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ENGLISH AND FOREIGN.

In commenting on the Newmarket Houghton meeting, the Fiold says :— Wo must record here one gratifying fact, apart from the main business, and that was that the Prince of Wales' La<ly Peffgy, by Hermit — Belle Agnes, won the Maiden Plate in a field of thirteen runners. Some high hopes were, entertained o' her as a yearling, and also at the commencement of this season, but they were not realined, clown to her appearance in this Maiden Plate. The Prince and his immediate friends were almost afraid to back her, and she started at 10 to 1 ; but she won easily — a fact which speaks volumes for the. quality of those behind her. However, the hearty cheers, renewed when the number went up, which greeted her win, must have been more gratifying to her royal owner than the «in itself ; and of course H R.H had to receive many a congratulation from fair and noble lips when he entered the Birdcage. For the first time within our remembrance, says the same paper, an even-weight maiden plate for two and three year olds (9st each) figured on the programme. Its raison d'etre was hard to discover, as, of course, the two-year-old's chance, unless he was an Ormonde in disguise, was nil. We trust that such a ridiculous race will not appear again. Kaunitz was the favourite, but he cut up disgracefully, and Murdoch achieved a very easy victory over Inchbonny, the unfortunate two-year-old, Castilian, being of course far in the rear. Ormonde finished his three-year-old racing career at Newmarket with a walk over for the Private Sweepstakes, arranged at Blankney during the Doncaster week, between Melton, The Bard, and the Duke of Westminster's unbeaten champion. Since he first carried silk in a Post Sweepstakes over the Bret by Stakes Course at the Second October meeting last year, the son of B<-*nd Or has »ot met auything capable of extending him, and has altogether won thirteen events, three of them as a two-vear-old, and ten during the present -season. He" has been indulged with two walks over, and his winnings amount to the large sum of £24,57(3 10*, of which sum he has secure.d £21,568 10s this year. As the winner of the three chief classic races for three-year-olds — the Two Thou«ap4 Guineas, gpgom Derby, anrj Oonc#ster St.

Leger — it is interesting to compare the sums won at three years by those horses who had preceded him in securing the events named, and we find that West Australian, iv 1853, won £10,975; G!a<liateur. in 1865, £19,914; and Lord Lyou, iv 1866, £20.350. It was not decided till a quarter of an hour before the race to run Oi'inoude for the Free Handicap at Newmarket. He had done his customary morning exercise, but had not, in turf purlance, been " btabled up " for tho Jay." The Duke of Westminster was prevailed upon to start the champion by his daughters, L-idy Ormonde buing most pressing in her request. St. Mirin. was in the paddock ready to don his grace's colours for the fir»t time had he not consented to the overtures made to him. Though Archer just shook Ormonde up at the Bashes, he had his two opponents sprawling in the next 200 yds, and after the race Archer said he could have won with another 2st in the saddle. This is probably a trifle " tall " talk, but there is no doubt the son of Bend Or won in a canter, and his viotory was enthusiastically received.

A young Scotch laird, Mr Wedderburn, bids fair to cast into the shade the most daring achievements of the late Marquis of Hastings, Captain Scott, and other notorious " plungers." Amongst the bets he laid at the Newmarket meeting were 20 " monkeys " on Ormonde (whose proper price was 100 to 15), 5000 to 500 ou Forio (exactly double), 2000 to 1000 on Kauniiz, ami 5000 to 1000 ou Grandisou. He won the first two, but lost the others, and was £6000 '• out" on the balance !

A noteworthy circumstance in connection with The Sailor Prince's victory in the Cambridgeshire is that the wiuner is the first horse of his age that has been successful iv the race. The nearest approach to a win by a six-year-old was in 1860, when Mdlle de Chantilly, under B.st, ran second to Weatherbound. In three other instances a six-year-old has struggled into third place — viz., Compensation, in 1841, with 1-i 91b ; Trouucer, in 1850, with Bst ; aud in 1852 Lady Evelyn, with Bst 81b. On one occasion only has the Cambridgeshire beeu won by an aged horse— viz,, in 1847, by The Widow, with 7nt, in which year the Cesarewitch winner, Caurouch, carried the same weight, as hasMnso been the case this season, Stone Clink and The Sailor Prince each carrying 7st 71b into first place. In 1845, however, the same thing first occurred with two three-year-olds — The Baron whining the Cesarewitch, and Alarm the Cambridgeshire, each with 7st 91b. It is probable, too, that tie"SHilor" is the only animal that has pulled through after being, as he was, twice unplaced in the race, such » circumstance being possible only in the cases of the solitary five-year-old winner, Lozenge, and the aged Widow. Lozenge certainly did not run in the race before winning in 1867, but we have not at hand The Widow's antecedents to refer to. There is some talk in England of founding a race to be worth £100,000 net at Newmarket, by subscription of 50«ovs forfeit or lOOsovs if the horses are not struck out by a certain date. The scores of the leading jockeys up to 29th October were as follow : —

