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SPORTING NOTES FROM NEW SOUTH WALES.

(By Ona Australian Sporting Correspondent "Warbior.")

Monday, November 29. On Saturday morning last the Randwick training tracks.were thrown open to the public, aud some half-dozen trainers put in an appearance. This .morning (Monday) Lamond was out shortly after dawn of day with the New Zealand crack and Fernandez. Trenton ran lefthanded for oue mile and a*half, and, with the exception of his ic-m home in the Melbourne Cup, he never ran better or stronger than he did this morning. Mr William Cooper having scratched the son of Musket for the whole of his Sydney engagements, and his running lefthanded—the same as Flemington— convinces me that he is kept in clover specially to beat Trident in the Champion Race on the sth March next; and notwithstanding the j Invermays, Commotions, Maluas, and Sheet j Anchors, the Champion Race of 1887 should be won by either Tbidest or Thkntok. The third day of January 1887 the entries close for the Newmarket Handicap and Australian Cup, and the weights will be declared on the 24th of the same month. Should Mr Cooper.cuter Trenton for the latter event, and Mr S. Miller the Six-year-old William Tell for the first-named handicaps, they will be hard to beat— especially if the Victorian Admiral Rous handicap Trenton at 9st 101b and William Tell at 9st 21b. At this distant date, five weeks before the entries,'! predict that if these twa horses receive no more weight than allotted by me, William Tell will be near the wiarier of the Newmarket Handicap, and Trenton the Australian Cup. • ' ' ' l ' In my last letter' you published the" weights issued by Mr Scarr of the A. J. C. Summer Cup, Carrington Stakes, and TattereaU's Club Cup. The pruning knife has already been actively at work, Trenton, Bravo, Sardius, Fernandez, PlsnifO, The Wave, Acme, «nd Volcano having been scratched. No doubt most of my readers take a deep interest in th« thoroughbreds of New South Wales, and the principal racing events to be decided on Boxing Day and New Year's Day. Now that Trenton has cried a " go" in the Summer Cup, the Melbourne Cup Arsenal occupies the promt* nent position in the Handicap with 9st. The Jewel coming next with Bst 12lb ; Ben Bolt, Bst 101b ; Industry, Bst 81b ; Volcano, Bst slb ; Tom Brown, Bst 31b; and Brown and Rose, Bst. Out of these seven . I 'pick five well-knotfn performers :—: — Arsenal's win in the last Cup, carrying two stone less than Trenton, was nothing else but a repetition of Zulu's fluke. Mr Gannon's four-year-old is now called upon to carry Ist 91b more than he. carried to the front last November, which I feel certain he cannot do," and I will therefore pass him by and go on to the next on the list. The Jewel. — At the same distance as the Summer Cup, Mr Mayo's horse ran a grand second to Meteor (7st 101b) in the last Hawkesbury Handicap, an 1 followed it up by running second to Bohemian with 7st 61b in the Sydney Metropolitan Stakes, and ran a desperate race for first place with Industry on the third day of the A.J. C. Spring meeting. The Jewel can romp the distance with Bs l 2lb, but not with Bit 101b, so I must also knock the bay son of Goldsbrough—l la' out of the Cup. _ ,

Ben Bolt's win in the Oaufield Cup with 7st 61b was a very meritorious one ; so also was his performances last season, when he ran third to Tempe, carrying 6st 81b, in the A.J.C. Summer Cup; second to Tempe (6sfc 61b) in Tattersall's Cup, and his victory" in the Carrington Stakes with 6st lllb. Of the Bst division I prefer Ben Bait. Industby and Volcano are scarcely cherryv jpe — the firstnamed having beeu overworked at the late Autumn meeting of the A.J.C, having to carry Bst 121b to victory in the October Handicap. Tom Browk has seen his day. Two years ago Tom defeated Merlin and Minerva in Tattersal's Cup, but he only carried 6st 51b. His * really best performance was as a five-year-old at the April and May meetings of the A.J.C. (1885), when he carried Bst, Bst 51b, and Bst 61b, running second to Merlin and beating Corio lanus in the City Handicap (one mile and ahalf—2mm 4lsec) ; Moonshee (7st 101b) defeating Tom for first honours in the Place Handicap (one mile and a-half ) ; and third to Honeydew in the Queen's Birthday Handicap, the same distance as the Summer Cap — one mile three furlongs. If he could not get nearer than third with Bst 61b in his best day, he can't win now with only lib less on his back. Brown and Rose has never performed creditably with any weight above 7st 151b. ' She ran very well as a three-year-old, winnine the Summer Cup ■with" 7st, beating Lord Clifden, Merlin, Archie, Willeroo, Tom Brown, Minerva, and 13 others, in 2mhv 40sec; third in Bandwick Plate, Off Colour first and Malua second; and third in Wagga Wagga Cup, worn by Impulse. The chestnut daughter of Somnus — Giggler canped her previous running by her grand performance at the V.R.C. Carnival meeting, when she carried 7st 41b to the front in thft VR C. Handicap (one mile and three-quarters). Sheet Anchor C9<<t 61b) a length off, Lesbia (6sfc 61b) third ; Off Colour, Acolyte, Coriolanus, Asehal (6st 21b), and nine others also starting. Time, 3min 7sseo. On the 4th of November' last she carried 7sk 71b in the

y.R.C, Vettom, Btik.es (one mile » o <l a-h»U)

and won by half a length, Ben Bolt (Bit' 61b) second, aud The Pencil (6st 71b) third. Time, 2min 3S£sec. Conspicuous among' the 18 starters were fcjardius, Dunlop, Britisher, Grace Darling, Impulse, Lancer, Industry^ and Claptrap. As soon as Mr A. F. Smart's little mare was allotted 7st 13lb, 9lb mor"e than she carried the previous year, Brown and Rose could get no nearer than third to Bravo' (6st 101b) and Britisher (Bst lib) in the V.R.C. Handicap \ but the friends of the Rose had the satisfaction of seeing her dispose of Meteor, Sardius, Jlonte Christo, Ringmaster, Claptrap, Grace Darling, aud others. If I could only get myself to believe that Bst won't trouble her I wouldn't go further than Brown and'Rosel My next letter will deal with the • 7st and 6it divhions, from \yhich I think will come the winner. As soon as the entries; and again the weights, (or the Summer Cup were published I picked two horses "who I feel certain' will run into a place, if not win — namely, HEXHAM (7st 61b) and BURRILDA (7st 2lb). Two of the studraasters of the " tight little island" (Tasmania), Messrs Agnew and Page, have had very bad luck lately. The firstnamed has suffered a great loss by the death of Jennie, who died while foaling to The Assyrian. ,Mr Page's British Workman, which it will be remembered ran as a five-year-old second to Swiveller in the Launceston Cup of 1878 t broke his leg on the stud farm. Squire fage was just upon the act of shooting this promising stallion, when a gentleman who was present prevailed upon the son of the old stage coach proprietor to save him. British Workman was at once slung, and I am glad to hear favourably progressing. '

The Victoria Racing Club have at last determined to sift the oats from the hay, to abstract the chalk from the milk, and lastly, to separate the honest bookmaker from the blackleg' 1 on race days at Flemington. It is generally the case. When certain abuses creep in at our outdoor sports, racing clubs and committees of other sports wink at it, but as soon as it takes a firm hold, and the unfortunate public who pay the piper are duped to the extent o.f £500 or x6OO, they rise up en masse and cry out, " Down with the blacklegs ! We must revise, the list of registered bookmakers, and. get .ricj of Tom, Dick, and Harry, who are unworthy^d occupy a gin case on the hill, let alone a license to rob and plunder visitors in the paddock/ Speaking from what I witnessed on Cup day,X can testify to the character of at least five (5) welohers who were allowed to bet in the paddock, one of them having a warrant out for him in another colony for easing a country yokel of his spare cash at that innocent game— the three-card trick. It is to be hoped thafthe A J.C. will follow in the footsteps of the V.R.C. and overhaul all candidates iOli 01 admission to the registered list of bookmakers.

