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LAKE COUNTY.

The Jubilee Celebrations.— Neither the gloom, of the shortest day in the year, the frost of the season, nor the depression, 'could in any way damp the ardour or cool the enthusiasm of the residents in this the most isolated co-inty of New Zealand on the occasion of the recent jubilee. Processions, feasting, speechifying, firing royal salutes, treeplanting, &c. were the order of the day, and at night iireworks, bonfires, and beacon lights flashed the patriotic and loyal emotions of the Wakatiponians far and wide over the face of the heavens. Later on balls and social gatherings formed further outlets of loyalty, while in the churches the serious aspect and the more solemn side of tho event was fitly and adequately dealt with. At Queenstown the procession,swhich started punctually at 11 o'clock a.m., opened the proceedings, and consisted of the braßS band, members of the M Battery, the cadets, the fire brigade, the mayor and councillors of the borough, and the general public. After parading the town to the lively strains of the brass band, a halt was made opposite the Athenaeum, where a platform had been erected for the convenience of those •who took an active part in the ceremony of handing over the institution to the municipality, to be conducted in the future as a free library. Mr L, Hotop, as president of the Athenfcum, in a neat speech gave a short history of the library, and dwelt upon the great usefulness and credit the institution had been to the town, hoping to see both greatly extended under the new regime. The Eev. D. Eoss, who was received with loud cheers, delivered an eulogistic oration on the reign and times of Queen Victoria, •which was listened to with interest and much approbation. He said that they were taking a step that few towns In the colony have seen their way to adopt — the opening of a free library for the benefit of the townspeople. There was perhaps no town in the world with so small a population that could boast of such a possession. Mr L. Hotop then handed over the keys of the Athenasum to the mayor, who said that he thought they were giving a testimony of their loyalty in a very practical manner, and one which would extend the usefulness of the institution tenfold. He heartily thanked the trustees and subscribers of the Athenceum for handing ove- so valuable a property to the ratepayers, and felt sure the municipal council would carefully watch and guard over the institution. Revs D. 0. Hampton and B. P. Rothwell also delivered addresses. The ceremony concluded, the volunteers and fire brigade, headed by the band, marched to the park, where a royal salute was fired, while the children, after being refreshed, entered into the sports provided for them. During the afternoon 150 gum trees were planted by a number of the young folks.. In the evening Eicbardt's hotel was tastefully illuminated, and a lot of fireworks were let off, in which example several private householders followed suit. Later on a ball was held in the Garrison Hall, which, however, was not so well attended as was expected. {She whole of the proceedings, with this exception, went off without any serious hitch, and the occaeion will long be remembered by all who took pai t in it There were of course the usual loyal demonstrations of cheering, and singing and playing the National Anthem. At Arrowtown the festivities were more of a material than an intellectual nature The procession, consisting of the brass band, volunteers, and school children, which latter were abundantly supplied through the foresight of the Government teachers, Mr and Mrs Sutherland, with flags, banners, and bannerettes of a great variety of colours and designs, formed quite an attractive feature, as hundreds of little feet went patter, clatter over the hard frozen ground in the best of jubilee glee, despite the keen frosty morning. A feature in this stream of colour was a large banner resplendent with a golden crown and other rich ornaments designed and executed by Mr J. P. Sutherland, the head teacher Indeed the procession partook much of a mediceval character. After firing the royal salute and feu-de-joie and the playing of the National Anthem by the band, the procession marched to the recreation ground, where the nucleus of a jubilee park was planted by some of the children. The trees were the gift of Mr Sutherland, who also suggested the idea, and a number of trees were likewise presented by Mr Peter Butel, which were planted lat»r on. Mr G. Heller, mayor of Arrowtown, delivered an appropriate address, and Mr John Elliot addressed the children and called for three cheers for their teachers, which was heartily responded to. The procession Mien dispersed and attacked the cheer provided—namely, a bullock roasted whole (the gift of Mr W. Scoles), a roasted pig (the gift of Mr W. JenJdns), a jubilee pudding, &c. The intensity of the loyalty displayed may be estimated by the fact that a whole bullock, a large pig, a number of hams and rounds of beef , 40 loaves of bread, and hundredweights of plum pvidding (hot) were consumed. This was washed down by I don't know how many Government sluice heads of tea, served and handed round in buckets, the whole giving unbounded satisfaction to all who partook of it. The bullock and pie were excellently cooked, and were especially relished. Mr Sutherland, who is an accomplished and successful photographer, Jtook several views by the instantaneous process of the festive throng, copies of which, I understand, are to be forwarded to the Queen. The proceedings were of course copiously interlarded with cheering and music, in which the National Anthem came in for its full share. In the evening the most successful ball ever held in this district came off in the Arrow Drillshed. It cannot have bean attended by less than 350 people, 120 couples taking part in the Grand Jubilee March, especially arranged by Mr G. Stoddart, the MO. By some tacit arrangement the affair was turned into a fancy dress ball, and as such was so creat a success that it Is not difficult to predict that it will shortly be repeated. There were many highly interesting characters, and not a single excess of any kind was noticeable. The catering was done by Mr H Dixon, of the New Orleans Hotel, and though the attendance was six times what was contracted for, there was no lack of comestibles, a fact which speaks volumes for the resources of Mrs Dixon and her establishment. Throughout the day he most beautiful weather ruled, although the early morning was intensely frosty. . July 4.— The mountain walls r«und our district have effectually kept off all the bad weather which 'has recently swept over this island ; indeed for the -past eight months we have enjoyed unseasonably •fine weather. The days have been balmy and altogether delightful, with only intermittent frosts, and tthose we have had not over severe. Spring- Meet.— The Lake County Jookey Club have decided to hold a Spring Meeting on Saturday. •24th September next, when stakes to the amount or JBSO will be run for. „.....« > *. Acclimatisation.— The Lakes District Society iheld a meeting of subscribers last week. The ibalance sheet showed a credit of dE9I 10s 9d.

