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ENGLISH AND FOREIGN.

The results of the great Derby and Oaks races, run last week, will be found in this issue. It will be seen that the former was won b5 that young Mr Baird who races under the name of ♦' Mr'Abington," and is a cousin of Mr D. Baird, whose colt Enterprise won the Two Thousand Guineas a month ago. Since that race Enterprise broke down', and had to be scratched for the Derby, and it is a piece of good luck for the family that they had so good a colt as Merry Hampton running in their interests. , Merry Hampton never' appeared on a racecourse till this season, but he was engaged in the Guineas, and may have started in that race, for which he was being backed a month. before at 20 to 1. His name did not appear in the Derby quotations till the first week in April, when he was backed to win several thousands of pounds, commencing at 40 to 1 and, leaving off at 33 to 1, but by the day of the race his , price had shortened to 9to 1. A reference to his tabulated pedigree in another column will be of interest, for it will be seen that he gets The Baron and Gladiator strains of blood through both sire and dam, while in the Derby his most doughty opponent was a colt named The Baron, and also a descendant of the original horse of that name, who won the St. Leger of 1845. The time (2min 43sec) in which Merry Hampton won the Derby equals the fastest on record, made by Kettledrum in 1861 and Blink Bonny in 1864.

Merry Hampton, the winner of the Derby, has been compelled to take a spell owing to slight injuries received in his stable from the prick of a nail. The owner of the second horse in' the Derby also races under an assumed name, for " Mr Fern" is 'none other than one of the BurdettCoutts family. The colt The Baron won all his races last year. It is not often that a stallion sires the winners of both Derby and Oaks in the same year, but such is the case with Hampton on this occasion, he being sire of Merry Hampton and also of Reve d'Or. The only previous instances on record — except of course when Eleanor and Blink Bonny won both races — occurred in 1815, when the Duke of Grafton's Whisker and Minuet, both by Waxy* won the Derby and Oaks respectively ; in 1824, when Sir J. Shelley's Cedric and Lord Jersey's Cobweb, both by Phantom, were successful ; and in 1852, when Mr Bowes' Daniel O'Rourke and Mr J. Scott's Songstress, both by Irish Birdcatcher, achieved the feat.

While plsnn " Mr" was about in the Derby, it will U" m..v- - 1 that the owners of the placed horses in Mi<* O -ks are " all noblemen," the two Dukes of Beaufort and Westminster being split by that grand old racing man Lord Falmouth, who some few years ago retired from the turf, but 1 has of late years been nibbling in a quiet

way at his favourite sport. It is needless to say that if St. Helen had got her head in front of Reve dOr at the finish of this race, her victory would have been enthusiastically received. The Eiridsford that appears to have started second- favourite for the Derby is, it may be mentioned, a colt the property of " Mr Manton" (the Duchess of Montrose). He is by Isonomy out of Sonsie Queen, and did not race last

year. The expectation that, with the opening of the regular racing season in the Bois de Boulogne (says the Paris correspondent of the Field), the crude restrictions placed upon -betting in every shape would be withdrawn, was not destined to be fulfilled. Upon the contrary, the police, acting no doubt upon instruction^ from their, superiors, were even more ruthless in their pursuit of offenders than they had been at the

Auteuil Steeplechases the previous Thursday, "rating several bookmakers and even "backers," among the former being Mr John Gideon, bo well known' in the English ring, and his son. The former had his pockets searched, and a sum of 5000f, which he had on him, was confiscated, Mr Gideon himself being detained in custody, like a vulgar pickpocket, until the day's racing was over. One hardly knows whether to laugh or to feel irritated at such senseless proceed-

ings, though it is no laughing matter for those ..who are subjected to such indignities; and if