It is 'with regret that "Warrior" read the announcement in the Witness of November 19 of the intention of the compilers of ;the " New Zealand Turf Record " to suspend the production I -of that work this year. What are .the sporting I people of New Zealand thinking of ?' I can asI sure "my readers that in a great measure the success of racing in Melbourne and . Sydney is due to Mr Edward Chapman's, ability in [ compiling the " Australasian Turf • Register," ; and I can safely say, without flattering the compilers of the "New Zealand'' 'Turf Record," tiiat it was a creditable production, ' and worthy of better encouragement thfinthey receivedat the hands of the racing public;'. When I arrived from New 'Zealand I presented a. copy of the V 1 New Zealand Record to4,well-known press^w^iter, who spoke in glowingHerms of the I quantity of information the book contained. I The Auckland Stud Company and Middle Park \ shareholders were very foolish in not subsidising this work, for to us in Australia the f< New Zealand" Turf " Record was an" advertising medium 'for the sires and dams located in Auckland and Christchurch. ' " v ' The stud matron Queen, who in "her day was & brilliant performer in her native land (3?astt>ania),has given a chestnut filly foal to The I Assyrian.. Also at St. Alban's stud -farm : — Duster, a filly to Wellington ; Repartee, a colt to First King ; Gipsy Girl, a filly to Savanaka ; Idalia, ; Pardon, Athena, Queen M#ry,' Lady Jervois, and Seaspray, colts to St.^ Albans; Waterlily, a filly to The Hook (by fishhook); Prioress and Venturess, fillies to Savanaka ; and Hypatia, a filly to First' King. The imported First Fruit, the property of Mr'Agnew, has thrown a colt foal to British Workman in Tasmania. AU the above youngsters are doing well. Poor little Gorry, one of the best,, if not the best, light-weight jockey in Australia, and the favourite of Victoria, met with a very severe accident in the Sandhurst Cup whils^ riding the favourite LeHbia. No one could account for the mishap which caused Gorry to- tumble out of the saddle on to his head on the hard ground. Dr Hinchcliffe, who was ai the races, .attended to the little suffeier, after which he had him conveyed to the Bendigo Hospital, where tfe lies in a very critical condition. Gorry is a" splendid finisher.. His last good win was iv? the Flying Stakes at the V.C.R. carnival, when he rode Hortonse • home an easy winner in front of William Tell, Bedouin, Huntingtower, and others. I hope that in my next I shall be able to report Gorry's safe recovery.

Mr George Watson, the veteran Melbourne Cup starter, must take a back seat with regard to the annual number of times he Jias wielded the flag when compared with Mr "Clarke, the veteran, who has occupied the box at Newmarket races and judged the Cesarewitch Stakes for the 34th time. He must have "an eye like an hawk." ' '

There is no mistake about it. the promoters of horseracing, aquatics, and cricket in Sydney have in Lord and Lady Carington two living patrons, not deadheads as is generally the ense. Lady Oarington for the sec'ondTbime has contributed a gold cup, valued al lOOgs, to be presented to the winner of the 22ud Sydney ■Cup.

Betting has already commenced on < the Summer Cup, Hexham holding the, premier place, backers- accepting ll's and lj)'s to 1. Highland Mary, now that she h^s gone into Mayo's stable, is second favourite" 1 at 12 to 1 ; Cairo, 14 to 1 ; Silver King, 16 to 1 ; Pilot, 15 to 1 ; Brown and Rose, 20 to 1. ' The English Eleven easily disposed of Eighteen of Goulburn by one inning's and 58 runs. Bates bowled 131 balls. 16 maidens, 31 rung, for six wickets ; Barlow bowled 128 balls (three less than Bates), 17 maidens, 30 runs, for 10 wickets.

Beach, the champion sculler of the universe, arrived in Melbourne on Saturday morning by the Luntania. He was accompanied on the voyage by Messrs N. Matterson, P. Kemp, O. Neilson, J. G. Deeble (his backer). Our old friend " Paul Pry " (George Coppin) presented William with a diamond bracelet for Mrs Beach and £25 for himself. Only fancy to be able to earn on the boards of the Melbourne Theatre Royal £25 for 15 minutes' bye-play ! Won't the sup's, and ticket-takers suffer for this extravagance! The pantaloon and olown wilt have to perfortn at tfce next pantoroiine. for 25 "bob,"

SEIZURE OF BETTING MONEY. The case of Byranfc v. Patterson and othere, for the decision of the Court regarding a seizure by the bailiff of certain moneys as they were handed over ia payment of a bet came before Mr Justice Williams on Friday. The case came up on an interpleader summons taken out by the sheriff. The circumstances were that a writ of sale had been issued in the oase of Edward J. Bryant v. Dugald Patterson, James Morrison, and another ; and the sheritf 'a officer had seized under the writ a sum of £75, which was being passed over to Morrison by Richard Laugley, a bookmaker. The money was claimed by Langley, Frank Miller, and j Samuel Webb ; and to settle the claims of the j contending parties, an interpleader summons had been issued by the sheriff. Mr Mouat appeared for Bryant, the judgment creditor; Mr D. M. Stuart for the parties claiming ; and Mr J. Macgregor for the sheriff. Mr Mouat asked that all witnesses be directed j to leave the court, including the plaintiffs. He , knew nothing of the parties, but from his inbtructions he was led to anticipate a direct conflict of testimony. The application was refuspd, his Honor saying he did not think he ought to exclude all ! parties to the case. Mr Stuart having opened the case, His Honor suggested thai it should be decided by a jury of four ; but, if all parties desiied it, he would dispose of the matter at once, to save further trouble. Mr Mouat said' that he was quite willing to do whatever his Honor thought most expedient; and Mr Stuart added that he wished the matter decided by his Honor, who had power at any stage of the proceedings to send the case before a jury if he saw fit. His Honor : Very wel). I will see how the evidence shapes. Richard Laugley, bookmaker (carrying on his •vocation in Dunedin) : I remember Wednesday, the 17th ult. I was in the front bar of the Grand Hot«l in company with Miller and Morrison. Brown came in afterwards and looked on. I was about to pay £42 103 to Morrison and £47 10-i to Miller. I had counted out four £10 notes and seven £5 notes, and placed them on the j table in a pile. I was counting out 15 single notes from another bundle, in order to bring j the amount up to £90. The payment was in i connection with the New Zealand Cup. Before the counting out was concluded I heard a bit of a scuffle, and saw Brown with the £75. I was taken' quite aback by the circumstance. Mr Stuart : Whose money was that £75 ?

Witness: It was and still is mine. Brown was on the scene all the time, and was looking on when I begau to count the money. I hdS intended to place the £15 together with the £75 •before paying the men.

Mr Stuart : I understand the writ of sale is for £37 Is, together with 15s costs. Witness: When Brown seized the money I asked him to return it, saying that it belonged to me ; and that after I had discharged my liability I did not care what he did with the money. The wager on which I was " struck " was £100 to £2 10s laid to Morrison. I intended handing over £50 of the money to Miller in accordance with the order produced, which I received on the 12th ult. It was for what is known as "hedging" money, and the orders was in these terms : " £50 to £2 10s Spade Guinea (Dick Langley for the money). J. Morrison." According to the betting laws, Tattersall's rules, my for the bet remains. t) His Honor : Of course, if you have not paid. Wjtness : The reason that the men were not each receiving £50 in full was that there were deductions for other wagers. Immediately after the seizure I waited on the sheriff, who declined to refund the money.

To Mr Mouat : The bet in the first instance was with Morrison. I first saw the order on the Saturday before the seizure, but cannot say whether I received it before or after the seizure. Frank Miller, a printer, stated that lie gave the order in question to Langley about halfpast 2 on the day of the seizure, and about three-quarters of an hour before the seizure. Langley had placed £75, on the table. He then put his hand into his breast pocket, aud was in the act of counting some more, when Brown seized the £75 and put it into his pocket. Lang* ley had not had tinie to count out the 15 single notes when the seizure was made. No person but Brown touched the £75 after Langley had laid it down. After Brown seized the money Langley said that it belonged to him, and that after he had, settled with his clients Brown could seize them if he liked.

To Mr Mouat : The £15 was given to witness after the seizure was effected. He never heard Brown ask Morrison whether the £75 belonged to him. Brown, after making the seizure, tried to assert that tbe money had passed to Morrison. Of the £15 be received he paid £13 to another bookmaker named Patterson.

