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WINNERS OF TRADESMEN'S HANDICAP.

Note. — In 1875 the distance was a mile and a half. From 1876 to 1879 inclusive the distance was one mile and a-quarfcer. In 1880 the distance was made one mile and a distance. In 1881 it was further reduced to one mile. The race did not apnear on the programme of 1873 and 1874, a Butchers' Race being substituted. %* Mohawk, winner of the Post Stakes, is a useful-looking son of Duntroon hailing from the Oamaru district, but now the property of Mr H. Goodman. * # * On the second day of the meeting, Saturday, the course was heavy in consequence of the rain that fell almost continuously from early morning. The Selling Hurdle Race was a soft thing for old Trapper, who fairly revelled in the mud, though his backers did not like the outlook after half a mile had been covered, as at that point Poole had to put the whip on the chestnut and drive him along for a quarter of a mile to get him up with Mabel and Ravenswcod. The last-named was the only horse that fell during the race ; he c&me to grief at the hurdle by the windwill. With this dangerous customer out of the way, Trapper had the race at his mercy. The owner had to pay £65 to retain the veteran son of Duntroon. %* Captain Cook made the running in the Provincial Handicap, but was unable to live with Sultan when the latter made his rush. White rode a nice race on the favourite, making the result safe without showing up the colt too much. Le Temps had the outside running at the home turn, and considering this handicap he performed very creditably, but his only chance of winning was in the event of Sultan falling. ■ %* The public displayed bad judgment in allowing Doubtful to go out at such a long price as 8 and 10 to 1 for the Novel Handicap. The horse had shaped well for a mile in the Maiden Plate, and being a sturdy customer with a light ■weight the wet weather gave him a great advantage. But we were all to blame more or less — the handicapper for letting him off with 63t, aud myself for overlooking him when framing a tip in the Times. The race was practically a match between Doubtful and Gold Dust, the former winning rather easily at the finish. He is, lam told, another of Burlington's get. Will no one give this sire a turn with some good mares ? He has proved himself a particularly useful stallion, though so far only mated with hackneys. %* The Two-mile Trot was one of the most puzzling races of the meeting for backers, fully half the starters having strong claims to support. Rose, the winner, is a daughter of Quicksand, the sire that begot Silverbell and one or two other well-known trotters. She is an average mare that need not be expected to develop into a second Duchess. *** La Rose had an excellent chance given her in the St. Clair Welter, her many defeats on metropolitan courses justifying the handicapper iv apportioning her a light weight, and, making the most of her opportunity for once in a way, she won in a canter, and thus earned the first money her owners have taken in a handicap at the Forbury this season. * # * The running in the Novel Handicap was shown to be true by the result in the Scurry, which Gold Dust took from a dozen others, she being the best of the rough ones in the absence of Doubtful. * # * Snapshot's running in the Consolation was most peculiar. At the distance post he appeared to be right out of the race, hut putting on a tremendous spurt -he caught the leaders and over-ran them by a couple of lengths before the winning post was reached. This marvellous exhibition of speed was particularly gratifying to the owner and trainer, who make no secret of their belief that when well Snapshot is one of the fastest; horses in the country, though he does not always run up to their expectations. %* The sum of £8729 was passed through the totalisators during the two days, being £1053 more than last year. Mason and Roberts handled the money without a mistake. *** Mr Dowse proved by the results in most of the races that his judgment was more reliable than that of his critics, the majority of the races being closely ' contested and the dividends above the general run, taking an average Tight through. He made one miscalculation on the second day in under-estimating Sultan and 'giving St. Clair