In the following week Wood scored four more wins and Archer one, so that the difference between them was 16. Our latest files only bring us up to November 3, when Archer was riding at Brighton. Next day, according to news via America, he rode at Lewes, and three days afterwards committed suicide. The field of 16 this year is the smallest that has contested the Cambridgeshire since 1840, when 13 competed. In 1839, the first year of the race, there were but 12 runners. If (says the Field) the Cambridgeshire was a shock, tho result of the Dewhurst Plate was something truly awful, and so confounds the two-year-old form that no one Will envy the task set before the analyst of trying to unravel it. One of the crowning upsets of the season as regards our two-year-olds was seen in the Home-bred Foal Stakes, when Belisarius beat Grandison, the colt who made a dead heat with Penzerschiff in the Champagne. This is almost fcqo extraordinary to be explained, anJ we must leave it to our analys f , with every good wish for his happy delivery. We may add that the gtntleman who has made himself conspicuous lately by laying extravagant odds on Ormonde, to-day laid 5000 to 1000 on Grandieon. No possible recent public form could be trusted or calculated to give the wiuner of the last great handicap of the season even a reasonable chance of success, and so far as the Cambridgeshire was concerned he had for two years iv succebsion been we.ll tried for it, but was found wanting in public favour. All associated with him, however, were immensely fond of his chance, and have accordingly won a very large >take over the result, an extremely satisfactory circumstance for his owner. It was one of the most excitintj fiui-hes ever witnessed, and to White's brilliant aud determined riding victory was mainly due. Archer has won every other important race in the calendar, some of them many times, but he has experienoed very perverse luck iv the Cambridgeshire, but at no time more so than ou this occa-%ion. He made no secret of his belief that, homo trials notwithstanding, St. Mirin would win the Cambridge.shire, aud it was doubtless this fact which induced Mr Matt ton to start the colt, despite the immense pull in the weights Carlton was said to possess. The death is announced of Mr Thomas Sutherland Dawson, of Hungerford House, Norton, Malton. Mr Dawson was second son of the late Mr Thomas Dawson, of Tupgill, Middleham. He lived for a short time at Tupgill, Middleham, but ho left there in 1866, and removed to Spring Cottage, Norton. In the following year he went to Ilsley, in Berkshire, and trained there tor some time for Sir Robert Jardine and others. His next move was to Hambleton. As a trainer he was best known for his connection with the late Lord Glasgow (at Middleham), Mr Jackson (of Fairfield), Mr Maskelyue, Mr Mackenzie, Mr Jamieson, and Sir Rabert Jardine. He trained Tim Whiffler, the winner of the Chester Cup in 1862, when at Tupgill. and his best horses included Grand Coup, Sycee, &c. At the Newmarket October sales 20 of Mr Manton's horses were offered. Only four, however, changed hands, and the sensation of the day was the purchase of St. Mirin by the Duke of Westminster, who bid the reserve of 4500gs put on the tecoud in tho Cambridgeshire. Lourdes was sold to Capt. Mnchell for 1300gs, and Syltebo and Esterel were disposed of at low prices. The reserve of lOOOgs was not offered for the Devil to Pay, for whom 4100gs was given a year ago. Neither did Loved One elicit a bid, his reserve beiug 1500gs. The Sun, Oberon, and Mezzotint were almost among those sent back, fhe Puke o? Beaufoiv «>W three, Pepper w»d

