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TALK OF THE DAY.

BY MAZEPPA.

%* General entries and acceptances for the D.J.O. Birthday meeting must be made with Mr Sydney James on Tuesday next. See advertisement above.

%* It will be seen by advertisement in this issue that nominations for the D.J.C. Champagne Stakes of 1889 close on the 20th inst.

*/ So Friar's Balsam has not won the Two Thousand, and this most certain of all the certainties that we have had for many a year even failed to gain a place. Whether he started at all is a mere matter of conjecture. All through the English vriuter season the son of Flower of Dorset paralysed the betting on this, -the first of the classic races ; but a suspicion was breathed in the papers to hand this week that there was a screw loose somewhere, as he had been a bit knocked about for the Derby, one day being at 9 to 4 offered and the next day at 2 to 1 tak,en. There was no betting worth speaking of in connection with the Guineas, but it may turn out that the colt's decline for the Derby became tnore pronounced between the time of the last wail leaving and the day the Guineas Stake was »nn, and I shall not be surprised to leurn when fc4lß&t'ticuitJßcome to hand that fvW& Pal-

sam had by the early part of last week been knocked out of the betting, on both races. If so, there would ba a close run for favouritism between Orbit and Ayrshire. Orbit would doubt- ' less be fancied after his success in the Craven

Stakes this season (in which, by the way, he carried a 51b penalty) ; and Ayrshire was one of the moat esteemed colts of his season nexc to Friar's Balsam, he having won five of the seven races.in which he competed as a two-year-old. This is the first year that the ' Guineas has been won by a horse belonging to the Duke of Portland ; and as though to emphasise the occasion Fortune decreed that the whole stake should go to this owner, his Johnny Morgan, who I take to have been a complete outsider, claiming second money. Referring to the Derby colts of the season, a writer in the Sportsman says : — " Looking at the whole classic entry, so far as level moulding and beauty of symmetry go, Ayrshire perhaps may be entitled to pre-eminence. He is as to make and shape an orthodox colfc, so to -say, evenly balanced and bloodlike everywhere. Reader, strike off in your mind's eye a medium between the sire,. Hampton and the dam's sire, Galopin, and you have Ayrshire, who is stronger than the Lord Olifden horse was in his youth, and slightly shorter on the leg than was the late Prince Batthyany's idol. There can be no doubt but Ayrshire has long since shaken off any lameness or , soreness experienced after whining the Doncaster Champagne Stakes; everybody speaks of his improvement." The winners of the Two Thousand for the past 20 years — the race was established in 1809— are as follows : — 1869 -Pretender 1879— Ohariberfc 1870— Macgregor 1880-Petronel 1871-Bothwell 1881— Peregrine 1872— Prince Charlie 1882— Shotover I^73— Gang Forward 1883— Halliard 1874— Atlantic 1884— Scot Frea 1875— Cambalio 1885— Paradox 1876— Petrarch 1886— Ormonde 1877— Chamant 1887— Enterprise 1878— Pilgrimage 1888— Ayrshire. * # * The One Thousand would appear also to hare resulted in a boil-over, for, though all the placed fillies are known performers, Sea Breeze had shown exceptionally good form as a two-year-old, and was looked to as a probable winner of both the One Thousand and the Oaks. The following is a list of winners of the One Thousand for the past 20 years : — 1 869— Scottish Queen 1879 -Wheel of Fortune 1870— Hester 1880— Elizabeth 1871— Hannah 1881- Thebais 1872— Eelne 1882— St. Marguerite 1873— Ooibla 1883— Hauteur 1874— Apology 1884— Busybody 1875— Spinaway 1885— Farewell 1876— Caraelia 1886— Miss Jummy 1877— Belphoebe 1887— Eeve dOr 1878— Pilgrimage 1888— Briar Boot. *** Maniac will not go up to the Canterbury Trotting Club's meeting. His owner is dissatisfied with the handicaps, and objects, not without reason, to travel so far to give 15sec to Gipsy. %* In self defence I am forced to proceed a step further with the argument with the editor of the Canterbury Times. He in the first place made the assertion that lmin 34sec was ssec better than the world's record