matters were' to remain in\statu'qu6'p few weeks more, facing 'm J France would'come &> ah'jeridl 'while English breeders would so far be benefited that the French' would* have ( to' 'come 'to' them for the thoroughbred sire's which are now raised in the country.' ' I think 'that' people in England hardly, realise, even now, the 'mischief which has been wrought in three short weeks, but 1 am well within the mark when I say that the falling off inreceip'ts at A'uteuil (four days),' Vincennes (two),andLongchsmps (one day) has been quite £6000. ''"' '- "". " ' ! In passing sentence. in the case pf the Bat's, libel on Mr R. Peck, -'thje judge 1 said: — !' James Davis, you pleaded guilty at the last sessions to, an indictment charging: you with having published a libel upon Mr Feck, which libel was contained in a publication called the Bat, which was published by you. It was contained in no less than three pages of your paper,' and, from beginning to end I find nothing but' opprobrium 'of the most offensive character heaped upon Mr Feck. You begin by stating that the task of criticising his. public career would be impossible without offending him. , You speak of the mode, in which he has secured a fortune for himself as being discreditable to him. You go on to 'speak of ' thorough rogues,' and then ' say that'you^do not mean' to apply the term to Mr Feck ; but youi language 1 showed-' 'that you did intend to apply it to' him. You then 1 - go on' in two' or' three columns to state further matter insinuating that he has been untrue and unfaithful to those who- employed him ; that he was untrue when placed in ! situations of trust ; and,' in short,' you heap upon him' every opprobrium that one man can heap upon another i You conclude your libel 'as vindictively as you commenced it. Now if .all this had been as true as you have admitted it to have been false, it would have afforded you no justification, unless you' had satisfied the jury that it was for' the public's advantage that this' scandalous' libel should have been published. I think that you, and everyone else, should understand that. a man cannot evade the criminal law. of libel by proving that what he published was true unless he also proves that it: was for the public's advantage that this truth should be known. There are many things which happen in a man's life occurring in his family which may be very painful, but. there is no justification for the publication' of these things to the world unless it be for ,the advantage of the public. , This ought to, be thoroughly understood by all those who embark in such speculations as you have engaged, in. Now, ,you profess your counsel to have known nothing whatever of Mr Peck, and 'yet, accordingto your own counsel's admission, you allow to be ; inserted in this journal a most offensive and scandalous libel, imputing to Mr Peck things for which, if true, he would ' deserve to be scouted by all honest people. But there was not-one single particle of truth in it, and it was published, not for the purpose of giving ' honest information 'to the public, but for the purpose of inserting in your journal that which was likely to increase its circulation, and' put money in your pocket by pandering to the appetite of a bad portion of society, who delight in reading slanderous and scurrilous libels so long as they personally are not attacked. It is now pointed out to me on your behalf, and in order to save yourself from punishment, that you personally knew, nothing about the libel. You were then within the clutches of the Jaw and seeking to 'escape punishment, and it was with this view that you, acting under the advice of your solicitor, offered to apologise. If the- apology had come out in the first number of the Bat after you had found out — if you ever took the trouble to find out at all — that' the libel was false, if it had .come voluntarily from yon, and you had stated that you had been induced by a correspondent in whom you had confidence. to publish the libel on Mr Feck, I should have thought a very great deal of an apology like that. ' But no such offer was made and it was not till February 28 you put that apology in your paper. An apology under such circumstances I look upon as being worth nothing whatever. It is given ' under compulsion, and for the > purpose of rescuing you .from the -position you stand in. I look upon that, apology as an admission that the article was absolutely baseless, and that it was a wanton and malicious libel.- Beading that apology in a light most favourable to yourself, it shows that you took not the smallest trouble' to make an inquiry into the truth of this article, although you knew it was calculated to damage Mr Feck to an incalculable degree. I should like to have heard from you from whom you made the inquiries which' led you to say that there was no foundation for the article, but not a word has been said at out that. < So far as the question of costs is concerned, I have nothing to do with that; I have only to consider the interests of the public. Yet it is due >to Mr Feck to say in reference to the costs, that although he can get. no indemnity for them, you, yourself, consider, under the circumstances in which the case stands, that some indemnity 1 ought to be given him. I have nothing to do with the question of costs. This prosecution ■was instituted by the Public Prosecutor because he felt that the libel upon Mr Feck was a malicious and wicked one, and because the public are interested in the suppression of the wanton publication of foul and malicious libels. I look upon this libel as coming within that character. . The fabrication of ' such a libel has brought you within the meshes of the law, but the sentence lam about, to pass upon you is nothing like the extreme penalty I am entitled to give you. The man who publishes false statements «v""< intent to extort money is punishable with imprisonment with hard labour for three years. The man who publishes a libel knowing it to be false is 'liable to imprisonment to hard labour for two years. The man who simply publishes a libel without the publication being in the interests of the public is liable to one year's imprisonment. I -am not going to inflict anything like the extreme penalty I might do, but I hope the punishment which I give you will be a warning not only to yourself, but to others, for in all human probability a repetition of such gross misconduct will be visited with double, threefold, and fourfold severity. The sentence is that you be imprisoned for three calendar months, and that you pay a fine of £500 to the Queen." The defendant was then taken from the deck, but was presently brought back at the direction of the judge, who then explained that in default of payment of the fine he would be sentenced to a further term of six months' 'imprisonment, the two terms to run concurrently. The victorious career of The Sinner received a check recently at Manchester, wherfj the odds of 20 to 1 betted on him for the Hunters' Flat Race Plate were bowled over by Mr Gubbin's colt, Eilmeague. « The Baron, it appears by papers just to hand, ran once this season prior to his essay in the, Derby, for as will be seen elsewhere he won the Craven Stakes at Newmarket on April 14.

