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PENINSULA.

The nomination for the Peninsula district took place at Naumann's Hall. Mr T. H. Dodds was returning* ' officer. There were about 200 people present. The following candidates were proposed :— Owen James Hodge, proposed by John Chbtww, seconded by William Hood. William James Mudie Larnach, proposed by William Robertson, seconded by Arthur Smith. John Wells, proposed by Joseph Fbwham, seconded by Gborgb Stokes. 1 Mr Obetwin, in proposing Mr Hodge, eaid that the. latter, thou?h young and untried, had shown them that he was sound and advanced in liberal ider^ ot- ' politics; also that he wa3 no trimmer, and h' A d nowish to tamper with one party or another xhe: speaker was going on to make a long spe.ech, tout was interrupted with a number of imcompluaeatary remarks, and cries of " Cut it short " and. " We want to hear the candidate, not you." Eventually he Bubsided'under protest. . Mr Hood, in seconding the lamination, also attempted to give along addraw, but was summarily cut short. '

Mr Robbrtson, in projwsipg Mr Larnach,, met withi no bettor fate, but he managed to get out the expreaBion of opinion that in Mr Larnach they had a member of whom they should be proud* for he was a gen- • tleman and a man of influence.

Mr Smith, in seconding the nomination, said 1 tJiaft « Mr Larnach was a man of po3itipn and influence ; but what was Mr Hodge ? A. man of flowery speeches, a mere carpet-bagger, who would be founds at the» Spanish Restaurant if wanted. The proposer and/ seconder of Mr Wells contented themsdveß with expressing the opinion that he was the. most fit and proper, person to represent the district Mr Hqdohj, who was received with applause. B aid! that if i,t ware fcrae^that he was to be foun^ »* the Spanish Bestaurant he would ho found wher 6 most o f hw constituents were to bo found, and flo t In the> Grand Hotel, which waa so far above tb^Q, v th e -yr wanted men of weight to represent t hea» let them take such, but he could assure the^a that they would feel the weight of such members, wtut had men of weight ever done for them bull draw the gold out ot their constituents to make thf/fc' own gold ? An Elector asked Mr Hodge to show the requisfiWon which he profe9seo\ to have received from the. Peninsula electors. <

Mr Hodge said h$ iaU Dot received one. Ha did no* care twopence Jo* a requisition. In answer to other questions, he.said he was not in favour oi the State disBemmatyig religious instruction in schools, but he waai in torour of giving facilities at all schools for religious: i instruction being given to such as desired it. He wag) in favour of a progressive land tax, but it was too nea»his hearers dmner-time for him to explain iuat then> how he would work ifi, Mr Larnaoh, who waa greeted with great applause-, Baid he was no*, there to talk twaddle or speak aboutthings tha,t were impracticable ; he asked for a irß' new*! o$ their confidence on the grounds that he waff w,eU known to them, had lived for years and spent his money in their distrioi, had done aH he could ,for their advancement, and, had btea a large i employer of labour.. He had given five diflerent i churches sectiono of land to build od, had given land for school and had spent £1500 in the district in readmaking alone.® If a candidate who waff not. a qualified elqctor in the, district came to him and asxed.bim for his vote, be would take it as a gross ! piece of impertinence ; but that waa what one of his ■opponents was doing.— (Cries of *!An insult to the) electors !" and " He's an interloper.") There was- aa individual who had the impertinence to come before thej» and ask for their votes who had no interest In the district, and who had been crammed for this election.—(Loud.applause.); This individual had said he did not care twopence for a requisition, and yet he , had the audacity to offer himself for election. He (tt> fl , speaker) could; not believe that the electors were «„ . depraved as to return a man of that class ; if t w I were, it wa3 time, tor every man with any resr ec r,or ! himself and to* his family to leave the country V^,™ | was a mountebank politician who had dare d V o Ze amoH£*)wm and aak forf 0r their votes. Well if they seat anyone to Parliament they shor,, d one of themselves, and not take any r Mn ont ot the "*reet and send him. When that eot t O f thing cain» about, he would say " God halrj, New Zealand."—(Applausr.) If they chose one oi the two persons who opposed him, he would not qvarrel with them, but he would not respect them \ and he would also promise tb,aii he would never trouble 'them again. He felt satisfied thai; when tS# numbers went up on Tuesday he wou'd be atk ifra. head of the poll.— (Great applause.) In.answe* tp questions, Mr Larnach said he was in favour <?)t giving fairplay to all sects on education^ mOtttere. He had been the means of getting the JSfci. cut up and rendered suitable for homes for the iß»rk-. ip4? elapses. ■ Mr WxMA faid that h« had always advocated thecause of the industrial classes, and would cofi&nue tOi do so. Ho waa in favour of abolishing the bankruptcy laws, and also of the canal scheme for improving the: harbour.

A (how of hands resulted as follows :— Larnach, 60 z Hodge, 30 ; Wells, 8.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18840719.2.25

Bibliographic details

PENINSULA., Otago Witness, Issue 1704, 19 July 1884

Word Count
941

PENINSULA. Otago Witness, Issue 1704, 19 July 1884

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