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TALK OF THE DAY.

, BY MAZEPPA. . *„* Mr J. Drumin has brought down from Waikouaiti a nice filly to Duntioon. She comes three years' old in January nexb, having been a late foal; and has the appearance of growing into a good stamp of a hurdle racer, having plenty of size and substance, and good bone. I • have made the remark before, but it will stand repeating, that Duntroon's stock are nearly all of a hardy sort, lasting up to ages at which the majority of our racers are done with ; and this stallion seems to have the knack of patting his brand on all his offspring — so much so that one could easily pick out the Duntroons from a mixed mob. This is generally regarded as one test of a sire's value. It is to be regretted that the son of Malton is not given a chance by having a better class of mare 3 put to him, for there is not a more useful stallion in the country. My admiration for a good horse prompts me to give Duntroon's owner this gratuitous and unsolicited advertisement. %* Three betting disputes came before Ohrisfcchurch Tattersall's for adjudication last week, ; the matters at issue being unsettled wagers over the last New Zealand Cup. In one case, in which the pleadings were somewhat complicated with hedging bets, judgment wa* reserved pending the production of fuller evidence;

in another the bookmaker was desired' to_' pay over £2CO lost, on' Ldchiel; and in, the third the backer was declared to be owing the £25 ia dispute. From what I can make out the decisions have given general satisfaction, and there can be no doubt that the existence of such a body as Tattersall's is of service, there being no other tribunal that will undertake* these judicial' duties. But the one thing needed to properly equip such a body, and make its decisions respected, is the power of punishing those who may transgress. At present it is practically optional with the party found to be in fault whether he shall abide by a seuteuce' or treat it with contempt. Tattersall's certainly has the power to declare such a person a defaulter, and to a man of sensitive temperament this would be a heavy punishment; but there are among turf habitues a certain class endowed with the imperviousness of. the rhinocerous, and they don't care two shakes of a lamb's tail for any such senteuce, having no business to lose and no reputation to maintair. The only way to get at such individuals would be to have things so arranged that the branding of a man asa defaulter would carry with it expulsion from the racecourse; aud to .do this there would have to be an understanding betwef n Tattersall's and the jockey clubs. ' I don't konw why this could not be managed. Both bodies are interested in maintaining a minimum of knavery on the turf, and affiliation might be effected on this basis : that in consideration of Tattersall's undertaking the dirty work which the jockey clubs will not soil their hands with, the latter should enforce Tattersall's decisions. I am, of course, speaking generally, and with no particular reference to the three case 3 spoken of above. *** The Great Northern St. Leger of 1889 has received 49 entri?<?, including sisters to Necklace, Trenton, and Mata, and a hrother to Krnpp, and a half-sister to Nordenfeldt. The Hon. 6. M'Lean, the only Dan?din owner represented, has nominated Lady Florence and the lona colt. *** It is a relief to the perplexed tuif statistician to find owners of tr otters. becomirg aUvetothenecessityofgivingussomevariationscn the sickening serie3 of Tommys and Pollys tb&t have often induced confusions and hanky-panky. 'Seldom Fed is the bright idea that has suggested itielf to the mind of a man who a year or two ago would doubtless have called his nag Charlie or Little Nell, according to the sex. *** Anteros gained one of the prizes given for imported stali'ons at the Grafton Show. We lost a treasure when we allowed this horse to leave the colony. *** He was an astute and experienced jockey, and had been ridings hot favourite, who eventually finished' in the ruck. Upon dit« mounting outside the paddock the great horseman procerded to pass his hands carefully down the back sinews of his mount. Then sang out au irate backer of that favourite — " J'yar ! What's the good o' feeljn' 'is leg? Feel 'js bloomin jaw — you've broke it." This hon mot is all the way from England. *** Shop betting has become immensely popular of late months in Sydney, and Mr White and one' or two others have , found it necessary, in order to meet the demands of their clients (says a local- paper) to open books on all descriptions of fancy means of wagering. Royal Stakes, Queen's Birthday Cup, and Melbourne Cup, at 2000 to 1, is a luxury often dealt ir, selections taking a very wide range, and backers having also taken rather kindly to "the Roy »1 Stakes and Queen's Birthday Cup double, fc r whioh the standard price for mixed goods is 1000 to 4. The same shop has pencilled 5000 to 25 each against Volley and Bravo . and Volley and Cranbrook for the Melbourne 'Derby and Cup as well as against Trident. That price is still to be had "on tbe field." The chances offered to those who are ever ready to " put down a brick and pick up a house " end with the 200 to 1 "if not " of placing the 1, 2, 3, for the'next Melbourne Cap. *** Who challenges Hales' claim to be reckoned the Archer of the