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THE UNVEILING OF THE BURNS STATUE.

efforts of the people of Otago, who have soralong time been raising funds .with a view of erecting a monument in memory of Robert Burns, have at length been crowned with success, and a statue of the poet now stands in the Octagon on the most commanding site that could be procured. The statue, which is composed of bronze, is about 9ft high, and represents the poet in a sitting posture. The pedestal upon which the statue has been erected is of Peterhead granite, and was constructed by Mr Munro, of Dunedin. It is 9ft in height, the dimensions of the base being 9ft 3in by Bft 3in. The sub-base is constructed of Port Chalmers bluestone, and stands about 2ft above the level of the ground. The height from the foot of the pedestal to the head of the statue is about 20ft. On the face of the pedestal the following words are inscribed in gold letters : —

SOBEKT BUENS. 25 January 1759. 21 July 1796.

The ceremony of unveiling the statue took place on Tuesday, fully 8000 persons being present. Prier to the ceremony a procession, consisting of various societies, was formed in the Triangle reserve. The order of the procession was as follows : —

Mounted Troopers (2). Pipers (6), under fipe-major Adair. Members of the Caledonian Society (30). Kngineers Band (25). Dunedin Fire Brigade (18). Seamen's Union (HO), with banners. Cavershara Band (2t5), under Captain Briggs. Operative Batters (27). Druids (69). Mosgiol Band (30), under Bandmaster Haig. Protestant Alliance (30), with banners. Loyal Orange Lodge (30). Foresters, Lodge Enterprise (40).

The procession — which, by the way, was not a very imposing one — marched along Bond street, up Jetty street, on to Princes street, thence along George street, down Hanover street, up King street, and through Moray place into the centre of the Octagon. Flags bearing different devices, selected from the writings of Burns, were suspended from the tops of the buildings across the street? through which the procession passed, but the display was rather insignificant than otherwise. A great deal of interest was, however, manifested in the day's proceedings. Large crowds of people collected in the vicinity of the Triangle reserve some time before the procession was formed, and still larger crowds assembled in the Octagon before the arrival of procession there. In order to get a good view of what was going on, many had taken up positions on the tops of the buildings surrounding the Octagon ; and the forms of numerous spectators could be seen at the windows of the Town Hall and other buildings. When the procession reached the Octagon some alarm was caused by the horse of one of the mounted troopers* slipping on the asphalt and falling with his rider. The latter, however, kept hold of the animal's bridle and relieved the minds of the spectators by rising quickly and quieting the horse, which appeared to be very much frightened.

The procession reached its final destination in the Octagon shortly before 2 o'clock, and marched into t. large space which had been kept clear by the constabulary for their accommodation. Shortly after Sir George Grey drove up and was loudly cheered as he mounted the platform, where he was joined by Messrs T. Fergus, T. Bracken, W. D. Stewart, Hatch, Reese, and Bruce, M.H.R.'s, Mr J. B. Thomson (chairman of the Statue Committee), his Worship the Mayor, several councillors, and the town clerk. As the time fixed for the ceremony had not been reached by some 15 minutes, several of the bands played selections, all of which were characteristic of the occasion. At the fixed time to a moment the proceedings proper were commenced.

Mr Fergus, M.H.R., said : Ladies and gentlemen, before calling upon Sir George Grey to address this vast assemblage I have got a few words of apology to offer from a number of men — eminent men in the colony — and also from one eminent outside man, a Scotsman, the Earl of Aberdeen. — (Applause.) I regret exceedingly that owing to the exigencies of politics at the present time, a larger number of the members of the House of Representatives are not here to-day to do honour to Scotland's great bard. I have to convey to you, in their names, apologies for their nonattendance to-day, specially from our eminent townsman Sir Robert Stout — (cheers, and cries of " Oh !") — it is utterly impossible for him to be present — and from the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Sir Morris O'Rorke, who made all arrangements to be here to-day, but is prevented from coming. I have also in my hand a telegram from the Earl of Aberdeen, received by Sir George Grey last night, in which he says : — •' Will you kindly convey an expression of my regret at having been prevented from visiting Dunedin, owing to the necessity of leaving early by the mail, and offer best wishes in connection with the unveiling of the Burns statue? " Ladies' and gentlemen, any words of mine would be entirely futile in introducing to you such an eminent gentleman as the one who is now upon my left. — (Three cheers were given for Sir George Grey at the instance of Mr Fish.) His name has been known in the annals of Britain before most of us were born, and his name will live in the annals of New Zealand after the most — all of us are dead. Sir George Grey, at very considerable personal inconvenience, has undertaken to be present to-day, and I have no doubt that you will hail with pleasure his presence once more on a Dunedin platform, and especially on such a platform as he adorns to-day. — (Applause.) Ladies and gentlemen, I have, nothing more to do than to call on Sir George Grey to perform the opening ceremony on this occasion. — (Enthusiastic cheers.) Sir George Grey said : I have to introduce to you the great-grand niece of this mighty poet. To me it is a most touching fact that she should be present here to-day, and in your name, and on your behalf, I now call on her to unveil the statue of her illustrious kinsman.

Amid great cheering Miss Burns unveiled the statue, and the Engineers played " A man's a wan for a' that."