To Mr Stuart : Brown congratulated witness on his good luck, but said nothing to Morrison. His wager was taken from Morrison four months ago, and the order was then made out. His Honor : Morrison is not here. Mr Stuart : No ; he is at Waikouaiti. This was the plaintiffs' case. Mr Mnuat urged that Brown was justified in seizing Morrison's money in order to sutisfy the judgment against him. Brown's evidence would differ from that of Langley and Miller in some details. In the sheriff's room, after the seizure, Brown challenged Langley to deny that he had paid tKe money to Morrison, and he made no reply.

John H. Brown, sheriff's officer, .stated that he was entrusted with a writ agaiust James Morrison, M. Webb, and Dugald Patterson. He made inquiries concerning tbe men, and fourfd out that Morrison was to be paid a large sum In reply to a question put by witness, Langley said he had to pay Morrison £50. He was present on the Wednesday when the money was being paid over. He made some remark to Miller about his good luck. **

His Honor : What made you say that ?

Witness: By way of introducing myself to the compacy. — (Laughter.) • After Langley had finished counting out the £90 I went to put my hand on it, but Langley's hand was on ,jt first. He said " How dare you touch this money ?" I at the same time asked Morrison if it was his mopey. Laugley was talking at the time, and Morrison nodded assent. Laugley rated me for interfering with the money before it was paid over, and said : ' If you have to get any money from this man, wait till I'm done How dare you touch my. money ?" I said " All right," and stepped back a pace from the table. He counted the money over again. It was counted out in four lots. I took hold of the money and dragged it away from Morrison. That is the money I brought into court, with the other £15 picked up off the table by Miller. Morrison asked me who I was, and I told him I was a sheriff's officer, and showed him the seal of the court on the wrjiti. I invited tUw^ to s> owe to tbe court, W>

Morrison said in effect that I was no gentleman, and he would not come. Langley came with me, and I told the sheriff what I had done, asking him to check me if I mis-stated anything. I said to Langley " You can't deny that you had the money and paid it over." To Mr Stuart : Laugley asked for the money, and then asked the sheriff to give him a receipt for it. I omitted to state that I said to Morrison : " Langley knew nothing about this ; it's no put-up job." 1 understood that Morrison had won a hundred; that he owed Laugley something, aud had to pay some of the other away. What the other witnesses said was not true.

To his Honor : Morrison's shut hand was on the money before I took it. C. M'K Gordon, sheriff of Otago, deposed : I remember the iuterview spoken of by last witness. Brown aud Laugley came into my office. Langley was in an excited state, and said that Brown had taken some of his money, and asked that he should get it. I asked Brown to tell me what had happened, and he told me what he has stated to-day. The last words he used were : " Langley, you won't deny that you put the money on the table and- pushed it towards Morrison, and Morrison put his hand on it." Laugley did not reply to that, but asked for a receipt for the money, which I declined to give. Langley, at my request, withdrew while I spoke to Brown. I then called Langley in and told him I could not part with the money, but would hold it, and justice would be done.

To Mr Stuart : A good deal was said about settling by both Brown and Langley. Langley did not give me to understand that he abandoned his claim upon this money. Richard Langley (recalled) said that at the interview referred to he stated that he had not settled, and demanded the money back to piy his liabilities. The £15 was not placed on top of the £75. Witness understood that Brown had to get £2 from Mi^er, and that that was what he was after.

To Mr Mouat ; Witness did not remember Brown saying " I want to clear you in the eyes of your client— this is no put-up job "; but ib is possible he said that.

Mr Mouat asked, in the event of his Honor deciding that the money should not have been seized, that a charging order be granted on the evidence.

His Honor : There is no debt. Langley is not bound to pay, supposing the money were hia. Mr Mouat : But I am asking for the order on the assumption that the money is Morrison's and is merely in the sheriff's custody. His Honor : 1 see no reason to disbelieve the evidence of Miller that he received the order from Morrison on Langley for a part of this money ; and that it was in the contemplation of the parties that he should be paid £47 10s out of this £90, and that Morrison was to receive the balance of £42 10s. What seems to me the most probable to have happened was this ; That Langley put down this money on the table and pushed it towards Miller, as Brown says, and did in fact part with possession of the money j but that the money was placed on the table in order that Miller and Morrison might -divide it between them, according to their respective interests. Then Brown comes forward, Morrison puts his -hand upon it, and Brown seizes it. Taking this view of the case, there would be £43 10s out of this mixed fund which would have been the absolute property of Morrison, the defendant. So far, at any rate, the seizure ' was justifiable. As for the balance of £47 10s, that

Mr Mouat: That makes £90, your Honor. There js only £75 in court.

His Honor : Yes ; Miller got £15 immediately after tbe seizure. As to the balance over the £42 10b, it seems to me that it belongs to Miller or Langley ; and that so far as the £42 10s of the money^in question is concerned, the property having passed to Morrison, as it was intended to pa«Bby all concerned, the sheriff was justified in seizing it. Mr Laugley, of course, when he saw* the whole amount seized, was naturally anxious that he should be enabled to settle not only with Morrison, but with Miller, as he hafl promised to do, and the seizure of the whole amount of the £75 prevented that. The order will be that the sum in court in excess of the £42 10s be paid to Miller ; the balance to remain in court to satisfy the judgment creditor.

Mr Mouafc applied for costs. His Honor : It seems to me that this is such a case where no costs should be allowed on either side. I don't think that LaDgley has established any claim to the money. Miller is the man entitled to the balance according to my lights. AUSTRALIAN. The Victorian trainer, Mr James Wilson, sen., will shortly return to his new training establishment at Dryadale. His striug, a small one, has been further reduced since the bale oi" First Prince by the two-year-olds Query and Tabard being turned out of training. The contest for the next Champion Race, in March, should be a very keen one. The scratching of Trenton for all his summer engagements at Randwick would lead to the belief that he is to undergo a preparation for this particular race. To beat Trident will be a great ftat. The veteran Commotion is also reported to be a competitor. With only these three in the race, it would be worth a day's journey to witness the, running. It is just possible (says a Sydney paper) that the New Zealand colt, Disowned, may sport silk in it. Bhonld he do so, the event will cause a great amount of interest.

After Invermay had lowered the colours of Tamarisk in the Wagga Derby, the Hon. W. A. Long offered lOOOgs for him, but even that large sum was not nceepted. In the opinion of many good judges he is the best colt of the season, bar Trident.

According to " Merlin," the Tasmanian racing authorities are not going to be intimidated .by the action of the Melbourne bookmakers. The contributor in question writes thus concerning the prospects of the summer campaign jn the snug little " island :— " From all I could learn while in Melbourne the intercolonial nominations for the T.T.O. and T.R.O. Summer meets are likely to be numerous, and this is in spite of all the damage that some members of the ring are trying to do both meets, simply because the totalisator was allowed in the paddock at Elwiok last February. These gentry must be taught their proper posit ion, and they certainly cannot be allowed to dictate to racing clubs. The result of their presumption will probably be that the T.R.C. will follow the example of the southern club and have the totalisator in the paddock." The Hon. Lady Oarrington has manifested her interest in racing by notifying the A.J C. committee of her intention to present the club with a 100-guinea gold cup, to be added to the Summer Cup Stakes.

Some of the mares and yearlings at Morphettville were so frightened by a recent storm that thfty charged into a fence, and the brood mare Lulu and a yearling colt by Neckersgat out of Minnie were killed, tyr M. I*QUgtoiq, pf Sheet Anchor fame, has

purchased the V.R.C. Handicap winner, Brav6 for 1000 guineas. .'.' , Though business is not brisk in the Sydney betting market there has been a fair amount of wagering over the forthcoming summer handfcapp. When the weights. made their appearance Trenton was looked upon as having a good " show " for Tattersall's Cup, aud ? was very frequei tly picked with Hexham, Acme, Volcano, and others for the double. Tlie pen, however, w.is run through his name. Aetna was auother which looked to.have a weight raiicb. she could handle but she was speedily scratched. Hexham is the popular pick for both events, and is ruling fifst favourite in each. As will be eeou below, the double has also beeu fairly patronised. The following prices have beeu taken"?—** SUMMER CUP. 100 to 10 agst Hexham 100— 7 Highland Mary 100 - 7 The Orphan ;' 10D— 7 Cairo mo— 6 Monte Chrlsto • 100—6 Pilot ♦ t 100 — 5 Industry 100 _ ,) others TATTERS ALL'S CCl\ * 100 to 9 agst Hexh»m 100— (j Highland Mary 100— a Maid' of rhe Lakk 100 — 5— 3 others SIMMER AND TATfERSALL'S CUPS. " 1 000 to 20 agst Hexham . and Hexham , SOO — 10 Orphan and Orphan lOOd — 10 Volcano and Hexham oOJ — 5 Hexha<n andiSilver King 500 — 5 Hexham and Myall King ■>00 — i> Volcano'and Hi]shland Mary 300 — 3 Highland Mary and Hexhafu 300 — 5 Orphan and Pilot 500 — 5 — Pilot and Hexham • ' ENGLISH AND FOREIGN. The Kempton Park Royal Stakes of lO.OOOsovs, which will be decided at the Spring meeting- iv 1889, has closed with 25i nommatfous, among them being H.R.H. the Prince of Wales' Loyalist, and own brother to Paradox. * Several foreign sportsmen have subscribed to the race, and the entry includes both Ormonde and The Bard. ' One of The Bard's legs has filled and his turf career for this season had closed when the last mail left, The scores of the leading -English jockeys up to October 15 were as follow; — .

