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THE JOLLY ANGLER.

By Thos. Tod Stoddakt.

Below a shady hazel tree

An angler trimmed his flies. Singing—" Hey derry I trout that are mttrj No longer— no longer are wise ! " Of dapper make and ruddy hue, Twai a jolly blade, I ween ; With his hey derry ! fresh from the ferry, Over the meadow so green. Right gladsomoty he eyed' the stream , And shook his wand anon — With a hey dorry ! brown as a berry The wandering waters run. Oh ! well I wot that ruddy btafo Ifr one of our heafcty band— - WlthJiis heY dqrry i fcront that are xaerty Swim to toe angler's hand.

CHAMPIONSHIP OF LOCH LEVEN. The championship was fished for on Thursday, September 3. The competitors consisted of a champion from each of the clubs engaged angling in competitions daring the season. There were 25 representatives, who left the pier at 10 a.m., and ceased fishing at 6 p.m. The total capture was 94 trout, weighing 651b 140z, ; and the prize fell to the rod of Dr William Telfer, of. the Dumfermline Club, with 10 trout weighing 8f 1b — the others having from one to tight trout each, and one of the number coming' in clean. The championship of 1885 was a more successful day, 21 competitors capturing' 155 trout weighing 1501b 13§oz, the champion then being Mr P. D. Malloch, of Perth, with 20 trout weighing 231b 14oz.

Bare fly is the bait mostly ntied on Looh Leven, and sometimes trolling with artificial minnow is pretty successful, but in most of the competitions the competitors are restricted to fly fishing only. .

I may here mention the charges for a day's fishing on Loch Leven. For eight hours' fishing 20s, or 2s 6d per hour, with 33 6d additional for one of the boatmen, the Loch Leven Angling Association paying the other boatmen. The average weight of Loch Leven trout is about lib, but a two or three pounder is not uncommon. During the last four days Off the season, " open to the public," there ifcJre killed 618 trout weighing 6471b 3oz°; and «n the last two days, •• not open to the public"— the patron's prize and the championship— 4B trout, 501b 4oz ; and 94 trout, 961b Boz. Captain Hall -is the name of the manager at the Loch, smd is most attentive and well qualified, for the position ; while some of the old boatmen, such as Dick, Geordie, and "The Cooper," can spin a yarn equal to any tar afloat, or kill a fish either.

The 200 Loch Leven fry recently landed in Queenstown, and the charge of which Mr Hotop has undertaken, are thriving well in the hatching boxes. It is proposed to liberate them in the creeks near Queeastown, and it is hoped they will interbreed with the Lake trout and thus evolve a better sporting fish, the Loch Leven trout being a good fish to rise to the fly. BANK NOTES. Lovell's Flat. — This creek has been in very fair fishing condition since the Ist of October. Mr Alex. King in one day took 21 fish weighing 241b, about 14 days ago. This gentleman has visited this stream three times of late, and has in each, instance succeeded in filling his creel. Mr William Fraser has also made some capital baskets. All the fishing up to the present time, however, has been in the top waters of the creek ; but as soon as the waters of the Tuakitoto lake get warmer the "big fellows" who take up their spring quarters there will shift into the creek, and then them will be some fun for the anglers who reside in that neighbour* hood. Mr William Fraser had a very goed catch last Monday evening, the 29th, killing five trout weighing Bilb, the heaviest fish turning the scale at 3|lb. While taking the hooks out of one of the smallest of the catch (lib in weight), the cannibal disgorged a 7in trout, thus conclusively proving that the genus trout is not above making a meal off " his sisters, his cousins, or bis aunts." Mr Fraser caught all his fish with the white bait phantom, a very deadly lure when manipulated by skilful hands.

Waitati.— This stream as is usual on holidays was visited by three or four Dunedin anglers, and Tuesday last, the-30tb, proved no exception to the rule. I have not heard of any phenomenal takes, but everybody got something, which you will allow is much better than coming home with an empty creel. I heard ■' of one gentleman getting six very nice fish weighing 7lb. Mr R. S. Smith caught a very nice little basket of eight, while Mr Corbett seemed very well pleased with three very decent fish that he had induced to come into his basket " out of the wet."

