Agent?- It seems very much like it, for the detailed report of the running is not in the least suggestive of a fluke, nor . does the winner appear to have been helped by any of fortune's freaks. The simple fact of the matter is that he was too good for his opponents — and these were not a bad lot as steeplechasers go nowadays, for everyone of them has previously performed in a creditable manner, and I doubt whether there will be so good a lot contesting the Grand National. Appended is a list of WINNERS OF THE HAWKE'S BAY STEEPLECHASE.

Last Thursday's event was one of the best betting races the Hawke's Bay Club have had for Borne time. Mangaohane was actually first favourite on the machine, but all the starters were well supported. The sum of £3366 wag passed through the totalisator, or £399 more than last year. It will be noticed that no South Island horses took part in the meeting but all the leading Northern districts were represented. , - ♦ # * Mr Newton, an English amateur rider of some repute, was a passenger by the last mail steamer from England. He comes to Australia for health's sake. j ♦„,* During the settling over Sydney Tat- ! tersall's meeting some spirited wagering took place "right out " on the Melbourne Cup (says the Leader), and at 1000 to3o Silver Prinoe,Cranbrook, and Carlyon were each well supported. Double event betting on the Derby and Cup was also liberally indulged in at 1000 to 5 for •• mixed goods," Volley being chosen principally s for the former. The two, cups, Caulffeld and ' Melbourne, attracted some attention at 5000 to 5. %♦ It is openly stated in the Old Country that George Barrett is to have his riding license back again before long. %♦ While cantering at the Forbury the other day Gold Dust wrenched one of ,her fetlocks, and came home on three legs. This mare is beginning to show indications that her visit to Everton Lad was' not resultless. * # * The death is announced of Tom Cannon's 10-year-old Cobhatri stud-bred horse Glen Albyn, by Blair Athol— Maid of Perth. Glen Albyn was in his day a smart racer over eprint courses. ♦*♦ I am - pleased to hear that the Otago Hunt Club's season has so far resulted more satisfactorily .from a financial point of view than the last season or two did. With two enthusiasts like Messrs ' Hart and Taggart to work up the affair, I have no doubt that in due course the club will be actually in funds. There is some talk of organising a concert at an early date to give the club a lift, and should this be successful the drag will be taken off the wheels. V The field for the Two Thousand Guineas was the same in number, as when Ormonde won the year before last, and with this exception it was the smallest on record since Pitsford did the trick 'in 1850. ,* Friar's Balsam was known to have an abscess in the 4 but , the general impression— the result of the confi- : dence reposed in the colt by the stable — was that this would not affect him, and he started the hottest favourite (3 to 1 on) which has been '■ • unsuccessful in the race in recent times. Para- 1 dox had odds of 3 to 1 laid on him in 1885, and though the Chopette colt nearly defeated him, yet he won by a head. %* The details of the race were given last week, but a few additional particulars of this sensational event from the pen of a leading writer will doubtless be acceptable, jl quote from the Sportsman:— "The race which was to' flo completely upset public form began with, military 'punctuality. In cantering ctown the ,1 Rowley 1 Mile Friar's Balsam - must have broken '• 'fresh- abscess or something of . thai sort, as* within ** minute or two of the- signal 'given .Gannon' found his mouth full of- bjood and' matter. . This must have had, a choking effect upon him, as he ran a beaten colt every yard of \ the way, and only, took third place for a few, etrides at the Bushes under 'distinct pressure. In the meanwhile the pace set by Johnny Morgan 'was suiting Ayrshire to perfection, .and John Osborne had neither to use whip, nor spur in taking him to the front as they rose out of the Abingdon Mile Bottom. ■• HeTiiad, in fact, won the race, everywhere, and to make the triumph of Heath House more complete Johnny Morgan stalled, off Orbit by a head for second Slace, with Crowberry close up oa'tbe'jnrhip? and ' a good length and a-half ahead of Friar's Balsam. The result was .60 startling and so unexpected that the bookmakers did. not greet the downfall of the favourite with half] the; volume that might have been .expected." As for '• the* I'layers1 ' layers of odds, they were simply dumb-, founded,; and'the few who hastened 1 to the padTid6k t» ascertain the cause if 'the; catastrophe wjwu too late, that the poor "Friw'i*'

