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ENGLISH AND FOREIGN.

The figures of the leading Euglish jockeys, up to May 1, were as follows :—: — Mounts. Lost. Won. Wood, C 79 ... 55 ... 21 Archer. F 89 ... 68 ... 21 Barrett, G 11l ... 92 ... 19 Cannon, T 50 ... 31 ... 16 Fagan, J 33 ... 20 ... 13 Barrett. F 98 ... 85 ... 13 Watts, J 69 ... 59 ... 10 F. Archer, C. Wood, J. Watts, and G. Barrett were reported for disobedience at the post at Chester, and after hearing the evidence the stewards fined each of them £5. The English Jockey Club have resolved that all apprentices who have not won three races be permitted to claim 51b allowance when riding for the stable to which they are apprenticed in all handicaps and selling races, and in ail other races not confined to horses of the same age, provided Rules 10 and 46 are not infringed by any such allowance. Aloo that in the absence of special agreement to ride for a lower sum, the fee toa winning lockey shall be sgs,and to a losing jockey 3gs, and no further charge shall be made, except when engaged to ride by request away from home, when the cost of travelling expenses and one guinea a day for living shall be charged to the owner, or owners, who engaged the jockey."

Those who lament or chuckle over alleged decrease of interest felt by the public in horseracing must be blind to the signs of the d.iy, writes " Blays." Never but once in a rather long experience have I heard any coming struggle more talked about than the contest for the Two Thousand Guineas Stakes. The one exception was the great match between the Flying Dutchman and Voltigeur.

The value of the Two Thousand Guineas, won this year by Ormonde, was £4000. Last year, when Paradox was victorous, the amount was £4300; in 1884, £4150; in 1883, £4550; in 1882, £5000 ; in 1881, £6150 ; and in 1880, £4850.

Ormonde woo the Two Thousand Guineas (distance, one mile 17 yards), in lmin 46 4-ssec, Paradox last year occupying lmin 51 2-ssec. In 1884, Scot-frees time was lmin 48sec, and on the previous amdversary Galliard went 'he course in lmin 50 2-ssec. A few previous records follow :— ln 1882, Shotover, lmin 53 2-ssec ; lbSl, Peregrine^ lmin 49.sec ; 1880, Petrouel, lmin 52sec ; 1879, Oharibert, lmiu 51sec ; 1878, Pilgrimage, lmin 56sec; 1877, Petrarch, lmin 50sec.

Ormonde, Minting, and Saraband, undoubtedly the best trio of the six that furnished the field for the Two Thousand Guineas, are all over 16 hands high. The field of half-a-dozen which wont to the post for to the Two Thousand Guineas is the smallest for that event since 1850, when five competed. On that occasion Mr Hill's Pitsford won by a neck from Lord H. G. Lennox's The Bee Hunter, the latter starting at 2 to 1 and the former at 5 to 2.

John Porter has done very well in the Two Thousand during the last five years, having trained .three winners during that period — viz., the Duke of Westminster's Shotover and Ormonde, and Mr Cloete's Paradox. A Paris paper informs its readers that the f Prince of Wales' recent visit to the gay capital 1 was for the purpose of borrowing a sum of 50,000 dol. sterling. It further states that the prince went on to Cannes, where he played baccarat with Lord Dupplin ; that that nobleman lost 250,000f. on the occasion, and being unable to pay, wenb home and blew out his brains. The imagination of the true flaneur, unrestricted by fact and unbiassed by considerations of probability, attains to a growth that rivals Jonah's gourd or Jack's beanstalk. — Truth. Royal Hampton, since his City and Suburban victory, has been under veterinary treatment, but he is now looking well and walking soundly, and he will now be prepared for the Eclipse Stakes, to be run for at the Sandown Second Summer meeting.

The Stewards of the Jockey Club have given notice that all persons who, being dissatisfied with the weights allotted to their horses in handicaps, make complaints personally to the handieapper, are liable to a fine. All complaints shall be made in writing to the stewards of the meeting, who, if they consider them Htber frivolous or unwarranted, shall inflict a fine not pxceeding £10 on the complainant, or, if they think fit, forward the complaints to the Stewards of the Jockey Club.

In an article on turf nomenclature the New York Herald says— On the whole, they do these things better — not in France, but in England. In a comical way one of the most recent examples — " Stiff-un," by Coroner, dam Ghost - i& a prodigy. As every racegoer knows, " Sfciffun," or "The Stiff," is tho horse that runs

oftenest in this country, for he is in every race in which a horse is started, and is notiiitendod to win. There is no backer of horses in this broad land who has not as some time or other wager. >d his dissolving dollars upon " SbiiT-un.''