Srft going cheap at 150g8, though he is not Bound. Mr Jousiffe gave 1500gs for the two-year-old colt by George Frederick — Ma Belle, an own brother to Beau Brummel. This was the only two-year-old that fetched a good price, but several well-known horses were sold, How's That going for 1400gs. aud the colt by Dutch Skater — Duchess of Parma for 1050gs. Silvator found a purchaser for 800gs in Mr Bitjrmami — noD a very big price for the sire of 0.-feian and Elzevir, who himself won tha French Derby aud the Grand Prize. A report current at Newmarket that The Bard had beeu sold to the Duke of Westminster for stud purposes i 3 not correct, but negotiations are still pending, St. Gatien, for the third year in succession, won the Jockey Club Cup at Newmarket, and polished off Melton in the easiest fashion by eight lengths. On the previous occasions of his success he scored in similarly hollow style, the verdict in his favour beiug 15 lengths last year, aud 10 lengths in 1884, when he was only opposed by Archiduc. Mr Haramoud's horse will commence stud life next season, being announced to stand at Heath Farm, Newmarket, at a fee of 50g». Three thousand to 500 has been taken about The Baron for next year's Derby, while 500 to 40 has been booked about Graudison.

Lord Hasting?, the owner of Melton and other well-known racehorses, is reported to be coming out to Sydney for a trip, as his health has been very bad lately. Attention having been called by the Police Committee for the County of Cambridge to the large number of members of the county constabulary taken from their ordinary duties for service at the different race meetings at Newmarket, it has been stated by Major Calvert, the chief coustable, that the Jockey Club had paid for this service during the past five years £1291, which had gone in reduction of the police rate for the county. The club also paid the railway fares of the officers. The Jockey Club were also the largest ratepayers in the county, being assessed higher than 90 out of the 128 parishes in Cambridgeshire.

Just as the racing season is being brought to a close, a proposal has been submitted to the btewardß of thd Jockey Club for enlarging the stands and enclosures at Longchamps, which has a very .ambitious if not a very practical aspect. The author of this proposal offers, upon certain conditions, to form a compauy with a capital of £400,000, for the purpose of rebuilding the grand stand at Longchamps, and erecting fresh stands for the spectators who do not care to pay as much as 20fr, and to contribute towards a branch railway abutting on the courfe, from which the nearest station (Suresnes) is now nearly & mile distaut. This is not all that the new scheme would effect, for M. Thuasne, the framer of it, would increase the number of races open to foreign horses, and haw one or two handicaps with three or four thousand pounds added money. He would also increase the amount of money given to second and third horses, and allow a bonus to the sires and dams of winning horses. He further proposes that, when the balance sheet admitted of it at the end of each season, the Jockey Club should refund to owners the amount of their stakes and forfeits ; and though some of these proposals strike one at first sight as rather wild, the stewards of the, Jockey Club evidently think that something may be made out of the whole scheme, as, after hearing verbally what the author of it had to say, they asked him to put it upon paper. The number of horses in training at Chantilly is increasing every year, there being at the present time something like 800, these being distributed over about 30 training stables, of which Baron de Schickler's (Webb), M. Delamarre's (T. Carter), M Aumont's (F. Carter), Count de Berteux's (Planner), Bnron A. de Rothschild's (Lynham), M. Michel Ephrussi's (Cunnington), and Prince d'Arenberg's (C. Pratt) are the most important.

In French racing this season Baron de Soubeyran, an usual, stand* at the top of the list of winning owners, for he has won over £24,000, or nearly double the sum credited respectively to M. Mitchell Ephrussi and M. Lupin, who come next on the list. M. P. Donon aud M. C. J. Lefevre stand rather low on the list, with little over £4000, a small sum indeed when anyone takes their stable expenses into consideration, combined with the fact that neither of them can be included among the plunging division. Baron de Hirsh and Baron de Rothschild stand on the same footing with a couple of thousand a- piece, but the average of the last-named gentleman would have been notably increased had not the family been suddenly plunged into mourning and the stable colours been withdrawn for the rest of the season. This happened at a moment when all the horses in training were fit, fresh, and well, and sportsmen earnestly hope that there is some compensation awaiting the blue jacket and canary cap during the next season. Mr J. L de F. Martin has secured an excellent average of £3000.

tocher. F. Wood, C. Barrett, Q. IVntts, J. Barrett. F. Pagan, J. Dannon, T. iVhite, A. It Mounts. 504 441 622 425 490 219 240 269 Lost. ' 334 293 510 938 409 183 180 228 170 351 Hi 87 81 60 41

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18861224.2.102

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN., Otago Witness, Issue 1831, 24 December 1886

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2,504

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN. Otago Witness, Issue 1831, 24 December 1886

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