mouth^was full 1 of bad. pixxfl. "His^'downfall under 1 such cruel circumstances was^a painful blow to the Kingsclere stable. "The' Duke of Portland has been smothered with' good luck this spring, and 'where a break will occur it is impossible to .'say, as Johnny. Morgan has worked himself into the position of a' most able aide-de-camp to the hero of the hour. ' ' ' ' . . ! **♦ This made .the .sixth Two Thousand Guineas winner ridden^' by the veteran John Osborne. The first of these was so long ago 'as 1857, on Vedette, who, though as often ?s' ( hot lame on his way-to the post, was thb ora(sk of his years. The veteran' horseman's ■skill and judgment (continues the writer from whom I quote), are the same as ever, nor has the century ' produced an example more commendable vto the younger school pf his profession. Then many years sped by, ( until late^ih' th^ •" sixties "^ the Ashgill jockey, secured .another, Two. Thousand 1 when Pretender outstayed the roaijing (Bella- '| drum, only, to tt become i .himself .a ' ; V mtisician ? " ' which alone prevented the lengthy Adventurer, colt from cheaply taking rank' with "West Aas-' tralia'n Gfadiateur, and Lord ' Lyon,' the 2'only triple-crowned heroes, up '& that titne.. Representing the same dwneTship as Pretender, Both well, in Joh'nlOstyorn'ets Hands capture'^ wljat may safely be described, as; a, slice of luck^inas^. much as he beatbya.le'ngch Sterling, whd eventually proved himself the champion of His ag e » whereashisNewmarketconquerersankinjboavery estate. On the stalwart Prince Charlie — how low fortunate that the Dobbler's game was frustrated , — Osborne rode a splendid finish} just outlasting Maidment on Cremorne. His; Camballo victory was readily achieved, and now, after this long , interval, his sixth Two Thousand has been won,' and, what is at least worth noticing, he has won it on a descendant of Vedette, for Ayrshire's dam is that horse's granddaughter. . ' '*, ]'- , * # * John Osborne attained his 55th,]year on January 7 last. The only bet he had on the Two Thousand was with Mr Vyner, the wager being an even sixpence that Ayrshire . beat Crowberry. On one occasion, it will be remembered, Lord Falmouth lost a similar, wager, and ornamented the coin before paying n. Perhaps Mr Vyner did the, same, „ -%*" On, the evening of the Two Thousand day Mr Barrow, the wellrknown .Newmarket veterinary, lanced the abscess in the colt's jaw, and' a quantity of, discharge was .extracted, which gave the horse relief, and his trainer hoped . in a few days to be able to resume work. ' • *** We learn that Ayrshire's time overthe Rowley Mile (one mile 17yds) was lmin 52 l-sthsec, as tined by Benson's chronograph, the value of the stakes being £3550. Last year Enterprise (9st) occupied, lmin 45 3-sthsec, and the stakes were of the same amount, while' in 1886, when Ormonde (9at) was successful, 'the time was lmin' 46 4-sths'ec, and the value of the race £4000. 'Some previous "records follow :— 1885, Mr Brodrick-Cloete's ' Paradox (9st), time lmin 51 2-sth sec, value £4300 ; 1884, Mr J. Foy's Scot Free (9st), time lmin 48seo, value £4150'; 1883, Lord Falmouth's .Galliard (9at), time lmin 50'2-sthsec, value £4550 ; 1882, Duke' of Westminster's Shotover 1 (Bst 91b), time lmin 53 2-stlißec, value £5000 ;' 1881', Mr'Grosvenor's Peregrine (Bst 101b), time' lmin 49sec, value £6150; 1880, Duke of > Beaufort's Petronel (Bst. 101b), titne lmin 52sec, value £4850. ,, The weights carried in the race were altered from colts Bst 101b, fillies Bst 51b, "t0 bolts 9s't, fillies 'Bst 91b in. 1882, and it may be added that the fastest 1 time in which the Tw6 Thousand has. been won is lmin ' 43sec, ' by Diophantus in 1861. * # * It has been suggested that there are enough ponies in and about Dnhedin to make a good race if thb D. J.C. should see, fit to put such an event on" the Hunt Club programme. I . pass the bint on to those who have the management of these affairs. *** A smart piece of riding has been ao complished by a gentleman farmer in Brittany, namd M . Adam Boucher, who made a bet' chat he would ride from Nantes to, Paris within three days, the distance being just .under 250 .miles. He started from Nantes at 1 o'clock "Wednesday afternoon, and reached the Place de la Concorde at 11.30 Saturday mqrningi-wifch just an hour and a-half to spare. With the exception of 1.2 hours' rain and the loss of ■ a shoe, the ride was an uneventful one, and the* horse he rode, an 11-year-old chestnut gelding named Fra Diavolo, had what 6ur American friends would call a " good time^' as his master treated him to six bottles of champagne