Sir George Grey then addressed the assemblage as follows : — How can I fiud fitting words to address so vast an assemblage ? How can I tell in what terms to speak to men and women who have come to found a new empire in this part of the world, encountering many perils and dangers ? In what language can I address those who are about to introduce a new era, greater

and happier, we hope, than any which has preceded the present one ?— (Hear, hear.) And how also can I without trembling try in adequate terms to set forth the merits of that great man whose statue has just been unveiled for us? Fancy what intellect and genius his, conceive that, standing in the presence of the statue only, of so gifted a being who with but little education raised himself to so high an eminence ! I stand here absolutely trembling lest I should not do justice to his merits. And why and whence has risen this admiration for that great poet ? It is for this reason, that he was one of the people ; that he came forth from the midst of his fellow citizens, with no prospect in life, no hope of advancement, or of influencing his fellow-men — (hear, hear), — and he thus showed you what the intellect of the people at large is. He gave to you a proof that any man, however humble his birth, however poor his state, may attain the very highest degree of eminence. — (Hear.) Since Burns exhibited this great example to the world, no mother lives, however poor, however wretched, but she may hope she may be the mother of as great a son, and one who may prove as great a benefactor of his race. — (Hear.) The consciousness of this must ennoble us all, must strike every heart with joy, and may fill every bosom with hope. — (Hear.) But then you will tell me what sorrows and, what sufferings he underwent. Was his an enviable lot ? I answer " Yes." Just let me read one short extract to you of a letter from Jeffreys, the great and learned author, and what does he say? He says : " What troubles me most is the pitiable poverty in which that gifted being and his nobleminded father passed their early days. In this way he passed his early days, the gainful frugality to which their innocence was doomed, and the thought how small a share of the useless luxuries in which we, such comparatively poor creatures, indulge, would have sufficed to shed joy and cheerfulness in their dwelling, and perhaps to have saved that glorious spirit the trials and temptations under which he fell so prematurely." And then Jeffreys goes on tp say that he could grovel in the dust for years weeping for shame to think of the troubles and toils to which Burns was exposed. Well, now, I will tell you Ido not agree with Jeffreys. Do not think me crnel, but I glory in his trials and troubles. It is from such circumstances heroes are brought forth, and in no other way can they be given to the world. But what was it this noble-minded man said himself about these terrible afflictions ? — and thousands should cherish these words. Did he complain ? Did he groan? No. He says — That if I must afflicted be To suit some wise design, Then man my soul with firm resolve

To bear and not repine. — (Hear.) Therefore it is with gratitude I think that the Great Creator dealt so wisely as to fit him to give us that bright example which he did give. Let me try to explain more fully what I mean. Some people are but little acquainted with his religious character. Some people little know how great and good a man he surely was, and I believe that it was misfortune through which he was led which chifly caused that feeling to arise in his mind which gave rise to the beautiful maxims which he gave forth to the world. Now let me tell you that I think his sufferings were of those greatest consequence to us. For if his maxims are so good as I shall presently show them to be, we here in a new world have the opportunity of carrying them out and giving effect to them. — (Hear.) Let me tell you what a few of those maxims were. Let me put them forward as rules of guidance for themselves. Let these words lodge in your hearts : " May prudence, fortitude, and truth erect your brow undaunted." Prudence, fortitude, and truth in his belief constituted a man greater than any nobleman or prince that walks the earth ; and as he said— Princes and lords arc but the breath of kings ; An honest man's the noblest work of God. — (Hear and applause.) Now, will you, the inhabitants of a new country, lay these words to your heart and adopt that maxim ? Let that be our rule, and we will seek no coronets, no favours from kings except such as a nation bestows or deeds performed ; but we will deem an honest, true, and good citizen as the most superior of beings that walks the earth? — (Applause.) In the same way, through his life, he inculcated this great lesson; that our first and most bounden duty to man was that each man should help his fellow men — help in every way. And he points put that the most dreadful curse upon earth is "Man's iuhumanity to man," which "makes countless thousands mourn." Let us strive by our laws, by our customs, to save men from the countless ills which they have suffered in the oldest countries, and from which we can relieve them here. — (Hear, hear.) I should weary you if I were to go through maxims of this kind which he lays down. The main thing is the love of human being for human being ; and not only that, but goodness of man to every dumb creature, as he himself calls them, " our fellow mortals " — that they have but a brief life given to them for enjoyment upon earth, and that the Creator has afforded means by which the lives of the great mass of them may be rendered lives of happiness. We should think of them even as of ourselves. What can be more noble than a sentiment of that kind ? As he says : " Poverty may overwhelm a man, and leave him truly honest and noble-hearted "; and again : " A man may have neither money nor influence to aid a failing friend, yet by sympathy may render him priceless service*" — (Hear.) I will not trouble you by quoting, as I was going to do, because but few can hear me, the many beautiful expressions he gives of love and gratitude to his Maker, of submission to His will, and true piety which actuated his heart ; but I ask you, knowing that such was the case, and assembling here this day to offer the highest honour to Burns by placing this statue in Dunedin — I ask you, the founders of a new empire, the makers of a new people, will you give up in accordance with the modern notions of some people, will you give up all gratitude to that Creator who has placed us here in the midst of so many blessings ? — (Hear.) Will you relinquish all love to His creatures, sympathy for your fellow men, hope for the future, all that 'guided your forefathers upon earth, and walk blindfolded and without knowledge in the midst of difficult trials, which you will have to meet in the new world ? — (Hear.) Let me now advert to the influence of Burns. Conceive howl ittle he could even have thought that a new country would have been founded here in New Zealand. Such an idea could never have entered his mind, and when he wrote his poems and spoke to a few millions of people, he never expected to see the Anglo-Saxon race and the English language prevailing over such a great portion of the continent of America, over Australi, and over New Zealand, bringing into birth a nation which will have to be reckoned by billions and not by millions, all united by common blood, by common sympathies, common faith, common literature, and common laws. From the Atlantic on the one side to the Indian Ocean on the other, the Anglo-Saxon race must march dominant over the world.— (Hear.)