for a mile. I asked what race he referred to ; and by way of answer the following appears in last week's issue of his paper : — 11 ' Mazeppa,' while accepting our conclusions with respect to Titbit's mile and a distance •record,' asks what race we refer to when we speak of lmin 39|sec as being the world's record for a mile. We referred to no race, but to Ten Broeck's American record against the clock, at the same time remembering that Bendigo was credited with running the Lincolnshire Handicap in lmin 36 4-sth sec. The accuracy of this time, however, is generally discredited," My confrere has, it will be observed, tactitly confessed having made a mistake of three-quarters of a second in respect of what he asserts is the record, for whereas ha at first gave us lmin 39sec he now quotes lmin 39|sec as the best time. And I may be allowed to remark that it was his assertion that lmin 39sec was the world's record that prompted me to ask what race he referred to. Had he spoken of lmin 39|sec I might have guessed that he referred to Ten Broeck's performance against the clock; but lmin 39seo did not suggest Ten Broeck. However, that threequarters of a second is not what I am mainly concerned about in writing this paragraph. My chief object is to ask my friend's authority for the, concluding sentence of the paragraph quoted above — viz., "the accuracy of thistirhV [Bendigo's Lincolnshire Handicap] "is generally discredited." Is it ?By whom, pray ? I will not' flatly contradict the assertion, for with so many scores of English writers some may perhaps have questioned whether Bendigo actually performed the feat with which he is credited, and it is at all times a difficult thing to prove a negative; but this I do say, that the two leading sporting daily papers — the Sportsman and the Sporting Life — in referring to past Lincolnshire Handicap times and values, quote Bendigo's lmin 36 4-sth sec without a word of excuse or explanation (vise issues of March 22 last) ; and in the face of such evidence I fail to see how the sporting editor of the C. T. can hold himself justified in asserting that the accuracy of the time is " generally " discredited. I for one, at any rate, am content to accept the authority of the two papers referred to. *** Here is the Sportsman's paragraph, which may prove interesting apart from its value as an argament in my favour : — According to Benson's chronograph, the time occupied by Mr Legh's Veracity (4yrs, 6st 101b) in winning the Lincolnshire Handicap (distance, one mile) was lmin 42 2-sth sec, and the value of the stakes was £1684 155. Last year Mr Manton's Oberon (4yrs, 7st 81b) won in lmin 45 l-sth sec, and the race was worth £1584 155, while in 1866 the time taken by Mr E. C. Naylor's Fulmen (6yrs, 7st 131b) was lmin 41sec, and the stakes amounted to £1634 155. Some previous records follow:— 1885, Mr H. T. Barclay's Bendigo (syrs, Bst 51b), time lmin 36 4-sth sec, value £1724 15s; 1884, Mr J. W. Smith's Tonans (6y'rs, Bst 31b), time lmin 43sec, value £1734 15a; 1883, Mr J. Davis' Knight of Burghley (aged, 7st 81b), time lmin 48 2-sthsec, value £1414 155 ; 1882, Count F. de Lagrange's Poulet (syrs, Bst 71b), time lmin 43 2-sth sec, value £loT4 15s; 1881, Mr W. S. Crawfurd's Buchanan (4yrs, 6st 101b), time lmin 45sec, value £1925; 1880, Mr H. Rymill's Rosy Cross (6yrs, 7st 131b), time lmin 47sec, value £1635." *„,* By the time these lines are in print July will, I hope, be commencing to feel at home in his new quarters at Mr Barnes' place on the Clarence river, New South Wales. He has, of course, been bought by that breeder mainly on account of his Traducer blood. Mr Barnes had made up his mind to get ope of Arethusa's grandsons, and was fishing for Le Loup, but Mr Taggart would not sell at less than his own idea of the chestnut's market value. *** Speaking of July, I am reminded of his elder brother, Cheviot, concerning whom it is stated in the American papers fhat he has been scratched for the Suburban and placed^ in the stud for spring service. He was done with as a racer before he left New Zealand. *** Mr Bonner's dream of getting Maud S. to, beat her own record is set, down by some American experts to be well nigh impossible of fulfilment. The latest papers from, fene States