Australias ? This season alone he ha 3 had no fewer than 64 mounts for the Hon. J. White alone, and has ridden 30 winners, the value of the stakes taken by these baiog £16,239. A Sydney paper— the Telegraph, I think ,it is— adds that though Hales' winnings had never before bren so heavy, he has always been represent d by a big total. From January 1 to April 16, 1884, he rode in 15 race?, winning seven, of the value of '£3654 103; from August 1, 1884, to April 10, 1885, 41 mounts, 14 winning ones, £3503 153 ; September 12, 1885, to May 1, 1886, 36 mounts, 17 wins, £9774; aud belwren September 11, 1886, and April 16, 1887, he was in tbe saddle 51 times, of which 23 were winning mounts to the value, of' £13,194 Bs. These amounts, added to the present season's, bring the prizes won by Hales for the Hon. James White since he commenced in 1884 up to the grand tdtal of £48,365 13s. — - *** At the Turakina meeting on the 3rd inst , the chief event -the Handicap, of 30sovs, one mile and three-quarters— was won by Mr Scally's Corßair (9st 51b), who beat The Dove (Bst). Little John (Bst), and four others. The best dividend of the day was £11 10s, paid to backers of The Dove in the Flying Handicap. Messrs Hill and Poole put £660 through the totalisator. *** It is rumoured in more than one wellinformed quarter in Melbourne that the trouble Bravo is suffering from is cancer in the feet. *** Backers had a bad time of, it at the Ashburton races last Thursday, the favourites being dished' in every race but one—the'exception being Jack, who won the Flying Handicap rather ensily. From the particulars published in another column it will be seen that Ravenswood was one of the starters in the Hurdle Race, but this horse, who when at his best was a really good performer ovejf the little slacks, and on one occasion was returned winner of, the misnamed Steeplechase at the Forbury, must" have come to the end of his tether, as he was unable to get a place even* in the_ moderate Company arrayed against him, though carrying only a fair racing weight ; and showed signs of lameness on being brought back to the paddock. Horses don't ! last to all eternity. The Sir William who ran in the Selling Hurdle Race is, I suppose, ttie old nag of that name ; he also found the pace of the juniors too smart. The Ashburton Plate' was contested by a field of 10, among them a somewhat celebrated " has been "' in Mr Mitchell's Liverpool. This horse, who in his day was regarded as a good thing for the Derby, had tbe steadier of lOst on his back, and after going a mile_ seemed to have a say in the race; bat coming up the straight he got temporarily blocked, and when an opening presented itself the son of Idalia was unable to take advantage of it, being beaten out of place by three nags that he would have made mincemeat of when in his prime. The time for the mile and a-quarter is given as 2min 16|sec. Daddy Longlegs, tbe joker that won the Maiden Steeplechase at tbe Otago Hunt Club's meeting last, September, shaped well for half the distance in the Ladies' Pukp, when he died away and took no part in the finish. Aunie Laurie, winner of the Hack Race — she is a daughter of .Burlington— was bought by Mr D. O'Brien for £20. Jackiana good horse each time he started, 'finishing a capital second in the chief event and" appropriatingjthe Flying very easily, though f having

9st 71b to 'Carry. Miss Webster, Harry Goodman's cast-off, beat the favourite in the Consolation, and this brought the meeting to a conclusion. Mr D. O'Brien's starting is highly spoken of, the large fields being in most cases got off on even terms. Dan is just the sort of man that should be able to start properly, and his services will doubtless be in demand whenever available. Messrs Hobbs and Goodwin passed £1226 through the machine. %* The first mention of the totalisator in the House this session was by Mr Beetham, who on Friday gave notice to move that portion of the proceeds from the machines be applied to purposes of charitable aid, somewhat after the system adopted in France. This -motion may possibly bring about a debate of the whole question ; and there are many who will hope that it does, for a section of Auckland's representatives have already announced that they will lead an attack on the machine ; and the sooner the battle is fought the sooner the clubs will know their position. What the outcome will be it is impossible to foretell ; for we cannot even guess what shape the question will assume when it is f&ally submitted to the vote. It is probable, I should think, that if Mr Beetham's motion is carried the effect will be to somewhat curtail the use of the machine by country clubs, for the reason that there would not be so much profit in its use; but from a sportsman's point of view this might not be a great gain, inasmuch as no distinction would be drawn between those clubs that apply the revenues of the totalisator to the purposes of racing and those that carry on without recognising an obligation in that respect. What I mean is this : that if the use of the totalisator were allowed on the one condition of handing over a percentage to charity, clubs might be started in the large centred to race for the profit of the. promoters, and thus do great harm to the clubs that are legitimately fulfilling their functions by applying the entire proceeds over and above expenses to the