on the road. - • ■ %* Mr Hammond's Sultan keeps in form, and at the New Brighton race's oh Thursday of last week pulled off the double of the two flat handicaps under heavy weights; -his impost in the Coronation Handicap, one mile auda-quarter, being 9st, and in the Flying Handicap, six furlongs, he had a halfrstone penalty, making his weight 9st9lb. Both r*ces were won very easily. The colt is no- doubt a really good one. Though his opponents were neither renowned nor numerous, they included Count D'Orsay and Erin-go-bragh, to - both of whom the black colt was conceding weight. The sum of £1089 was passed through the totalisator. Idalia, winner'of the Disposal Stakes, was bought by Mr D. O'Brien fop £16 10s. V Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show in London was brought to a termination by two matches on the Manchester couroe between American bronchos and English thoroughbreds. B»th matches were over a distance of 10 miles. In the first match, for a stake of £400, the con- ' ditions provided that the horses should be changed at every half-mile, with, one rider to each set. The English throughbreds were furnished by Mr B- Goodall, the rider being Mr J. 'Latham. The broncho horses were from the Wild West Studj and were ridden by the Mexican, Antonio Esquivel. The half-mile saw the Englishman with a slight advantage, this lead being lessened by the adroitness with which : the American changed, and at the finish of the '• second circuit the American led., < amidst loud j cheers, the riders being dead level 1 - when the third half-mile was completed.' The Englishman than gained a decisive lead* his mounts showing the greater pace, and owing to this advantage he continued at the head' of affairs till the eighth circuit, when the American,* by bis quickness in changing got the, lead,'' which, he -maintained till entering; the fourteenth lap, Jwhen his : horse bolted clean, across 1 the 7 track, which let. up Latham; who at this. time got half a lap^to the 'good, which he maihtairied ; till the sixteenth, when the American caught Jhiin/gt;e'ati l 6heerifg signalising Mshis.fea^ ' On , entering' "the seventeenth - lap the' 'American's, saddle slipped j 'and let him down heavily against the iron, railings. This ended' the American's chance; for it was aton^e seen that he had hurt himself rather seriously, his' shoulder , being badlydamaged. The Englishman then finished theaistan'ce alone^ J '■ h \\'"'.'J-~ ' * ♦** In the second- match.. .the, conditions s wereT slightly 'different, as 'the jockeys', bad' to .change their mounts without any 'assistance. AlthoughiiheEngh'shban'smounfesho wed much the /greater pace the alacrity with which the American* mounted and disinpanted fully counter- , balanced any advantage' tnat^ttfie Englishman gained in this respect. I nipaeHiatel^ou starting . the Englishman 'go-off .with a; short leadj' and passed the post slightly ahead 1 atr the end of the %st lap," and also'effected a; further 'advantage iii bis cli'ange^'but'owwg to a wUision the cow-

pletion of the next' lap, through an 'Americari 'horse getting on the tra6k he' lost hiß lead,- and. tlje American quickly went to' the head df Affairs. Latham then gradually leksenedtW gap, but the Americanly" his 'spletfdid" dismounting 'rapidly gained and increased his' lead-to acouple of farlongs. The American thiiri lost a' considerable/ amount of ground; but Latham' never succeeded in making' anything like ; a diminution !of his opponent's long ' lead; the' American winning amidst tumaltuoua applause by 400 yds. iTime, J 22min. .•••;•"■■'-'■ -. - ,-•• ... ; *. v f *^'TheOaliterbury Times' representative ■ has been inspecting Mr Stead's horses, and the ' .following ex tracts, from 1 his notes will be (found' interesting :— Gipsy King Was never handsome,: except^ of course, on, the prjncjple 'that:handsome is as handsome does; but jiwfnow 1/*1 /* vigo-; rous wiriter'epat ' arid ' S general neglige ' air give hiiai' the appearance pf a grejit banging halfbred hnnter/ secured *by t 'som'e"g6od''^udge'tb' carry 16s't' to h ! ouiids/*©ut' h^ ; is ! as' ; quiet''as a 1 sheep,' and 'permits a closer inspection 5 , ;which reveals' the fact tWat • the material which! made him' about ir a couple of stone" better" than any three-year-old but of bis own" stable is still there.., He is more * wonderfully muscular -thAn ever, looks the picture 1 of winter health, and so' far.as; we could 'see' tHrougK 'the ; natural cover|ing of those much'criticisedlegSjis assound as when, he' made his y«Z>W. ' Maxim has grown' v6ry, little since he npseti our .predictions' in* the Micldlepark P4atelaßt' December tWelveraonths, arid