have a -good deal to say on the subject, and *if may interest some of our local ' trotting folk >to read the following opinion by Dr. George. H. Bailey, who, as -the Maine State , veterinary surgeon, is looked up to as an authority :— " If ever the present record of 2min B£seois beaten I shall expect to see it beaten by a Wilkes.'; My frequent visits to Kentucky have caused' nochange in my opinion that the present record is about the limit of the trotting horse, and that those who are looking to see a mile encompassed in two minutes will look in vain. . There never, has yet been a quarter of a mile trotted in 30 seconds, and years and years ago there .were horses that could trot a quarter of a mile nearly, as fast as they can now. Of course careful selection of breeders in striving to produce extreme speed, the improvement of track, sulkies,' harnesses, shoeing, weight, boots, and other trotting appliances, have all contributed to produce j the maximum in speed with the minimum of. friction, and until the weight can be materially lessened, which under the present rule horses are obliged to carry to obtain,' a record, no marked . reduction of the record .can possibly take place. My own belief is that whenever any horse attempts to beat the present record, and should by any possibility trot the first quarter in- 30, seconds, that the attempt would fail right then and there,' while, if one could ever be produced thai could trot two quarters in succession at that rate of speed, the improbability of their accomplishing the other half at the same rate would be increased a thousand fold. It should be recollected that among the . thousands of trotters that have so far been produced, and of which over 400 entered the charmed circle (2min 30sec) in 1887, but one has ever yet been produced that has ever beaten 2min lOsec. It is plainly apparent from the above what extreme speed means. The old argument that has so long been used that we were all the time gradually reducing the record, has long since lost its force, as the nearer approach to the limit has been reached, and the difficulties to be encountered by those who believe that the realms of the scythe-bearer are to be still further invaded will be found to increase rather than diminish, as the future battles of the turf are fought."

%* Mr D. Twohill, who has cut his stick and left us to settle down in Sydney, was a genuine sportsman, and one of the straightest owners we have had. He seldom travelled far away from Auckland,, but last February paid us a visit, and was the victim of a bit of bad luck in missing the Forbury Handicap. During his brief sojourn in Dunedin he made many friends, who will be delighted to hear of Cinderella pulling off a good race at Bandwick, or wherever else she may compete.

**♦ Clifford and Alfy Woods, two of our best jockeys, are taking a short trip to Australia.

%* Gorton's sire. Thunderbolt, -is dead. He was foaled in 1857, and was consequently 31' years old. As a racehorse he was possessed of great speed. At two years of age he ran second to Melbourne, beating Thormanby, in the Findon Stakes at Goodwood, while among the events that fell to his share were the Trial Stakes at Warwick, Stamford Plate (twice) at Newmarket, Select Stakes at Newmarket (in which he bowled over the odds betted on Buccaneer), All-aged Stakes, and Stockbridge Cup. Though he sired no horse of the first class, several of his progeny inherited his speed, the best of them perhaps being Thunderstorm, and others that at onetime or other earned brackets may be mentioned in Lyric,' Fireball, Pillory, Grapeshot, Priscilla,' Badames, Obirper, Meteoraj Havoc, and King Harold. Lyra, Gorton's dam, was in foal to Thunderbolt when shipped from -England to Auckland. %* Oulda, Fallacy, and -the Malton mare Titania are, Mr Stephenson tells me, believed to be in foal to Le Loup. Martyrdom has certainly held to that sire ; while Quiver and Lucy, who visited the same stallion, are supposed to be also in an interesting condition.