enriching of their stakes and the improvement of their grounds. These private clubs could under certain circumstances make things exceedingly unpleasant for the regular, clubs, as the latter are in most cases burdened with j liabilities heroically undertaken for the sake of posterity — as in the case of the D. J.C., which is scraping and screwing to free the Forbury course from incumbrance — while the private company clubs could carry on at a smaller expense, caring about nothing but paying a dividend. I don't know that it would actually pay to start clubs of this kind as a speculation, but it might ; and it is for those who have a better knowledge of these matters than I have to guard against any unfair competition by inBisting that in tha event of Mr Beetham's motion being carried the position of the legitimate clubs is made secure. *** Speaking of the totalisator and the House reminds me that a curious statement; was made the other evening by Mr Carroll, in seconding the Address-in-Reply, to the effect that if the Government insisted on every totalisator ticket being stamped with a twopenny stamp there would be a conttibution of about £20,000 to the revenue. Someone may have been "stuffing" Mr Carroll, or, as likely as not, he spoke at random — which is a common thing for our legislators to do when talking about sporting matters. As a matter of fact the amount passed through the totalisator each year, taking the average of the past three or four years, is about half a million of money. At 2d in the pound, this wound mean a total contribution of £4166 13s 4d if exactly half a million were put through, or, say, in the rough £4000, for there would be a trifling deduction for the coat of collection. It is to be hoped that if the whole question of the machine comes before Parliament some member will make it his business to inform his brethren of the correct total turned over by the totalisator, so that the vague talk about millions of money, which is occasionally heard, may not mislead those clear old innocents who don't know a totalisator from a tomahawk. *** The Winton acceptances were not obtainable in time for this issue, and it is therefore with some diffidence that I attempt to fortell the results. With a start, I should take Victory for the Hurdle Race, Forget-me-not for the Birthday Handicap, and perhaps the Flying Handicap also ; and Wardrobe for the District Handicap. %* The Porirua meeting on the Queen's Birthday will doubtless attract » number of Wellington sports, and there is every promise of good racing. In regard to this fixture, also, I am in the dark as to what are likely to pay up, bat may mention the following as likely to run forward if they start : — Hurdles, Reputation ; Cup, Germaine ; Stewards' Stakes, Cupid ; Railway Stakes, Sylph. *^* Another Birthday fixture is that at Greymouth". Looking at tbe handicaps as published in another column, I should select CorrieVick for the Trial Stakes, and British Lion for the Birthday Handicap. Promotion will probably win- the Hurdle Race if he starts, but his owner may perhaps prefer to have a cut in at the Wanganui meeting. * # * The Oamaru Jockey Club find it hard work to carry on. At a committee meeting held last week the statement of assets read by the secretary showed that the out standing liabilities, not allowing anything for handicapping, amounted to £39 ; the plant was valued at £40, and there was a cash balance of £16 10s. According to the report in the local Times, Mr Christie expressed the opinion that the wh^ole of the assets should be realised on and the club wiped out. — Mr Barton regretted the absence of the treasurer, as his retention of £30 of the club's money was a matter to be dealt with at that meeting. He would move that the secretary be instructed to write to the treasurer, requesting the return of the £30 retained on behalf of the lessees without the sanction of the committee, and unless the amount be refunded within 14 days the matter be placed in the hands of the club's solicitor for recovery.— This was seconded by Hamilton and carried unanimously. — Some mention was made of putting the club in liquidation, but it was decided, to defer any action till after the balance sheet was audited and another meeting had been held. **♦ The handicap for the. Great Northern Steeplechase is just about a stone too low all round. lam not inclined to find fault with the imposts when considered relatively, but it seems to me that with a maximum of list 81b the light weights can have no show unless 6ome real clipper crops up among the dark ones. The reason for making so light a handicap is probably that there are no first-class horses engaged; but I do not consider this a valid argument for a minimum of 9st. As several of the horses engaged are, or have been on the fiick list, I shall leave to our Auckland correspondent the task of selecting the wheat from the chaff, and will content myself with the remark that so far as my knowledge of present form is any guide I have a fancy for Mangaohane and Magnesia. If the Jim that figures at 9st is the horse that Gentry used to race in Marlborough and Wellington districts, he too should have a chance if in any sort of condition, though I do not much care for the show of a Dag that has been long on the shelf. V The privileges of the Cromwell Trot-. ting Club were knocked down in four lines atj *15145.