Pnrekereki. — Trout are pretty plentiful this year; but fishers seldom come this way. Two young fishers at Tahatika have landed about 80 fish each since the season commenced. This says well for them. Waiwera. — Fish seem to be taking again in this stream. Last week Mr J. Mulhair secured two fine specimens weighing 51b and 61b respectively. They were exceedingly pretty fish, and in the very pink of condition. The same gentleman informs my correspondent that he had on several still larger fish, but owing to the obstructions in the river they got away. It is rumoured by several anglers, that there is a monster fish in this river, some estimating it to be from 151b to 201b. It has been seen by several parties, but as yet no one has been fortunate enough to secure it. It is to be hoped that it will soon be captured, as it is these large fish.that play such havoc with the young fry.

Molyneux. — Fish are beginning to come up the river in fairish numbers. The miners at Kaitangata have already secured over 100, averaging from 41b to 91b each. The Balclutha anglers have also done very well. Mr George Aitcheeon, of Kaitangata, managed to secure a very nice specimen weighing 9Jlb on Monday evening, the 29th November.

The second competition of the Clutha Angling Club for this season took place in the Clutha river on the 30th nit. This was the first competition confined to the river, and consequently it excited considerable interest. Unfortunately there was a slight fresh on the river and therefore the competition was carried out under unfavourable conditions. There were eight entries. The following were the results : — W. Willocks, 7 fish ; weight, 161b 4oz; heaviest fish, 41b loz. R. Mason, 3 fish ; weight, 91b 6oz; heaviest fish, 31b 14oz. John Low, 1 fish; weight, 31b 4oz. The other five competitors returned with empty baskets, they never having even seen a fish.

The Kaihiku correspondent of the Clutha Leader states that the opportunity for securing trout when the river is low is largely availed of, and poaching is practised by those Who ought to know better.

Owake. — It is not often I hear from this out-of-the-way stream. I have before mn't note of a splendid basket being made by IV>r Mason, hotelkeeper— l2 fish averaging 2\\b each, all caught in one day. The gentleman who saw the basket says that they were the handsomest lot of fish he has ever seen. If any anglers contemplate fishing this river Mr Mason will be only too happy to escort a party, and also show them the best places for fish.

Otameta and Upper Mataura. — I hear local anglers are having capital sport on these streams. One gentleman killed eight fish weighing 32&1b in one day on the Otameta. The same angler also killed 10 fish weighing 301b in the Upper Mataura. The flies that the fish took best were black gnats. Waipahi. — This stream has been visited this week by two well-known Dunedin anglers, Mr Boot and Mr Carlton. I had the pleasure this evening (Tuesday) of inspecting Mr Boot's creel, and I mast say a finer lot of fish I have never seen. One fish in particular, which weighed over 61b, was what a fiflherman would osll a perfect fiah, it being almost as deep *s it