What are the quarrels of the princes, of Europe to us ? What are their wars, their' contests for a few feet of territory, to us, the inheritors of so vast a territory — the forefathers, as I tell you, of billions of people speaking one common tongue. We can pursue all great objects, thinking little or nothing of them ; we can attend to our own duties, rendering men happy and contented; see that our lands, all our common property, is equally distributed under fair and just laws — (hear) j see that no favouritism is shdvvn to wealth — (hear) ; see that all have equal rights, all have equal opportunities of advancing themselves in life. These are the maxims that we should hold in view, These are the duties which we should strive to fulfil. These are the objects which we should follow. When I say that you have much to do, I tell you that you have to make Burns' " Cottar's Saturday Night" — that which was written under the imagination of a poet — a true picture upon earth. New Zealand was made to realise that. He must also have had a forecast in his mind of what a country was to be occupied by men of his race when he wrote as he did : Oh Scotia, my dear, my native soil, For whom my warmest wish to' heaven is sent ; Long may thy hardy sods of rustic toil Be blest with health and peace and sweet content. (Applause.) Yes, rustic toil. Let all men have land open to them. Let all have a chance of sharing the bounties which God has offered to his children upon earth, and let there be no distinctions and differences made amongst men in that respect. It is all very well to say that those who have money in their pocket and can ' pay ready money down for so muoh land shall have a freehold and walk lords of the earth, residing where they please, doing what they like with their land, and that if a man, honest, "a 1 son of rustic toil," fit to cultivate the ground, desires land, becuuse he has not a considerable sum of ready money shall only hold ipon leasehold subject to his rent being raised from time to time, compelled to reside upon it as long as he lives — not to live where he likes — and yet shall pay the interest for ever upon the very money that the other man pay? lown in cash, that being the only difference between them. Will you have different races brought into existence in your own country with different privileges ? Will you have it said in the one casf that hfe who has bought a freehold may leave his land as he likes, but that the other cannot subdivide his land, sub-let it, or leave it in portions to his various children, but must leave it to someone, and turn the others out beggars ? I say that great poet looking down upon us, who bids us look for freedom, tells us to look closely to all such things as those in the new country which we occupy here.— (Applause.) And then what does he say further ?—? — And oh, may Heaven their simple lives prevent From luxury's contagion weak and vile ; Then, howe'er crowns and coronets be rent,

A virtuous populace may rise the while And stand a wall of fire around their much-loved isle, There is a lesson, if you be content with small things. I have seen in this country, and I know of many farms occupied by families and worked by families in which "The Cottar's Saturday Night " is really and truly fulfilled — in which there are peace, contentment, and happiness. The produce of the farms yielda all they desire and a surplus, by which they may purchase necessaries ; and, though arriving at no great things, they are in a position which will not injure their fellow men and set an example of peace, contentment, and happiness, which it is our duty to follow. I consider that the lessons taught to us by Burns are these, and it is from teaching these lessons that he is our great benefactor: contentment with what we have, a natural desire to lay by what is necessary for our children and for old age, but to abandon luxurious habits, and as far as we can to get rid of the vast expenditure which has been seen in this country, and to reduce our expenses in every possible way, because such expenses and such wealth as I speak of are really wrung from the people. From such a vast population as I see around me — now what could I realise this moment if I could tax every individual I look upon and put the money in my pocket ? What a vision rises before me of what I might do and what I could do and accomplish in the way of personal enjoyment! But would that satisfy me for the misery I must bring on families, for the poverty I must plunge some into? We cannot come to such an ideal as Burns has drawn until we determine that we ourselves — each one — will live with economy, and that we ourselves will each one resist any undue taking of money out of the public pocket to the impoverishment of the people. — (Hear, hear.) We can do that well without injuring anybody. We can do it with justice to ourselves, and to all connected with us. We can render our lives happier and healthier, and at last we can sink into that grave to which he, the great Burns, has led as it were the way for us. If we follow his precepts we can enter that grave satisfied with our lot in life and with the enjoyments we have had bestowed upon us, and grateful for the Providence that has placed us here. Now, if you really love Burns — if you idolise his memory in the manner that I do myself — you will feel that we can take no greater, no worthier guide than he is — that by following in his footsteps we shall benefit ourselves and raise this young nation to that pitch of prosperity which I hope to see it attain. I see around me mothers of families, their husbands, their fathers, their children — I call upon them all to join with me in agreeing that whenever we pass this statue of Burns we will recollect these great principles which he has left for our guidance ; that we will feel that he was in truth an inspired messenger sent to us ; that he was trained in toil and misery to give him the heroic character which he had — that contempt for wealth, that love for his fellow men, that ardent desire for all their benefit which characterised him. Let us think of that ; let us resolve to imitate him. Let this be no ideal ceremony; let it be one of the greatest days that has dawned upon this part of the world. When men are erecting a monument of this kind they erect it to impress the principles and the great conceptions — not the mere admiration of a fleshly man, but reverence for a truly great and noble soul, which animated one of the first and greatest men which the last two centuries have seen. With that recommendation I shall not keep you longer. I shall try to pursue that course — weakly failing from time to time. All of you will have to undergo such troubles; but let those who hear me this day think that there is something nobler and greater than wealth, to be prized far above rank, and that that something may be gained by every single man on earth who chooses to devote himself to his Maker and to his duty. These are the lessons we should learn; these are the duties we should fulfil, with the fervent hope that some hearts will this day recover fortitude