**♦ The Hawke's-Bay Jockey Club, have found it advisable to curtail in respect to the stakes to be raced for at the Steeplechase meeting. An all round reduction of £270 has been made, the stakes in the big steeplechase being shortened to £300. %* Tommy Buddicombe, who had his collarbone broken at Duntroon, has sufficiently recovered to be removed to his parents' home at St. Kilda, but it will be two or three weeks before he can do any work, and he is of course precluded from riding at the Birthday meeting. V The Wellington Steeplechase plub, the latest addition to our racing organisations, has issued a programme of events to be run off at the Hutt Park course on the 7th of July. There are six races, and the sum of £430 is to be given in stakes, the chief event being the Wellington Steeplechase, of 150sovs, about three miles. Mr Evett is handicapper. * # * Some of our readers perhaps have met Mr W. H. Fagan, one of the oldest members of the Victorian ring, and a great lover of coursing; He was accidentally knocked down by a brace of greyhounds while attending a recent coursiug meeting, and had his shoulder broken. As he is an old man the accident is a serious one. *** The result of the old-established Chester Cup appears in this issue. Kinsky, the winner, is one of , the best-known handicap horses in England, and last season placed three stakes to his owner's credit, including the Leicester Jubilee Cup. %* Kings and princes can do a great deal by virtue of their position and the cringing of sycophants, but when they enter the ranks of horseowners their highnesses have no more command over the results than the meauest of their subjects. The Prince of Wales is one of the unluckiest owners in England, and I observe by the files that Prince Albert Victor has had to put up with the buffeting of Dame Fortune. His Royal Highness ran Paddy in the Tenth Royal Hussars' Cup at Kempton Park, and this gelding, who was less fancied than Mr Kavanagh's Sorrow, made a gallant fight with the favourite, but the latter just got home by a neck. Being brought out again for the Consolation Race, Paddy fell approaching the fence before the open ditch, and took •no further part in the race. *** Hermit, -whose career has been a very sensational one since Mr Chaplin bought him . for lOOOgs as a yearling, and then won the Derby with him when all hope of his doing so appeared , gone, has to his credit 290 winners of about 640 races, worth upwards of £320,000. There is no race of importance which has not fallen to the share of his progeny except tho St. Leger. %* The stallion Emancipation, by Wilberforce from Fair Nell, met his death at Coonamble (N.S.W.) by getting staked in the chest. *** That promising ' young lightweight, John Fielder, was seriously hurt owing to his mount in the Canterbury Park Autumn Handicap, Fleeto, stumbling and unseating himi ' *** There were nine starters for the Canterbury Park Flying Handicap— viz., Mitrailleuse (aged, lOst 41b), Hester (4yrs, 7st 111b), Lady Marion (4yrs, 7sb 41b),. Sentence (aged, 7st 41b), Scotchman (aged, 7st 21b), Athlete (3yrs, 63t 9lb), Merigobah (2yrs, 6st 71b), Butterfly (4yrs, 6st 71b), and Lady Yattendon (3yrs, 6st) M Mitrailleuse, who started first favourite at 5 to' 2, got away in the front rauk along with Lucifer and Athlete, and the latter being steadied, Butterfly went up third at the bend. Lady Marion challenged Mitrailleuse in the straight, but the top weight drew away and won with a little id hand by a length and a-quarter from Lady Marion, who had Athlete at her girths. Lucifer was fourth, three lengths away, and was succeeded by Sentence, Butterfly, and Merigobab, with Scotchman last. Time for the six furlongs and 50 yards, lmin 22sec. *** Mitrailleuse is top weight with lOsfc 5Jb in the Royal Stakes, six furlongs, to be run at Sydney on the 6th, Ben Bolt coming next with lOst ; Cardigan has 9sfc 81b ; The Nuu, 9st 41b ; Pet Girl, 9at ; and then comes the exAucklander Cinderella, who is not at all badly treated at Bst 12lb ; Kingfish has 7st 121b ; Pearl Shell, 7st 10lb ; and Too Soon, 7st 81b. For the Queen's Birthday Cup, one mile and three furlongs, Algerian and Ben Bolt are bracketed at 9st 91b, Pasha has 9st, and Too Soon, 7st 21b. " Nemo," who ought to be well informed, as to present form, selects the following 13 as likely to provide the winner of this event : — Algerian (9st 91b), Pet Girl (Bst 81b), Fig Tree (Bst 4.1b), The Queen (Bst 21b), First Flaneur (Bst), Alma (7st 121b), Corday (7st 101b), Cairo (7stßlb), Locksley (7st4lb), Aberdeen (6st 121b), Touchstone (6st 101b), Rosebud (6st 51b), and Fleetu, (6st). *#*! The reason that