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ENGLISH.

£2500 to £500 has been taken about The Baron for the Derby.

The Newmarket special correspondent of the Dublin Sport says: "I am in a position to inform you that in a, few days Archer's will be proved to be a little over £100,000. His daughter, two years of age, receives £40,000, and tho rest has becu grnerously divided amongst his friends. Charles Archer, his brother, receives £2000, and Mr Herbert Mills, one of his confidential friends at Cheltenham, falls in for £5000. No one who might fairly be thought entitled to be remembered by the star horseman has been forgotten.

The Kempton Park Great Breeders' Produce Btakes, of -5000sovs, to be run in 1889, has obtained an entry of upwards of 600. This is the largest entry ever obtained for a race. The Salvation Army invaded the racecourse at Northampton during the recent meeting with bands and banners, but those who came to enjoy the sport took umbrage at the intrusion, and the army quickly beat a retreat in scattered order. The big drum did not escape damage.

The following were the figures of the leading jockeys up to November 12 : — Mounts. Lost. Won. Archer. F. ... 512 342 170 Wood, C. ... 168 311 137 Barrett, G. ... 650 536 114 Watts, J. ... 140 351 89 Barrett. F. ... 518 431 87 Fagan, J. ... 268 IPS 70 Cannon, T. ... 240 . 180 60 During the following week Wood rode four winners, and as there was then about a fortnight s flat racing to come off before the close of the season he stands a good show of topping Archer's score. Melton finished his turf career by winning the Liverpool Cup, with Ost 31b up, against 17 competitors, and he has now gone to the stud. The stallion Prince Charlie has just died in New York. Prince Charlie was bred by the late Mr H. Jones, and was foaled in France in 1869, when his dam, Eastern Princess, was on a visit to that country. He was by Blair Athol, but, unlike that sire, was possessed of speed rather that staying qualifications. Although his best form was perhaps shown over the Rowley Mile, the many races he has won over shorter courses gained for him the distinction of the "Prince of > the T.Y.C," in addition to " King of the Rowley Mile." Prince Charlie altogether won 24 races. He made his debut in the Middle Park Plate . whjch he wo'a bY a bekdj'atid his duly other ap«

pearanceas a youngster was in the .Criterion, which he also won," defeating,' amongst others, Mr Savile's Cremorne. The pair met in the Two Thousand Guineas the following season, when Blair Athol's son won by a neck from Cre-mc-rne, but in the Derby, which the latter woo,* Prince Charlie, though starting first favourite, finished no nearer than seventh! He won, 10 races off the reel as a four-year-old, and 'did not sustain defeat at that age. At five years he only went down once, when Blenheim' upset the odds of 5 to 1 laid on him for the Queen's Stand Plate at Ascot. Prince pharlie's lastappeacance on a racecourse was when he, beat Peut-etre in their memorable match over the Rowley Mile on the Saturday of the Newmarket "Houghton meeting in 1874. The latter httf just won the Cambridgeshire as a three-year-old with 6st 101b up, and it being insisted upon by his partisans that he was the best horse in the world at a mile the match referred to was arranged. ' * Prince Charlie carried Bst 101b to the 7stl2lbof M. Aumont's colt, and the scene on the course! when he won in easy fashion by three-parts of a length will long be remembered by those who witnessed it. The victory was received with the utmost enthusiasm, and after the race his breeder^ rode him off to the town in triumph. The Prince covered the distance in lmin 52seo. He.was sent to the stud at the end of 1874, and although he never proved a very great succesß,some years later we find several of his stock winning races, notably Bonnie Charlie, Court Beauty, aud Princess Catherine. Perhaps the best of his progeny was Prestonpans, who, among other races, won the Hopeful Stages at Newmarket in 1879, and the Liverpool Autumn Cup the following year, while other well-Jcuown winners who claim the " Prince of the T.Y.C." as sire are Charles I, Lady Charlie, Reconciliation, Princess Louise 11, Prime Cheddar, Loch' Leven, Pirate of Penzance, Princess Victoria, Prince 10,Prince Rudolph, and Prince Rupert. In December 1882, Mr H. Jones died, and in the following January Prince Charlie was, together with a number of brood mares, submitted to auction at Tattersairs, and was knocked down to Mr T. L. Reed for the comparatively small sum of 680gs. Some time afterwards he was ' shipped to America for service at the stud. (Mr G: Stead's horse Lochiel is a son of Prince Charlie.) The Sporting Life is extremely pleased to note that Lord Randolph Churchill has started a racing stud. The Chancellor of the Exchequer has entered a yearling filly by Peter out of Katrine in the New Stakes at Ascot, the Great Challenge Stakes, and the Middle Park Plate, and she is also in the One Thousand Guineas of 1888. He has also engaged a filly by Robert the Devil out of Idun in the FirstJSpring Two Year Old Stakes. These, and all other horses. of his, will be trained at Newmarket by W. Gilbert, who has so long trained for Lord Cadogan. The entries for tho Middle Park- Plate and Dewhurst Plate for next season are very satisfactory, and show little difference from those obtained for the races recently decided at Newmarket. The Middle Park Plate has 106 subscribers, as compared with 107 this year, and the Dewhurst Plate has 88 in the coming year, an increase of four over 1886. The Prince of Wales' Loyalist heads the list in both events, and most of the high-priced yearlings have been included. The Duke of Westminster has nominated the brother to Ormonde for the two race?-, and other owners well represented are Mr D. Baird, the Duke of Beaufort, the Duke of Hamilton, Baron Hirsch, and Mr Manton.