During the following w.eek Wood rode four winners, reducing Archer's lead to 22. Archer paid his first visit to Ireland durjng the Curragh October meeting and wofa 'two races there, his opening victory being on Lord Londonderry'n horse Cambresmofe. The Buccess of both owner and jockey was highly popular. The salo of -Mr Lorillard's stud.— The celebrated stud of Mr Pierre Lorillard was disposed of ou the 15th October, at Kancocas Farm Jobstown, New Jersey, U.S., and attracted a ■large attendance. Included iv the sale were the •celebrated sires Mortemer and Irqquoie, the Utfer of whom, it wiJJ be recollected, was a brilliant performer in Englaud, a)id won the Derby and St. Leger of 1881. He provoked .keen competition, and there was an English commission iv the market for his purchase. -The biddings" reached £4500 when the British agent retired, and Mr W. 11, Jaokgon, the breeder, making an oifer of £4000, Iroquois'was knocked down to him, chiefly with a view to keeping the only Amei ioan-bred winner of the English Derby iv the "States." Seventy-tight^mares and five stallions real : sed in the aggregate £28,597. Petrarch, who won the Middle Park Plate in 1875, and beat the largest field (30) that ever went to the post for the race, has now sired two wfuuers of the same event, iv Florentine and Bu^body, the latter of whom successfully carried LorJ Falmouth's colours in I^B3. Many anecdotes have come to my knowledge of the annoyance, and, simetimes something worse, caused: ;by the error 7 in telegraphing The Cob as the winner of the Caesarwitch instead of Stone Clink (says a writer in the Sporting Life}. Some of the others were indeed almost of a painful character ; others involving only the loss of a bottle or two, or matters of that" kind. But one thing is certain, and that is,- that *- nothing in the way of wiring results should' be "chanced" and that the hoisting of- the winning -number should be waited for. A .wrong message goes all over the Kingdom, and may be distributed in lots of places before the "correction" has time to undo the mischief. I have heard an instance of a geiitUman in the. city who on receipt of the news on the «• tape " that the Cob had won, said excitedly, " At last I have won £1000 on a race,", went .Vto the door, took a cab ami drove hoW, perhaps not to learn the true iom.lc until fate in the day or next morning. One cm imagine the joy of the fauiily circle, tli« "iltar papa" business, the '"hero of the hour," an 3 all the pleasant visions conjured up by " mammai^._but one cannot so easily imagine the reverse side of the picture when Stone Clink. upset the harmony. That is only one instance, and who can tell what more or less serious consequences the error in this and kindred' cases; may not have led to :j: j Ormonde lias up to date "won £23,000 in stakes. At a recent meeting of the. Jockey Club Lord Drogheda wished to substitute in Rule 46 1-e handicapping the words " United Kingdom " for " Great Britain,'' which .would, relieve Irish horses from the ban imposed' by the latebt addition to that rule. Lord Droghe'da pointed out the disadvantages under which owners of racthorses and trainers iv Ireland suffered as cprn« pared with their brethreu in the sister Kingdoms, and was seconded by Lord Bradford. Mr Craven, the Duke of St. Albans, and the stewards opposed the motion, ..chiefly on the ground that the addition to the rule had net been on its trial sufficiently long yet, and on a division the figures fchowed a" 2 'dead-heat — 13 voting for and 13 against the motion. There being no majority in favour of the motion, tajs the Calendar, it was not carried. After such an unsatisfactory result, however, we may expect to hear of the matter cropping up again, and puhhed to a more sensible termination. General Owen William's residence, Temple Houie, near Marlow, has been partially destroyed by fire. Damage to the Extent of £30,000 was done. Writing of tbe English crack Ormonde, Mr W, A. Kerr in the Live Stock Journal said :— ln tbe paddock at Doncaster we had a good opportunity of taking critical stock of the Kingsclere crack. The secret of his marvellous gift Of going is in bis length, scope, faultltss action, and enormous ' •tride. He "skims over the ground, despite' dwjdsdly rou^h hooks, seemingly without au

