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ENGLISH.

The will, dated October 23, 1884, of the late Mr Fred. Swindells, was proved on June 8 at the principal registry office, the net personal estate amounting to £146,057. The testator leaves his plate, jewels, furniture, carriages, and horses (not being racehorses), and a legacy of £20,200 to his wife absolutely; £5000 to his brother, Thomas Swindells., and the residue he leaves to his adopted son, Frederick C. Swindells.

C. Wood, who rode Hurry in the Oaks, was reported after the race for disobedience to the starter, and the stewards suspended him from riding until the Ascot meeting. According to Truth, Mr Cloete was strongly advised to change his jockey on Paradox in the Derby at the last moment ; but either no good rider was at liberty, or he was resolved to trust Webb, whose scurrilous assailants were put to shame by the splendid race he rode. Mr Cloeto took the wise course of tolling Webb frankly of the scandalous insinuations which wore current, and after some very plain speaking he added that, of course, he did not for a moment doubt his jockey's honesty, and concluded by promising him a present of £2000 if he won on Paradox. After the race, Mr Cloete expressed his entire satifaction with Webb's riding, and gave him £100. In this issue appears a copy of a challenge issued by Mr R. Ten Bfoeck to back time (7 mm.

17 sec.) for four miles against any number of, horses that (Wners choose to name. " In the course of his letter the writer says that he has repeatedly timed English horses to cover Rowley mile (1 'mile 17 yards) in 1 mm. 38 see The last Derby was the thirty-third that Mr ■ 'J. F. Clark brie judged, and the office- of judge has been filled by the same family for 80 yearsi the grandfather and father of the present judge having in turn officiated. . . '_ The figures of the leading English jockeys up . to June 13 were as follows : —

Fred Archer's continuous run of successes seems almost unparalleled ; but, up to the present, as far as continuity goes, they do not equaj 0 that of George Herring, a jockey of the olden time, who won nineteen races in succession without an intervening defeat. Among notable exploits of jockeyship may be ' counted that of Benjamin Smith, who rode and won a race after having one of his legs broken in the struggle, The rider of Caractacus, in a race at Bath, broke his stirrup leather, yet, nevertheless, defeated all his opponents, and was so clever as to bring the detached stirrup home with him, so that he was able to scale the correct weight. Foremost among the jockeys of the old days was Frank Buckle. As an instance of his power of work, it >iay be stated that he would ride from his house to Newmarket,' take part in a trial, and then come home the same day to tea at six, the distance covered being ninety-two miles, not counting the riding he would accomplish on the course at the capital of the Turf. Frank Buckle once rode a match against a lady — a Mrs. Colonel Thornton, at Doncaster — • for a cup valued at seven hundred pounds. It was on September 23, 1805. . Mrs. Thornton wore a purple jacket and cap, nankeen riding skirts, embroidered stockings, and purple satin shoes. At starting her mare took the lead, and made the running for a considerable way, when Buckle came up, and headed her for a few lengths ; she then challenged him, and, after a pretty severe contest, won the race in good style. Her bold and successful riding elicited the admiration of assembled thousands. ' ■ A curious incident occurred in the Auteuil Steeplechase. Chancery, who was leading after the last jump was cleared and looked a certain winner, was suddenly seized with giddiness and had to be pulled into a walk. Even then he managed to crawl in third, but after passing the post ho staggered about like a drunken man and fell to the ground. The raid upon betting men ha Manchester will (a London paper says) be soon followed by the same domiciliary visits' at some of the London clubs. The whole thing is a crying disgrace. A duke may take the odds to a thousand, but a commercial traveller, a tradesman, or any of your common folk, may not back his fancy for half-a-crown under the most frightful penalties. It is high time the Legislature stepped in and repealed such class enactments. Talk about the restrictions on betting having deterred the crowd. Take any great thoroughfare in London, or the big provincial towns, and note the sight of the myriad faces eagerly watching for the announcement of a big race result in •. the windows, and then judge whether prohibitive legislation has not rather fanned the flame of speculation. The sporting and quasi-sporting community number in this country nearly, two millions, and, setting aside the fact that much blackguardism exists— as, it exists more or -less everywhere — there is no reason why this large section of the population should have their sole recreation- quashed to please the Quakers, the candlestick-makers, it hoc genus. * The Jubilee Prize of Baden, to which the liberal sum of 2000 soys is added, has attracted a capital entry. Mr. Hammond,! who won the ■ race last season with Florence, has nominated Eurasian, the Duke of Hamilton is representsd with Cosmos, and' Mr. Manton with ■ Keir. , Mr. Gebhard has entered both Eole and St Saviour, and other well-known names in the entry are Crim Tartar, Pizarro, King Monmouth, and Prism. ,

Mounts. Archer, F: ... 214 Wood, 0. ... 178 EHlea.A. ... 137 Barrett, G. ... ' 187 Watts, J. ... 124 Barrett, F. ... 139 Woodburn, J. 80 Loates, S ... 136 Snowden.'J. ... 71 ' Lost. ... 127 ... 132 ... 107 ... 156 .'..,, ,97 ... 112 ■ ... .;. ' 64 ... 124 >.. 69 Won. 8T 48" 30 31 27 21. . 16 12 12

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18850808.2.67

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH., Otago Witness, Issue 1759, 8 August 1885

Word Count
983

ENGLISH. Otago Witness, Issue 1759, 8 August 1885

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