hedoes not show the "'rude 4 ' condition which distinguishes Gipsy' King,' but it would be a bold: man indeed that would find much fault With the champion pf the year.' His fore legs are incased in thick bandages/ but wind-galls,' we Junderstand, are the only serious'tr'ouble, and these may not hie very' formidable. At 'our' previous inter-, view Mr Stead hoped that his colt Would remain as sound as we sa^him until the Derby,' and. he now looks for the samejgood management and good fortune to carry him over the Champion at, Flemington. Sextant ' looks'' ragged and • used ' up. He is still troubled with his feet, but apart ' from this he carries a wasted, effeminate appearance, which one hardly expects to find in one*of the biggest winners of the season;;; He hksbeen backed by somebody for the next New Zealand Cup, but, while he is a colt for' which we have always had more than a passing fancy, he! strikes, us just now as 'about the ' worst goods these early and apparently rash speculators could select; He is sure receive 'somdthing solid in' the. way of weight, and at present looks the lenst likely, of Mason's string to stand a, good spring* preparation. ' Lochiel looks better and sounder than , ; when we saw him under 'similar circumstances last year, and as he has lived in clover.sincehe. broke the ring — not merely as a reward for this meritorious performance-r-he may make another formidible bid for the big race. 1 ]■ { *#,*• From ; American turf statistics, lit, appears that .the progeny of the thorougbred sire Virgil by Vandal from Hymenia, have won in stakes since 1876 g total of 375,619d01. , , . , *„♦ Friar's Balsam, before ever- being stripped f or, his first public race, the New Stakes ' at Ascot, 'where he met Seabreeze (a previous 'winner); 'Ayrshire; Sawdust, Bartizan j Simqn Pure, and Saltire, was the medium of one of the i biggest bets at a short price ever recorded in connection with the Derby 18 months in kdvanoe' of the Epsom , race. A friend of Sir Frederick ■ Johnstone's, and an enthusiastic admirer of the, 'son of Hermit and Flower bf Dorset,* Accepted 10,000 $o 2500 about Friars- Balsam for. the Derby, , .\i , . „-..-, .-.mxh •* # * All sorts of dodges -.have been tried by the- ring to circumvent the infernal ciaohine. A band of 'Queensland bookmakers' irecenljly offered Brisbane Tattersall's Club £500 if< the committee refused to allow the totalisator to be worked at 'their next race meeting, but the baitwas declined. , r „ , ; «•< - ) *$* From Cromwell we learn that Mr^O.Cr." Mountney has purchased the entire Goldfinder, and will use him for stud purposes next' season. - Goldfinder is sire of Jimmy, Maggie, Luoyj and other well-known trotters. . i . 7 ' ' : ♦»♦ Mat Dawson^ says that Silvio was Jso 1 good that he could have won two Derbies out of "i three ;' but he was not so good as either -Wheel of Fortune or ' Jannettel ' Even now ' Lord Fal-> mouth often talks' of the trial between those three at Weight-for-age, and in Which Wheel of Fortune, 3yrs, was first; Jannette,,4yrs,|secohd; and . Silvio, syrs, third. It is Bjat iDawson's opinion fchat there never' was a horse in late year/r like St. Simon. J ' ' -, •. ' * 9 * The North -East Valley" 'Borough, Council have gone a step further than any of | the other councils that have declined to back up the suggestion, /made in the Cbristehurch 'circular^' .The Mayor, .MrSeptjtams Myers, gave it as his opinion that so long ai gaipbling" on "horseracing continued the totalisator was preferable by ; far to bookmaker^las being less likely to induce dishonesty,; besides providing funds for racing purposes, and the council gravely carried a resolution, the /'cause why" of which maybe an enigma to the future councillors, to the effect \ that the council is of opinjon that the totalisator should not be abolished. ! *** Fred B. %vmtt ha^i had bad y mojzzle " lately. The Duke of Portland and Lord London- , derry tossed for the choice of h'B services isonie i time back, when Hazlehatch was intended to fun 1 in the Two Thousand, and the Lord Lieutenant | having* won the toss John Osborne was retained I for Ayrshire. ! . • 1 „,'''; *^* The^aron was offered for sale at New- : market recently, but the disappointing son' of Xenophon failed to reach the reserve of SOOOgs placed upon him. *** Kurow Jockey-Glijb is early afteli with next season's programme. The races are fixed for the 21st September, and a bill of fare providing fpr the disbursement of £165, spread over eight events, is now before the public. Mr George Dowso is to handicap. *%* The doings of Mr Benzon— a yoijtng gentleman that we take some interest in) owing to his having 'honoured Dunedin with a visit — are .chronicled iu'detail in the English papers., He is reported tp have won something like £1.800 over Bonnie -ScoManUi at « recent 'race: meeting' atPlutttpton; but at the satne meeting made, a loss which would apt as a^settoff. 