'effort, and his •' gather " is quick and indicative of tremendous propelling power. Though perfect in front, with good fore legs, his are not nearly so powerful or well 'turned as those of hjs sire. Porter has done wonders with the colt since Epsom, and has been successful in developing all his best points as well as in filling up some deficiencies. Ormonde appears thoroughly*sound and to be possessed of the best of tempers with plenty of courage. The excellence of Stockwell, the Emperor of Stallions has .been reproduced and intensiftal by,his great grandson,, who now" takes a triple first with West Australian, Gladiateur, and Lord Lyon. One of the features of the First October meeting, Newmarket, was the victory of Lord Falmouth's popular colours 'on Blanchland. Everyone will hail with satisfaction the return of the Cornish peer to the English turf. la America last season Messrs Dwyer Bros, won no less than 195,250d01, or equal to £39,000, which is far in excess of anything won in England or Australia by- any one stable. Mr J. B. Haggin is well up on. the list, with 87,423d01 ; and Mr Baldwin, another Pacific Coast sportsman, comes next, with 78,395d01. ENTRIES AND HANDICAPS. AUCKLAND SUMMER MEETING. The following acceptances have been received for fche undermentioned events at the Auckland Summer meeting :— AUCKLAND CUP, Of lOOOsovs. st ib st lb Kelson... ..9 8 Disowned ... 7 4 Turquolso ... 8 7 Kingflsh ... 7 3 Pasha ... ... fl2 Friendship ... 7 3 Lochiel ... 7 12 Clogs ... • ... 6 12 Fusillade ... 7 11 Victoria ... 6 10 Tet.ford .:. 7 10 Scot Free ... 6 7 Waltirl... ... 7 9 Dressmaker ... 6 4 Cinderella ... 7 6 Cremorne ... 6 4 Derringer ... ,7/, 5 Lady Norah ... 6 0 STEEPLECHASE, 1 Of.3oosovi. Belle ... ' ... 12 0 Falcon... ... 10 0 GuyFawket ... 11 7 Coral ..". ... 9 10 Jim ... ... 11 0 Omata... ... 9 7 Macaroni ... 10 -11 Silvio ... ... 9 7 Peter Osbeck ... 10 Jl Fair Lily ... 9 7 Tiger ... ... 10 7 WELLINGTON RC; MEETING. The following weights have been declared for the WELLINGTON CU>, Of 1 500sqvs. sfc lb, " sfc lb Nelson ... ... 912 Armourer ... 7 5 Pasha ... ... 8 4 Derwenter ... 7 4 Administrator ... 8 . 3 Trickster ... 7 4 Fusillade ... 8 3 Ruby ... ... 7 4 Waltirl ... 8 2 British Lion ... 7 4 Thunderbolt. ... 8 0 Salisbury ... 612 Tetford ... 8 0 Torpedo ... 6 12 Tigridia ... 8 0 Charmer ... 6 10 Spad'Guirea „. 718 Hivulet ... 6 9 Cinderella ... 7 11 Ahua .... ... 6 7 Silence... ... 7 10 Musk Rose ... 6 7 Artillery ... 7 9 Cremorne ... 8 6 Titbit .'.. ... 7 8 The Shah ... 6 5 FirskLord ... 7 B»XadyNbrah ... 6 0 Rumour ... *7-7 Fardingale ... 6 0 VfOtoria ... 7 7 CANTERBURY SUMMER MEETING. The following weights 4 have been declared for the C.J.C. Summer meeting: — MIDSUMMER HURDLE RACE, Of lOOsovs. ' st lb st lb Peter Osback ... 11 13 Mainbeom ' ... 9 11 Tres Sec ... 10 12 Irish King ... 9 9 Rocket... ... 10 7 Gunpowder ... 9 7 Aroha ... ... 10 0 Archduke ... 9 4 Mamnioc ... 9 11 Bob Roy „. 9 0 MIDSUMMER HANDICAP, ' Of 30Qsovs. Nelson... ... 9 12 Moana... ... 7 6 Tasrvian .„ fl 2- Marion... ... 7 2 Fusillade ' ... 8 9 Leon ... ... 7 2 Hubina... ... 8 8 Ruby ... ... 7 2 Maligner ... 8 5 Chttntilly ... 6 12 First Lord ... 8 5 Longwaisb ... 6 7 Administrator ... 8 0 Pafcrioian ... 6 3 Lochiel ' ... 713 St. Ives ... 6 3 Spade Guinea ..'. 712 Perwenter ... 6 0 Artillery ... 7 11 Sfc. Clnir ... 6 0 Hermitage ... 711 Fog ... ... 6 0 Titbit ..? .„ 7 ASHBURTON SPRING MEETING. The following weights have been declared : — ASHBURTON CUP, Of 125sovs. st lb st lb Rubina ... ' ... 8 0 Puok „, ... 612 Spade Guinea ... 7 9 Titbit.' ... 6 8 S 'nibble... ... 7 8 Dem enter ... 6fi ftek ... ... 7 I Talebearer ... 6 6 Meteor ... ... 6 13 Ruby ... ... 6 5 SPRING HANDICAP. Of£osovs. Bublna ... ... 9.3 Titbit ... 7 10 Spide Guinea ... 8 12 Talebearer ... 7 10 j Quibble... ... B 'lo Vanity Fair ... 7 0, Jack ... ... 810 Marchioness Hiel 6 0 Meteor (Sherwln's) 8 7 Gaiety... ... 6 0 SrcoNß Day, HURDLB HANDIC VP, Of 50sovp. Mammoc ... 12 7 Marquis ... 9 10 Moody ... ... 12 3 Rob Roy ... 9 0 Irish King . . ... 11 8 Albert. ... 812 Aroha ... ... 11 0 Loch Naw ... 8T j KAKANUI RACES. Nominations have been sent in as follows for the Kakanui meeting : — KAKANUI HANDICAP, Of 30s6vs. Gaiters Chester Viking Miss Wtbater Beeswing Kino Briarleat Pauline. PUBLICAN'S HANDICAP, Of2Caivß. Gaiter* Chester VU ing Tenakoa Briarleaf Ccmefc Kino Bernardo Miss Webster Beeswing Pauline.' HANDICAP TROT, Of 25sovi • Why Not Senior Oliver Magic Peter Kate Lltt.le Ned Fniry •' Bcb Grasshopper Sally. NEW BRIGHToFr.C. MEETING. The following handicaps tave leen declared :—: — HURDLES. Two miles. st'lb^ st ]b Meteor... ... U o Rob' Hoy „. 8 10 Mitmmoc ... 10 10 Fleetwirg „. 8 10 Mainbo ra ... 10 8 Johnny \... 8 9 Aroha ... ... 10 8 Master Guy ... 8 9 Archduke ... 10 2 Gunpowder ... 8 9 Baldie ... ... 9 0 NEW BRIGHTON CUP, Or c mile and'a-half. Klngask ' 8 8 ,Wairuna «. 012 Meteor (Sherwin's) 8 8 Conundrum ... 610 Darwenter ... 8 7 Marlborough ... 610 Master Agnes ... | 5 Teddy \uiTle „c 7 Arjhduke ... 8 0 Ploughboy " « o Finance ... 7 7 Kate Haye« !" " 0 Popifc ... ... 7 0 Malvtao -. Z6 0 Meteor ... 7 n • *»

PLUMPTON PARK RACES. The following are the principal weights for these races :— HURDLE RACE. st lb sfc lb Master Agnes ... 12 3 Aroha ... ... 10 2 Mammoc ... 10 7 Archduke ... 9 12 Mainboora ... 10 5 Master Guy ... 9 0 Irish King ... 10 3 Johnny ... 8 10 PLUMPTON CUP. Titbit... ... 8 8 Mirella ... 7 5 Rocket ... ... 8 4 Archduke ... 7 2 Meteor ... ... 8 2 Galatea ... 7 2 Patrician ... 7 7 Tumntalus. ... 6 9 Weeßhoddie .... 8 7 Popit... ... 6 7 Viuaigrette ... 7 6 Teddy Yuille ... 6 6 MASTERTON RACES. The following nominations have beeu received for the Boxing Day meeting of the MastertonOpaki Jockey Club : — OPAKI STAKRS HANDICAP, Of 12580V5. Pasha Administrator The Spy First Water Putangitangi Iron Satanella Rumour Smooth Hollo Charmer Little Scrub, RAILWAY PLATE HANDICAP, Of 608OVS. Pasha Tornado Forester Revoke Putangitangi Iron Satanella Humour Honeysuckle Shah Glalcks Smooth Ro lo Secretary Charmer Little Scrub. HURDLE HANDICAP, Of 40BOVS. Freebooter Hallcore Zulu Acme. MASTERTON HANDICAP, Of 50SOV8, Pasha Tornado Forester The Spy Rumour Honeysuckle Giriri Jennette The Shah Glaicks Rollo Charmer Revoke Survivor. TRADESMEN'S HANDICAP, Of 80bovs. Pasha Revoke The Spy First Water Putangitangi Freebooter Satanella Humour Honeysuckle Giriri • Shah Rollo Secretary Charmer Little Scrub. NAPIER PARK RACES * The following are the principal nominations received for the Napier Park Racing Club's meeting at the New Year : — HANDICAP HURDLE RACE, Of 808OV8. Tim Ahua Snapshot Volcano Liberty Bret Harte Hurricane Denbigh NEW YEAR HANDICAP, Of 2oosovs. Clyde Fardingale Tigridia Mystery Soudan Sylph »>nvell Pasha Rivulet Huata Kahu Silence The Poet Expelled The Laird GREYMOUTH RACES. The following weights have been declared : — « MID&UMMER HANDICAP, Of 70sovs. sfc lb it )b Tramp... ... 9 6 Gallant ... 7 13 Athol Daisy ... 9 0 Temuka ... 7 10 British Lion ... 8 4 Barney ... 7 8 Albert... ... 8 4 Anvil ... ... 7 8 Cardigan ... 8 0 Stella ... ... 7 6 Memento ... 6 0 Madonna ... 7 • Sir William ... 8 0 HURDLE RACE, Of 40sov». Royalty ... 11 0 Harkaway ... 9 12 Poily ... ... 10 11 Barney ... 9 7 Btistol ... ICT 2 Dart ... ... 9 0 Temuka ... 10 2 Daisy ... ... 8 12 HAWKE'S BAY RACES. The following weights have been declared for the Hawke's Bay Jockey Club's Boxing Day meeting : — CHRISTMAS HANDICAP, Of lOOsovs. st lb o st lb Tijjredia ... 9 0 Orwell... ... 7 5 Pearl ... ... 8 12 Expelled ... 7 0 Deceiver ... 8 9 Huata ... ' ... 6 10 Silence... ... 8 6 Cl.\de ... ... 6 8 Soudan ... 8 4 Ldmrwaist ... 6 7 MissDargon ... 7 13 Fardingale ... 6 6 Laird ... ... 7 12 Psycho ... 6 5 The Poet ... 7 10 Thyme ... 0 4 Mystery ... 7 9 Sylph ... ... 6 0 Rivulet ... 7 8 Kahu ... ... 6 0 Salisbury ... 7 6 Kupe ... ... 8 0 HASTINGS HANDICAP, Of 200SOVS. Pasha ... ... 9 0 Salisbury ... 7 5 Tigredia «• ... 810 Orwell... ... 7 3 Pearl ... ... 8 7 Owheoko ... 7 2 Silence... ... 8 4 Expelled ... 6 10 Deceiver ... 8 2 Huata ... ... 6 7 Laird ... ... 7 13 Clode ... ... 6 6 Soudan ... 7 12 Longwaist ... 6 5 The Poet ... 710 Fardingale ■ ... 6 4 Liberty ... 7 9 Grisilda ... 6 3 Mystery ... 7 7 K»hu ... ... 6 0 Rivulet ... 7 5 HANDICAP HURDLE RACE, Of lOOsova. Denbigh ... 11 12 Snapshot ... 9 0 Liberty ... 10 7 Hurricane ... 9 0 Volcano ... 10 7 Bret Harte ... 8 7 Owheoko ... 9 0 First Whip ... 8 7 Tim ... ... 9 0 ISLAND BAY RACES. •The following nominations have been received for the ISLAND BAY PARK CUP, Of 400sov8. Pasha Tetford Lady Nora Tigredia Fardinga!« Administrator The Spy Revoke The Poet Pearl Waitiri Rubina Charmer Rumour Tennyson Maligner Nelson Cinderella Prttrician Spade Guinea. Fay Silence Soudan Salisbury Titbit Talebearer Artillei-v Giriri Fusillade. INVERCARGILL RACES. The following nominations have been received :—: — * NOVEL RACE, Of 30aov. Resartua Aparima Swainrer Goldsmith Patch Al Golddust. HANDICAP TIME TROT, Of 30sov8. Surgeon Tom Meiry Girl Foreraask Charlie Topsy Evangeline Anneau dOr Tint dl.d 1 . r Maggie. INVERCAHGILL CUP, Of lOOaovs. Water King Cathedral Violin Adela Finance Hose Captain Cook Oivis. HURDLE HANDICAP, Of 30bovs. Cathedral Lady Ellen Canazou Civic. HANDICAP TIME TROT. Of 2030V8. Surgeon Tom Foremait Topsy Evangeline Anneau dOr MerrvGirl T»nt d»Or Chwlte,

