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ENGLISH AND FOREIGN.

Iho field for the Two Thousand Guineas this year was the smallest sinca Wosfc Australian wou in 1853, but tha small umabsr of starters wm amply mads up for by the aolendid struggle which took place between Paradox and fcha despised Oliopefcte colt, the actual result being in doubt until the former's number wont up. The suspense must have been great for the many plungoi-a who had baon laying 3 to 1 on tho favourite, and equally so to those fow who had backed the unnamed colt at lone odiia. <*

Archer 89ams ia for a* good a soason as ever, he »a v uig had the winning mount on Paradox m tho Two Thouaand, and, in all probability, that on Mellon in the Darby. He has also a trood lead in the way of winning mounts: for up to May 7 h* bad won 34 raoes out of 98 mounts ; while Wood, who oame next in order, had scored 25 wins out of 100 attempts. F. Archer has now ridden four winners of Vi° /wo Thousand Guineas, viz., Atlantic in 1874, Cbanborfc in 1879, Galliard in 1883, and Paradox m 1885.

It is reported that a gonaral ecara was created on the Guineas day at Newmarket by tho cuoulation of a rumour that the Jockey Club portion of the stand would be blown up with dynamite during the race for tho Guineas, Jitlra precautions were adopted at tho various entrances a«d passages of the building, but happily tho only explosion that took place was the outburst of ohoering which the exciting finish of the Two Thousand called forth.

The Bard's presence went far to spoil the two year-old rueinq; at Epsom, and after winmux both the Westminster Scakes and the Hyde Park Plate, be journeyed on to tfandown Park and scored a seventh successive main at the fashionable Esher meeting, so that he has in all won considerably over ;S4OOO tor hia joint owners, Mr Peck and Geii. Owen Williuuas.

MrF. Gabhard purchased Jolly Sir John before the International Steeplechase at Sandowu IWk, .nd the pink and gold-spotted jaokot of the American sportsman was worn successfully therefore at the firefc time of asking en this aido of the Atlantic. The Eirl of Dudley died suddenly last montb, His lordabip was a frequent visitor to imporfcuufc race meetings some years ago and wat noted foy tbo heavy investments he now and again made. The Oaks waa a raca li 3 once or twice had sen'iatiomil wagars on and whan Petrarch was fiefcatod by Morninff Star i\fc A Root the er.rl laid £10,000 to £5000 on \,he Two Tuous&ud \n iuuor.

St. Simon did not take part in the Asoot Cup after all, the Duke of Portland having struck his sealed nomination out of that raca a month previous.

M. Lupin's crack three-yoar-old Xaintraille3 was withdrawn from his English spring engagements in order to fulfil those he had in France, which were looked on as certainties for him, and proved so in reality. Among them was tho Poule d'Essai (or French Two Thousand) of 2100 sovo, in which he beat Reluisant and Anglomane iv 1 tnin. 43 1.5 see. for tho mile. Wood went over specially to ride him

The French One Thousand Guineas waa won by M. Ephrussi's Barberine. Advices from the Indian Territory give particulars of a tragedy which opourred last week, near Ferd, at the close of a horse race. A large crowd had gathered, and Francis Copeland and Frank Watson got into a dispute about tho result of the race. High worda were followed by blowp, a.nd then each man secured a Winchester rifle and bsgnn shooting at each other at a space of three feet. Watson fell dead, and Copeland was mortally wounded, and has since died. Both men were well known, having been engaged in the stocfc business. Tbe duel 'was witnessed by a great crowd of peopl9, nono of whom attempted to. Bcparate the combatants. A claim for £5000 as compensation for the destruction of tha Rover, tho oire of St Gatien, name on for inquiry at the J£erry Bossiona lace rn'onfch. The proceeding*; cimced a conaidarabla amount of interest in tho locality, and the small court honne was crowded to "its utmoi-t capacity. The claimants (the official a%s:gneen of tho Court oi Bankruptcy) wore represented by Mr' Seymour JBush, B.L. The claim was for £5000 for tho malicious deufcrucfcioa of Tho Rovor, fiira of St. Gatien, on the 19th of .last Novfiinbor, whoa ifc will bo recollected 'tbo horpo'fl throat waa cut in so bad a manner thtvt he survived only ten minutes Counsel elated tbo rase at tiomo length, pointing out that in tlio riret iristftuin The Rovor was tho property of Mr Daniel Shino, tinder of Liafcowel, and

that when that gentleman became a bankrupt the property in the horse reverted to the official assignees, who now claimed for his malicious destruction a sum of £5000 The Rover, the counsel argued, was unquestionably the sire of the now famous racer, St. Gatien, the property of Mr John Hammond, and who, it; will be rocollectert, was one of the dead hoaters in last year's Derby. At the time St. Gatien's sire came into the hands of the official nsaignees it was their intention to offer him for aale at Tattersall's, where undoubtedly he would have realised a very considerable sum, but on the night in question the horse was brutally killed, and so Mr Shine's creditors were deprived of a very considerable sum of the assets that would have fallen to them had a sale, as intended, been effected. Edward Hussey, a messenger of the Court of Bankruptcy, and who was in charge of The Rover at the time, was theu examined, and deposed as to the arrangements he had made for his safekeeping, but on the morning of Nov. 19 1884, he found the horse in bis stable with his throat cut from ear to ear. On the night of the occurrence there was a patrol of police outside the Btable, and he (witness) heard no noiae of breaking into the stable or of any persans bein? in the yard. Mr Frederick Gallaher, editor of Sport, was then examined, and dewoaed that hs hart no doubt that had The Rover been offered at Tattersall's after the Darby ha would have realised a good price. He had not seen the horse, but in England The Rover was generally regarded as the oertain sire of St. Gatien. This oloßed the claimants' case, after which Me3ars Nelligan and Creagh addressod the Court without calling evidence.— Mr Elliott deposed that to him Mr Hardman had valued the horsa at £500, mentioning that ho would in a short time be worth £2000. This closed the case.— Mr Hickey, J.P., stated that he thought it right to aay that he Baw Mr Thomas Beasley in London, and that gentleman told him that if the horse was worth anything be was worth two thousand pounds. The question of the award was then considered, and Mr Rice, J.P. proposed a sum of £1000 as compensation for the 'destruction of The Rover. Mr Hickoy, D.L., seconded the proposition. After much diacussion, an award of £500 was made. From this the assignees at once announced their intention of appealing.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18850627.2.42.2

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN., Otago Witness, Issue 1753, 27 June 1885

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1,220

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN. Otago Witness, Issue 1753, 27 June 1885

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