Highway Bobbery Almos? , to sell the poisonous, drunken, purging stuff as medicine to honest men, innocent women, and harmless children fco weaken and destroy their systems and health, when pure faarmleßS Hop Bittebs can be had that cures always and continually at a trifling cost. Ask druggists or pbysiciwia . Bead .— [Advt.]

and strength, and enter upon such a struggle, and be determined to make this nation siich a nation that Burns would make it to be.' I now return thanks for the reception you have" given me, and assure you that in all the ways' I can help you on such a pat you will find me a willing and ardent friend.— (Great applause.) Sir GeokgAh then resumed his seat, but rose a moment afterwards and said : This is the birthday of our noble Queen, and I am sure that her heart' would be gladdened to-day if she knew that you had erected a statue in this part of the world to the memory of her favourite poet. Will you give three cheers for the Sovereign of this noble empire. The request was responded to with the utmost heartiness.

Sir Geobge Gsey : We have the poet's greatgrand niece here. She unveiled the statue, will you give her three cheers? The ladj was very heartily cheered.

Mr J. B. Thomson said : The proper, thing to do to-day would have been, as chairman of the' Statue Committee, to hand over the statue to the mayor and corporation of Dunedin, but I' am sorry the mayor is not present. — (Laughter; the mayor being at the other end of the platform.) I very humbly apologise to the mayor. I did not see him, and was told he was not present. As a matter bf fact the statue has been erected on a site granted by the corporation, and to the corporation it now belongs, to hold in trust for the citizens. The only thing I have now to do is formally, in the name of the committee, to hand it over to their protection and care. I hope it will be the harbinger of many statues which will adorn the streets of our city. His Worship said : The city councillors and myself are here to-day in response to an invitation from the Burns Statue Committee that we should take possession of this statue of Burns, Scotland's greatest poet. It gives the City Council and myself very great pleasure to be present on such an occasion. I have now formally to take possession of this memorial. I will take this opportunity of congratulating the committee on the success of their efforts in raising a memorial to the kindly man — a man I much admire — who wrote " A man's a man for a' that." Three cheers were given for the mayor, and the proceedings closed shortly after 3 o'clock THE BANQUET. A banquet in honour of the unveiling of the statue was held in the Lyceum Hall in the evening. ' '. Mr J. B. Thomson (chairman of the Burns Statue Committee) occupied the chair. He was supported on his right by Sir George Grey, Messrs R. C. Bruce, J. Hatch, D. Reese, M.H.R's., and Dr Hislop. On the left were Messrs Thomas Fergus, Thomas Bracken, and W. D. Stewart, M.H.R's. Messrs R. K. Murray and A. Sligo acted as croupiers ; and some 80 persons, among whom were members of the City Council and Caledonian Society, sat down to the banquet. Mr W. Wood, of Stuart street, catered ; and among the dishes served up was the celebrated haggis. The Kaikorai Band played a number of selections while the banquet was proceeding. The Chairman, before proceeding to the toast list, referred to one or two apologies he had received for non-attendance. They had, he said, all heard the apology which had that afternoon been read from the Earl of Aberdeen. In addition to that he had received a congratulatory letter from the President of the Caledonian Society of Wellington. He had also a letter from one of the most highly respected clergymen in the South Island of New Zealand — the Rev. Dr Stuart.— (Cheers.) He read the letter, which was as follows :—: —

Queenatown, May 19, 1887. Dear Sir,— As lam here under orders, I will not be able to be at the unveiling of the Burns statue and banquet. I cannot tell you how much I would like to hear Sir Eobevt Stout, Sir George Grey, and Sir Maurice O'Rorkeon such a theme as Burns, poet and teacher. My first academic honour was anes6ayon Burns and Horace— now long ago— and ever since I have revered him as the poet of the people. I hope you will have good weather, and an audjence worthy of the occ«sion. In token of my sympathy, I enclose a cheque for &l to the Burns Statue Fund. I need not say that if I were present I would join in the thanks to the committee, who have worked for the statue in all weathers. — I am, &c, D. M. Stitakt.

Wm. Brown, Esq., Hon. Secretary. (Applause.) — The mayor of Dunedin was also absent owing to a long-standing previous engagement which he had to keep. Mr E. O'Conor,M.H.R. for a West Coast constituency, had also written expressing his regret that' he was unable to be present. In addition to these he had to make verbal apologies for Sir Maurice O'Rorke, Sir Robert Stout, and James Gore, M.H.R., who had been for some days past seriously indisposed. He concluded by proposing the toast " Her Majesty the Queen." The toast having been duly honoured,

A choir, composed of 18 ladies and gentlemen, sang the national anthem, the company joining in. Mr R. K. Murray proposed the health of his Excellency the Governor, after which Mr R. Francis sang " A man's a' man for a' that," with a vigour that called forth cheers all round the tables.