weighed close Ori solb, two anda-half days' fishing —a basket any ingler' may well bo pr<rad of. The most -killing" flies were -btecfc' gnats- and March browns; If Mr Boot bad caught all th« fish that he hooked and played, .he would have required a gillie to carry his catch home for him. He lost quite as many as he caught.; One large fish in particular ran out.-every.yard of line on the reel, and then* broke. awaj.. T have since had word that Mr Carlton,, caught - this self -same' fish two days aft.er,Cand ;tlftt it weighed 741b. - ■ ■ „--• .' •* Mr CarltoD, who returned, oii.Jfridayrfrom the Waipahi, has furnished me with ainote of bis , take on this stream for four days VangJing. Tuesday, 8 fish, 161b; Wednesday,^ fieh T i2lb; Thursday, 8. fish, 9&lb; Friday*.* fiuh^lCHD— 23 fish 47£lb. Mr Oarlton says ih'e weather on Wednesday and Thursday wasso'bad for-fiahing that he only went out for an hour et.so'., . ci\ .Henley CanaL— -Some good, bwsk:«tq'af i e,heing made here this season. Every favourable evening one or two anglers may be seen jtrqlling on this favourite reach, and a,number,of;iiish have been caught weighing from. 41b, fcf 6lb,each. A resident in Otakia who has A*, sampled^ them tells me they are in prime condition for the table, and have a fine flavour. *;,;." n: . i \ A CONGER EEL STORY.' '. ■ " I guessjithou'll not rememberHbi- Uncle Jonas?" ■ ••■ ■> '; ,f., f . .: " Well, I can just remember him 1 ,. Robert ; but it's as mich as th' bargain." ■ • ,- \ '* • • *•' "I dar say .... Hufc< anS'jßJ'a 'war particular friends. We had . a 1 - rare' dtf together i' th' Isle of Man once, 20 ye"ai" sio<' There wur thi Uncle Jonas an' -me,." and- Jone & Simeon's, the bazzoon player. Jcmeh'ad a'wood leg shod wi' iron. We o' set off .together to th' Isle o' Man, and when we geet-°theer we went straight across to a place • oo'ed' Poit^Erin, at the west end o' th' islan', wliere there <*kht very goodfishin'; and it's a terrible 'plice-frir conger eel, an' o' sorts o' big fish. - Weekpne-day we took a boat, an' a boatmao, an' we' Svbnl out a-fishing i' th' bay, wi' strong lines/tod great hooks, ready for aught tha* ooom. : while we sat theejr, danglin'- th' lines o'er'4h\' edge o' th' boat, thi Uncle Jonas begaa/aVjolrin'Jone about his wood leg. • Jone,* he-saSI, \<-if this boat happens to upset thou'Bi float; longer; than me .\ 'How so!' • Thou's so "mich. wood about tho'.' • Well, but,' said Jone^'l think thou'll ston as quid a chance as ine— riM'hWe a wood leg.' 'How so?' • BediSseHhott'rt so well timber't at th' top erid/,:St*t while 'they wur agate o' their fun, thvuncle<^on£B'felt a great tug at his line. • Hallo f '•" dried he, iwhat the devil's this ?' Come here, lads/i'TJie boatman went and gut howd o' thelirie',. "♦^y,' said he, ' this is a conger, and a big* .tin,' too ! I hope it'll not break the line! By the mass, how it tugs ! Gently ! It's a blg^n - is-this ! Let him play a bit ! It's Comin !• EJb,' what a mouth! Stop fur! Here it isli*^ it wur a tremendous size ; an' as soon -as^e'd^getten it o'er th' edge o* th' boat it flew fro'sidi to ride, snappin* savagely first at one, theniV another on us. • Look out ! ' cried one< ! ' ' "■J'uidoe' it! " cried another. 'It's a devil !'j«riel^ another. 'Mind; thou'll upset th' rboatl- Heigh, Jone; It's comin' to -tb.6e2, "• -ityffizbut ! ' Jone took aim at it with hisiir'on-shodj^ooUleg ; but he missed th' fish, and : sefaV4fs~)#Vod leg slap through the bottom o' th' boat ree't^up to th' knee. '-Theigh'er ! ' cried 'tti&lffider Jonas, 'thous shapt that grandly, owa'-lspl' * Poo me up," cried Jone,'ooo me nps sotne^ofl yo; I'm fast ! " Howd ! stop ! ' said thi Uaole 1 Jonas , ' thou munnot tak' thi leg 'outl ■ We's be* drown'tl' «Drown't or not -drowttV /cried Jone, 'l mun ha' my leg out o*'thts'hblel f • Thou mun keep it where it is;*l 4ell'thd, else we's ha' th' boat full o'waytef in "a minute.' ' An' how long am I to Cruttle'ddwti here,?lcried Jone, wi' my leg i' this hole ? Tien." he gave a sudden jerk, an' he skrike't out lotlcfer than ever. O, poo me up, this minute."' - • WJiat's •to do now ? ' ♦ Th' conger's gotten howd' 'dn> me beheend 1 Tak' it off ! ' An' sure erioufh it had gotten fast howd o' th' soft end of hisbaok, and theer it stuck. 