rather too much weight in- the Provincial Handicap, but when a man makes 'eight good handicaps and only one bad one during a meeting he has, I think, done very well, ■aad should be happy in the approval of a good conscience. * # * Mr Driver, too, made a very fair job •of the starting ; and the secretarial duties were Tvell looked after by the Messrs Sydney and Barry James and their assistants. *** Many folk growled at being compelled to pay half a sovereign for the privileges of the stand and saddling paddock, there being a feeling abroad that this tax should only be levied at the Cup meeting, I doubt, however, whether "the fee kept from the inner enclosures any who would have been there if the charge were lower. The club cannot afford to be careless of its ordiary revenue in these times. .. \* On behalf of those who are not 'wholly absorbed in the dry details of the racing, 1 -have.to express t thanks to the club for provi^lug suoh'a good band as that commanded by Mr Coombs. Their selections' were delightfully played. "

*** T. Payten has the following horses iti work in the interest' of the Hon. James White : — Abercorn, Aberdeen, Cranbrook, Carlyon, Ensign, Volley, Plutarch. Yearlings : Che Sinecure, by Martini-Henri from The Solent (imp.), br g Rudolph, by Martini-Henry from Rusk (imp.), lanthe, by Chester from lolanthe, and br g Cartoon, by Gang Forward from Miama. *** Commenting on the result of the City and Suburban, an English writer says that the success of Fullerton caused many old bickerings and heartburnings to arise, and when Sir George Chetwynd's colours came dashing by the post there was little cheering, and but the slightest enthu»iasm. Of course those people who had supported Fullerton were jubilant; but the majority thought of his terrible in-and-out running last year. Another sore subject is the inglorious display made by Merry Hampton. He never was able to make the slightest show in the race, and evidently something was radically wrong. Mr Abington was rightly most anxious that some inquiry should be made, and he suggested it to the stewards. The horse was examined by Professor Pritchard, and ultimately it was discovered that; , his suspensory ligament had gone. This was the seat of the old trouble previous to last year's St. Leger. That Merry Hampton should have as nearly as possible won is evident. » * # * Another writer^ " Pendragon," says that if Merry Hampton had run iv the Derby as he ran in the City and Suburban, he would have been a couple of hundred yards behind everything when the top of the hill was reached. Where he would have been afterwards it is impossible to say, as on Wednesday, he was slow up hill, slower down hill, and slowest of all on the level. His show was so bad that I for one declined to see anytning wrong — that is, intentionally wrong — in it ; it is a poor compliment Lord Hastings or any other "turf senator" pays perhaps our best jockey, and certainly one of the shrewdest of our owners, himself an accomplished cavalier, when he thinks that if roping had been the intention, the work would have been done in this clumsy and bungling fashion. No ; I prefer to believe that Merry Hampton had a bad day, just as the winner had once or twice last season. *** There are 33 nominations for the D. J.C. Champagne Stakes of 1889, or nine less than for 1888; and we have only seven Otago entries, as against 15 last year. New names in the list are Golden Hope, foe a colt by Burlington out of Fable, and Investigation, for a colt by Gorton from Deceit. \* An aged trotting gelding named Black Hawk, by Sample, from a mare by Green's Bashaw, arrived at Sydney from 'Frisco by the Mariposa, and trotted unsuccessfuly at the recent races at Moore Park. He is not yet fit after his voyage. *** The Duke of Portland doesn't care a rap for racing. He was away salmon fishing ■while his Donpvan and Johnny Morgan were winning big stakes at Leicester. * # * There are 168 stallions in America who are credited with having sired five or more performers each during the 1887 season. Blue Bull heads the list with 54 performers ; Happy Medium has 36 ; George Wilkes and Almont, each 30; Red Wilkes, 29. *#* When the last mail left London Minting was first favourite at 5 to 1 for the Jubilee Stakes, which we have since learnt was