'He purchased Fornax" before, running 5 m the Berwick Sellisg Handicap, but although she' was made favourite/ stie had to;pufcup. with iecbna^plaWto Crofter, ' who the judge's verdict by ahead. The latest freak on Beiizdp's 'part is' said to be that he has taken to playing John ' Roberts at pyramids at £1 a ball- 1 r^ut we cannot believe all we !»»; *\'": •'-»• *v' v ♦■•■:■•- ;. . v , r> , 1 * + * In' April *Msfc a cyossbred .Arab, horse called Shotover, which has been- through- the Soudan war, trotted 19 miles in 58min 30sec at' Milton (Englana)-fb?y Wager of :£lo.' : The con^ ditions of the match were that' the horse should trot fromthe Billet, Keystreet, td the Squu-rels, at Stoclcbury, and back, twice— a'distance of 1Q tailes— in 'an "hotir,* i 1 minute's grace being allowed for the' turiiV ' The rtu» comWneed at a minute to the half hour, young'jjm Biiley, a lad 13 years of age, bestriding his sfeed with all the ease" and assurance of -a full-blown . jockey.' *6h6^ver''c\it'ou^Htfe7^^g' 4 at' t & < ''-rare'paGe;' Vhioh a ihV ; neyer : 'onße t slackenedj'and-the half- x distance^wai'Xovered. in 28min;^" Quickly turrii^gjhdrieWd' rfder-headel bacKi» Bfiookbury: Wd iri u< fanicry"t dr febnie, ifchwhbflje ultimktSly passragth^' winning post ja 53min

v3ofieo,«r,lim^n,tojth^gopd, y^Shotovei Wled, ; up, as /resh- as, whebßhoißtar|;e(),, and .what bakes, Ithe performance all the more nota,b{e.js that she Was purchased some time ago, by hef>lowaer^for. f A, mere,; Bong,; who imagined, that;, she possessed .such,' qualities; until . recently they ; i became developed) : The. .race* was; rud,\vith scrupulous; fairness, land^Me?Brs,.,Paynei Mid , Goodhew,^who .followed behind * ons a ) f,rap t as ' ■judges, state,;that.. the. horse , never, once jhroke oufcof her .trot. ct.<i.'K'- ;/,-u- u\ ''f-A, "* ' -'.v <,< *j*<<Shifnal,;the three-year-ojld-son :6i Ec, Loup and Eugenic, was ;put up: to. auction on, Saturday last, ? « by r Messrs * Wright, Stephenson, . -and Co., the cause iof -this-being, I understand,; that 'the partnership previously, subsisting between the colt's owners had been dissolved.; Mr Mercer, who has had, the training of Shifnal, was , anxious;, to, retain the colt as bis own .property, and succeeded in doing so, but for this he had to pay- 123gs,s Which I ,take. s to. be the full! value, though I happened to know that he is.. slippery / customer over this own tfistanoe-^aeven or fight i furlongs — and perhaps may return his purchase, money 'before, next season's far < advanced^ , It was rather a plucky purchase on Sam's part, and; ,1 hope to see him rewarded. -'„"*,' \ ! '• •'.' *'^f The following, advertisement appealed a ! few years back in an American newspaper, aild; is the most ingenious speoimon of alliteration we have ever come across,*— ", Spanker, the property of Squire 'Samuel Stevens, of Shaker walls, Saturday,. September 16, will be set upfbr sale at Saratoga Springs ; a strong,' staunch, steady; sound, stout, Bafe, sinewy, serviceable, strapping, supple, swift, smart, sightly, sprightly, spirited, • Bhineing,>ure-fdoted, sleek, smooth, sorrel steed of superlative symmetry, with .small star and snip,' squaref-sided, , slender-shouldered, , sharpsighted, free, from stain, sprain, spavin,' springhalt, sciatica, staggers; strangles,-seeling,)sellan-der, surfeit, seams, stramous .swellings, scratchings, splint, scurf .-sores, shuffltng,^hambling gait, ■or sickness of any i sort; neither stiff «mouthed, shabby-coated, smew, shrunk, spur-galled, saddlebacked, ■ shell-toothed, short-winded, , splay-, footed, *or v shoulder-slipped; nor' is •he sour; stubborn,- or' sulky ; neither, sly, nor skittish, slow, ' sluggish, or 'stupid ; never slips^ 'strays, slacks,- stalls, .stops, shakes, snivels," snuffles, snorts,- !nor stumbles,. Ha 3 a spry,- showy, stylish, swish tail ; can - feed on stubble^ sanfoin, sheaf-oats, straw sedges, [or Scotch [ grass; carries 16at -with surprising speed in his stroke over a -6ft sod or;- stone, wall. His sire is Sampson,- by Sangrado, oui N of Spangle, sister to Sunset; dam ,by Sultan Sdlyman, out of Sally Slut.,- Spanker won the . Steeplechase Sweepstakes andSubscription Plate last season at Scarmont. His selling price is £67 16s 6d sterling. He is to be seen -at Squire Samuel Stevens' stables, stall number six, at Shakerwalls." •• v > , > ( , . - %* An action fpr £5000 for an alleged libel which appeared in a Broken Hill paper has been commenced by the Adelaide turfite Mr S, Ferry, ' the .words complained of.