* # * The Yankees, it seems, have been studying how to prevent mares from generating grey foals. Mr L. Brodhead, a well-known Kentucky breeder, says: — "TMLy observation,/ after nearly 20 years of obaervative study of this subject, is that grey is the weakest of all colours and least likely to be reproduced. Grey stallions and grey mares may have grey progeny, but in no other way is the colour produced. The sire or dam must be grey ; it requires a direct cross. When the grey is bred out of a pedigree by one cross, after generations will never throw • back to the grey ancestor ; that is, if a bay mare has a bay or chestnut foal, none of this fo'al'fi produce will be grey. The grey is biiried' for ever by one cross of the bay or chestnut. I have never known a single exception to this rule, either from personal observation, reading, or inquiry of other breeders. I -think ' that chestnut is the compromise colour between a bay and a grey ; that is, a pedigree with much grey in it is likely to produce chestnuts." Mr Bonner, after i reading this letter of Mr Brodhead's, said that I he believed that chestnut was a compromise I colour between bay and grey. Harold, the sire of Maud S., is a bay, and Miss Russell, the dam, is a grey. The distinguished produce is a chestnut. Nutbourna, a grey, is getting very few greys now, the prevailing colour being hay or chestnut. The effort to fix the colour through mental impression has been remarkably successful. Blinds are put on the mare so that she cannot see Nutbourne, and immediately after mating a bay stallion is led in front of her. Since the strict enforcement of this rule on the farm at Tarrytown not one Nutbourne foal out of 10 has come grey. A good performer may be of any colour, but as fashion prefers a bay or a chestnut, intelligent breeders aim to produce one of these colours. All this may not be exactly new — the " mental impression " trick, at any rate is as old as Jacob — but some -of our readers may perchance glean a useful hint from the researches of these restless, inquiring Americans. •■ %* Meta, the half sister of Pearl,' being 1 by Anteros out of Pearlash, won the two chief events at the Waipawa meeting on the Ist inst. In the Flying Handicap she put up 6st 101b, and beat Psycho (7st 31b) by half a length ; third place being gained by Premium (7st 51b). For the Mayday Handicap,"' of 40sdvsr,- one mile and three-quarters, there were six starters, Meta (6st 71b) winning by a length from Premium (71b lib),- with Miss Dargon (7st 81b) third.Po or old Trickster (with 7st 71b) waSvlast in this event. Clyde won the Hurdle Race and Welter Handicap; the Hack Hurdle Race resulted in Long Roper coming in first, but being disqualified for missing a hurdle the stakes went to Stella ; and the Hack Race was won by Dispute, who paid a dividend of £21 13s. The sum of £1316 was passed through the machine. *** The Cape Government has made a small grant to purchase some well bred stallions, with the view to the production of good troop horses; and the first animal bought in England' was the well-known entire Beatus,byEthus out of Gladness, by Carnival. !' *** The geography of New Zealand, seems to be a hopeless puzzle with English folk. The London Sportsman, which might be supposed to bo a well-informed journal, gravely informs its readers that tho Wellington Cup, won by Beres- ' ford, was run for at Auckland. ", , ,' t , ! *** The Oamaiu Tiajde^men's ßacingjClub", LoontemplaW IwWing wcoron tha >Q«eeftV

-Birthday, but tho committee allowed' themselves •to>b ( e choked off by/the dem'ana of f £ls ; fnr £he use of the course, and the proposed meeting has .been allowed to lapse.' \ At tb'ecomrnittee meeting, Mr B; Barton, the chairman, is> .reported , by, the North Otago Times ( to have «aid that "although the club's position would "warrant, the payment .of the amount demanded, yet, the charge being considered exorbitant, it would be for the committee,' present to decide whether, under the, circumstances,, the club should hold their meeting elsewhere, or whether it would be better, n,otto have a meeting. He, was pleased to be able to say_,that qne or two of, the lessees jw,ere favourable, to the amount being -reduced, while, ,on the other hand, he regretted to state that one or two of the lessees had shown, a. spirit quite foreign to the encouragement of racing." These remark's provoked the following, letter from a. writer signing himself "Jockey Club":— " I challenge Mr Barton tq produce any evidence of the lessees being anything but unanimous in the price decided to be charged. "The sum, of £15, per day was decided ,by the lessees to be charged to any club usipg'the course, and if the lessees allowed the Tradesmen's .C}ul? to,' use it at a reduced, rate, the O.J.C. would have an, equal i right to ask for a reduction. The price offered by the Tradesmen's Club— namely, £5, would be a positive loss, as l the damage done, to the course and stand would be much over that sum. The club knows that the, lessees have large responsibilities in connection with the course and stand, and, in place of abusing them, and, doing all they can against them, one would rather expect to see>h honourable body of men, such as the committee of a racing club ought to be, joining hand in hand with the lessees, and, helping to pay off the liabilities connected with the 1 course. I may mention that the price chai-ged for the use of the Timaru racecourse and' stand is £25 per day." So far as an outsider can understand the position of affairs as between the club and' the lessees, the latter have the best of the argument. If the club had, said that they could not afford the price demanded, they would have taken up a .position that no one could assail; but I really cannot guess the process of reasoning by which they arrive at the conclusion tbat £15 is an extortionate sum for the use of the course and appurtenances for a day's racing.,. Why, at' that rate the club could hold two meetings a year at a cost not exceeding the interest oh £400, and how far would £400 go towards buying a course of their own?