Detters from Banger Burt, Clinton, suggested the jrossing of brown trout with Loon Leven male fish, >tating that he had made the experiment with great tuccess. The society adopted the suggestion. Wholesale Murdbr by Poison.— lt is computed >hat before September next between 200,000 and 300,000 dozen rabbitskins will be secured in this disirict alone, representing a money value of between 620,000 and £30,000. Already the skins are coming in in great numbers, and, favoured by the fine weather, the rabbiters' is the leading trade just now. Competent judges estimate that of all the rabbits pßisoned the skin of one only in every five is obtained, the other four dying in their holes or in the jrevices of the rocks. From this the extent of the slaughter may be estimated, and when it is further jonsfdered that this massacre is an annually recurring and increasing event, it will not be difficult to gauge the strength of the hold bunny has upon the district. It is positively uncomfortable to make guesses as to which is the weak party, who will have bo go to the wall. Is It to be bunny or his enemies, bhe settler, or will the latter be turned Into professional rabbiters pure and simple ? Obituary.— A very sad death occurred last Saturday week at Skippers reefs, where Mrs James Griffiths died some days after giving birth to a stillborn child. What adds to the melancholy nature of the event is that the deceased was only married a little over 12 months ago. Both husband and wife were held in high estimation by all the residents, as was shown by the large cortege which followed the remains of the latter to their last resting place. Great sympathy is felt for the bereaved husband. Lessees Beware.— Mr H. N. Firth, in hiß capacity of gold receiver, sued Samuel Gower for rent due on a mining lease, amounting to £56 13s 4d. There were 11 shareholders interested, but judgment, as a matter of course, went against Gower. Parties holding on to leases thinking that they are absolved from paying rent because they require the lease no longer, should surrender their leases, or they will be liable for rent until the leases expire by effluxion of time.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18870708.2.46.2

Bibliographic details

LAKE COUNTY., Otago Witness, Issue 1856, 8 July 1887

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1,601

LAKE COUNTY. Otago Witness, Issue 1856, 8 July 1887

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