- being that " the rosin must- have, been rubbed off Speculations -reins id the Cup." „ , ; * ',f, f i . ( -V" The Sportsman contradicts a ! state* trnent to the effect that, arrangements., had; 'been, made. between, the parties, to, the-,Chetwynd-Durham-case by whicVihe matter, in {dispute, would, .be. arbitrated upon, by Lord jH^rschellj !the,Hqn., James Lp,wjther»,.and Mr Chaplin. So far ppthing. whatever of the; kind, 'has been ar-, ranged, neither has there bsen a discussioh on the" subject by any, of tlipse. concerned in the case,! which we have good, ground for- believing will eventually be decided; before a judge. :| „ '„ , , *^* -Friar's -Balsam' has >■ generally * spoken of as a little horse, 1 and though much less ■ than either of the Duke of Westminster's pair —Orbit' and Ossory— the son of Hermit stands 1 10 hands gin,' whilst sOsHory. is the giant of the Kirigsqlere trio that ?ran in the' Two Thousand, Standing a hancLhigher than Friar's Balsam 1 , and ' being just over 16 hand?. <* , - , . * # * Of Oirowbirry, "one of the crack three-year-old colts in England, it is said that one of his fore feet is a bit smaller than the other', There is a horse <in Nelr.Zealand of whom I am 'assured 1 by gasman who professeato'know all 'about.it tha| one i of. the legs is measureably shorter than itsiellow. '; i. , r, s' ' ?^*'A' Parliamißntayy paper shows';' the amounts, as estimated 1 by the Chancellor of the 'Exchequer in opening his' Budget/ to bel yielded hf the horse duties'ahd T?heel tsix pfoposed.in the Excised Duties 1 (Local Purposgs)' BUl! As regards' the. pr'dposed' horse 1 'duties, isoo^oooi soo^ooo horses' were" 11 estimated to "yield, -at" d6l' each, £500,000; 4000 at'£§ ! each',' £2o;oo0 :' and 1500 horse dealers at- £ls each. £22,500-^a 'total of £542,500. For the 'wheel ;tajr, 300,000 carts with two wheels were estimated to produce; at '5s each, £75,000 ; 150,000 carts with four wheels, at 10s, £76,000 ; 150,000 ' carts weighing more than JOcwt, at £1, in addition to the 5s or 10s duty, £150,0,00— a total of £300,000. ♦ # * piana is the name gjyen to thp' maiden chestnut mare that Mercer is schooling to jumbing on behalf of one of the .'patrons of his stabK V ' ' *^* At the last Newmarket' meeting a somewhat singular objection was made to a mare named Queen being declared the winner of the Selling Plate. It seems that Queen of Diamonds, -dam of Qallopiug Queen, doe's not appear in the V Stud Book," h,eirig half bred, which faot^ it i.s claimed, should haye been stated at the time of .entry. ■ - %* ' Racing in France is • undqubtedly undergoing a great change.' The number of people who pay at the doors has fallen off, and owners haye, especially at some of the meetings, taken advantage of the fact that the attention of the stewards ban. been engrossed with that elaborate toy, the '* pari-mutuel," and the absence of any practical and professional judge. The Paris correspondent' of an English .paper adds that at" Auteuil a former county court judge is in the chair, and. at Longohamps a retired colonel looks at the winning post from a military point of view. Who knows but that we may not have sonje peaceful, Qod-fearing brother qi angle as starter, 'arid' 4«d that' ! handicap*ping is relegated to the department, of that' grocerY assistant who weighed out thecjarthoraes, at tlip" horse show where no competitor in the' draught * class was accepted over half a ton in weight. iP-jencUlersarebaaiy 'off , but then jtis th^ fashToh, notwithstanding 'the- defence attempted, by 'Mr' Chaplin: Piessei'n'otlto" haye pity on this hatdused class of individuals. Field money is like di*monds.--not .to^be ,|oijfid An . t i*tuß land^f anW. Bothing can induce; the'puplic to back horses for' ..which they have not a strong fancy. They 'will' back one,' and perhaps two, horses, but they will not look at the others, and the, fdvourites have been rolling home since the commencement of ' the racing at Longchamps. - , „/-,, i = "" '< • ',';" . ,*#^jMedjco, tbe^prsißjjhat Westpn u^ed^to race r ; ride to hounds, fieems to have got all right again," for ■\TJ notice" tbat^ ridden »by. ; Mr § Aynsley,:. he won- a 'three-mile steeplechase at - Cambridge' last week." '.'There were seven starterft^ but;dnlyifourlfinißhed. r .^y ■. .^.fs.. ♦^, The leMmgparticTiiars'ol the race for? -the One Thousand .Guineas, published last" week may be supplemented by.a few"additioijal ftfctf gleaned from the detailed', reports. 7 Seabreeze, with Love in Idleness,' was always ? cpnSpicubus in ; the^centre^ andiuntilithe Bushes were ireicKed,' ddabuen many of the >Bpectafors thoughts that" eJjQ was in front.' It? then,' however, became