'For pity's sake •!&&'. it off! cried Jone. Oh ! don't poo so hard ! / tiet it get loose of itsel! Prize it's -monthr? oppen ! Oh! I connot ston this ! It's do" iise^B cried tbi uncle Jonas. • It'll not let go IP ■ ',TKeri cut it yed off!' cried Jone; ' an' pod ashore" Ss fast as yo con ; I'm bleedin' like acauve ! ' :^i we" pood ashore as fast as we could/ 7 wi'- tfo"tfe's legsticking through th' bottom' cT'tii* boat, but when we were gettin' near '-lano^ joiie's leg coom again a sunken rock, an'-feiiap'tWeet off close to th'boat. 'Theer/- saill^otteVpooin' his stop out o' th' hole ; ' thank. Gojl for" that sink or swim ! Now then, tafc' .ifciS thing -6S niy hinder end ! ' Bo wi' much ado', we'tflanjiged to cut th' conger off, close to th^'ye'd i 'bui> ijfe yed stuck fast to th' owd lad's br'geciiets jwhetrdone. An' thi Uncle Jonas h»d to" <jarry Jdne bh his back fro' th' boat to th' alehouse- wi 7 his' broken stump, and th' congor's head 'fcangirig'' oeheend him. An' when th' folk at th' alebonse seed as comin', they shouted fro' th''dur"'bblie',"'«in' axed what luck we had? 'Luck/ said 1 Jone, "look at th' back o' me here ! I've had bitelif nbbodv else has." v v ***.: • A WONDERFUL OINTMENT' TOi^LURE FISHES.'/ :• WyTake of man's fat, cat'B fat,, asfles? fa-^, -'heron's fat, and of the best assa-fstida "of gach two drams; mummy, finely powdSreeij twb drams ; cummin 6eed, finely powdered, tWbT scruples ; and of camphor, galbanum, abd Venice turpentine, of each one dram ; , civet grains; two. Make., according to art, all into air, indifferent oyntment, with ye chymical 6yls of ye lavender annisse, and camorail, of each an equal qnantity ; and keep the same in a narrowrmo»thed and well-glassed gaily pot, close ' cbvered/i^nth a bladder and leather, and when yOu go" to angle take some of it in a small pewter* ! Box, made taper, and anoint eight inches' of the' line next the hook therewith, and when Wasfiecl off repeat the same. This oynment Whichj-'for its exCellenpy, I will call un'guenftim^'liiscatoruHi mirabile, prodigiously causes fisTf'to/bite in the hand of an artist that angles wi.thiiir water, and in proper seasons and times,' end_.wit l h'.\«M'fa&/e taokle, and with baits ft\arii' propfr for \he river, season, and fish he designs, to wftinY The man's fat you may get of. the Lsoqdoir chyrurgeons, concerned in anatomy, and'ifcfie'beTOn's fat from the poulterers in Londbnii ""' The rest are to be had from druggist 'or apothecaries, and this composition will serve yoa-two' or c three Summers' angling. •• ' ■ • < The formula for this wonderful Ointment appears in James Chelthsm'e' Anglers Vade Mecnm published in 1681. J* This i£"wlfc the exception of the Secrets of Angling; ti&e only book published which gives inffi&tioiw s of the belief of its author in the.. efficacy 6f -the ointment it describes, and no' one now" even need doubt its utility under the p^opei I'positions,1 ' positions, which I have italicised. .* - ' • '-;. "* :

Sufferer* from trfngh and BnjOTnftafktibuW tm> mediately lake Bowmaton's " CaVfAgtjfu dr Irish Mo»» ; " it is most comfortlnaln'aUaying'lrritaMoa of the bronchial tubei Ity it.— XAjwi^; »

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18861210.2.76

Bibliographic details

THE JOLLY ANGLER., Otago Witness, Issue 1829, 10 December 1886

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2,598

THE JOLLY ANGLER. Otago Witness, Issue 1829, 10 December 1886

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