won by the son of Lord Lyon. *#* The stewards of the Jockey Club have sanctioned the running of the Derby and Oaks of 1891 over the new course. They also suggest that the £1000 rental now paid for the privilege of using a furlong of ground . in the present course be divided between tha Derby and Oaks as added money. The new track does not please , most of the sporting writers, the turn being, more abrupt than the old one at Tattenham Corner. %* The thoroughbred mare Nora Creina, the property of J. G. M'Fadden, died at Lexington, Ky., on April 4, having reached the ripe age of 29 years. She was a chestnut, foaled 1859, by Mahomet, dam by American Eclipse; second dam, Queen Mary, by Bertrand. She had her first foal in 1865 and her last in 1886 (which came dead), having , produced 16 foals, 14 of which came to maturity. %* Lord Rosebery is said to be about to import a team of the Vermont Black Hawk 1 breed of trotters. These are exceedingly handsome animals, and make probably the finest roadsters, if not the fastest, to be found in the United States. They are bred in the .White Mountain district of Vermont. , *** At an inventory of the live stock of Thomas Keeble, who died at Manor of Huby, Leicester, England, in 1501, a " grey trotting gelding" was valued at £1, a "dun ambling horse " at £1, and a " great trotting gelding" at £10. The latter, we presume, had shown more than the ordinary rate of speed. The trot was recognised in England nearly four centuries ago. *#* Merry Hampton's turf career is at an end. He goes to the stud. *#* Lord Rodney is retiring from the ranks of racehorse owners. *#* Macaroni, sire of Lovebird and Florence Macarthy, is dead. Twenty-five years ago this famous son of Sweetmeat and Jocose carried all before him as a three-year-old, winning for Mr Naylor the Derby, in which he defeated Lord Clifden by a head, as well as the Two Thousand Guineas and Y«rk Cup. These suscesses he followed up by a long career at the stud ; among his sons being the Two Thousand Guineas winner, Macgregor. He spent the latter years of his life at the Mentmore stud, and there died in the second week in April, having completed his 28 years. *** Fagan has ridden the winner of the Gosforth Park Juvenile Plate seven years in succession, and the race has ever since its institution fallen to a horse trained ' in Mr Wm. I'Anson's stable. %* Three hundred guineas was the price, recently paid by Mr T. Valentine for a three-year-old colt named Noble Chieftain, by Fitz James out of Village Belle. ' ' '' / , ' %* At the annual financial meeting of the English Jockey Club, held at Newmarket on' the 18th April, on the motion of the stewards the chairman of committees, for the, time, being, of the Victoria Racing Clubland' the Australian Jockey Club, New South Wales, were elected honorary members of the club. ♦^♦Mick Carmody, the ex-Aucklander,' has got a job as trainer in a Tasmanian stable. *** Why is it that several of the 'Australian papers keep telling us that Tetford did not race in New Zealand this season ? The scribes over the other side should read the papers. ***' Messrs Mason and Roberts passed" £255 through the totalisator at the Winton meeting. The business was spoilt at the outset, there being no investors on the Hurdle Race, and the finish of the day's work was almost as bad, there being but £1 in the machine on the Consolation. *** I. understand that Sb. Clair will remain in Cutts' hands during the winter. He takes a lot of work, and wante it as regularly as Nelson does, and it is thought that there will be a better chance to get' him fit for the C.J.C. November meeting by having him trained in Christchurch.