*„,* While racing in the Liverpool Grand National five of the horses fell, two refused, and one'swerved t off the course through an accident. Frigate, who finished second to Playfair, has, says a Home writer, ha,d a most tantalising experience of Grand Nationals. When she first ran , for the race, in 1884, she filled second place to Voluptuary'; was again second the ( following year to Roquefort ; in 1886 she fell at the first fence;' in 1887 the showed to no advantage; and this year has to put up' with second plade for the third time. She was extremely unfortunate on the last occasion, for had it not been that Usua, by swerving through putting his shoulder out, carried her out of the course, she woiild have made a much closer fight of it with Playfair, even if she h'ad'not actually won. *** I' called in at Stephenson and Hazlett's stable a day or two ago for the purpose of having a look at a couple of the young stock that have recently been put into work. The yearling filly by Apremont from Fallacy is a beauty — a wellf grown, evenly-made, and tractable .young lady;, indeed, I prefer her 'bo any yearling that Waddell hasiyet had the handling of, excepting perhaps : Hyacinth, who was as handsome as they make ' them. I saw her, too, under a disadvantage, for she had a day or so previously picked up a nail in her off hind foot, and as she walked round the' box with her foot in a poultice she was as lame as, could be. The filly will, I hope, be all right again in a week or two at the most. The unnamed gelding by Musket out of L'Orient, now rising three years, is, as his trainer says, a "funny looking fellow," his immense quarters, short back, and well-developed shoulders causing him to present a stumpy cobby appearance that is the 'reverse of elegant in a thoroughbred ; but he is as fat as a dumpling, and when he has galloped the superfluous flesh off his frame he will probably by reckoned passable looking, even if not a beauty. Should he train on, of which there is little doubt,' as he is a healthy, sound colt, he will in all likelihood not be distressed by anything within the range of what are considered medium weights. He is engaged in the next C.JjC. Derby. I have to thank' Waddell for showing me round at a rather inconvenient hour. '

♦j,t* Since Fulmen won the Lincolnshire •Handicap in 1886 with 7st 131b, this' son of Galbpin ran in 13 races without contributing to his ' keep until he pulled off the ' Batthy&ny Stakes. The win was peculiarly appropriate, since Fulmen was bred and raced by Prince Batkhyany until that owner died."

* # * Another best on record comes to us from America, in the shape of the list of entries for the Great Produce Stakes for the two-year-olds, called " The Futurity,", which will be decided at Coney Island in 1890. The entrants number 915, and the probable value of the event is 100,000dol, 12,500d0l of this amount being added by the Coney Island Jockey Club. In looking down the list of sires we come across such familiar names as St. Blaise, Great Tom, Iroquois, Pizarro, Bend Or, Charaxua, Sir Modred, Dalnacardoch, Rotherhill, Rayon dOr, &€.. The Brooklyn Jockey Club have algo announced a valuable two-year-old race, to be called The Great American Stakes. It is to be run in the spring of 1889 over a five furlong course, and the club guarantee that its value will be 20,000d01.