SOUTHLAND HANDICAP. Of 40sovs. Water King Violin Adela Finance La Hose Captain Cook Civis. FLYING HANDICAP, Of 20BOV8. Water King Warrior , Violin Cathedral Adela Goldsmith Finance La Rosa Golddust Hastings. OAMARU TRADESMEN'S RACES. The following nominations have been received: — BOXING DAY HANDICAP. Roaespur Paddy Gaitere Sunflower Dau Freebooter Plunger. TKOT. Kate Daikie Bob Bamm Tommy Bessie Dick Silkie Bess Little Nell Butcher May Maggie. NOVEL HANDICAP, , Marlon Lucy Jenny Lind St. Gatlen Freebooter Gunner. THADESMEN'S HANDICAP. Rosespnr Stickler Paddy Dan No Name Pandora Sultana Plunger. LADIES' BRACELET. Tommy Paddy Gaiters Dahlia' Jenny Lind Sunflower Freebooter Plunger. RACING IN AUSTRALIA. SANDHURST. November 24, 25. SANDHURST CUP, OfSOOsovs. Second horse, SOsovs: third, 15sova out of the atake. One mile and a-quarter and a distance. ■ tance. Mr J Tully ns br li Middlemarch, by Maribyrnong—Housemaid, 7yrn, Bst 21b (Trahan) 1 Mr R Batty's eh h Uraberto, 6yrs, 6st 121b ; (Rhodes) 2 Mr J Wilson's br h Ringmaster, 4yrs, 7st 111b ... (Moore) 3 Captain Haimes' br h Norfolk, 6yrs or aged, 6st 10ib ... ... ... (WAnwin) 0 Mr O Barnett's br m lesbia, aged, 6st 91b (Gorry) 0 Mr S Miller's b m Impulse, aged, 6st 71b (A Turner) 0 Mr B B Luttrell's eh m Verbena, aged, tfst 61b (carried 6st 12lb) ... (Musgrove) 0 Betting— 2 to 1 agst Lesbia, 3to 1 Middlemarch, 6 to 1 Impulse, and 8 to 1 Ringmaster. Lesbia went to the front on the fall of the flag, and passing the stand led Norfolk, Umberto, Verbena, Middlemarch and Ringmaster in the order named. Lesbia and Norfolk were together at the back of the course. Lesbia fell as Umberto was passing her, and Middlemarch lost some ground by almost running on to the fallen mare. Norfolk led Umberto at the side, then followed Verbena, Middlemarch. Impulse, and Ringmaster. Umberto led into the straight, with Norfolk next, and Middlemarch coming fast on the outside. The latter got in front at the distance, and won by a length from Umberto, Ringmaster third, then Verbena, Norfolk, and Impulse in straggling order. Time, 2min 28 2-ssec. . «, : BENDIGO HANDICAP, OfSOOsovß. Second, 40sovb ; third, lOeovi. One mile and a distance. Mr H Hunt's bl c Kohai, by Manuka— ldalia, 4yrs, 7sb ... ... (Morrison) 1 Mr B Batty's eh h Umberto, 6yrs, 7st lib , . (S Davis) 2 Mr E B Luttrell's eh m Verbena, aged, 6st 71b, carried t!st 131b ... ... (Musgrave) 3 , Mr J Tully's br h Middlemarch, 6yrs, 9st lib (in1 eluding 101b penalty) ... ... (Trahan) 0 Mr T Coney's eh h AUander, aged, 7st 101b (Williamson) 0 Captain Haimes' brfh Norfolk, dyrs, 6st 12lb (Anwin) 0 Mr S Miller's b m Impulse, aged, 6st 81b (Turner) 0 Betting: 2 to 1 agst Middlemarch, 3 to 1 Kohai, 4 to 1 Umberto. ' Umberto had the best of the ' start,' and assumed a lead o£ a length, the next to follow being Middlemarch, Allander, Norfolk, and Kohai, with Verbena last. Norfolk soon went to the front, being attended by Umberto, Kohai, and Impulse, with Allander last. At the back Middlemarch broke a blood vessel, and was pulled up. Umberto led into the home turn, with Kohai, Norfolk, and Impulse next. Kohai got in front before the distance was reached, and won in the en^ by a length ; Verbena a fair third, with Impulse fourth. Time, 2rain lse'c. RACING IN ENGLAND. ; NEWMARKET SECOND OCTOBER. October 12, 13, 14. CESAREWITCH STAKES. A handjeap of 25sovseach, with 500 added. Second received 200sova,andtliirdl00sovfl. Two miles and n quarter and 28ydB: t , Mr R C Vyner'« eh t Stone Clink, by SpeculumStone Chat, 4yrs, 7st 71b ... (Glover) 1 Duke of Beaufort's The Cob, 3yrs, 6st 4lb (Wall) 2 Mr J Hammond's Eurasian, 4yrß, 7st 61b (Robinson) 3 Mr J Hammond's St Gatien, Syrs, Oat 51b (Wood) 0 Baron de Hirsch's Althorp, -Jyra [allowed 51b] (Day) 0 Mr J R Gnbbins' Ashplant, 3yrs. 7st 101b (LRshmar) 0 Mr G Lambert's Chels&, .'!vrs, 7st 101b (F Barrett) 0 Mr Manton's Oberon, 3vra, 7st 51b [car 7st 71bJ (G Barrett) 0 Lord Bradford's Sir Harao, 3vrs, 6st 131b [allowed 51b] ... ... " ... (Smith) 0 Prince Soltykoff's Silver, 3yrs, 7st 2lb (Arnull) 0 Mr Douglaj Baird's Atheling, 3\ rs, 7st (Warne) 0 Mr Childwick's Harpenden, 3yrs, 6stlOlb [allowed 51b] ... ... ... (Allsopp) 0 Mr G Lambert's Marlborough, 4vro, 7st [ear 7st lib] ... ... ' ... (Martin) 0 Mr H T Barclay's Runnymede, 4yre, 7st (White) 0 Chevalier Ginistrelli's tiaffaello, fiyrs, 7st ( I'omlisson) 0 M. Euphrusei's Lavandiere, 4yrs, 6st 111b (JWoodburn) 0 Mr J Douglas' Old Joe, aged, 6st 31b ** (GWoodburn) 0 Duke of Beaufort's Winter Cherry, 3yrs, sst 81b (Cleminson) 0 The Duke of Beaufort declared to with The Cob. Betting : sto 2 agst Silver, 11 to 2 Atheling, 8 to 1 Harpenden, 100 to 9 The Cob 100 to 8 each Chelsea and St. Gatien, 20 to 1 Sir Hamo, 100 to 3 each Stone Clink, Eurasian, and LavanHiere ; 40 to 1 each Oberon and Raft'aello ; 50 to each Ashplanr, Old Joe, and Althorpe ; 66 to 1 Runnymede, and 100 to 1 Winter Cherry. The flag having fallen to an excellent start, Winter Cherry went to the front, and made running from The Cob, Chelsea, Atheling, Harpenden, Ashplant, and Raffaello, the next lot being Runnymede, Stone Clink, Eurasian, Oberon, and Marlborough, the last three being Sir Hamo, St. Gatien, and Old Joe. So they ran past the end of the ditch, where Winter Cherry w»« still showing the way to The Cob