the Manchester Cup is now called " The Whitsuntide Handicap " is because the stewards of the Jockey Club object to a race being called a " Cup " that is not a piece of plate, and the title had to be altered accordingly. *** A jockey named Gardiner, at Thargomindah, Queensland, was wasting to ride the horse Friendless, and took a fever, which brought on delirium, during .which he walked into the river, where his , body was picked up. The case reminds one of poor Archer's death. *** After his mishap in the Liverpool Grand National Usna was examined by Mr Atkiuson, who found that Mr Gubbin's horse had wrenched his shoulder and loins, and though no bones had been broken or dislocated, serious injuries were sustained. *£* Mr John Field, of Tasmania, is about to start racing again, and has placed three wellbred youngsters in the hands of Thomas Keating to be trained. Two are fillies by ProtoMartyr out of Pandora, own sister to Malua, and Cynthia, by St. Albans from Aglaia, by Peter Wiikins. The third is a bay colfc by Creswiok out of Meander's dam, ♦„* Some of the Australian papers are urging the authorities to take steps to prevent two or more 'horses running under the same name. The /Sportsman properly remarks that purity of lineage is absolutely essential in our racehorse if the high character of the Australian horse is to be maintained, but with confusion on the turf and in stud records it must become an impossibility. They do these things better in France. There every horse, as soon as he is a day or two old, has to be registered with the mayor of the district in much the same way as births of children 'are registered here,' while not only is a duplication of name strictly guarded against, but every mark borne by >the colt* is noted in order to prevent any cases of mistaken identity. There is nothing to prevent a similar state of things here. Our shire councils provide every facility for a similar system, and it is a matter of surprise that legislators have not brought such a measure into action ere now. * # * Mr Bell, of Fielding, has purchased the Somnus — Fair Helen filly from Mr Oliver. %* A home of rest for horses has been opened at Westbourne Park, Bayswater, England. The "home" does not receive hospital cases, but is solely for those that require rest or suffer from temporary lameness or are " off their feed." The latter it is stated is very common in England, and is cured by filing horses' teeth, which in many cases have become so long that the owner prefers semi-starvation to the agony of its self-inflicted wounds. - - "

*** A colt by St; 'Albans from Betr'ea is highly spoken of, and "Augur" considers him the boss of the Victorian yearling. The same writer tells us that BnfiUder's not as well as he might be. ' " *** The following is a note of the highest prices paid privately for trotters in the United States :— Weanling, b c Charles Backman, bred at Stony Ford, £1000 ; yearling, b f £udie D., bred in Kentucky, £1000; two-year-old, br c Chimes, bred at Palo , Alto, California, £2400; three-year-old, b h Startle, bred at Stony Ford; £4000 ; four-year-old, chmMaud S., bred at Woodburn, Ky., £4200; stallion, b h Jay Gould, bred in Orange Co,, N. V., £7000 ; gelding, b g Rarus, bred by R. B. Conklin, Greenport, L. 1., £7200; mard, eh m Maud S., bred at Woodburn, Ky., £8000. The highest' prices paid under the i hammer have been:— Weanling, b c Delphos, bred at Jersey ville Stock Farm, 111., £750; brood mare,- b m Reina Victoria, bred at Glenviewj Ky., £1405; stsillion 1 , b h Pancoast, bred at Woodburn, Ky., £5600. The fastest mare, Maud S., was bred at Woodburn, in Kentucky; the fastest one, two, and four -year-olds, Norlairie, Wildflower, and Manzanita, were bred at Palo Alto, California, and the grand-sire, Electioneer, and the dam, Elaine, of the fastest yearling, Norlaine, 2min 31§seo, were bred at Stony Ford. These three world-famed establishments represent the three- great breeding sections of the country. 