The accident to St. Gatien is not of the serious nature at first anticipated, and he will in all probability soon resume active work with a view to the Eclipse Stakes, his chance for which it is believed is not seriously prejudiced. " I hear that the Duchess-Dowager of Montrose will probably reduce both her racing and breeding stud very considerably before the close of thi.s season, and that it is very unlikely that her grace will be found among the bidders for high-priced yearlings this summer." — Truth. At a meeting of the Jockey Club on April 28 the important proposal of Mr Craven that " No horse be eligible to be handicapped for any public race unless he shall have been habitually trained in Great Britain, or have twice run there during the preceding six months of the racing season " was considered. A memorial from the Stewards of the Irish Turf Club, protesting against the exclusion of Irish horses from English handicaps unless they had previously run there, was read by Lord Suffolk, and the Prince of Wales read a letter from Mr Chaplin, from Paris, expressing his opinion that there was a strong feeling in the French Jockey Club against the proposal. A motion of Lord Londonderry's as an alternative to the exclusion of Irish and foreign horses, they should be handicapped at even weights with the best horses of the same age, was subsequently withdrawu, and Mr Craven's addition to Rule 46, on being put to the vote, was contirme 1 as passed. H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, Lord Hastings, Mr Craven. Sir G'-orge Ohutwjnd, Lord Cadogan, General Owen Williams, Mr Lowther, and Lord Rosslyn took part in t.he discussion.

The death of Lord Vivian, at the age of 78, is announced. To most interested in the turf Lord Vivian's figure must have been a familiar one for many years, and for a time hardly anyone was a more regular attendant of the Newmarket meetings. His colours, as far as we recollect, were not carried by any. horse of remarkable excellence, although if memory serves his lordship was interested in Sabreur, who some Mx-and-twenty years ago ran with considerable success as the property and in the colours of Lord Zetland. His name will revive in some recollections of therenovvned steeplechaser Vivian, so frequently ridden to victory by Capt. Bi cher when carrying the colours of his then owiior, Capt. Lamb. The most noteworthy success achieved of late years by a horse bearing the orange and purple hoops of Lord Vivian was when the three year old Hidalgo won the Newmarket Handicap of 1877, after a triumph in tht Sale Stakes during the early part of the same afternoon. A useful filly that ran for him at about the same period was Polly Perkins, purchased for 700gs after a\ inning a plate for two year olds in the Newmaikefc July week of 1576. When in the possession of Lord Vivian she \s ah winner or the Hardwicke Stakes at Stockton and several other races. The story of the remarkable drtam of the just deceased nobleman (a member of the Jockey Club) that Aldrich would be the hero of the City and Suburbau afternoon of 1874 has frequently been related. „ The case of " Batthyany v Smith," which comes on for trial before Mr Justice Chitty in the High Court of Justice shortly, will bring up some very important questions connected with the Austrian and Hungarian law.s of entail. The late Prince Gustave Batthyany, who wan naturalised in England and lived there, died in 1883, leaving most of his personality to a Mis Smith. Among this property was a house in Park Lane and one at Newmarket, more than £100,000 in money, and the deceased's plate, pictures, racing stables, and stud. Piincc Batthyany's stud was very valuable, including Galopin (winner of the Derby in JS7S), anrl Fulmen, who was sold to Mr Naylor for 5030g.5. Prince Batthyany, however was the owner of eight entailed estates ."n Austria-Hungary, and while living in England he allowed these to fall into utter neglect. In fact, he never visited any one of them after succeeding to his title in 1870. A great many of the farms were lot very much below their value, the chateaux, farm buildings, cottages, and other tenements were suffered to fall out of repair, timber was felled ex! i uvagan tly and sold for little, and the general result of all tills was that when Prince Edmund Batthyany, Prince Gustave's eldest son, inherited the estates he found their value to be J, 200,000 florins less than when his father had inherited them. The question which an English Jaw court will now have to decide is whether Mrs Smith, asheiress of Prince Gustavo's personality, can be called upon to make good the deficiency, caused by neglect, in value of the entailed estates. The law.s of entail in Austria and Hungary are very strict. An entail ca n onty be cut off by an Act of Parliament sanctioned by the Crown, and the ownur uf a majovat is bound to take all reasonable care r.hat his estate shall not decline in value. When he dies his personality is always drawn upon to compensate for losses in the real estate. This is managed by official curators, who require the heir in tail to furnish an inventory, and who, after causing an appraisement to be made, add the surplus, if any, to the value of the property, or else oblige the heir to supply the dificit. If there be no personality to meet the deficit, the revenues of the estates are administered by curators until the estates recover their former value. Paince Edmund Batthyany's claim against Mrs Smith's inheritance is for 950,000 florins. Prince Edmund B.ttthyany is well known in England. He was educated at Eton in Dr Hawtrey's time, and afterwards became very popular in yachting circles.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18860625.2.56

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN., Otago Witness, Issue 1805, 25 June 1886

Word Count
1,816

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN. Otago Witness, Issue 1805, 25 June 1886

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