*** It is stated that in the proceedings in connection with the libel. action brought byJ3ir, George Ohetwynd against the Earl of Durham. Sir, Henry James has been, retained on behalf ob the plaintiff, assisted by Mr Poland, Q.Q. ; whilst the Earl of Durham wilfbV represented "by,, Sir Charles Russell, \wjth.wh j om will.be fqundMr. Charles Mathews,. (&O f Sir George j claims damages to the amount of £20,000/ Mr, Lockwood, Q.C.j and the Hon.' Alfred LytteltWhaye been, retained as counsel .for „C. Wood m.his actions against Lord Durham- 'and the Licensed Victuallers' Gazette.', "' M , ' , "';'" ' **♦' I donot'clairc' any greaV credit for picking Erin-rgo-Bragh to win the Nev^Brighton Cup, for the grey horse was, generally believed to have been under-rated by „the handicapped and the result of 'the race' justified that supposition. The Flying Handicap resulted in a dead heat, between Erin-go-Bragh and Titbit, the labter having 91b the best of the weights and winning in the run off. If Titbit regains his last season's form he will score again before long.

*** A remarkable souvenir of the late Fred Archer has been published in the form of a picture painted by Mr Archibald P. Tilt/ . The artist has produced a very striking plate, representing the famous jockey passing the winningpost on the " white horse," and has very vividly expressed the words given at $he foot l -

■ Across theheath, along the pourse, . 'Us said that now.on phantom horse . . , Thegreatestjockeyetourdavs; ; ! ( Bides nightly in the'moonlight ray's. lp,te George Sije^enson, yrhp 'was JjaortaUy injured.,by, being struck Jay j^faiokiat

Greymouthi' left iine' ii chil,a*ren, s now^ t oriihanßj' ' their' mother ; having died' some three 1 - years ■ since. "■ : .'>•«-<■ %■*;/;< ' * # * Breeders' do not mind paying for the •services of the fashionable stallions. In England •■ the lists of Hampton and St. Simon 1 ate .full at ■> lOOgs per mare; 'while in America. the fee* of the great stallion Dictator, sire of Jay-eye-see and Phallas, is 500dol, but even at this: high ' figure his book is closed. * > '• . . * # *. The privileges of the Winton meeting realised £30 17s when put up to auction. ■ *** Jimmy Allan tells me that the partnership in which he is' associated with' his brother ■ Malcolm has had two smacks in the face by Dame Fortune : Captain Webster has struck his dicky off fore leg so heavily that he has had to give up ■ galloping for swimming; and Daisy has completely broken down in her preparation for -the Selling Race at the Birthday meeting. The mard is knocked out, but" hopes are entertained of I bringing Captain Webster to the post; J ' • *'p* On Wednesday evening of last week ■thejstewards-W the Riverfcon Racing Clnb met to inquire into the alleged misconduct of two jockeys at the last races, it haviog been asserted • that one gave the other 10s to give false evidence at ah inquiry on a protest entered against Lewis for running inside a post. Both the lads,' Hagger^y and Duncan, were-pronounced guilty, and were punished by fine and reprimand. 7 • %* Messrs Christie, Barton, Waters, Doqley, Johnston, Hamilton, Sanderson, and the| secretary were the only members, of the Oamaru Jockey Club attending the ineetiDg called for the 2nd insfc., and the business was postponed for a week %* Flatcatcher, who won the Maiden 'at Duntroon, is, I believe, the son of Guy Fawkes that competed against ChantilJy and Fair Nell in 'the.Geraldine Sires' Produce Stakes. He had nothing but Beeswing against him on Friday last, and won very, easily. The Cup was a poor race 1 , only three competing, and one of these — College Boy — had matters all his own way, winning as he liked, though the finish was cut fine| Barnardo's defeat of Jackal in the District Race was the surprise of the day. There were 12 starters for this race. • After this, who will say 'that we must go to handicaps' in order' to secure large fields. College Boy was unable to concede the weight in the Jockey Club' Handicap^ and even failed to run into a place, the race being won by that useful horse Comet. Messrs Mason and Roberts passed £682 through the totalisator during the day. *** Tommy Buddicombe, one of :Mr Turnbull'B lads, was riding Belladonna when she fell 'in, the Consolation Race at the above meeting,; and besides getting a nasty shaking he had his collar bone broken. As a result Tommy was compelled to lay up in Oamaru for a few days.