Mr Bruce, M.H.R., proposed the toast of " The British • Army, Navy, and Volunteers," composed, he said, mainly of that race which fought so well at. vVesay and Agin court ; that other race, which on many' a bloodstained field in every quarter of the globe had shown that fiery valour which was the singular characteristic of the children of Erin, and also of the sons of Caledonia, who for centuries showed such a stubborn front to their Southern foemen — whose soldiers even when fighting as mercenaries in Continental armies so often turned the tide of battle and sheltered retreat by their unbroken ranks. He proceeded to refer to the grand achievements of the British army and navy, and then, referring to the poet whose statue they had that day unveiled, he saidthat his memory was treasured by thousands of those whose pathways were the trackless ocean, and by soldiers in their lonely bivouac, who liked the true poet of democracy and cared less for the effusions of what we called the higher poets. — (Applause.) He also spoke of the volunteer force of this colony — of our citizen soldiers who had already, here, under the light of the Southern Cross, given proof that they still possessed the martial instinct of the mighty Anglo Saxon race which had built up the greatest and most powerful empire on which the sun had ever shone, or at least of which history had left any record. Referring to the tremors which went over the colony when there seemed any probability of a war with Russia, he said they only invited invasion, but to seem strong would remove the cause •of fear. Russia would do well to keep her ironclads under the shadow of the guns of their own forts, for if she sent them abroad they would surely fall a prey to the British navy. We in these colonies had a proud reputation handed down to us which we should jealously guard. Apart from the achievements of more recent years, we should consider tiat

we were descended from those old sea kings who, like* Ajax, put 'hot their trust in, gods not in demons but,in their own battle axes ; and when he looked at the tall,' lithe,' manly forms of the citizen soldiers of this colony, he could not help but think that they would, when the day of trial came, prove themselves worthy' of their ancestors who had fought at Trafalgar for national existence and at Waterloo for victory.--. (Applause.) , '

During this speech frequent interruptions were fnade by Mr H. S. Fish, jun., which led Mr Bruce on one occasion to remark, "If any gentleman wishes me to sit down, I shall do so." The interruptions ceased after this remark. Mr R. Andbew sang " The Red, White, and Blue," after which • , , Captain Duncan and Major Andbew briefly responded to the toast. • ■

Mr Sligo proposed " The Parliament of New Zealand," referring to the honour done to Dun. edin by the visit of the distinguished politicians who had borne amongst them on the .'present occasion, and particularly by the presence of Sir George Grey, whose very ■ name wanned the heart. of every inhabitant of New Zealand, whatever their political opinions.— (Cheers.) Speaking of the present Parliament, he said the people had expected little from it, and they had got it.— (Laughter.) With one thing the people of New Zealand were greatly disappointed and annoyed, and that was that, the, House had not seen its way to reduce the number of its own mom"bers. — (Loudand prolonged cheering.) He hoped they would vindicate the character which their Parliament had possessed in the past, and by electing better members do away with the disgraceful logrolling to which they had in a large degree been subjected-— (loud applause)— so that, to slightly alter the poet's own words, they might say that M sense and worth in Partiajnent may bear the gree an' a' that."

Mr Downib Stewart rose to respond to the toast, which he said Mr Sligo had proposed in such qualified terms. He had no difficulty whatever in responding on behalf of the Parliament of New Zealand. That Parliament was made by the people, and the people were responsible for the members they sent there. — (Hear, hear.) It was a very easy task to Bit some hundred miles away from the centre of action and judge f omewhat uncharitably and somewhat critically the actions of their members ; but he ventured to say that the gentlemen who composed that House were earnest and honest, and that they desired to promote the welfare of this colony.— (Hear, hear.) He knew well that it was looked upon as a popular thing to speak ill of the members of Parliament and of the House itself — (No !) — but he would say that the character of the Parliament was the character of the country. — (No!) The members were chosen by themselves, and if they chose to send men there who did not represent them the remedy was to oust them. The matter of the number of members, which Mr Sligo had touched upon, was one open to great controversy, and he believed in the welfare of this colony it would not be wise to reduce the number. — (Cries of "No," and "Question!") The few thousand pounds which it was supposed woulcl be saved in this way would be swallowed 10 times in expenditure in other directions.— (•* No ") If that gentleman who was interrupt* ing, and whose name he knew, would kindly re« strain himßelf for a minute, he would probably have an opportunity of speaking afterwards. He, for his part, felt proud of belonging to the Parliament of New Zealand. — (Hear, hear). The manner in which Mr Sligo' had referred to the House was no doubt popular at the present moment, but if he had a more intimate know* ledge of the working of the House, he would no doubt modify his opinions. One of the company, who had been previously interrupting, here again demurred. There was a cry of " Put him out," and the waiters and one or two gentlemen present went round to remonstrate with him. ■ '• Mr Bbacken said it had been asserted of the British Parliament that, "Whether girt with friends or foes, a man may speak the thing he will," and his experience of the New Zealand ! Parliament was that it was a very fair reflex oi its great prototype. It was a credit to New Zealand, and fairly represented the intelligence and honesty of the community generally. No doubt they differed on many political questions, just as he differed from his friend Mr Stewart on the question bf woman's suffrage. He did not like to turn their women into men. — (Applause.) But, taking them as a whole, the members of both Houses were actuated by an earnest and honest desire to further the progress lof New Zealand. He thanked them very { sincerely on behalf of the Parliament of New Zealand. — (Applause.) Mr Hatch said the members "of .Parliament were as good a type of men as they could wish to see. If they were not, the people would be ! doing the right thing in putting in a better class lof men. He was sorry that these subjects had been introduced at a banquet of that kind, and he would not have spoken of them had not the gentleman in proposing the toast made reference to the politics of the day, and had not those remarks been so warmly taken up by Mr Stewart. — (Applauße^)

When the speaker had finished an elderly gentleman at the central table rose and asked Mr Hatch : " What do you think of Burns yourself ? " but the hon. member did not deign to reply.