; *** Marlboiough ran at the Wanganui meeting in the name of Mr A. J. Parsons, who is, I presume, the new owner of the son of St. George and Farewell. His first essay in the colours was a failure, for he was badly beaten in the Flying Handicap by Rufus; but in the longer race, the Winter Oats, the ex- Southerner came in an easy winner. Of the seven starters in the Steeplechase five fell, Faugh-a-ballagh being one of these. He came down at the water jump, and though Lyford was quickly in the saddle again — he received an ovation for his dexterity in remounting— the delay cost Mr Rutherford's horse the race. Kangaroo had little to spare at the finish. There was a sorry exhibition of fencing in the Maiden Steeplechase, all the -starters blundering. Three of the jockeys were hurt by falls during the day. Potts had his arm broken absve the elbow and his jaw fractured; Martin was badly shaken; and Shearsby was cut and bruised about the head. \* Mr A. Walker's horses were brought to the hammer last Monday. ' Apres Moi was passed in at 212gs, the owner being unwilling to part with her at less than 250g9 ; but Snapshot was knocked down to Mr Taylor, of Ohristohurch, the owner of Crossbow, at 62gs, which' l think is a very small price for a horse that, displayed such a phenomenal turn of speed ay he did in the Consolation Handicap last Saturday.Speaking of this horse, I am told that his collapse in the Birthday Handicap was owing to his hind legs having been trampled on during the race, by one of the horses that was trying to overtake the leaders. The accident happened somewhere about the quarter-mile post. If this is so— and the horse's legs bear signs of having been in contract with something— his falling away is easily understood. At the sale Annie Laurie fell to the bid ot Mr J. M'Kewan, who paid 15gs for the daughter of Burlington. The trotter Hawkdun was passed in, the best offer being 95gs, while his owner wanted 150g8. This member is by Bucephalus out of a Malton mare. Thistle, by Laertes, was also passed in, the best offer being lOgs. The yearling colt Rothamsfcead, by Gorton out of Hippona, failed to find a purchaser at the sale, but Mr C. Turnbull secured this promising youngster by private treaty. * # * George Smith is schooling the Duntroon colfc Campbellfcown over hurdles, and I hear that the youngster is coming on nicely. %* Niagara is out of the hands of Mr Day, the Sydney vet., and joins Foulsham's string at Caulfield. *„* Enid slipped up and threw her jockey shortly after passing the winning post m the Birthday Handicap at the Forbury, but neither horse nor rider was hurt, and the filly was quietly captured after cantering to the back of the course. *** There was some horse racing at Thornbury, near Riverton, on Queen's Birthday. The 1 Hurdle Race was won by Mr Officer's Ranger, Gipsy Girl and Pabulum being his closest attendants out of a field of eight. There were 10 starters for the Trot, the places being filled by M'Dougall's Bob, Black Bess, and Peat Bog. All started from scratch. Both flat races were taken by Calder's Gipsy Girl, Hall's Flying Dick being second in one race and Bridge's Countess in the other. Protests were lodged against the winner on the ground that the rider, M'Nab, was at present disqualified, and the committee decided to take legal advice before paying over the stakes. The Novel Race provided that each rider was to face his horse's tail. It was evident (says the Western Star) that the riders had practised the 5 art of riding backwards, a pastime hitherto supposed to be confined to Jack Tars ashore for a holiday. One man had the crupper to hold on by and another had a contrivance made some,what after the fashion of a pack saddle. The riders experienced great difficulty in steering their horses, and freque»tly went inside posts and wide of the course. A dispute arose at the termination as to whether the race should have been once or twice round. It was settled by the two first (Stevens' Seabreeze and Goldie's Spoopendyke) dividing the stakes. *** British Lion, my selection for the Greymouth Birthday Handicap, pulled off that event and the other chief race of the day ; in the latter one giving his old opponent Steelbone 31b and a beating over a mile and three-quarter course. The startling dividend of £95 8s was paid out on Corrie Vie in the Consolation, the owner being the only investor on her. This dividend counts the thirteenth in order among the bonanzas of the totalisator in New Zealand, the list of plums being as follows :—: — £306— Crummy, Fire Brigade Handicap, Taredale. £259— Louie, Napier Handicap £251 14s— Kalo, Shorts Handicap, Auckland £223 4s— Mavis, Trademen's Handicap, Hawke's Bay £174 12s— Lavender, Ashley County Plate £159 6s— Polly, Trotting Handicap, Dunedin £153 9s — Liberty, Hurdle Handicap, Hawke's Bay £139 10s— Tristan, County Plate, Cromwell £120 17s— Adamant, Dunedin Cup £114 68— Malvina, Peninsula District Handicap £113 Bs— Sly Sam, New Brighton Trot £9G — Isaac, Hurdle Handicap, Dunedin £95 Bs— Corrie Vie, Greyraouth Consolation. *** Between 400 and 500 persons patronised the Porima meeting on the Queen's Birthday, this being esteemed a satisfactory attendance. The Railway Stakes, of 20sovs, was contested by a field of six, the winner turning up ia Prosser's Gladstone (7st), with Cupid (7st 81b) second, and Revoke (Bst 101b) third. In the Maiden Plate Bob Ray's cast-off Itepo was rather easily beaten by King's Rata, The Flower being third. Reputation (lOst 71b) ran off at the first; hurdle in the jumping race, and after a rather exciting series of baulks and falls Germaine (lOst 71b) was declared winner of the 30sovs, with Highland Mary (Bst 101b) second. The Selling Hurdle Race fell through, there being no entries, so the next event on the card — the Cup, of 50sovs, two miles — was proceeded with. This attracted a field of seven, of whom .The Spy (Bst 51b) and Gladstone (7st) were made the favourites. Neither, however, gained a plaoe, the race being won by a length by Germaine (Bst 71b), with Pilgrimage (7st 61b) second, and Cupid (7st 91b) third. The Selling Hack Race was won by Te Whiti r and after that event was decided Mr Oliver sent Germaine out i for third time to essay the task of winning the Stewards' Purse, in which she had to carry a penalty of 101b. It is small wonder that she was beaten ; the strange thing about the race, to my mind, being that she got second place to Pilgrimage. The Forced Handicap, was takfen by Orongorongo. Charmer, Gladstone, and Cupid, as well as Germaine, started three times during the afternoon. This, on a sandy beach, is very rough treatment, especially as two of the courses were not short ones. Over £1100 was passed through the machine by Mr C. M'Laughlin< *** The entries for the Grand Steeplechase are satisfactory in regard to numbers, there being 20 by the 'tally; but I think that in regard to quality they are about the poorest lot we have ever had in the big race, there being not one among them that can be classed as a first-class steeplechaser in hi 3 prime. Moody, Orient, and Faugh-a-ballagh were at their best serviceable ' cross-country nags,'b'ut not quite Al, and' - are now the worse for wear ; Master Agnes r and Irish Kiugaresb far as we know them good hurdle racers, but' hardly up^o the stamp of Canard and Co. over hedges';' Haka has never had a f jump of any kind in publfc.and

■the others are rather a mixed batch. We may have a good race, but I fancy that the whole fleet bunched together would not be worth a Clarence or an Agent or a Canard. Had Tres Sec kept right he could not have been handicapped out of it in such company. I suppose 'the Aucklanders are all crooked, or we should have had some of the Ellerslie representatives entered. *** It will be observed that the Birthday Handicap at the Napier Park meeting was ' annexed by the Musket colt Waterfall, and' that^ Chemist gave Mangaohane weight and a beating in the Steeplechase. Soudan pulled' off the Welter Handicap. „ V The Musket filly Pearl Shell will winter at Randwick. *** Mr Donovan, the owner of Dunlop, who won the last Melbourne Cup, has' been in the habit until very recently of displaying under a glass case in a side parlour adjoining his bar the gold horseshoe which was tacked on to the £3155 which went to the credit of the Cup winner. , The proud possessor 'of ' this < trophy (says the Sportsman; got a hint' list week to the effect that it wasn't' altogether ; the most sane proceeding in the world to leave a solid gold trophy, which might easily be pawned for £90, in such close proximity, to the public bar. Mr Donovan took the hint, called on an acquaintance in the moulding line, and had v fac-simile made of lead gilded over. The 18-carat shoe went upstairs into his safe, the counterfeit of poor old Commotion's shoe stood until Monday night under the glass case in the back bar. On Tuesday morning 'twas missing, and I sympathise sincerely with the hypothecated's feelings when he melted down the blue metal— value, approximately, 2s sd. * # * The Hon E. Mitchelson was among those who voted in the House for the abolition, of the totalisator, and it is whispered that the machine is, not even yet safe, there being a possibility that