*** A jockey named Holmes is now consielered to be a coming Melbourne light-weight. Although full-grown, he is said to be no taller that a six-year-old boy.

*** The handicaps for the D.J.O. Birthday meeting were issued on Tuesday, There being so many horses in each race, I forbear from oriticißing the calculations in detail, as such a task would take up more time and spaoe than I have at disposal this week, but I may takethiß opportunity of expressing the opinion that Mr Dowse has given owners little if any cause to complain — as to the galloping races, at ' any rate, ' for I have looked the weights up and down and can see no conspicuous faults.- As to the' Trot, I must confess that, so far as I understand the form of the, performers in the list, the handicap might have been improved by giving Silver Bell and Boojum a few more seconds start, and Rose a few less ; but Ido not pose as an authority on these puzzling races, and would not be too positive in setting vp 1 my opinion as against Mr Dowses. I do hold, however, that a limit of 65sfcc' is enough in any three-mile race. Next week we may have some idea as to what horses are, likely to come from other places, and then we shall be in a better position to pick the winners. In the meantime I regard Tres See* Trapper, and Monteagle as the trio from which the- winner of ;the Hurdle Race will come ; Apropos will be dangerous in the Birthday Handicap if she is the selected representative of MrGoodman's stable, and next to her I fancy Sultan and Wakatipu ; for the Tradesmen's, which is a perfect bewilderer with its 30 entries* Sultan and La Rose may have a show, and Enid must not be forgotten; and of the trotters" Reefer, Lady Grey, Present Times, Pirate, and Rose are a dangerous quintette. The odds on - offer on the two flat handicap's are 25 to ' 200 the field. , . • *** A little all-round betting is being done on the New Zealand Cup, for which 100 to 6 is obtainable on the field, Spririgston' being most inquired after. Wolverine has been backed at 100 to 3 for several hundreds, and more would) ' be taken at the price if obtainable. * Exchange* Ruby, Redwood, ftlanton, Chain Shot, and others* also have occasional supporters. On the double —Cup and Derby— loo to 3is asked for the best; pioks when one horse is taken for both events* and 100 to 2 to 100 to 1 about mixed goods* Backers seem to fight shy of Carbine for tha Derby, but the two Mantons, the two Exchanges, the two Chain Shots, the two Redwoods, and other similar selections are frequently tho medium of transactions. V The Otago Hunt Club met for the first time this season at Severn on Saturday.' There was a good muster, and one run was got off after a hare that dodged through a number o£ wirp fences, thus bringing many of the would-be followers to a stop, Jaok Poole made some splendid jumps on Peri, who seems to be a usefuH stamp of a nag. %* Mr Harry Goodman will remain in Dunedin until after the Birthday races are over, and will then make up his mind whether to taka a trip to Australia or stay at home. ' • ■ "^* Gues'swrirk'is dead. i( .£te was by Gang. Forward from Peradventure, and will be remembered in consequence of running Commotion to & 'head in the Champion of 1883: - f? »''*#* Googeedeegallageennllah is the name of a horse entered at Ivanhde (N.8.W.). It is 'haijdlyas « short and .sweet " as it might be ■ , •„* The two-year-old Golden Heart, by Darebin, has been sold to Mr* T. Cook, of Maryborough, for 150gs. The^colt is one of the finest specimens of a two-year-old that has ever been seen in Queensland. •• J t#* B. Williams, who rode Mitraffleuse r 'in ■ the Ryde Handicap at Rosehill, was fined £5 for disobedience at the post.

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TALK OF THE DAY., Otago Witness, Issue 1903, 11 May 1888

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TALK OF THE DAY. Otago Witness, Issue 1903, 11 May 1888

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