The Chairman next called on Sir George Grey to propose the toast of the evening, which appeared on the programme as " The immortal memory of Burns." Sir George Grey, on rising, was greeted with enthusiastic cheering. He said :> Mr Chairman, ladies, and gentlemen, — Immortal memory: I cannot promise you that, or hold out any hope of its fulfilment in the sense in. which it is generally understood. Heaven and earth are to pass away. The great statue you have erected this day must moulder into dust. There is no immortal memory in the sense in which, I 6ay, it is generally understood. The name of Burns may be forgotten in a few centuries ; but the thoughts {that Burns has imprinted upon the human mind, the words that he has uttered* and the influence that he has exercised will not die out so long as man remains upon the earth. (Applause.) You saw the multitudes assembled to-day. Every one of these will impart some of Burns' ' sentiments to others. That greater multitude than we 6aw to-day will impart some influence to others, and thus from man to man they will spread. The author of them may be forgotten. The good they have done will never die out from this earth.—(Applause.) And then, for myself, I {jo not hesitate to say that I believe that the spiritual world beyond this earth will be filled by many who have been deeply

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influenced by Burns, and whose fate will then depend upon whether or not they have followed out the maxims he has endeavoured 'to instil into our minds. The thought is a tremendous one, but it is a true one, that the acts that we perform, the words we utter, must influence the fate of the living and of the dead, so great is the responsibility that rests upon us. And I ga y that Burns has upon the whole left behind him thoughts clothed in language so simple to understand- words that appeal to every human heart— and insofar as man can exercise an influence upon mortal man and upon the spiritual world he has done so, and greatly for the benefit and good of his fellow creatures.— (Hear, hear.) It is a large thought that we have to enter upon in considering this subject— a very large thought. The earth has undoubtedly' entered upon a new era; the extent of the habitable globe is now known ; we can calculate to a uicetiy the space left for man to spread over— it is but very small— and some new relations must be established between the inhabitants of this earth by which to accommodate themselves to the new state of things which, must be forced upon us. And I believe that in the writings of Burns you will find laid down principles which will tend to ameliorate the new state of things which is coming the condition of God's creatures upon earth. That ja my firm belief. There is arising a great nation— the greatest that the world has ever seen, and which must ultimately perish in its turn, though I believe it will have a longer endurance than any previous nation has had, and that nation will be influenced greatly and largely by that poet whose statue you have this day made manifest to men. I cannot tell the comfort that I myself have had from his writings. 1 cannot gay how much they have influenced my lifeFew are the (good things that I have done in comparison with the opportunities which God has given to me, but these few have often been attributable to the influence of Robert Burns. — (Applause.) You may therefore well imagine that to me to try to aid in the work which was this day accomplished was a labour of love — a labour in which I delighted ; and I hope that what we have done by erecting a statue in this city to thememory of Burns may be one means of inducing the youthful population of this country to try in so far as they can to emulate the greatness and goodness of that man. — (Applause.) You have presented to their eyes a visible image of the esteem borne towards him by the people of this portion of New Zealand, and I will say that the other inhabitants of New Zealand are not one whit behind you in their love and admiration for Burns, and to see such a statue standing here, or to know that it has been erected, will and must have a great effect upon the youth of this colony. We cannot benefit Burns now in any way by erectingthat ; and yet, if any glimpse into this world is to be allowed by those who have quitted it, it must to those spirits in a distant realm cause a feeling of deep and great satisfaction to know that the good principles they have endeavoured to inculcate will likely spread and bear fruit. These are thoughts that fill one's mind with hope. It seems as if indeed immortality was given to man in that respect. But there is a higher reward given to every man, in his own heart to ihinkthathe has been a fellow labourer with his Creator—admitted into partnership, as it were, with Him — when he endeavours to carry out the opinions of the Maker of this world to all the creatures He has placed upon it.— (Applause.) Now that undoubtedly was* Burns' view, and should be the view of every one of us. And ;then when life is to close, what must be the thoughts of an individual passing away, who really has laboured in so great and good a cause, to think that when he quits the earth he has performed the greatest of duties, and that if allowed to labour still in God's service in another world he as, as far as possible, prepared himself to bear his part in that new state of existence. — (Applause.) Such are the thoughts which the proposal of this toast has forced upon my mind, and which I cannot refrain from giving utterance to. I believe that we, in founding a new empire here, are engaged in the greatest and noblest task which can occupy man, and having this day taken so great a step in the direction I speak of, let us try not to stop here, but for the future to do our very best to walk on in the path upon which we have entered. — (Applause.)

Mr Francis sang " There was a lad was born in Kyle."