! with Oberon? Stone Clink, and Eurasian next, followed by Chelsea, Marlborough, Silver, Harpendeu, and Ashplant ; St. Oatien having improved his position, and left Old Joe hopelessly in the rear. At the Rowley mile starting post, The Cob for the first time headed Winter Cherry, and the pair came on clear of Stone Clink, Oberon, Chelsea, and Eurasian, the only others that remained near them being St. Gatien, Harpenden, Silver 1 , and Althorp. Before the Bushes were reached, Winter Cherry had dropped out, and at the top of the hill both Silver and Oberon , had had enough of it, and, Chelsea being iir trouble soon after, The Cob came on, followed by Stone Clink, the pair having now the issue to themselves. At the dip they were almost-level, and seemed to many to collide; but, commencing the ascent, The Cob once more drew out. Half-way up the hill, however, Stone Clink again challenged, and, running on most gamely, caught The Cob a hundred yards from the pot>t, and won a fine race by a length. Eurasian was a bad third, well clear of Althorp, who was fourth. Time, 4min 2sec. Value of the stakes, £1240. MIDDLEj^P-ARK PLATE, Of oOObovs, added to a' 'sweepstakes of BOaovs each, tor two-year-olds— colts Bst 10lb, fillies Bst 71b ; winners extra. Second, received SOOsovs, and third lQQsovs. Six furlongs. 107 subs. Lord Calthorpe'a eh c Florentine, by Petrarch— Hawthorndale, Pat ... ... (Watts) 1 Mr D Balrd's Enterprise, 9stf 31b ... (Archer) 2 Mr It H Combe* Maxim, Bst 101b ... (Rickaby) 3 Mr Manton's Timothy, 9st 31b ... (G Barrett) 0 Mr A Benholm's Freshwater, 9at ... (Osborne) 0 Lord Bradford's Chjppeway, Bst 101b (Wood) 0 Colonel Forester's Yanderbilt, Bst 101b . , (F Barrett) 0 Mr A Brisco's Flower Girl, Bst 71b [car 8»t 91b] , ' (Cannon) 0 * Betting : • 7 to 2 on Enterprise, 6 to 1 agst Timothy, 100 to 12 Florentine, 100 to 7 Flower Girl, 100 to 6 Freshwater, and 20 to 1 Maxim. The first to show in front was Enterprise, next to whom came Maxim and Chippeway, followed by Timothy and Florentine, and so they ran for half this distance, when Florentine took second place, quite two lengths behind the leader. At the' Bushes, Enterprise seemed to be winning easily, but Florentine was kept going, and the favourite, running very unkindly, came back to him in the dip, and, going up the, hill, Florentine went to the front and won by a couple of lengths; three lengths between second and third ; Timothy was fourth. Time, lmin 17 4-ssec. Value of the stakes, £2685. CHAMPION STAKES, " Of 20sovs each, with 700 added. Second received 10 per cent., and the third 5 per cent, on the whole stake. One mile and a-quarter and 73yds. 71 «, subs. , Duke of Westminster's b c Ormonde, by Bend Or —Lily Agnes, 3yrs,-Bst 51b [car Bst 81b] (Archer) 1 Mr Manton's Oberon, 3yrs,Bst 51b... (G Barrett) 3 Prince Solt.ykoff's Argo Navis, 3yra, Bst 21b (Arnull) 3 Betting : 100 tfb lon Ormonde. Oberon held a slight lead of the other two till coming down the Bushes hill, where Ormonde went to the front, and stayed there to the finish, winning iir a canter by a length from Oberon, who, after a good struggle, had shaken off Argo Navis, the mare being a bad third. Time, 2min 19sec. ' Value' of .the stakes, £1190. HER MAJESTY'S PLATE, Ot 500gs. Weight for age. Two miles 105 yds. Mr J Hammond's b h St Ga* ien, by Rotherhill or The Hover-j-Sfc Editha, syrs, Gst , (Wood) 1 Mr Vyner'a Stone Clink, 4yrs, 95t ... (Oeborne) 2 Mr G Lambert's Chejsea, 3yrs, Bat lib (Goater) 3 Mr D Balrd's Attieling^yrs, Bst lib (Lashmar) 0 Duke of Hamilton's Jacob, 4>rs, 9st (-Watts) 0 Mr Vyner's Kudos, ,3yrsi Bst ilb ... (Glover) 0 Betting : 9t04 on St. Gatien, 100 to 15 agst Chelsea, 7 to 1 Stone Clink* 100 to 7 Atheling, 25t to 1 Jacob, and 50 to 1 Kudos, The last-named at once went to the front, and came along with a long lead, the others ruuning in close order to the Rowley mile stand, where Kudos' 'retired, and Atheling went ob in front of Chelsea and Stone Clink. At the Red Post the last-named took up the runniDg, but she was-hfeaded at the distance by St. Gatien, who won in a canter by three lengths ; a bad third. *> . NEWMARKET DERBY, A sweepstakes of 25rovs each, with 200 added, for three-year-olds'." Second received lOOsovs. Last mile and a-half of the B.C. 41 subs. Mr Manton's- br c St Mirin, by Hermit — Lady Paramount, Bst 101b ... ... (Archer) 1 Mr JH Houldswocth's .c by Springfield — Morgiana, Bst3lb'... •„. ... (Warue) 2 Prince Soltykoff 's Blondel, Bst 101b (Cannon) 3 Betting : 10 to 1 on St. Mirin. ' The'Morgiana colt- made the running with a clear lead of the favourite to the Red Post, where Archer closed up, and, coming out in the last hundred yards, won by a length ; a bad third. SANDOWN PARK. . October 21. EIGHTH YEAR OF THE GREAT SAPLING PLATE, Of lOO.Osovs, by subscription of 10g8 each; for two year olds ; eolta,.o«t ; fillies and geldings, Bst 111b ; with penaltiea and allowances. Five furlongs. Lord Hastings eh f Mirage, by Speculum— Kuonyma, Bst 61b ...» ... (Lashmar) 1 Captain C Bowling's b c, by Speculum — Baroness, Bst 91b [carried Bst 101b] ... (T Cannon) t Mr J Hammond's b c Aiutree, by Sefton— -Electric, 9st ... •--... ... (G Barrett) t Mr G Masterman's Pftter's Pence, Bst 9lb (J Watts) 0 Mr Abington's Evangeline, Bst (Jib (C Loates) 0 Betting: 9 to t 4 agst Baroness colt, sto 2 Peter's Pence, 7 to 2 Aintree, 6 to 1 Evangeline, and 100 to 8 Mirage.' Mirage, on the left, was quickest away, and made running from Aiutree on the other side, the pair settling down clear of Evangeline and the Baroness colt, with Peter's Pence soon outpaced in the rear. A quarter of a mile from home the Baroness colt passed Evangeline and assisted Aintree in challenging Mirage, who was not to be caught, however, and won by a head ; a dead heat for second place. V' * FORESTALLING. (The Field.) Whatever may be the opinion of the public and of sporting writers, there can be no doubt that few, if any, owners of racehorses will dissent from the soundness of the arguments advanced by General Owen Williams in his excellent letter to the 'Morning Post respecting the position now occupied by The Bard in the betting for the Cesarewitch. "As regards Mr Peck and myself," writes' the general, " we have everywhere stated that we have not backed The Bard for a single shilling, and have never attempted te^do so. The Cesarewitch course is two miles anil a-quafter, and Mr Peck and I consider that to ask The Bard to give Silver 201b over that severe course would be asking him to perform an impossible task. It is perfectly wtll known that neither Mr Peck nor I have, either directjy.or indirectly, betted one shilling on The. Bard or against him, and I can only regret that? the public should have backed