The Prince of Wales had a winning horse of his disqualified recently, as will be seen by the following notification : — " The Stewards of the Grand Military Steeplechase having met to consider the objection lodged by M*

against the ' Prince of \ Wales's b g Hohenlinden for the Grand Military Hunt Cup, are' of opinion that/ the ' horse ' in l question was wrongly described aa a six-year-old instead of agedjana that Hohenlinden is thereby disqualified, and they award the race, to Mr G. Aberoromby's Maaslandj which came in second. — Signed, D. C. Drury-Low, Edward A. Wood, F. E. Lawrence." The Oaks' winner also showed up at the Craven meeting,' being' indulged with a walkover for the Riddesworth Stakes, a sweepstake of 20050v3 each. " , , ' 4 Mr Torrance, a well-known American gentlemen, owner,' and amateur rider, whose name is closely identified with sport of , every kind, ■ was unfortunately 5 killed 1 whilst rising Gabjie tot Count deMadre in the "Steeplechase Handicap' 'at'La Croixde Berny, France, in April. Hishorse stumbled at an open drain and fell,' pitching Mr Torrance on his head and breaking his, neck. , Death was instantaneous. ' ! ';. ',",,' f;> This well-known stallion' Lord Lyon, was* destroyed at ,the ! Croft' Stud recently.; , Lord • Lyon, as a racer, stands as one, of the four victors of what is now known as the "triple crown;" and it is carious to relate that by a head only he should have secured the Derby and St. Leger from Savernake, a horse that had Tom French as a pilot at Epsom and! Chaloner on his back' at Doncaster. As a two-year-old he won three out of four events, and pulled off 6ix races out' of nine at three years old ; so that, in 1866 .he brought about a, great surprise when, he succumbed to Rustic in the Prince of Wales Stakes at Ascot, and finished behind Rama and Ackworth for the Doncaster Cup, Fripponnier also beating him for the All- Aged Stakes 'at the Houghton meeting at Newmarket. As a four-year-old he earned seven brackets off the reel, but terminated his career that season with a head defeat by Rama in the Queen's Plate at the Autumn meeting at Lincoln. Lord Lyon was a son of Stockwell out of Paradigm, a mare that also produced Gardeyisure, Achievement,' Chevisaunce, &c. Lord Lyon, , considering his credentials as a racehorse, was not a great success at the stud, and he had been almost, erased from breekers' memory until Minting came out' with flying colours' as a two-year-old. Still itis fair to add that his offspring also included Placida, Touchet, Cosur de Lion, Beanstalk, Lady Ronald, Water Lily, Poursuivant, Speedwell, Bonnie Marden^ Primula, Subduer, Bissrta and Zadig. . , . I, read in a weekly,- paper that Matthew. Da'wson twice refused £10,000 for. The Baron before he recently accepted the offer ,of Mr Burdett-Coutts. This is simply a romance, as the horse has belonged to Mr Burdett-Coutts ever since he first became .known to fame, and "Mr Fern" has nominated. him' for every race in which he has been entered since he was a yearling. I understand that The Baron will not run for the Grand Prix, which is his first engagement after the Derby, bnt, he is to be started for the Gold' Cup at Ascot.— Turf. ' , • / The young Scotch laird whose disastrous "plunging" created, such » sensation at Newmarket last autumn commenced the present season more auspiciously by betting £3000 on Camaralzaman, £1000 on Anarch, and £10,000 oh ' Arinamite — all winners at the Craven meeting.

At the Epsom Spring meeting, close to the entrance to the paddock, an attempt was made by a pickpocket, or rather gang of pickpockets, to rob Sir J. D. Astleyof his watch and chain. The popular baronet was, however, one too many for the light-fingered gentry, and although the thief who first clutched the watch passed it to a confederate, the latter had not time to get away before being collared by Sir John, who brought him quickly, to earth, and recovered his property. , Buccaneer, who had been for several years located as a stallion in Hungary, was shot in April, having attained his 30th year. Besides being famous in England as a racer, he had also made a name at the stud, and some of' the best of his progeny may be named in Paul Jones, See Saw, nnd Brigantine, the lastnamed of whom won the Oaks in 1869, while See Saw stands out as the Cambridgeshire victor in 1868 as a three-year-old with the big weight of Bst 21b, and Paul Jones as the winner of the Chester Cup in the same year. Buccaneer raced until he was a five-year-old, and after a period of stud life here was disposed of to the Austrian Government. It was not long ere he made further mark, as his son Kisber — so named from the place in Hungary at which he was foaled — won the English Derby in 1876, after having as a two-year-old given a meritorious performance in whining the ' Dewhurst Plate, with Springfield s and other youngsters of note behind him: The offspring of Buccaneer, who was by Wild Dayrell out of a Little Red Rover mare, have won a large number of races on the Continent, the united value of 'the stakes they have secured representing a very large sum. We understand that his hide will be stuffed and placed near the similarly preserved remains of 'the famous mare Eincsem (who died only, a short time since) in the Festh Museum. At the Harzburg Stud the thoroughbred mare B Plat, by Orlando out of Torment, brought into the world on the 14th of April her nineteenth living foal in succession. ' Of these 16 still exist. The mare is 23 years old, and looks as if she was not more than 10. She was bought in England with a filly foal by Neville, together with her twin sister F Sharp, who produced 11 foals and died last year. B Flat's best progeny were Puni ('by Savernake), C Dur, and Flatterer, and her erect progeny won about £12,000. Lord Falmouth's one i familiar colours were to the fore again at Tie Newmarket Craven meeting, where his coir. Blanchland carried off the Biennial Stakes. ■ ' '

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18870603.2.75

Bibliographic details

Otago Witness, Otago Witness, Issue 1854, 3 June 1887

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3,100

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN. Otago Witness, Issue 1854, 3 June 1887

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