Mr Feegtjs, M.H.R, in proposing the toast of of " The Burns Clubs and Caledonian Societies of the Colony," said it gave him very considerable satisfaction to be present that night, because since the initiation of the movement to erect a statue to Burns some years ago, he had stuck to it through storm and sunshine, through bad report and through good report.— (Hear, hear.) He was very proud to think that he had stuck shoulder to shoulder in that movement with those whose names were foremost in the city at the present time, but especially with the working men of Dunedin ; because if any credit was due to any for the erection of the monument to the pout Burns in the Octagon that day, that credit distinctly belonged to the men who occupied a very humble position in life. — (Hear, hear.) He felt it to be an honour to be associated with them in this great movement, which was very near his heart, because he had the honour to belong to the native land of the poet, and like that lad who was born in Kyle, he had the honour to be a native of that historical parish itself. The songs that the poet so long ago wrote were also those which were crooned to him when he lay as a babe upon his mother's lap, aud whenever he heard the Scottish poet's name mentioned or any of his songs sung it made tho blqod go tingling througn his yeins. — (Hear, hear.) He admired Burns for his broad Sympathies, and it pleased him above all things W know that by the power of his name and eloquence men could be brought there that njght from the north and south, and that his old and respected friend Sir George Grey should come down to Dunedin from his parliamentary outies, afe very considerable inconvenience to aimself— now that more than threescore years had whitened his head — to do honour jo the poet whom they all loved 30 deeply. (Hear, hear.). It also pleased him to think wat they had the kindly sympathy of the People of New Zealand with them that night. «om the farthest North they had received not 0D 'y fair words, but substantial help in time of F^. The secretary of the Caledonian Sopiety ln Auckland had not qnly forwarded a sum of jjo&ey, but had also Bent kindly greetings to we Burns Statue Committee that day. He jrould say in conclusion that if every man in we colony of New Zealand was imbued with the Ngaest sentiments which Burns had given expression to in his more than marvellous and "nng work, it would be better for us as a

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colony— it would be better for us as individual men.— (Hear, hear.) He coupled the toast with the names of Mr Reese, M.H.R., and the president of the Caledonian Society, Mr John Wedderspoon. Mrs Toddthen sang " Whistle, and I'll come to you my lad," ' for which she received an encore. Mr Reese, M.H.R., in responding to the toast proposed by Mr Fergus, said the writings of Burns and the history of his life were great and noble examples for our guidance, and he thought Sir George Grey had commended them in a manner that had not been done before. He hoped that Burns would find a place in young colonials' hearts, and not be crowded out by the more fashionable poets of the schools. Mr A. J. Bubns proposed the toast of " The Mayor and the Corporation of the city of Dunedin." He said before he came to the toast he might be permitted to say a few words, and he hoped that it not be looked upon as egotistical if he referred to the poet Burns and his family. — (Hear, hear.) It was just possible that on an occasion of this kind he might be allowed a little latitude. It seemed to be the fashion amongst certain individuals nowadays to find apologies for Burns.— (A Voice : « Oh, no.") Hang the apologies, said he; the man was far above any human apology. Who were those that dared to apologise for the genius of Burns ? Were they men his equals ?— (A Voice " No.") Were they his superiors ?— (A Voice : " No.") Were they men who had many of his faults and follies, none of his virtues ?— (Hear, hear.) It disgusted him to hear the twaddle that was talked about Burns, and he must say he heard a great deal of it in this city. His blood boiled within him when he heard some parts of the speeches that were delivered at the laying of the foundation stone of the statue which had been unveiled that day, and it was as much as he could do not to get up and express his indignation for any man who dared in these days to offer an apology for Robert Burns.— (Hftar, hear.) He had heard his revered granny say that she could not understand why people should find apologies for the poet. He was writing of the times he lived in, and not of himself. These were the words of one who knew the poet well, and yet ministers who were scarcely able to compose a sermon in their " am " pulpits thought fit to find apologies for Burns.— (Laughter.) He trusted that he would hear nothing more of that sort. The speaker went on to refer to some incidents in connection with the Burns family, and concluded by proposing the toast of " The Mayor and Corporation of Dunedin," coupled with the name of Dr Hislop.

Mrs Toddthen sang, " O, for ane-and-twenty, Tarn."

Dr Hislop, in responding to the toast with which his name had been coupled, said in the absence of his Worship the Mayor he had been called upon to respond on behalf of the city corporation. He could assure those present that the statue which had been unveiled that day would be protected by the corporation with most zealous care.— (Hear, hear.) The corporation felt proud of the honour done to the city by the erection of the statue. The chairman had stated that their friends in Auckland had manifested a very great interest in the proceedings of the day in a very substantial manner by sending down a sum of money to help them to get quit of their pecuniary obligation. He would take this opportunity of suggesting that those present and others should show their interest in like manner. He thought it would be very wrong and in very bad taste if the people of Dunedin and Otago should allow any part of the expense of procuring this grand statue of Burns to remain a burden upon the committee. (Hear, hear.) As soon as Dr Hislop had resumed his seat, Mr Cramond rose and said: With all due deference to the last speaker, I call upon Cr Fish, as senior councillor, to respond to the toast.

Cr Pish said he exceedingly regretted that the mayor was not present that night. The gathering was one of those at which he thought the mayor should be present if possible, and he was quite certain that there must be some business of a very grave nature which had prevented his worship from attending. He felt great pleasure in being present himself that night because he was an Englishman, and because he was there to do honour to a Scotchman.— (Hear, hear.) He thought it was a very high honour. In responding for the Corporation of Dunedin, he might say that at the present time they were under a ban— (A Voice: "No, no.")— that is, there was' a little dispute on a little gas— (laughter) — and they were told by the press of Dunedin that the city councillors were not able to discuss this small question— (cries of; " Yes, yes "), — and that they were not able to judge as between the merits and demerits of two officers of their own.