the horse." Never was there a more manly and outspoken avowal than that which General Williams has chivalrously condescended to make. Long before his day, and down to the present year, other owners of racehorses, belonging, like General Williams, to the Jockey Clnb, have not deemed the public worthy of so much consideration. Fifty, forty, thirty, and even twenty years ago, it was the universal practice of big stables to bring from six to eight favourites into the betting for such a handicap as the Chester Cup, and at the last moment to unveil some unsuspected animal who carried all the stable money, and proved to be what every sporting prophet called «• the real Simon Pure," without havipg the least idea who that somewhat shadowy personage might be. The late Mr Frank Clarke, who long wrote under the name of "Pegasus" for what was then the greatestsportingnewspaperintheworld.oncewon a sovereign from another writer, who, claiming to be an exceptionally well-read man, maintained that once upon a time Simon Pure had actually existed in the flesh. Upon repairing with his friend to the British Museum, Mr Frank Clarke asked for a copy of Mrs Centlivre's plays, and turning to " A Bold Stroke for a Wife," convinced his antagonist that Simon Pure was an ideal young Quaker from Pennsylvania, the coinage of Mrs Centlivre's brain, who came over to Bristol on a visit to Obadiah Prim, a member of the same persuasion, and the guardian of Ann Lovely, a rich heiress. Befere the real Simon Pure arrived, an imposter called Colonel Feignwell personated him and carried off the heiress. There is no recognised authority among owners of racehorses who would cavil at the position assumed ■by General Williams. Lord Winchilsea long ago told us, in one of his turf poems, that, "Horses are not the public property." A question propounded by Captain Berkeley, one of the members of the House of Commons Select Committee on Gaming, which sat in 1844, and answered by Admiral, then Captain Rous, as a witness, exactly fits the case in point. Captain Berkeley inquired, " When a horse becomes a favourite with the public, and they hasten to back him, is- it not opening a door'to fraud if a man, without rhyme or reason choose to withdraw, his horse?" To this Captain Rous replied, " The fact is that every backer must feel that he is subject to the withdrawal of any horse the property of another. If a man chooses to back another man's horse' he does it at his own peril and risk. A man is very foolish to bet on another man's horse. He has no right, in fact, to back any man's horse but his own. The orthodox way is to back the field, and if a backer picks out a favourite he does so at his own risk, and has no right to expect pity if the horse does not start." No patron of the turf ever left a fairer name behind him for integrity than Sir Joseph Hawley. Yet, when a scoundrel who lived in a pothouse close to Kingsclere had suborned one of the stable boys employed in that establishment Sir Joseph promptly scratched Vagabond who was backed surreptitiously for the City and' Suburban, and ran him for th& great Metropolitan Handicap^ upon the following day. Upon another occasion, Sir Joseph scratched Aphrodite for the Oaks, which she could hardly have lost, and backed Breba, who was better than Aphrodite in private. No remonstrance was made by Admiral Rous about Sir Joseph's policy in this instance, although the gallant admiral had backed Aphrodite largely to win the Oaks against Teddington winning the Derby In the case of Shotover, who had won the Two Thousand and Derby, the Duke of Westminster exercising his undoubted right, scratched her for the Oaks, on the ground that another mare in the same stable — Geheimniss — was better. No murmurs of discontent were audibly indulged in upon this occasion ; but there was no lack of little backers who invested their money upon Shotover for the Oaks after she had won the Two Thousand. Wifchin our knowledge, dne gentleman staked three sovereigns at 1000 to 1 upon Shotover, to win the Two Thousand the Derby, and the Oaks ; and if she had started for the third race, even with Geheimniss in the same stable, he would easily have hedged all his money at 10 to 1, or less. No complaints, however, issued from his lips, although to a small backer it certainly seemed a hard case. The truth is that, in these days of universal knowledge and instantaneous communication it is too much the fashion with backers, who never contribute a shilling towards the sustentation of the Turf, to forget that they invest upon horses at their own risk. Every year the expenses entailed by "a stud of running horses"— to employ the phraseology of our forefathers — become heavier and heavier. Never were such fees charged for the services of sires as are eagerly paid for those of Hermit-, Sterling, and Galopin ! Yearlings are now knocked down for as many thousands as 40, or even 30 years since they would have fetched hundreds, and brood mares of promise are commensurately costly. The most eminent trainers now charge three guineas a week for each horse, where some of their predecessors, within living memory, charged only a guinea an/i a-half. Yet an owner, who at last sees a chance of winning a race with some horse upon whom he has already expended thousands of pounds, is denounced as selfish because he will not take 5 to 1 about his animal, when Scores of little backers huve picked up all the money in a very limited market at 100 to 6. Still more unreasonable is the clamour heard when, as in a recent case of The Bard, the public make some pet of their own an extravagant favourite for a race in which he has to carry a very heavy weight and which, in the opinion of his owner or owners' he has no chance of winning. Why should -a man run his horse for a race under such circumstances ? There are many recorded instances of horses which have never recovered from the effectß of a race for the Cesarewitch. Teddington, who finished in the front; rank as a five-year-old, never won another race ; and the same thing happened with The Baron, who, having won the Cesarewitoh as a three-year-old, never caught the judge's eye again.

Such forestalling as Lord George Bentinek indulged in when The Baron won the Cesarewitch in 1845, was of a very different character from that of which certain backers have been guilty in the case of Mr Manton's Oberon for the race of next Tuesday. As will be seen from an interesting letter addressed to us by John Kent, which we print in our present issue, Lord George came to the conclusion, from his home trial of Miss Elis, that The Baron would win the Cesarewitch carrying 7st 91b. He therefore risked his money by backing the horse for v heavy stake, and then approached Mr Wattp, the owner of The Baron, and •ffered him a large pr.rtion of the bets which had already beeu secured. If the backers of Oberon surrender any of their bets to Mr Manton, it will be done, we may rest assured, under the peine forte ct dxtrt of pompulsiou and self-inteuest. In like manner Lord George Bentinek refused to start Elfs for the Sb. Leger of 1836 unless the forestalled laid him £10,000 to £1000 against the horse, which they promptly consented to do. It should be borne in constant remembrance that the Turf affords the only possible outlet for gambling to the most speculative and opulent w»t!qn upon evth LycT?rgn^peili»pi \k%

greatest statesman of ancient and modern times— was in favour of public gaming tables, maintained at the expense of the State, and conducted, with scrupulous integrity, in order to act as a safety valve for men and women (whose existence he recognised) to whom play or speculation of some kind is a physical and mental necessity. The illustrous Spartan legislator deemed that gaming tables would preserve these black sheep from worse erhues and .delinquencies. In Italy the public lotteries and believed by the wisest heads to subserve the the interests of national morality. In this country, however, the dulness of life to the poor working man, no less than to. that idle ne'er-do-weel who lounges from year's end to year's end about Fleet street, the Strand and Tottenham Court road, is relieved chiefly by an oecasianal betupon a horseraoe. Humble backers of this kind may never have set eyes upon a thoroaghbred in their lives, and are probably without the faintest idea at what cost the animal of {heir choice is brought to the post. They know nothing of the long string of expensive but worthless yearlings through which the owner of a large stud has to struggle before he can expect to win a great race. It can never do them any barm to ba reminded, by burning their fingers, that "horses are net thepublic property."

Archer. P. Wood, C, Barrett, G. Watts, J, Barrett. P. Fftgan, J, Cannon, T. White, A. Robinson • W, Woodburn, J. Mounts. ... 470 ... 408 ... 5;<J ... 39J ... 450 ... 23J ... 221 ...' 2-19 ... • 278 . Lost. Won, 318 "• 158 2M 132 473 " 103 316 - 83 374 • n 170 63 • W5 59 « 212 37 /f sis ao

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Bibliographic details

Otago Witness, Otago Witness, Issue 1829, 10 December 1886

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10,942

SPORTING NOTES FROM NEW SOUTH WALES. Otago Witness, Issue 1829, 10 December 1886

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