another effort to have it abolished will be made before the close of the session. *** Silver Prince is looking fresh and well, but bis legs are not of the soundest, and it is feared that they will give Mr Dakin some anxiety. V The V.A.T.C., influenced by the decision of ,the Supreme Court that they could not demand the license-fees from the bookmakers on the flat at Caulfield, have forwarded an application to tha Government for a Crown grant of the racecourse held from the Lands department. %* Mr S. Gardiner is sending a shipment of young stock to Queensland. He will not, I fear, try New Zealand again in a hurry. It is said that part of Buudoora Park has been sold. , * + ? The Melbourne correspondent of the Tasmania Colonist quotes some remarks recently made by me as to Messrs Snider, Drake, and Weston having failed to get on in Australia, and adds the following: — "The names of Messrs Drake and Weston should never have - been mentioned. The Victorian Club refused Drake's admission to their circle ; and Weston, after •diddling 'the Christchurch folks, made tracks for Sydney, at which place the racing clubs refused to recognise him, and he had to return to h\& old game." ' >. ' *#* Having a fair knowledge of Weston's character, I concluded when I read the above that the Melbourne man from whom I have quoted bad exceeded the truth in saying that Weston " diddled " the Christchurch folks ; but in order that there might be no mistake about the matter, I communicated with a friend who was well acquainted with Weston's business — a gentleman whose name I am not at liberty to reveal, but whose word would be taken if the name were divulged — and by way of answer received the following, which I place on record as the justificatidn of a man who, I believe, was one of the most I straightforward fielders we' have ever had : — " The accusation against Weston in the Tasmanian paper is most unjust. I am intimately acquainted with the cause and effeot of his troubles, and unhesitatingly c ay that there was no attempt to * diddle ' the public. He certainly overlaid Lochiel in the New Zealand Cup, but when he found himself in a hole he was perfectly candid with the backers of the horse, and after losing his money he made a business-like and manly composition. There is no ground for the insinuation that has been made ; but some people delight in kicking a lame dog." ■ The settling on the Dunedin races took place Monday night, when the following sums were paid over to the owners of winning horses : — H, Hammond, £202 7s ; Hon. G. M'Lean, £158 13s ; J. Stephenson, £99 15s; T. Alexander, £66 10s;' D. Henderson, £66 10s; J. Toole, £66 10s; J. Crocket, £57 ; J. Beaton, £47 10a ; W. J. Haz- • lett,£42 15s; A. Walker, £38; J. Mason, £38; H. Wilson, £14 ss; R. Rutherford, £14 ss; S. J. Mercer, £14 ss; D. O'Brien, £9 103 ; G. Stead, £9 10s ; J. Howarth, £9 10s ; J. Welch, £9 10s; A. J. Keith, £4 15s; J. Ketb, £4 15s; total, £973 15s. The following was the result of the Queensland Cup :— Sirius, 1 ; Legrange, 2 ; Theorist, 3. Mr A. Drake reports to the Referee haviog laid the following wagers during the week : — New Zealand Cup— loo to 8 against Maxim, 100 to 7 Artillery, 100 to 6 Lorraine, 100 to 5 each Wolverine, Manton, and St. Clair, 100 to 4 Quibble, and 100 to 3 British Lion. Melbourne Derby and Cup— looo to 10 against Volley and Carlyon, 1000 to 10 Volley and Cranbrook, 1000 to 10 Lonsdale and Carlyon, 1000 to 10 Lousdale and Oranbrook, and 1000 to 25 Lonsdale and Lonsdale.

Year. Strts. Winner. Age. Weight. Time. 1873 1876 1876 1877 1878 1879 1880 1881 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 8 7 6 7 5 S 4 3 8 2 5 4 10 6 10 Bobtiy Burns Rory O'More Hob Hoy ! Sir William Blue Peter -. Blue- Peter Adamant Ooldstream Luna Adamant Minerva Capt. Webster Marion The Bard ' Sultan a 6 4 a 6 A 3 •4 at. lb. 8 7 8 6 8 8 7 0 8 0 7 10 7 11 7 3 8 2 9 0 7 9 7 7 9 3 7 2 7 7 m.B. 2 57* 2 22$ 2 21 2 29 2 17 2 13* 2 21 2 11 a 6 4 4 4 6 3 1 51$ 1 51 1 51 1 50 1 50$

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WINNERS OF TRADESMEN'S HANDICAP., Otago Witness, Issue 1906, 1 June 1888

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WINNERS OF TRADESMEN'S HANDICAP. Otago Witness, Issue 1906, 1 June 1888

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