' When the speaker had proceeded thus far, a gentleman rose, and flourishing his arm wildly in the air, protested vigorously against Mr Fish proceeding, but his remarks were drowned amidst the uproar which ensued. He, however, continued speaking and gesticulating with great vehemence, but was ultimately prevailed upon, after a good deal of persuasion, to resume his seat. As soon, however, as he sat down, Mr Fish began to speak again, bnfe his remarks were received evidently with much disfavour by a gentleman who safe on his right, and who expressed his disapproval by shouting out at the top of his voice, while he thumped the table zealously with his closed fist. A great uproar ensued, and the chairman called upon the gentleman to be quiefc, and threatened to name him if he did not do so. The threat, however, had no effect, and there were loud calls to go on with the proceedings. In the meantime Mr Fish had remained i standing and attempted to gain .a hearing. The Chairman, however, reminded him that it was out of place to speak about personal disputes there, but the reminder had not the desired effect of suppressing Mr Fish, who continued to speak amidst continued interruptions. ' Some? thing like order was, however, eventually restored by the chairman calling upon Mr Dey, Mayor of Mosgiel, to propose the toast of " The Ladies." The request was complied with, and the speaker made a very amusing speech ; but he appeared to be thoroughly wound up, and as he indulged in rather eccentric behaviour, such as saluting the ladies in the gallery and then turning round and addressing his remarks to one gentleman and another, someone thought fit to remonstrate with him. He however persisted in going on with his speech, and was only suppressed by the choir, who were called upon to render " Auld lang syne." The choir having complied with the request, the proceedings terminated.

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The following verses appeared in Tuesday morning's Daily Times :—

ADDRESS To be Spoken bt the Statue of Bubns at its own Unveiling at Dunedin, May 24, 1887.

" Once spoke an ass ; Why not a brass ?"— Spectator.

Haith, sirs ! it maks me unco proud To see this honest blithesome crawd, An' hear the jubilations loud O' young an' auld, Mair dear to mo than heaps o' gowd An' wealth untauld. As yet I'm just a wee bit scaur, I've nae been used to travel fat , A' row'd in strae, enough to gar An elder swear ; But, Lord t I'm fient a hair the waur, Tho' joggled sair. As ower your toun my glances stray, ' Ower silver beach an' lovely bay, An' charming wood, an' bank, an' brae, I 'maist could swear The land o' Kyle before me lay Divinely fair. I warn you, City Fathers dread, Here on this stane frae Peterhead My ear o' bronze can hear what's said Ayont yon door ; An' so, friend Pish, I tent you, lad, Blether no more. If " fishy " rot to talk you ettle, I vow, as I'm a lad o' metal I We'll cook for you a bonnie kettle O'fishy fare, Walter will call on you to settle That " small affair." Ah ! namesake Rab, my lad o' grace, Pair fa' your honest, sonsie facet Proud chieftain o' the " lJ'reethocht " race, Why do ye flee 'era ? There's nane wha now can tak your place I' the Lyceum. But, Rabbie lad, I dinna blame ye, Your high jinks there sair misbecame ye, Your Freethocht rants only defame ye, An' gar folk grin, But faith ! I'll try nae mair to shame ye, 'T wad be a sin. An you, auld man, pale lingering star With lessening ray, come from afar ; Lord ! How I wonder what you are, O Knight o'Kawau, Wi' gab sac high above the par, ' Bow-wow! Bow-wow! An' you, dear Tarn, my brither bard, A statesman-poet's lot— how hard ! But Poesy's her am reward, Bo dinna grieve ; Your crambo isna sac ill-faur'd As folk believe. , My honest pride I'll nae conceal, To see before me mony a chiel Wha's laid aside his country's weal A week or more. To do a grace to Hab Mossgiel An' hae a splore. Camafcerie voters may agree That legislators "arna free To leave their wark an' tak a spree. The misleart miDions ! Odds bodikins ! wha cares a flea ¥ or their opinions ? An' you my brither Masons a' Oome gie's a pressure o' your claw, We'll drink a quaich o' usquebaughJohn Barley's fluid. Como Rechabite an' Templar braw, An* hoary Druid. What, no ? Ye shak your pows sac wise ? Ye've sairly changed sin' my demise, If weel-timed dafhn ye despise, An' barley-bree. Good Lord 1 Who ever saw such gnys, Or e'er will Bee! An' noo, my douce Otago friens, May He who aye to mercy leans Send ye an eke to your sma' means, An 1 wisdom too. May Heaven bless your wives and weans, An' raise the oo\ On Geordie'a throne a queen, I hear, Has sat an' ruled this fifty year ; A gracious lass, to Britain dear, Victoria's been. God send she reign for fifty mair! God save the Queen !

Glossary.— Gowd = gold ; scaur = bewildered ; row'd = rolled ; strae = straw ; gar = make ; flent = devil ; joggled = jolted; blether = talk nonsense ; ettle = strive ; sonsie =• jolly ; gab = power of speech ; crambo =• doggerel ; chiel ==■ fellow ; splore = spree; camsteerie == restive ; misleart — unmannerly ; quaich = cup ; pow = head ; daffin = dissipation, fun; douce = sober; an eke = addition weans = wee uns, children; 'oo = wool; tent = advise.

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Bibliographic details

THE UNVEILING OF THE BURNS STATUE., Otago Witness, Issue 1853, 27 May 1887

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THE UNVEILING OF THE BURNS STATUE. Otago Witness, Issue 1853, 27 May 1887

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