1 ' ' ' *** An offer of 700 guineas was recently refused for Ben Bolt. The "would-be buyer thought of taking the horse to India. *#* Nearly every supposed-to-be judge has his individual fancy as to which is the moat promising V.R.C. Derby candidate this ' staspn, and there should be some lively betting during j the winter. One expert thinks highly of the ! Hon. J. White's Escort, by Chester out of Superba. ' , ,•■ %* It was suggested at the inquest on the body of George Holmes who was thrown and killed while riding Iroquois at the Richfield (Victoria) races, that J. King, the rider of Footman, had brought about Holmes' death by deliberately pulling Footman on to Iroquois and causing him to fall. The coroner pointed out that this was equivalent to an accusation of manslaughter, and the inquiry was adjourned to allow of the production of evidence on the point raised. On this evidence being given it was apparent that there had been no foul riding on King's part, and a verdict of "accidental death " was returned. ♦*♦ Eeferring to this sad occurrence, " Newmarket," has the following : — " I was not present at Richfield, and therefore can offer no individual opinion as to the cause of the accident, but, so far as King is concerned, I have a vivid recollection of his having pulled Rhesus off at the last jump in a hurdle race at Caulfield a few years, ago, and thereby preventing his horse jumping on the prostrate form of Corrigan, who had fallen in front of Rhesus. The occurrence took place in the straight, and in thus preventing Rhesus from landing on Corrigan, King pulled his horse on to the picket fence, and in addition to losing what appeared to be an ex-i nellent chance of winning the race, was very severely injured by the fall he sustained— a fall in which the horse also fared very badly.' . With , true espnt de corps Corrigan was not slow to recognise the manly and self-sacrificing conduct' of King on the occasion referred to, and it is on " record that he presented him with a diamond ring as a memento of his appreciation of the act. As I have already said, I am glad for the reputation of all cross-country riders that so grave a charge was not sustained, and it is a matter of regret that no one came .forward on King's behalf and mentioned the Rhesus and Corrigan, incident to the coroner and jury on Tuesday, last." *** The above should be read, marked, and, inwardly digested by those among our jockeys who may for gain or from pure love of mischief think lightly of blocking a> horse. I hold' the opiniof that all jockeys do not rightly estimate the responsibility that rests upon them to keep a clear course when they can possibly do so. The unavoidable, risks of race riding aro heavy enough to provide 1 sufficient excitement for the average human being, without adding to them by negligence. Intentional blocking, is, of course, a very serious, affair, and may not only lead to disqualificationj by the club, but, as the coroner pointed out, to! a charge of manslaughter being 1 preferred when' such conduct leads to the loss of life. *** The scratching of Friar's Balsam for 1 the Derby will mean the embarassment of many backers in England. The colt had been a hot, favourite all ( the winter, and the leading sporting! papers ridiculed the idea when it was mootedi two or three months ago that there was a screw loose with him. We . know now that it was no, false alarm that was raised. Coming" on the, heels of the defeat of the favourite inj the Lincolnshire and Grand National, -and' the upset of the winter choice for the Two! and the One Thousand Guineas, there .will be! great weeping and wailing in the camp of the backers, and betting will sure to be more or' less affected all through the season, for when the public is hit heavily it generally takes a long while to come up to the scratch again/ 1 V The result of the Kempton ParkJubilee Stakes stamps Minting as the crack of the English turf. He riot only gave 461b and a beating to Tyrone, but we may be sure there were some really good ones, behind him at the finish. %* It is with regret that I have to announce that the Lake County Jockey Club have decided to cut the Derby out if their next season's programme. The race was run at a loss to the club, and this expense was not considered to be counterbalanced by any advantages in the way of encouraging breeding. The club will hold a Spring meeting on the 7th November. ♦ + * The Duntroon Club made money out out of their last meeting, and propose to increase the stakes on the next occasion. %*' The Dunedin Jockey Club's Winter meeting will be held at the Forbucy next Thursday and Saturday, the first event each day starting at 12 o'clock, so as to allow of the proceedings closing before dark. ' The acceptances, which appear in another column, provide' material for close Btudy, for the more one searches the handicap the deeper becomes the impression that Mr Dowse has not made many mistakes, and that those which may have crept in have been obliterated from the lists by the acceptance fee. Commencing with 'the; Hurdle Race, I shall recommend my readers to back Tres Sec if he is* in anything like good condition. Master Agnes' weight is low enough to almost tempt one to have a shot on this good old warrior, but I don't think he can be very reliable just now ; and next to the' top weight I like nothing betfcer' than Trapper. Wardrobe is spoken of as a likely outsider, but personally I would- sooner stand Panic of the two. My tip at present, however, is Tbes Sec, and nothing else. The Birthday Handicap has 11 acceptors, and it should be a good betting race, as there is hardly- one in the list that has not some sort ' of a show. Apropos heads the . handicap with • Bst ■71b, a weight that will not treuble her at. all, the only consideration in her case being whether she can stay tho whole mile and a-half. That is it point that will now be decided one way'6r other,- for I C reckbri that < the 'withdrawal :6f: 6f

Silvermark means that Mr Goodman intends' 4o start the mare. • Hermitage and Snapshot'have of late been under' a cloud, but I don't think either is ' much amiss at the present moment. St. Clair is, I hear, . pretty i fit, and with only 7st 91b on his back he will make.the pace merry fill the way unless the course is ankle deep in mud, in which case the little fellow 1 will have- an extra handicap, for, so far, he has never been able to' get on a heavy course. Captain Webster's mishap prevents me from fancy-ing his chance ; but the next one on the list, The Brewer, must be in it if he is as well as he was last time he came to the Forbury. Hakawill, I am confident, tun well, and it is quite on the- cards that he may nearly win, for he is a strong horsewith a light weight. Sultan must not be forgotten either, for he has won several fairish 1 races, and if he can stay will be about when the post ia reached. Captain Cook is very well, and did a decent gallop ou Tuesday; and who will be bold enough to say that ( this horse cannot win ? Not me, assuredly', though' 1 1 > prefer others. Enid is a filly that I have a great liking for, ad she is well-bred, is in a dangerous stable, and won at the distance when she annexed the Oaks in November' last. Victory is not a fancy of mine. All in; I reckon that the race will be between Apropos, St.- Clair, and Enid, nnd at the time of writing I would just as soon stand Enid as anything- iv -the rice. The Trot is best lef^ alone until the day-; but meanwhile I may observe that my selections are 'Frolicsome, Reefer, Lady Grey, Foremast, and Bobby, and I rather prefer Foremast to any of the others. The Maiden Plate ought to be won by Dutchman; I, 'go for him in one. ' For the Tradesmen's I would prefer Sultan if a start were assured. Tho Selling Race will probably be between Crossbow, Comet, and Nelly, and of the three I like lastnamed best. Trapper should win the Selling Hurdle Race on the second day. I am, of course, writing before all the horses have arrived, and may see fit to alter ncy selections when", givicg my final "tip" in the Daily Times on the race mornings. - *** The top weights ought to have matters pretty much their own ,way at Wanganui on the Queen's Birthday. I reckon that Patsy Butler will win the Steeplechase with Faugh-a-ballagh; and the Winter Oats should be a soft thing for Marlborough, unless he is an over-rated horse. ' A scandal, in which the parties were Lord Deerhurst (one of the aides-de-camp of a Governor of Australia) and Sutton, an Australian bookmaker, caused a good deal of interest in the colonies about two years ago. His lordship owed Sutton some money, and refusing to pay, was thrashed. He then summoned the bookmaker, and had him sentenced to 14 days' imprisonment, though the conviction was afterwards quashed. Sutton was also expelled from the Victorian Club. Thus outlawed in Australia, Sutton went to England to try and better his luck, and succeeded admirably. Under the name of Robert Standish Sievier he got into the best society, won large amounts of money, and was presented at the Queen's levee in July last. In the midst of his prosperity, however, he received a cruel reverse. Lord Deerhurst arrived in England, and the consequence was that a notice was gazetted to the effect that " the presentation at Court of Mr R. Standish Sievier has been cancelled." At about the same time Sutton also had a run of very bad luck, and "took the knock," which, being interpreted, means that he was unable to meet his financial engagements. He is 28 years of age, and has played actor, soldier, bookmaker, and many other parts in life, and he wears a medal presented to him for- bravery while serving in Africa.

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Bibliographic details

TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 1904, 18 May 1888

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 1904, 18 May 1888

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