The entries for the Two Thousand and One Thousand Guineas for 1888 have appeared. The first-mentioned race has secured 78 subscribers, and the ladies' race 68. The Prince of' Wales has nominated Loyalist, the own brother to Paradox, for the Two Thousand. Mr Abington has entered a brother to Beau Brummel, while the Duke of Westminster has three* nominations, included in them being a" brother to Ormonde. The best running blood is to be noted in the One Thousand, a sister to Busybody and a sister to Border Minstrel having had responsibilities incurred for them. The Duke of Westminster has named four, two by Bend Or and daughters of Doncaster and Hermit, and the Duke of Beaufort has three representatives by Ben Battle, the sire of Bendigo, from Ischia, Oatmeal, and Fomula respectively.

St. Gatien, once considered the best horse in England, woundup his turf career with a victory over Melton in the Jockey Club Cup, run at Newmarket, but an English turf ■ writer remarks that Melton might have made a better fight of it had he been sober. Lately his courage has been doubted, and when Tom Cannon mounted him, the horse was treated to a good stiff nobbier of whisky and water. Cannon, who also tasted the liquor, declared that it was too strong, and, after the race, he expressed an opinion that it had the .reverse of the effect intended upon the! horse, who was quite drunk at the finish.

The English papers are full of gossip about Archer. The following is from the Licensed Victualler's Gazette : — It is said that in his early days he had a dreadful fear of death— not of death pure and simple, but the awful fear that he might be buried in a trance. It is well known among those most intimately acquainted with Archer that ho took the loss of his wife so much to heart that he sufltered-from melancholia, and, it is said, on the occasion made three determined efforts to end his lifu. When asked by his friends why he did not marry again, he would reply, " Oh, if I could only love a woman half so well as I loved her, I would ; but I" could not." The widow of a former patrician of the turf was so infatuated with her jockey that she offered to aftttle £10,000 a year (her income is about £20,000) upon him if he would marry her ; but Archer politely, but firmly, refused. The Duchess of Montrose holds very Ritualistic or High Church doctrines; and the bell of the chapel, built on the Buryroad in memory of her late husband, has been tolling almost incessantly, with slight intervals, since Fred's death, and prayers have beeu here offered up for the unfortunate jockey. Last winter, when Archer went to Cheltenham, his native place, to indulge in his favourite pastime of hunting, and to renew old acquaintanceships, he weighed lOst 71b, and if he had let nature take her course he was naturally an 11 stone man. In order to ride St. Mirin the deceased jockey went without food for three days, and was for 18 hours in a Turkish bath, and so much did he reduce himself that with all the paraphernalia (excepting the whip) appertaining to riding, he weighed only eight stone seven pounds ! "He is killing himself," cried the elder Jennings, when he saw Archer scale; and 6o he was. When his friends remonstrated withhim he would reply : "Ifl am not Archer lam a nobody." Wealth, much as he prized it, was a secondary consideration k> the applause of the multitude ; fame was to him as the breath to his nostrils; and when the thronging, surging multitude shouted their encouragement, loudly called him by name, and some, even more infatuated, tried to touch his jacket or stirrup leather in their idolatry, Archer's bosom swelled with pride, and all his self-denials and trials were forgotten in this brief moment of triumph. No monarch was ever' more disinclined to lay aside his "kingly power and sceptre than Arcfier was to part with his radng jackk

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18870107.2.77

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH., Otago Witness, Issue 1833, 7 January 1887

Word Count
1,718

ENGLISH. Otago Witness, Issue 1833, 7 January 1887

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