•apparent /to^everyb^l^ai^B^rlolJ^'. playinglthepart ofpiori^qß.^thW^ngemceras ' ,she was weU clear of, B9UeMah6nO*wh^wasifi -jturn Jn,advance;9i>*U;the'Othßre^^rgfeat ? an--' advantage did^Briar^rpotr^os|eskthati : Warned" TWM-ableitt) bring^er right across ft-om^righf; tb ! left ;withbut>any^danger/qf^iiiyrieXfag^with " anyxlof s het! -\ : rivals.. - hiu Seabreeze 1 <aa she/ coropletelyi lost ■ from*/ the •, dipi^.to .the^l.winning'-posjr Mu&gfo "like ' 'the ? good ifilly - she unquestipnably^ia^as she caught and passed r ßeU.e Mahone,and;reduced the six lengths*, lead which Briarrroot hejdinthe dip to > two *as they L 'box.Frondeuae finished fourth, Lovein Idlenessfifth, Her,-; Majesty NinaYse^entli^stafette? , eighth, Dolores ninth, Hall Mark tenth; Sawdust eleventh, Rebound, twelfth, and: last of ill came Lataniafand Magenta. Imiu 44 3-sthsec. Value of>the, stakes, v,;-V fe£. "' . In? 1887 the-Duke p£ Beautort's Reve* dOr occupied ;>linitt 47 3-6thsec',' and the value of the stakes was £3300Jwhile iu-'the year, when the Duke of Hamilton's Miss Jummy' Was successful,' the 'race was 1 worth? £2950, and the time taken was lmin 52 2-sthseo. »We append some' previous^ records Duke of Westminster's Farewell,' time lmin 47 :4-sthsec, value £3600 ;' 1884, ? Mr> Abington'sj Busybody time lmin 47seo, value 188S/Mr C. J. Lefevre's Hauteur, time lmin 50 4-sthsec, value £2900; 1882, Mr. W; S.'' Crawford's St. Marguerite, time lmin 55 2-sthsec, value £2900; 1881, Mr W.S.- Crawford's Thebiis, time lmin 50sec, value - £4750 ; 1880, Mr. ,T.? B. Elizabeth, time lmin 56seo, value; £39so. 'Tho weight carried war raised front Bst> 101b ■to Bst 121b in 1882. : v : ' -,-■«' j *^* More than 40 years ago' (says\an exchange), a certain Lord X; was known to be the maddest backer and' gambler of his day. , With him to gamble was to live, and to live to gamble, and in his own person he proved ; the reverse of this by gambling only to die. .Deeply involved before, he left a celebrated: "hell',?, .early one morning owing ; a small fortuneVra ,'debt of honour he < was bound topayt. HU one chance was the Jews, and accordingly he instantly went to' a certain notorious money lender,,wish whom he had- had many,' ruinous transaojions. >M P. K.i" said he, " Iwant £10,000.",5 ?'Most happy,' my lord; iupon what security?'??: JMJIy life." P. K. started. Fiendish as many of his transactions had been, he was as yet scarcely prepared to barter in the souls of men. J^Yes,?' replied Lord X..; " everything has gone '.through your hands, and my existence alone remains. You hold, policies. on.-my life for. nearly £100,000; refuse my request, and I swear, that I will commifbpen suicide and invalidate your securities. Grant if* and I will reinsure, for another £50,000, and, if I should lose it, I will kill myself in such a manner that, death will: be ; considered accidental.". Lord, X. got| hjs .ioan^nd lost it, and. a few months afterwards, when out with a large shooting. party, in getting over, a stile, he accidentally shot himself, and7P. r K. made £40,000 over the, transaction. -,//.;'"! .*** Mr T. Reynell, L,ane, ow?er f of The. Celt, is staking leghlpyoceeduigs for of the stake for which '/hej %a§. ; disqualified. Particulars of this affair appeared. in a previou. 'issue. ,', - ■' „ ... ,.,-.., - < «.%* Aninterestingtpointiniapji^gJawhas jusUbeen decidedsbyiMrjWwd, resident magistrate.'' :Ib tlßß7<a native >named r Aamuera — which, I may explaihjJs pigeon oEnglish for Saniu<»ls— entered Lady Artist for. twQ races at the Egmont meeting,, butsdid, not pay (the fees, and the- mare, did not' run,. Some, tune Afterwards Mr 8.-'Coyle bought .the.marg^iiot knowing -of the default bf ,the .previous owner, and ran' her at ■ other' race 'meetings,, no '.objection being made to his so doing. In Mapbh last he caused her to be entered, for a race at the April meeting of the Fielding Jockey Club, and when he applied for tickets for himself and Jockey, Mr Sandilands, as secretary of. the Fielding Clu.b, informed him he could not allow, the mare to run till he had paid £2,« the nomination fees due to the, Egmont Club; which claim- he. made in ac? cordance with aletter he had received from Mr Nolan, the secretary- thereof,, ■{ Mr.. Coyle obt . jeoted to pay, but finding the mare would not be allowe^to run until he, had, done. so, he paid it under protest, and now sought, to recover a re» turn thereof. His/,Woi^hiß Ipiind ' that the Egmont Club/is .within the r jurisdiction of the , Taranaki metropolitan , ; olub J 7 the ' Egmont Club had /dot notified the -nonpayment of the fees to ife/inetropolitan club.iwhichwaa the pro* per course, to^adopt, after .wh|o^fha Taranaki Club, should .have Reported the,, matter to the Wanganui, . Club, whioti , yjould in , $urn^ have advised the country clubs jihder As these formalities had not been, complied with, His ; Worship held that the FJejouig secretary w«s not justified in demanding payment of the fees, and. judgment was .therefore. "given for plaintiff, with costs., „■:' \ ' f '.' , , ' . • V recent sale'^f ip'-lS^Benzon'g horses in training occasioned sii^art competition. Captain Machell .was a , prominent .purchaser, and gave 1550gs (the highest fi^urjareaphed) for the two?year-olds Wrinkle and Fair Marion. A reserve ;of lOOQgs. w&s placed ori.7the , stalljon Kingswood, but it was not reached, and acouple of youngsters, r Hazlemere acid, Barkham; were bought in for 3100gs each. Altogether the sale realised 12.41.0g8., , j\' Xi , .j*. iti . , *** .There were .seven starters for the Kentucky Derby, run at the L.oqisville , meeting on the |.4th May. . Macbeth 11, by Macduff-r-. Agnes; won by a length from Gallifet, by Falsetto—lndia, with. -White,. (byj.Kfng Ban-^ Hegiaz) third.' The time being 2mm 38|seo. \* The Brooklyn Jockey Olub-HahdU cap, of 5000dol, one mile and a-quarter, was the • first of the big American handicaps. „It.waa run on the 15 tb May, and was contested by a. field of eley-en, made up as follows :-^The B.ar4 (syrs, Bst 131b), Hanoyer (4yrs, 131b), Exila. (6yrs,Bst2tb),Fenelon"(4yrß, fab 5,1b), Volante (6yrs; Bstlolb),'Favourj(Qyrs,.Bs.t4lb)i Oriflamme (4yrs, 7st 91b), Royal Avph'^ged, 7st 4 81b). Grb- { jver Cleveland (§yrs,;7s^7l]b),»Sa?9ny (syrs; Bst 3,lb), ! and galoolah (syrs, Bat $p%i $he betting -was 9 to, f 5-agßt HAno^er.^.i^^The Bard. .There was a grand rape between -- Hgnovey and The -Bard, the .latter,;, winning! by, a length; MwQFQV.fyvu Aength's^m fw>nt'.,o| pxile. t Time, *2mjn }3sec.. . t , 3f u „] ;^; (/ ,;4; - - ;{ %% Dnrjng tthe /weefej^opnifl^has; been backed for the New Zealand Oup at, 100 to 8, but pnlyin small sums. / .j^^Mi'-fr jSr&f .The , ptago,^ui^j, OlftVs, race meeting •. itfii-jfee w«y of, •.* stakes.-- a ,?«,- . ■ tt- i. hVv^-w^ht^d • - ' .'.

' ' * . Olub. 3 $ a £ 600 2000, 4000 800 800 400 60Q 2500 600 4CO 600 2COO 1200 2000 -400 2000 2000 '600 1200 600 600' 400' 1200 i 400 , 400 3500 1600 400 '£ 535 1065 ,1995 760 582 256 !475 970 301' 195 587 1330 900 965 .830 .800, 1505 328 : ■ 590 . 365. 430 220 975 275 3-50 3110 '649 < 284- ■ Si 1L ■ i i Oromwell... Greymouth Heathcote Hokilika... Invercargill 'Knikouro... ... [ Lake County ... Lancaster Park ... Maniqtoto J.O. .., Mar ton ... > North Auckland ... Onehunga „... Otahuhu ... Plumpton Park Porirua< ... • ' ... Kpeftdn ... ... Takapuna... ■ ... • apauui ,'., ' ' Town and Suburban.;. Vincent County . ... I Waimate ... „. Waipq ... Waipawa... Waipii ... Waveriey-Waifcotara :, Wolliii^ton R.O. ... Weatport... ' .;. Winton ... 2 3 6 2 2 3. 2 5 2 22 i 3 4 2 3 4 2 3< 2 2 2 3 2 2 4 3 2 3 5 ■ 8 4 4 2 3 5 3 2 3 4 3. 4 2 5 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 2 7 4 2 £ " 1 '65' 935 i 2005. - 40 218 141 > .125 1630 299 J 205 1.3 800 ' 1035. !70 1200 495 ' "272 610 235,, 170. 180 ■ 225 - „125, 60 396 1051 - [ .l«6.

Ashburtoir ..; ■Auckland .> ... taute^bury . ... j.Dunftliri ' " ... Egmorit' Foxfcbn • . >GeraldJne ' Hawke'aßay ',<.. Island Bay ... Manawatu ... Matlborough ■ - „, Maafcerton-Opakl ... Napier Park New EJrfgbion H.O. North .Canterbury ... Oamaru < , Petau6 Poverty' Bay Wairarapa ..'. Wnnganu) , H Club. I < • '>< 2 „4 . 3. I 5 2 2, 2 4 ' 3 .2 2 2 & 2 2 ,2 2 ! 3 "^ -I 1 ,'4 , . 7, 10 2 2 7 5 < 2 I 3 1 > -3 ' 2 • 4 2 ' 3 4 „4 I. Si;. ; £, ! too ;3500 28Q0, 5000 ' 400' .400 600 3500 2000' 400 600 ■ 600 2500 400 < 400 i :800 400 600' ' BUO. ! 1600; •Is OQ' 'r 840 7SOO^ ,9425. 820 480 930 5560 2405 fBOO 675 876 3880 450 . 605, 1015 615 1095' 1085' 2525|i ~W>: .4800;, » 6625 , '3580 480" sao , 2080 495 ' 400 ' % «s l ,375, j -380 ',-60 -•i305«-, 315. , 815 ' 495 \ '385!

Year., Starters. Winner. Eider. ' Weight. 1879 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 8 8 16 8 15 11 9 6 Baron New Year ... Clarence Clarence ... Macaroni ... Denbigh Mangaohane Chemist J. Maun Potto H. Lunn H. Lunn A.. Lyford Ellingham Redmond Bllingbam Bt lb 11 12 10 9 12 12 13 2 12 1 10 3 9 12 12 6

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TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 1910, 29 June 1888

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 1910, 29 June 1888

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