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ENGLISH AND FOREIGN.

At the Newmarket Second Spring Meeting the Breeder's Plate was -won by Lord Ca<3ogan's Lonely, who was bought at Mr Chaplin's sale of yearlings by Lord Cadogan for 530 guineas, and this was her- second victory. She is engaged io a num er of important stakes, including the St. Legev. The Newmarket Spring Handicap came next, and despite the bad luck which has attended the Duchess of. Montrose'e horses this season backers were content to take 7 to 4 about her four-year-old Keir. He was weighed at Sat 121b, and in the hand 3of Archer ho got home by a head after a fine race.

The meeting; of Scot-Freo and Harvester in the Payne Stakes was looked forward to with great interest, inasmuch as the battle was bound .to say a groat deal as to Harvester's chance of winning the Derby. Since the Two Thousand Captain Macholl and Jewitt gave Harvester plenty of good work, and the colt improved so much that the stable money kept going on- for the Deiby until on the night before the Payne Stakes tha colt was as good a favourite as Queen Adolaide at G to 1. That the stable thought the Payne Stakes a good thing was evident some time before the numbers were hoisted, as their commissioner backed Harvester for the Derby to £15,000 at 5 to 1, and when the Ring opsned on the Payne Stakes the same party shovell-d the money out to the Newmarket volt, and got a very nice price. At the same time the splendid form shown by Scot-Free in the Two Thousand made him the public favourite, and with Osborne in the saddle odds were laid on his giving the required weight away. Harvester, however, managed to beat him ah the difference of 71b, and the style in which Harvester won tho race % must have convinced anyone that at evpn weights tho result would have been tho same. He at once jumped to 3 to 1 for the Derby, so that the stable could havn had splendid hedging for their £15,000 had they desired to get out of any of the money. On the third day the proceedings were opened in a very sportsmanlike fashion. St. Simonr© wit belonging to the Duke of Portland, is believed to bo far and away the best

three-year-old in training ; but unfortunately he is not engaged in any of the big races of the> year confined co his own age. To get a line a& to hh real merits M. Lefevre and the, Duko of Portland same to an arranganaenfc to ran a match, or public trial, in which Tristan khouldl give the youngster 231ba, a stable companion, of each competitor joining id at a featherweight to ensure a true race. The match was not officially recognised an soch, and it was rum f«.r "love," but still it waa the most interesting: itom of the day. We usually get; some sensational but absurd! sporting news via San Francisco, and this month iB no exception, the following being the* latest bit of Yankee invention : A New York World's London special of May 39 says it ha© now transpired that the real ownor of the horaeSt. Gatien, which made a dead heat with Harvester for the Derby, is a builder at Epst>m,, and an intimate friend of Fred, Arohw^tbe 1 jockey, who rode Sfc. Medard. The popular belief among sporting men, says the dispafeh,, is that Harvester was never ill, as was reported and that the circulation of the report was merely a trick to rig tho market and obtain long odds. When' Harvester appeared on the track his perfect soundness was so patont to> all beholders that he wa3 very heavily backed,, and large sums of money must have beer* landed by his owners and backers. , It » probable, however, Sir John Willoughby will hava> norno awkward questions to answer aboutalleged trickery in tho reports as to his horwte condition, and also about the pulling by tl» jockey Webb of Queen Adelaide, who would undoubtadly have won had she been allowed.

Walton, the American plunger, has been badly smashed by the defeat of Richmond. The Earl of Aylesf ord, who is a large, landowner in America, got into trouble with jan employe of tho course on the Derby Day, was thrown heavily to the ground, and had his leg broken in two places. Governor Stanford of California, pnrchasad recently while in England sixteen of the choicest thoroughbred mares be could find. These have foals at foot by raoufc famous sires, such as Isonomy and Hermit. Up to May 17 the figures of tho psincipaJ jockeys were as under : —

Doncaster, by Stockwell oufc of Marigold,, has been sold by the Duke of Westminster to the Hungarian Government for £5000. Foaled in 1870, Doncaster wan bred by Sir Tatton Sykea, from whose possession he passed into that of the late Mr Jamas Merry, for whom he won the Derby in 1873, his pilot bein? F. Webb. At Ascot in 1875 he won the Gold Cup and the Alexandra Plate for the same gentleman, arid it was after this brilliant double event that he was purchased by hi 3 then trainer, Mr Robert Peck. In turn the latter sold the horse to tke Duke of SVeatnainstor for the unprecedented anm of £14,000, and he was forthwith installed at the head of his Grace's perfect stud farm at .Eaton. Doncaster can hardly be said to have been a success at the stud, albeit he was the airo of a brilliant racehorse in Bend Or, who won the Derby in 1880, and was undoubtedly the be3t animal ever got by him, and porhaps Muacaater was the besfc of the remainder of his progeny. ' In the race for the Two- Year-Old Stakes atNewmarket Mr W. Radfern's filly Ricochet's saddle began to slip back the instant the flajf fell, and Wood rollod off her half way down the Bushes Hill. He was fortunately unhurt, bat Ricochet was so terrified that she charged the "rails, and in falling over them cut her shoulder. This did not stop her headlong flight, and having galloped into the town ana past her otable door, she wa3 not caught until she had reached Fordham, a village five miles distant from Nuwmarkst.

Archer, F IVood. <» [ior,t"s, 8 U'afcfs, J IVe'.ib. F lonnoa, T Bxrrott, O Mounts. „ 134 .. H7 .. 112 .. 60 .. 64 ' ' .. 49 .. 3! .. 73 hvt. V? g» 95 40 DO 87 2L 61 Won. 57 29' 17 W XI li 10

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18840705.2.80

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN., Otago Witness, Issue 1702, 5 July 1884

Word Count
1,089

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN. Otago Witness, Issue 1702, 5 July 1884

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